The compleat fencing-master in which is fully described the whole guards, parades & lessons belonging to the small-sword : as also the best rules for playing against either artists or ignorants with blunts or sharps : together with directions how to behave in a single combat on horse-back : illustrated with figures representing the most necessary postures
Hope, William, Sir.

Lesson 11. Of Battery.

Ma

My next Lesson is called Battery.

Sch.

Why hath it that name?

Ma.

I know no other reason for its having that name, but because it is done with a kind of Beat. But before I proceed further, I will Page  62tell you that there are many Names of Lessons in this Art, the meaning of which cannot be easily explaind in English, to make the name, and the Lesson answer o∣ther, and therefore you need not trouble your self to ask a reason for their having such Names.

Sch.

I shall not; But pray tell me why you ha not English Names to them?

Ma.

I can give you no other reason then this, that it is like those who brought this A first to this Kingdom, out of other Coun∣tries, have still given the Lessons the proper names, which they had in their own coun∣try, and now those Lessons are so well known by the same names they give them at their first coming to this Kingdom, that they need no other.

Sch.

I think indeed that must he the reason of it, but how must I play this Battery?

Ma.

When you make use of this Lesson (for it is a kind of Beat) you may present your sword either without,* or within your Adver∣saries, if you present within his sword, and he within your-measure, you must lye with your sword about half a Foot from his, and when you intend to play the Lesson, give a little stroak with the Edge, and Feible of your sword, upon the Edge and Feible of Page  63your Adversaries, and in the very time you give the stroake give a beat with your Foot to surprize him: if he doth not in the least answer your stroak by offering to parie, give him the Thrust streight home to his Right Pap, as you give in a plain Thrust within the Sword, remember when you give the stroak, to make the Motion only with the wrest, for by so doing you keep your Body closs, and doth not disorder your self.

Sch.

I understand you, but if he offer to an∣swer my stroak, what must I doe in that ease?

Ma.

If you perceive him offer to go to the parade, then slip him, and give him the thrust without, and above the sword.

Sch.

May not a man make a Double Feint upon this Lesson?

Ma.

Yes very well.

Sch.

How I pray you?

Ma.

Thus, * when you perceive him going to the Parade, immediatly slip, and make your Feint in the other side, and give in the Thrust upon that side on which you gave the Beat.

Sch.

Must I give a Beat with my Foot, at every Motion?

Ma.

You may either give a beat at e∣very Motion you make, or otherwise, on∣ly Page  64at the first, just as you please, and when you are without distance, approach with the first Motion, and give the Beat with the Feible of your Sword, upon the Feible of your Adversaries.

Sch.

And how am I to play this Lesson, my Sword being presented without my Adversaries?

Ma.

You must observe exactly the same rules, your Sword being present∣ed without your Adversaries, as you do your Sword being presented within it, for you may play this Lesson upon any side, without dis∣engaging, after you have presented your Sword.

Sch.

Which is your Contrary to this Battery?

Ma.

My Contrary is this, you may either Park it with the Contre-caveating parade,* or otherwise, you may meet his stroak, and make a half Thrust at him, which will make him go to the parade, and so you be∣come the Pursuer.

Sch.

Which is your next Lesson?