The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.
Page  79

Lesson 17. Of Passing.

Ma.

My next Lesson is of Passing, or making of a pass.

Sch.

Shew me how I am to do that?

Ma.

Before I shew you the way of doing it, * you must know that there are two kinds of Passes, the first kind, (and that which most properly deserveth the name of a Pass) is that with which a man goeth quite by, and behind his Adversary, the second kind which is called a Pass, (but improperly,) is that with which a Man goeth only closs to his Adversary, and when he is closs at him commandeth his Sword, and this most pro∣perly is called an inclosing or commanding of your Adversaries Sword, and shall be the next Lesson I shall shew you.

Sch.

Shew me then the way of making a true Pass?

Ma.

The true Pass is done by runing quite by your Adversaries right side untill you be behind him, * and when you are run∣ing by, give him the Thrust at his right pap, if you give him the Thrust above the Sword Page  80but if you give it him below at his Arm Pitt, then you must in the time of you passing keep your head that same very way as you do when you play the single Feint 〈◊〉 the Head, and that to preserve your Fa from a blow, or joyne your left hand 〈◊〉 your Sword, about half a Foot from th point, and give him the thrust the very sam way as it is represented by the 2d: figure o the seventh plate. And when you think yo are farr enough past your Adversary (which is that if he should turn about to you, yo would be out of his measure,) You mu then turn about, and stand to your ow defence again, and remember alwayes whe you intend to pass, to go quite thorow wit it. And not (if you should chance not 〈◊〉take the time exactly,) to stop in the midle and offer to recover your Body. For the is farr less hazard in going foreward, a though you have not taken the occasion al∣together so exactly as you should, the to offer to recover your self.

Sch.

Sir I think there is a great deal of reason for what you say, for when a man offereth to pas it surpriseth his Adversary, if he go quite thorow with it, although he should miss the giving 〈◊〉 the Thrust, but when a man offereth to pass, an doth it not freely, it both disordereth himself Page  [unnumbered]Page  [unnumbered]

[illustration]
Plat 7

For pag: 80
[illustration]
Fig i

One receiving a thrust after his adversary hath beat his sword see pag: 80.
[illustration]
Fig 2

One passing below the sword after a beat given wt both his hands see pag: 80.
Page  81and encourageth his Adversarie to pursue him the brisklyer upon the bak of it, but I pray you, Sir, upon what occasions am I to make use of this passing?

Ma.

You may Pass upon the very same occasions that you can beat your Adversa∣ries sword. * (I mean not the two last wayes of beating of it.) But then you must first beat, and immediatly after your beat, Pass, or you may pass without beating, with the single Feint at the Head, Volt-coupe, and Ʋnder-counter, those are the best times which I know for Passing, but you will by frequent practice know all the occasions, upon which you may either Beat, or Pass, according to your pleasure.

Sch.

Which is your contrary to passing?

Ma.

If your Adversarie make use of Passing after his beat,* then prevent his Pass∣ing by using the contrary to beating, for by preventing his beating, you prevent his pass∣ing after his beat, but if he offer to pass u∣pon any other occasion, then the best con∣traries I know, are either to parie him, or otherwise to break his Measure, or go off the streight Line, as shall be taught you here. after.

Sch.

Which is your next Lesson?