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Author: Gregory, John, 1607-1646.
Title: Gregorii posthuma, or, Certain learned tracts written by John Gregorie. Together with a short account of the author's life and elegies on his much-lamented death published by J.G.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Gregorii posthuma, or, Certain learned tracts written by John Gregorie. Together with a short account of the author's life and elegies on his much-lamented death published by J.G.
Gregory, John, 1607-1646., Gurgany, John, 1606 or 7-1675.

London: Printed by William Du-gard for Laurence Sadler, 1649.
Notes:
Each tract, except the first, has a special t.p.
Dedication signed: John Gurganie.
Reproduction of original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Church of England -- Collected works.
Theology -- 17th century.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A42079.0001.001

Contents
title page
An ELEGIE On the Learned AUTOR.
Upon the much deplored Deceas of Mr John Gregorie, Chaplain of CHRIST-CHURCH.
Epitaphium Joannis Gregorii.
The Particular Titles of this Book.
title page
title page
title page
ΚΑΙΝΑΝ ΔΕΥΤΕΡΟΣ.
title page
part
title page
part
CHAP. I. Concerning the Characters of Time.
CHAP. II. Of the Eclipses.
CHAP. III. Concerning the Cycle of the Sun.
CHAP. IV. Concerning the Cycle of the Moon.
CHAP. V. Concerning the Ferial Character.
CHAP. VI. Concerning the great Conjunctions.
part
Concerning the Civil Characters, and first of the Sabbatical Years.
CHAP. II. Concerning the Indictions.
CHAP. III. Concerning the Periods.
CHAP. IV. Concerning the Aera's.
CHAP. V. Aera Orbis Conditi.
CHAP. VI. Nabonassar's Aera.
CHAP. VII. The Aera of the Olympiads.
CHAP. VIII. Aera Ʋrbis Conditae.
CHAP. XI. Aera Septimanarum Septuaginta, the seventie Weeks.
CHAP. X. Aera Alexandrea,
CHAP. XI. Aera Dhilcarnian
CHAP. XII. The Jews Aera.
CHAP. XIII. AEra Dionysiana Philadelphi.
CHAP. XIV. AEra Hispanica.
CHAP. XV. Aera Actiacae Victoriae. &c.
CHAP. XVI. Aera Christi Nati.
CHAP. XVII. Aera Passionis Dominicae.
CHAP. XVIII. Hegira Muchammedis.
CHAP. XIX. Aera Jesdigerdica.
CHAP. XX. What is Proleptical, and what Historical Time.
CHAP. XXI. Considering the Causses of that infinite Varietie which is found to bee amongst Chronologers.
CHAP. XXII. Of Canon Chronological.
title page
אשור
NIMROD. Annus Mundi 1718. Ante Christ. Nat. 2230. Cycle of the Sun 18. Cycle of the Moon 12.
Nimrod.
Synchronism.
part
Belus 2.
Synchronismi.
part
Ninus.
Synchronismi.
part
Semiramis.
Synchronismi.
part
Zames sive Ninias.
Synchronismi.
part
Sardanapalus.
Synchronismi.
part
PHUL. Circa Annum Mundi 3182.
Synchronismi.
part
Tiglath Philassar.
Synchronismi.
part
Salmanassar.
Synchronismi.
part
Sennacherib.
Synchronismi.
part
Asarhaddon.
part
The First King in this last Dynastie of Ashur was
Synchronismi.
part
Hevil Merodac
Synchronismi.
part
Belshazar.
Synchronismi.
title page
Of the Meridian without the Globe.
Of the Axel and Poles of the Globe and of the Hour Circle.
Of the Horizon.
The Reason of the Difference in Computation be∣twixt the Old and New Accompts.
Why the Meridians and Horizons which are so several upon the Earth, are but single without the Globe.
Of the Quadrant of Altitude, and the Compass.
Of the Great Circles upon the Globe, and first of the Meridians.
Concerning the Difference of Geographers in the pla∣cing of their Great Meridian, and the Caus∣ses pretending thereto.
What Cours is to bee taken with this Varietie of Meridians, and how followed, or neglected by the Geographers.
Of the Lesser Meridians.
Of the Equator, and the Lesser Circles.
The Description of the Waterie-Part of the Globe by the Rumbes of the Mariner's Compass.
The Original of the Mariner's Compass from the Magnetical Constitution of the Earth.
The Use of the Terrestrial Globe; and first of the Rectification.
By the known Place to finde out the Longitude and Latitude, and by the known Longitude and Latitude to finde out the Place.
Of the Difference of Longitude and Latitude, and what is to bee observed in the con∣verting of the Degrees of either into Miles.
To finde out the Bearing of one Place from ano∣ther, and what is meant by the Angle of Position.
To finde out the several Positions of Sphere, Clime, Parallel, &c.
Of Astrological Geographie, and to tell under what Sign, or Planet, a Region, or Citie is subjected.
The Description and Ʋse of Maps and Charts Ʋniversal and Particular.
The Description of the whole by Parallelogram.
The Description of the Whole by Planisphere.
Of the Section by the Equator.
Of the Section by the Meridian.
Example of this in the Description of the Planispherical Map of Hondius.
The Description and Use of Particular Charts.
Example of all this in the Description of Saxton's Map of England and Wales.
Of Topographical Maps, and for an Example the Description of Middle sex by Mr Norden.
Of the Resemblance of Countries, and to other things in Art or Nature.
Of the old and new Names of Places, and other Artificial Terms met with in the Maps.
The Concernment of All This.