The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 13. Of Binding.

Ma.

I shall, my next Lesson then is the Binding, or securing of your Adversaties Sword, which certainly is the chiefest Lesson, belonging to this Art. For a Man that can play it exactly, needeth almost no o∣ther.

Sch.

Because you commend this Lesson so much, I shall hear you discribe it wth the more attentiveness, that I may the better understand it.

Ma.

You will do well to do so, for it is the only secure play, belonging to the smal Sword.

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Sch.

I shall, therefore I pray you, let me hear how it is done?

Ma.

Take notice to me then, * when you keep the Quart Guard, the first thing that ever you should doe, should be to se∣cure or Bind your Adversaries sword, which if it be well done, you will be but in little hazard of being hurt by him, and it is done after this manner, after your sword is presented either within, or without your Ad∣versaries, immediatlie overlapp Six, or seven Inches of your Adversaries Sword, with 8: or 10: of yours, the doing of with se∣cureth his Sword: this Binding must alwayes be done with the edge of your Sword, whi∣ther it be presented within or without your Ad∣versaries, and immediatlie after you have Bound his Sword, give him the Thrust streight home, keeping a closs Left Foot, and remember alwayes when you bind, to give a beat with your Foot, and Bind with a spring, that is to say, press his Sword almost to the Ground, but stay not with it, but instantlie bring up your Sword again, and give in the Thrust.

Sch.

I begin to think that when a Man maketh use of this Lesson, he indeed secureth his Adversaries Sword better, and is in less hazard Page  68of being bitt by a Contre-temps, then when be maketh use of any of the preceeding Lessons.

Ma.

That is most certain, otherwise I could not have had the confidence, to re∣commend it so earnestly to you.

Sch.

Sir I am oblidged to you, for the pain you take to informe me; but which is your parade against this Lesson?*

Ma.

The best Parade absolutelie against this Lesson, is the Contre-caveating Parade.

Sch.

Which is your contrary to binding?

Ma.

My Contrary is Caveating, or Slip∣ping,* and you must do it before your Ad∣versarie feel your Sword, for your must understand, that this binding is done by feel∣ing, and not by seing, as the Lessons before shewn you are.

Sch.

I pray you let me understand this way of playing by feeling.

Ma.

It is known thus, when you over∣lap your Adversaries Sword, if he slipp you before you touch his Sword, (which is the feeling of it.) then your offering to bind is in vain, because he hath prevented it by Caveating your sword, but if you feel his sword before he Caveat you, then you may safely give home the thrust, because you did first secure it. Which you knew by your feeling, or touching of his sword, and which Page  69you, nor no man else, could have so well discerned by your sight.

Sch.

But what must I doe to prevent my Ad∣versaries slipping of my Sword when I am going to seeure his?

Ma.

You must (if you intend to Bind his Sword within,* and he slipp you) rebind his Sword again, either without, by making use of the first Parade in Terce, or within by making use of the Contre-caveating Parade, & after you have rebound him, give him home the Thrust, or if you intend to bind his sword without, and he slipp you, then either rebind him again within his sword, by making use of the first Parade in Quart, or without his sword, by making use of the Contre-caveating Parade, and remember that Binding or the Contre caveating parade, are only the contraries to slipping, and that slipping is ab∣solutely the best Contrary, either against the Contre caveating-Parade, or binding.

Sch.

I understand you very well, but may I not play a Feint with Binding?

Ma.

That you may, for you may make the ordinary single, and double Feint upon it, which resembleth very near the single, and double Feint upon battery, or you may bind his sword without, & give in your Thrust as you do when you play the single Feint at the Head.

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Sch.

When I am without distance and intends to bind my Adversaries sword, must I not approach with the binding?

Ma.

Yes, that you must.

Sch.

I find this to be a very useful Lesson, and therefore I will endeavour to practise it as much as lyeth in my power, that so I may become master of it.

Ma.

If you do that, I am confident you will confess to me, that what I have said in commendation of it, is far less then it deserveth.

Sch.

It may be so, but which is your Next Lesson?