The novelty of popery, opposed to the antiquity of true Christianity against the book of Cardinal Du Perron, entituled, A reply to the answer of the most serene James, King of Great Britain
Du Moulin, Pierre, 1568-1658., Du Moulin, Peter, 1601-1684.
Page  [unnumbered]

An Alphabetical Table OF THE Principal Matters contained in this BOOK.

A

  • ABsolution cannot be a Sacra∣ment. pag. 534
  • The ancient Church did not give the Absolution secret∣ly after a private confessi∣on, but reconciled the sinner publickly after the end of the pennance. pag. 653. & seq.
  • In the ancient Church Satisfaction was still performed before Absolution. Ibid.
  • Absolution by the Priest is not necessary. pag. 555
  • Absolution by the Priest is not a judicial act; That of the Roman Church is full of in∣justice. pag. 558. & seq.
  • Confession of the Adversaries. pag. 562. & seq.
  • Form of the ancient absolution. pag. 568
  • Absolutions in the form of a prayer both in the extream union, and in other actions. pag. 568. & 569
  • Ansvver to Thomas Aquinas about judici∣al absolution. pag. 570, 571
  • Gross abuses of absolution in the Roman Church. pag. 573. & seq.
  • Absolution vvith corporal and pecuniary pains, is contrary to the Word of God. pag. 576
  • Absolution is given in the Roman Church before the fulfilling of Penitence. ibid.
  • Absolutions vvithout penitence. ibid.
  • Absolutions by Proxie. pag. 577
  • Absolutions lucrative unto Priests. ibid.
  • Absolution given to the dead. pag. 579
  • Impious and absurd Rules about Absolu∣tion. pag. 582
  • Absolution upon condition of doing some vvicked act. pag. 587, & 588
  • Innocent the third, absolveth the English from the Oath of allegiance made to King John. pag. 636
  • David Prince of Northwales dispensed by Pope Innocent the fourth from the oath of allegiance by him made to Henry the third, King of England; the condition of the dispensation being, that he become the Popes vassal. pag. 648
  • Formosus Bishop of Porto, dispensed by the Pope from keeping his oath. pag. 27
  • Acacius Patriarch of Constantinople, did for a long time use the Bishops of Rome as his Inferiours. pag. 376
  • The horrible hatred of the Popes against the memory of Acacius after his death. pag. 377
  • Against accidents without subject in the Eu∣charist. pag. 748
  • The Acts of ancient Councils both Greek and Latine, publisht by our adversaries, are much falsified. pag. 331
  • Relative Adoration an invention of Du Per∣ron. pag. 414
  • Du Perron falsely saith, that Joshuah wor∣shipped the Ark, and that David exhort∣eth the people to worship it. pag. 777
  • The Apostles did not worship the Sacrament. pag. 776
  • Du Perron proveth by Numa, and by the Quatrains of Pibrack, that the Apostles Page  [unnumbered] have adored the Sacrament sitting. ibid.
  • That in the ancient Church they did not worship the Sacrament with service of Latria. pag. 778, &c.
  • Worshipping the species, that is, the signs and accidents is an idolatry of the Roman Church. pag. 777
  • The Emperour Adrian built Temples with∣out Images for Christians. pag. 441
  • Pope Adrian vvas strangled by a Flie. pag. 633
  • Aerius vvas too blame to trouble the Church about Fast days. pag. 505
  • Women Agapets, or conjoyned, are for∣bidden by the first Council of Nice. pag. 485
  • Agrippin Bishop of Carthage gathereth a Council against the belief of the Roman Church. pag. 298
  • Amedeus Duke of Savoy elected Pope, and named Felix. pag. 107
  • Albigeois persecuted, An. 1188. pag. 635.
  • Croisada preached against the Albigeois. An horrible slaughter of them. pag. 638
  • Alcibiades, he macerated himself with fasting, and is rebuked for it. pag. 510
  • Pope Alexander the third treads upon the neck of the Emperour Fredericus Bar∣barossa. pag. 105
  • It was the office of the Bishop of Alexan∣dria to signifie unto all the Bishops of the Empire (and by consequent to that of Rome) the day of Easter.
  • The great power of the Bishop of Alexandria, and that he was in nothing subject to the Bishop of Rome. pag. 271
  • Opinions of Ambrose, not approved by the Bishop of Rome. pag. 138
  • Ambrose elected Bishop before he was bapti∣zed. pag. 312
  • He excommunicates the Emperour Theodo∣sius without the advice of the Bishop of Rome. ibid.
  • He spake of the Bishop of Rome with respect, but was not subject unto him. ibid.
  • The Works of Ambrose are much falsified. pag. 420
  • Ambrose believed that a man could do peni∣tence in the Church, but once in his life; and Tertullian believed the same. pag. 327
  • Ammianus Marcellinus, being a Pagan Au∣thor, describes the dissolutions and the pride of the Bishops of Rome of his time. pag. 302
  • Anatolius succeeded Flavianus in the Patri∣archat of Constantinople. pag. 364
  • Proofs that he was not subject to the Bishop of Rome. ibid.
  • He presideth in the Council of Chalcedon. pag. 365
  • Old Hereticks worshipped Angels. pag. 40, 41
  • Angels fallen by the love of women. pag. 134, 135
  • Annonary and Sub••bicary Countreys. pag. 272. & seq.
  • St. Bernard calleth the Popes Court the Mi∣nisters of Antichrist, and a pasture of Devils. pag. 88
  • Pope Gregory the first hath prophecied of Antichrist. pag. 89
  • Alnulf Bishop of Orleans in Hugh Capets time, calleth the Pope Antichrist. pag. 102
  • The Church of Antioch in Chrysostoms time would prefer her self before the Church of Rome. pag. 96
  • The Archbishop of Antioch would not ac∣knowledge the Pope his Superiour. pag. 643
  • What true Antiquity is. pag. 118
  • That we must judge of Antiquity by the truth. ibid.
  • That the Roman Church is not ancient. pag. 118, 120
  • That the Roman Church contradicteth anti∣quity. pag. 143
  • St. Antony, father of the Monks, and his life. pag. 300, 301.
  • Fables and untruths in the Apocrypha. The Church of the Old Testament did not acknowledge them Canonical. pag. 178
  • Nor the Christian Church. pag. 193. & seq.
  • Apocrypha condemn Purgatory and Limbus. pag. 191, 192
  • They condemn Idolatry, Images, Invocati∣on of Saints, Prayers for the souls in Pur∣gatory, and merits. ibid.
  • The Apostleship was not affected to one par∣ticular Church. pag. 214.
  • The Apostles were equal in power by the very confession of our Adversaries. pag. 218
  • The title of Apostolick See was common to many Churches, and was not proper to the Roman Church alone. pag. 342
  • How and in what sense St. Austin said that in the Roman Church the principality of the Apostolick See was always in vigour. pag. 344, 345
  • Examples of appeals from the sentence of the Bishop of Rome. pag. 266
  • The Heretick Julian appeals from Pope In∣nocent the first to the Oriental Churches. pag. 339
  • When the appeals from the judgement of a Council first begun. pag. 355. & seq.
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • That Athanasius never appealed to the Bi∣shop of Rome. pag. 197
  • Nor Peter Bishop of Alexandria. pag. 305
  • Nor Chrysostom. pag. 320
  • Appeals from Africa to Rome forbidden by the Milevitan Council. pag. 324 & seq.
  • That as well in the great causes of the Afri∣can Church, as in the little, it was not lawful to appeal to Rome. pag. 326
  • That the causes of Bishops were not evoca∣ted to Rome, no more then those of infe∣riour Clerks. pag. 327
  • Letters of the Bishops of Africa to Celesti∣nus Bishop of Rome, forbidding him to receive any appeal from Africa, and de∣siring him not to meddle with their busi∣nesses. pag. 330
  • Of Appeals to the Bishop of Rome. pag. 331, 332, &c.
  • Of the Appeal of Flavian Patriarch of Con∣stantinople to Leo the first. pag. 355
  • Of the Appeal of Theodoret to Leo. pag. 357
  • St. Austin saith, that it is lawfull to appeal from the Judgement of the Bishop of Rome to a Council. pag. 359
  • That the Council of Constantinople the first, and that of Chalcedon will have the judge∣ment of Councils, and that of the Pa∣triarch of Constantinople to be without appeal. pag. 359
  • Laws of Emperours against appeals to the Bishop of Rome. pag. 360
  • Appeals to Rome forbidden in England by Henry the second. pag. 633
  • Means to apply to ones self the benefit of Christ. pag. 613
  • In the second Temple there was no more Ark. pag. 188
  • In the first Temple the golden Cruse with Manna was not. pag. 202
  • Archbishoprick of Rhemes given by Pope John the tenth, to a child of five years of age. pag. 101
  • The seamless Coat of Christ found at Ar∣gentacil. pag. 633
  • Arius riseth; what troubles he stirred. pag. 267, & seq.
  • Arnobius his opinions not approved in the Roman Church. pag. 142
  • Arnold burnt at Rome. pag. 633
  • Arnulfus Bishop of Orleans calls the Pope Antichrist. pag. 102
  • Aspersion and immersion in Baptism. pag. 70. 797, 798
  • Athanasius his opinions not approved in the Church of Rome. pag. 137
  • He saith that St. Peters throat was cut. pag. 234
  • He is banished by Constantine. pag. 289
  • He is recalled. pag. 290
  • He is deposed by the Council of Antioch, and Gregory put in his place. ibid.
  • He scapeth and takes sanctuary in Italy. ibid.
  • He returns to Alexandria, sent back by Pope Julius. Being driven thence again, he li∣veth hidden in Egypt three years; then scapes again. pag. 296. & seq.
  • He is restored by the Council of Sardica, and returns to Alexandria by the will of two Emperors, Constans and Constantius, pag. 291
  • Maximus, Patriarch of Jerusalem, restoreth him to his Bishoprick. pag. 292
  • A Book of the Virgin Mary falsly attributed to Athanasius. pag. 408
  • Whence Atheism proceeds? pag. 3
  • Augustin hath acknowledged a Church of the elect, and never retracted it. pag. 6. & 7
  • He believed that children not baptized are doomed to eternal death. pag. 129
  • Austins opinions rejected by the Roman Church. pag. 139
  • Du Perron corrects St. Austin. pag. 220
  • Austin made the Articles of the Milevitan Council, in which the appeals from Africk to Rome were condemned. pag. 325
  • He was not subject to the Roman Church. pag. 338
  • He makes a doubt whether the Saints hear our Prayers. pag. 394, 395
  • Texts of Austin, against Transubstantiation, depraved by Du Perron. pag. 737
  • And by the corrupters of the new additions. pag. 765
  • Austin impugneth with all his strength the real and oral manducation of Christ, pag. 752 & 794, 755
  • Vindication of Austins Treatises upon St. John, which Du Perron despiseth. pag. 758
  • Vindication of Austin, against Du Perrons reprehensions. pag. 761, &c.
  • Aurelianus, an Heathen Emperour, judgeth of the differences about Paulus Samosa∣tenus. pag. 279
  • Of austerity, dirt, and nastiness. pag. 499. & seq.
  • Example of a strange austerity. pag. 500
  • Altar See Table.
  • In old time Altars were wooden and move∣able. pag. 758, &c.
  • There was but one Altar in a Temple. ibid.
  • Whether the Churches authority ought to be above that of Scripture. pag. 55. & seq.
Page  [unnumbered]
    B.
  • WHether St. Peter by Babylon under∣stands Rome. pag. 233
  • Balsamon Patriarch of Antioch equalleth the Bishop of Constantinople to that of Rome. pag. 294
  • That Baptism conferred by women came from ancient Hereticks. pag. 48
  • That Baptism of things inanimate, Bells, Ships and Agnus Dei, came from Pagans and He∣reticks. pag. 48
  • The question of rebaptizing of Hereticks is not a point necessary to salvation. pag. 163
  • In that question both Cyprian and Steven er∣red. ibid. & seq.
  • The Baptim of Infants is proved by our Ad∣versaries by many texts of Scripture. ibid.
  • The belief of the ancients, that infants dy∣ing without Baptism are eternally tormen∣ted in hell. pag. 129
  • The Roman Church shuts them in a dark dungeon, eternal, and burning. And that being in a burning fire they feel no pain. pag. 669
  • That sins both before and after Baptism are both alike blotted out by Christ. pag. 618
  • Of the aspersion or immersion in Baptism; That we have no commandment of God concerning that. pag. 70 797, 798
  • Of spittle in Baptism. pag. 53
  • That the Roman Church holds not Baptism necessary, though she make a shew to be∣lieve the contrary. pag. 664. & seq.
  • The Roman Church holds, that perons come to years of descretion may be saved with∣out Baptism. pag. 665 & seq.
  • Two calumnies of Du Perron about that mat∣ter. pag. 665, 666
  • Explication of this Text, Joh. 3. Ʋnless a man be born by water, &c. pag. 666, 667
  • That Baptism is not absolutely necessary to infants. pag. 667, 668
  • In what sense St. Paul saith, that the children of the faithfull are holy. pag. 668
  • Gregory Nazianzen, Tertullian, Gerson, Lombard, hold Baptism not necessary, so that it be not despised. pag. 669, 670
  • Austins opinion upon this subject. pag. 670
  • The Roman Church holds that the Baptism which Christ conferred, was not necessa∣ry. pag. 670
  • She holds the Baptism of water necessary to salvation. pag. 666
  • That in the defect of Baptism the vow suffi∣ceth. pag. 668
  • That by Baptism original sin is altogether blotted out in infants. ibid. & seq.
  • That the defect of Baptism by water, is sup∣plied by Martyrdom. pag. 668
  • How contemptible Baptism is in the Roman Church. pag. 673. & seq.
  • That it is no less esteemed then confirmation. pag. 674
  • Doctrine of Baptism, and of the vertue and efficacy of the same in the Reformed Churches. pag. 674, 675
  • The Roman Church having deprest Baptism extolleth it with improper praises. pag. 675
  • She makes Baptism conferred by a Pagan better then that which was conferred by Christ. pag. 670 671
  • Second Baptism of the Fathers. pag. 138
  • Baronius maintaineth perjury, and the Popes power to dispense from keeping an oath. pag. 100
  • Destroyeth the succession of Popes. ibid.
  • Understood not the signification of this word Roman in ancient Authors. pag. 117
  • Censureth Fathers. pag. 122
  • A notorious lie of Baronius. pag. 264
  • His boldness to corrupt history, and to bring in Fables. pag. 268
  • He receiveth for true the Fable of Constan∣tines Baptism by Sylvester. pag. 275
  • He makes bold to condemn the Councils of Milevis and Carthage. pag. 330
  • He is taxed by Du Perron of Errour in Histo∣ry. pag. 337
  • He censureth the Emperour Justinian for making Laws about Christian Faith, and Ecclesiastical policy. pag. 380
  • St. Basil complains of the pride of the We∣stern men, and of Damasus Bishop of Rome. pag. 303
  • An opinion of Basil, which the Roman Church rejecteth. pag. 137
  • Basilides and Martial Spanish Bishops, be∣ing degraded, have recourse to the Bishop of Rome. pag. 299
  • Cyprian opposeth himself to the judgement of the Bishop of Rome, and hindreth the restitution of those Bishops. pag. 300
  • Saint Bathaeus suffered worms to crawl about his teeth. pag. 500
  • Beating and whipping ones self are not satis∣factions before God. pag. 619
  • Beatitude is in the Roman Church a degree and expectative of Saintship. pag. 402
  • Bel and the Dragon, that History is fabulous and condemned by Pope Gelasius. pag. 184
  • It is not held Canonical. pag. 179
  • The Church of Rome teaching to believe without knowing, follows ancient Here∣ticks. Page  [unnumbered] pag. 45
  • Bellarmine saith that Faith is opposite to Sci∣ence, and is better defined by ignorance then knowledge. pag. 46. & 812
  • That the question of the Popes primacy is the summary of Christian Religion. pag. 96. 97
  • Confesseth that he finds not in Scripture that the Pope is St. Peters Successor. pag. 97
  • That to believe St. Peters Succession in the primacy, is not of divine right. pag. 213
  • That the merits of Christ are in part necessa∣ry to all, in part not necessary. pag. 467
  • He saith that a sinner can say to God, Thou wilt pardon me fully by Christ, &c. But I will not have such a great liberality, &c. pag. 468
  • He saith that it belongs not to an Emerour to give Laws about sacred things. pag. 820
  • He believeth that God forgiveth to those only to whom the Priest hath forgiven. pag. 552
  • He saith that God is judged by the Priest, and that the Priest is judge in Gods cause, pag. 552 553
  • He maintaineth that a man is a redeemer of himself. pag. 602, 603
  • He saith, that we can satisfie God with our own works, and with condignity and equa∣lity. pag. 605
  • He teacheth that the sacrifices of great cat∣tel were more propitiatory then of small cattel. pag. 616
  • He saith that the Popes Canons are Canoni∣nical Scriptures. pag. 210
  • Benedict the ninth a Pope of ten years of age. pag. 102
  • Benedict the thirteenth deposed at Constance, retains the Popedom. pag. 106, 107
  • Berengarius condemned by Nicholas the se∣cond: His Confession. pag. 27, 28
  • Which is no more received in the Roman Church, ibid.
  • Bernard Abbot of Clervaux complains of the Roman Church. pag. 88
  • He taxeth Pope Eugenius that he had bought the Popedom. pag. 99
  • Bertram the Priest under Charls the Bald of France, writ against the real presence in the Eucharist, and was not troubled or blamed for it. pag. 744
  • The Bible was translated into the Dalmatick tongue by St. Hierome, and into the Go∣thick tongue by Ʋlfilas, a Goth Bishop. pag. 823
  • Queen Blanch worshippeth the relicks of St. Edmond, and represents to him the kindnesses she had done him in his life time. pag. 653
  • Her complaints against the Pope. pag. 656
  • The power of binding and loosing; and how far the Pope extends that power. pag. 580
  • How it is proved by the Roman Church. pag. 68, 69
  • Bishop of Bishops an arrogant title for a meer man. pag. 338
  • The calling of Bishops; their office, and how it was corrupted. pag. 94
  • In their reception in the Roman Church, they take an oath of allegiance without any mention of God or his word. pag. 89
  • Titular and imaginary Bishops. pag. 110
  • All Bishops are successours of the Apostles. pag. 224, 225
  • And equal in dignity. ibid.
  • Roman Bishops were elected by the suffrages of the people. pag. 240
  • A Bishop must not meddle with businesses of the world. pag. 241
  • The order of Bishops, and the limits of their Jurisdiction, were according to politick order and jurisdiction. pag. 272, 273, 308
  • An express Canon of the Council of Calce∣don for that. pag. 359
  • Proof of the same by many examples. ibid.
  • Bishops of the Roman Church boast, that they give the holy Ghost. pag. 565
  • The Bishop of Rome taxed to pay 4000. Crowns for his entry into h s Office. The other Patriarchs taxed to pay 3000. pag. 820
  • Body of Christ is no more on earth. pag. 702, 703
  • It is presented to us in the Eucharist, not as glorified, but as dying for us. pag. 701, 702 —741
  • The Scripture and the Fathers speak of three sorts of body of Christ. pag. 711
  • The Fathers say, that the bread is the body of Christ. pag. 718
  • The Fathers call bread that which is received in the holy Communion. pag. 727, 728
  • Great quantity of bread was laid upon the Table. pag. 771
  • Every one took with his hand the consecra∣ted Bread, and some carried it home. pag. 771 & 772.
  • It was carried to the absent. pag. 772
  • Decretal of Pope Boniface the second speak∣ing of St. Austin and of the Africans, as separate from the Roman Church. pag. 334
  • Why that Decretal is suspected to be false. pag. 335. 339
  • How Boniface the eighth came to the Pope∣dom, and his end. pag. 105, 106
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • He instituteth the Jubilee to be kept every hundreth year. pag. 29
  • He attributeth unto himself power both over the spiritual and the temporal of all the world. pag. 31
  • Bull. de Coena Domini. pag. 36, 37.
  • Doctor Bullinger confesseth, that in the first Ages little deference was made to the Roman Church. pag. 251, 252.
    C.
  • THe Chalice vomited by a little Girle. page 770
  • Why the Pope took the Cup from the people. page 799
  • Calvin is defended against the accusations of Cardinal Du Perron upon Joh. 3. Ex∣cept a man be born again by water, &c. page 671, 672
  • Proofs that the Books of Judith, Tobit, Ec∣clesiasticus, Wisdom, Maccabees, are not Canonical. page 177
  • Testimony of Josephus concerning Canoni∣cal Books. page 177
  • Enumeration of Canonical Books, according to the Greek Fathers. page 193
  • And according to the Latin Fathers. page 196
  • Austins opinion concerning the Canonical Books. page 204
  • Opinion of Pope Innocent the first, about the same. page 207
  • And of Gregory the first. ibid.
  • Decrees and Decretals of Popes set among, yea above Canonical Books. page 208. & seq.
  • The Canonization of Saints comes from the Heathen Apotheoses. page 50. 401
  • There is great reason to doubt whether they are Saints and happy whom the Pope hath canonized. page 401
  • Corrupt ways and forms of Canonization. ibid.
  • Canonization of St. Edmund, twice denied. page 648
  • And finally granted. page 652
  • Edward King of England canonized two hundred years after his death. page 633
  • Canons of the Apostles, contrary to the Ro∣man Church: They approve the marri∣age of Priests, and condemn Fasting on Sunday and Saturday. page 241
  • The Roman Church holds the Popes Canons for Canonical, and to have more autho∣rity then the Canonical Scriptures. page 208
  • Cardinals, when they begun, and what was their office at the first. page 94
  • By what means Cardinals attain to that de∣gree. page 109
  • They are discharged of the care of their Churches. page 110
  • A Cardinal, sirnamed the Ape. page 109
  • Cases reserved to Bishops. page 574
  • Cases reserved to the Pope. ibid.
  • Cassander he complains of the abuses com∣mitted about images. page 444, 447
  • Cassian his opinions not approved by the Ro∣man Church. page 141
  • The mystagogical Catecheses of Cyrillus of Alexandria are false and supposititious. page 789, 790
  • The Catechetical Prayer of Gregory of Nyssa was depraved by the Eutychians, and is full of Errors. page 784
  • St. Catherine, an imaginary Saint that never was. page 400
  • St. Caterine of Siena, being yet in swadling cloaths, would not suck upon Fridays: She whips her self with an iron chain. page 503
  • In what sense the Fathers take the title of Ca∣tholick Church. page 5
  • That the word Catholick cannot be the mark of the true Church. page 79, 80
  • That the Roman Church is not Catholick. page 81. & seq.
  • That Du Perron understood not in what sense the Fathers take the word Catholick Church. page 82. & seq.
  • Celestin the third strikes down with his foot the Crown of the Emperour, Henry the sixth. page 105
  • Celestin the fifth rid upon an Ass: He is co∣zened, and finally, put to death by Cardi∣nal Benedict, who since was called Boni∣face the eighth. page 106
  • Vow of Celibat is contrary to the word of God. page 469
  • The Patriarchs, Prophets, Priests, and A∣postles did not live in Celibat. page 470, 471
  • The rashness of the vow of Celibat. page 472, 477
  • It is condemned by St. Paul. page 472
  • In the Roman Church that vow is not free, but forced. page 477
  • Du Perron saith, that in Constantins time the Celibat of Bishops began. page 478
  • And that the Apostles command about it, was but ad tempus. ibid.
  • The doctrine of the Roman Church about the Celibat contradicteth Scripture. page 479 480
  • The Council of Nice forbids the obliging of Clarks to the Celibat. page 484
  • The Council of Fontanet in Lombardy con∣demneth Page  [unnumbered] the Celibat of the Roman Church. page 314
  • Coena signifieth a common Supper. page 776
  • The form of administring the Lords Supper. page 768
  • We have no certain precept of the Lord about the hour of celebrating the Lords Supper. page 797
  • When Ceremonies grow, ignorance groweth also. page 658
  • The Chair sanctifieth not the Pastor, but the holiness of the Pastor, and of his Doctrine sanctifieth the chair. page 89
  • The succession of Chairs is set down by the Roman Church, as a mark of the true Church. page 2
  • Austerity and chastity of that Order. page 496
  • The Cherubims of the Tabernacle were no Images of any Angel, and were not wor∣shipped. page 439
  • St. Christopher an imaginary Saint. page 400
  • Chrysostom preferreth the City and Church of Antioch before Rome. page 96
  • His opinions not approved in the Roman Church. page 139, 140, 413
  • Chrysostom recommends the reading of Scri∣pture unto the common people. page 169, 170
  • He was set in the Patriarchat of Constanti∣nople by Theophilus Patriarch of Alexan∣dria, without asking the advice of the Bishop of Rome. page 312, 323
  • He was twice deposed by the same Theophi∣lus, notwithstanding the intercession of Innocent Bishop of Rome. page 319. & seq.
  • The title of the Epistles of Chrysostom to In∣nocent is false and supposititious. page 321
  • Chrysostom is contrary to the invocation of Saints. page 420. & seq.
  • The 26. Homily of Chrysostom upon 2. Cor. is horribly falsified. page 422
  • He puts two persons in Christ. page 413
  • Our adversaries take the question of the Church at the wrong end. page 1, & 2
  • Of the word Church, and the diverse significations of the same. page 3
  • The word Ecclesia imports union, yet now a days is a cause of disunion. page 1
  • And why. Whether the Church must be be∣lieved before we be taught what we must believe. page 2
  • The controversies of Religion must not be begun by the question of the Church. ibid.
  • By the Church the Romanists understand only the Pope and the Clergy. page 3, & 4
  • The Church is a word that hath diverse signi∣fications. page 4
  • What it signifieth in Scripture. ibid.
  • The diverse appellations of the same. ibid.
  • The Church of the elect, and the triumphant Church, wherein they differ. ibid.
  • What the Church is according to the ancient Doctors, and what according to those of the Roman Church. page 5
  • The Church of the elect is not discerned with the eye. page 6
  • Dvers names of the Church of the elect. ibid.
  • Of that of the elect which is invisible. page 6, 7.
  • St. Austin acknowledged it. ibid.
  • Of what Church the symbol speaks. page 5
  • Definition that Du Perron giveth to the Church. ibid.
  • Reasons of the Adversaries against the Church of the elect. page 8
  • Objections of Du Perron against it. page 8, & 9
  • What the Fathers understand by the Catho∣lick Church. page 6
  • Two sorts of Churches. ibid.
  • What the Church of the elect is. page 6, &c.
  • What is the Church grounded upon. page 218, &c.
  • Two differents between the Roman Church and the Reformed Church. page 813
  • Whether the societies of Hereticks ought to be called Churches. page 12, 13
  • Whether there be no salvation out of the Church. page 13, &c.
  • Whether it be always visible. page 15, &c.
  • Whether it can err. page 22, &c.
  • Whether it hath more authority then Scri∣pture. page 55, &c.
  • Five rules to limit the authority of the Church. page 56
  • She is not an infallible judge of the sense of Scripture. page 64, &c.
  • Of her pretended authority to change the commandments of God, and to dispense from them. page 70, 795, 797
  • And to add to Scripture. page 148
  • The form and order of the Church in the Roman Empire in St. Austins time. page 340, 341
  • Conformity of the Abyssine Churches with ours in Doctrine. page 21, 22
  • All Churches are first, Apostolical, Original, and mothers. page 341
  • Which and of what nature must the marks of the Church be. page 73
  • Of the true mark of the true Church, which is the profession of the true Do∣ctrine. page 73, 74
  • The true Doctrine is more known then the true Church. page 74, &c.
  • Of the duration of the Church. page 110, &c.
  • Of her multitude and extent. page 111, &c.
  • Of Miracles. page 114
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Of union in the visible Church. page 116
  • Of antiquity. page 118
  • Of the Greek Church; it is more ancient then the Roman, and is the mother of the Ro∣man Church. page 22, 98, 99
  • The Church of Jerusalem is called by the Em∣perour Justin, the Mother of the Christi∣an name. page 308
  • The Roman Church hath erred, and erreth. page 26, &c.
  • Contrarieties between Scripture and her. page 36, 37
  • Antiquity of the Roman Church: And how her doctrine is descended from Pagans, Jews, and ancient Hereticks. page 38, &c.
  • She teacheth Perjury, Fornication, the re∣bellion of Subjects, revenge after pardon granted, and rebellion of children against their parents. page 84, 85
  • The Roman Church of this time is contrary to that of old time. page 130, 131, 132, 133, 143, &c.
  • The Church of Millain was very late sub∣jected unto the Church of Rome. page 313
  • Clement the first, his Decretal that goods and women be common. page 134
  • He calls James Bishop of Bishops, govern∣ing the Churches of all the world. page 240
  • Clement the second is poisoned by his Suc∣cessor. page 203
  • Opinions of Clemens Alexandrin. not appro∣ved by the Roman Church. page 166, 134
  • He extolleth Traditions very much. page 149
  • Consent of the Ancients in the number of Gods Commandments. page 130, 131
  • Dissent of the Roman Church about it. page 131
  • Communion under one kind was borrowed from the Manicheans. page 49
  • Is contrary to the Scripture and the Fathers. page 793
  • Du Perron confesseth that by the communion under one kind, the signification of the Sa∣crament is diminished. page 794
  • Why the Communion to the cup was denied to the people. page 799
  • The first Council of Nice limits the Jurisdi∣ction of the Bishop of Rome within the Provostship of Rome. page 272
  • Council of Sardica: What was done in it? The separation of the same into two Councils. page 291
  • The small authority it had. page 293
  • It was not universal. page 297. & seq.
  • Du Perron makes the Council of Nice, and that of Sardica, to be but one Council. page 298
  • 〈◊〉 Canons of Sardica help not the Popes primacy. page 299. 300
  • Council of Arles. page 266
  • Commandeth Sylvester Bishop of Rome, and judgeth of his sentence. page 266, 267
  • Council of Sinuessa, and that of Rome un∣der Sylvester, both false and supposititious page 267, 268
  • Council the first of Constantinople. page 306, 307
  • Council of Milevis. page 324
  • Council the sixth of Carthage. page 328. & seq.
  • Council the first of Ephesus. page 420
  • Council of Chalcedon. page 364. & seq.
  • The Eliberin Council forbids Images. page 441
  • Council the third of Carthage, and the sixth of Constantinople, are contrary to Tran∣substantiation. page 745, 746
  • Council the second of Nice hath erred. page 26
  • The Roman Council under Gregory the se∣venth, and what impious Articles were established in it. page 28
  • Council of Lateran under Innocent the third, and the errors of the same. page 28, 639
  • Council of Foutanet in Lombardy. page 314
  • Council of Clermont under Ʋrban the second, in which the Pope usurped investitures. page 631
  • Council of Rhemes under Hugh Capet. page 102
  • The Council of Constance deposeth three Popes. page 30, 31, 107
  • Dispenseth from keeping Faith to Hereticks. ibid.
  • Depriveth Fredrick of Austria of his Do∣minions. ibid.
  • Depriveth the Laity of the Communion of the Cup. ibid. page 796
  • Council of Florence. page 32
  • Council of Lateran under Julius the second, and Leo the tenth; Impieties of that Council. page 32
  • Council of Pisa assembled by Lewis the twelfth. page 33
  • Council of Lyons, and the farewell and com∣fort of a Prelate given to the people of the City. page 650
  • Councils contrary the one to the other, and excommunicating one another. page 27. 101
  • The Council of Pisa declares two Popes He∣reticks. page 106
  • Council of Basil. page 107
  • Council of Trent, and all its errors. page 108
  • It falsifieth Scripture. page 575
  • The Emperour Justinian and Pope Gregory the first, honour and esteem the four Universal Councils as much as the four Evangelists. page 368
  • Since the Apostles there have been no Uni∣versal Councils, in the sense that our Ad∣versaries Page  [unnumbered] take the word Universal. page 25. 291
  • Whether the Councils can erre. page 25
  • Absurdity of this proposition, that a Coun∣cil approved by the Pope cannot erre. page 533
  • Gelasius maintains that the Universal Coun∣cils can err. page 377
  • Why the Popes would never be present at the ancient Universal Councils. page 349, 354
  • An Universal Council may be convocated without the Popes consent. page 269
  • The Emperour Constantin, and his Successors have convocated Councils. page 269, 270
  • Constantin hath convocated the first Coun∣cil of Nice, without expecting the will of Sylvester, Bishop of Rome. page 269
  • Council of Tyr convocated by the absolute command of Constantin. page 275
  • The same Council transported to Jerusalem. page 289
  • The Council of Sardica was not convocated by the Bishop of Rome. page 291
  • The first Council of Constantinople convoca∣ted by the Emperour without, yea against the advice of Damasus Bishop of Rome. page 306
  • The first Council of Ephesus was convocated by the only command of Theodosius the second. page 346
  • The same Emperour convocateth the second Council of Ephesus. page 353
  • Council of Chalcedon convocated by the Em∣perour Martian, without, yea against the advice of Leo the first, Bishop of Rome. page 364
  • The Emperors sent an absolute command to the Bishops of Rome to come to Councils, or to send to them. page 348
  • The Popes petitioned the Emperors to as∣semble Councils, and many times were re∣fused. page 348, 353, 364
  • Hosius Bishop of Cordova (not the Deputies of the Bishop of Rome) presided in the first Council of Nice. page 270, &c.
  • The same Hosius presided in the Council of Sardica above the Legats of Julius Bi∣shop of Rome. page 301
  • Damasus Bishop of Rome had no Legats in the first Council of Constantinople. page 306
  • Meletius Patriarch of Antioch presided in the same. page 307
  • Aurelius Bishop of Carthage, and Valentin of Numidia, had the precedence in the sixth Council of Carthage, before the Le∣gats of the Bishop of Rome. page 328
  • Count Candidian presided for the Emperour in the first Council of Ephesus. Among Bishops, Cyrillus of Alexandria presideth in that Council in his name, not as Cele∣stins Legat. page 350
  • The Popes Legats placed under others. ibid.
  • Dioscorus of Alexandria, presideth in the second Council of Ephesus, above Leo's Deputies. page 354
  • Count Helpidius, presideth in it for the Em∣perour. page 355
  • Patricians and Counts preside in the Council of Chalcedon, and command in it abso∣lutely. page 365
  • The Tomes of Councils, both Greek and La∣tin, are miserably falsified. page 373
  • Du Perron acknowledgeth, that Confession is not of absolute necessity. page 523, &c.
  • He confesseth that auricular confession was not in use in old time. ibid.
  • He saith that Confession is not a Sacrament, but a necessary condition to the Sacra∣ment. page 524
  • The Adversaries confess, that the Confession made to the Priest, is not instituted in the word of God. ibid.
  • Publick Confession is necessary. ibid.
  • Four kinds of Confession received in our Churches. page 526
  • St. James saying, Confess your faults, &c. spake not of the confession made to the Priest. page 526
  • Chrysostom exhorted his hearers to confess their sins to none but God. page 531
  • Lombard and Gratian hold the Confession made to the Priests to be unnecessary. The Jesuite Greg. de Valentia, chideth Gratian about that. page 532
  • An obligation laid upon Citizens to confess their sins more exactly then Country people. page 538
  • What we finde amiss in the auricular Confes∣sion of the Roman Church. page 537, &c.
  • Foulness of Confessions. page 539, 540, 541
  • Rules for Confessions. ibid.
  • Lucrative Confessions. page 577, 578, 579. 819
  • By Confessions they search consciences, and the secret infirmities of Families. page 819
  • By the Doctrine of the Adversaries, and of M. du Perron, it is better for one to suffer his King, and his Father to be killed, then to reveal a confession. page 542
  • They hold that it were better to suffer Christ to be killed, then to reveal a confession. page 543
  • The boasting of a Spanish Confessor. page 540
  • The Sacrament of Confirmation is a humane tradition, yet is preferred before Baptism, page 674
  • How and in what sense we must be con∣formablePage  [unnumbered] unto Christ. Confutation of the Council of Trent about that of Con∣formity. page 618
  • Gregory the I. saith that the Apostles did not consecrate but with the Lords Prayer only. page 402
  • The Fathers hold that the consecration of the bread is done by prayer. page 704
  • That in the Mass no consecration is made. page 683
  • A Fable, that the words of consecration ha∣ving been pronounced by a shepherd, they were smitten by Gods hand. page 747
  • Conrad, son to Frederick the second; The Croisada is preacht against him. page 656
  • When Constantine embraced the Christian doctrine, page 286. &c.
  • Constantine giveth Judges to the Donatists. One of them was the Bishop of Rome. page 266
  • He will have the judgement of Melchiades Bishop of Rome examined in the Councel of Arles, page 266, 267
  • Constantine raised again, and setled the Chri∣stian Church without any communication about it with the Bishop of Rome. page 267
  • Constantine's Baptism and Death. page 286. and 275
  • He is accused by Du Perron of irregularities and actions against all good order. page 266
  • Of the donation of Constantine, and the fals∣hood of the same. page 282. &c.
  • The Patriarch of Constantinople placed in the second rank after that of Rome, by reason of the dignitie of the City, by the I. Coun∣cel of Constantinople. page 308
  • He governed the Church of all the world. page 343.
  • There was no appeal from his judgement. page 359
  • He is made equal in all things with the Bi∣shop of Rome by the Councel of Chalce∣don. page 368. &c. 375. &c.
  • The Patriarchs of Constantinople have sum∣moned the Bishops of Rome to appear be∣fore their See. page 377. &c.
  • Menas Patriarch of Constantinople excom∣municates Vigilius Bishop of Rome. page 381
  • The Patriarchs of Constantinople qualifie themselves Oecumenical Patriarchs. page 381, 384
  • Pope Adrian gives that title to Tharasius Pa∣triarch of Constantinople. page 384
  • Example of Gennadius Patriarch, shewing that he was not subject to the Bishop of Rome. page 375
  • What is contrition, what attrition. The Do∣ctors say, that by the vertue of the keys attrition becomes contrition. page 577
  • That it is the meritorious cause of Justificati∣on, and that attrition is an imperfect con∣trition. page 659, 660
  • The Councel of Trent hath declared that concupiscence is no sin. page 34, 71
  • In the ancient Church cortines were set be∣fore the Holy Table till the hour of the Communion. page 769
  • With how many arts, corruption, and soul dealing the election of the Popes is made. page 108
  • The Image of the Cross according to the Doctors, must be worshipped with adora∣tion of Latria. page 447
  • Prayers made to the Cross. ibid.
  • Priviledges of the Crossed, and how they re∣deemed themselves from the vow. page 642
  • The Crossed cozened by the Pope. ibid. & 647. &c.
  • Graces granted to them by Innocent the IV. page 650
  • Cyprian had opinions which the Roman Church approveth not. page 136
  • His opinion about St. Peters Primacie. page 225
  • Cyprian, and Steven Bishop of Rome, have a sharp dissention between them. page 247
  • A Schism moved against Cyprian by Nova∣tus. ibid.
  • A Narrative of his troubles. ibid. &c.
  • Cyprian calls always the Bishop of Rome his brother. page 248
  • He is held almost over all the West as a Pre∣sident; yea and over the Countreys of the East, South, and North. page 295
  • He opposeth the advice of the Bishop of Rome in the business of Basilides and Mar∣tial. page 248
  • Bitter invectives of Cyprian against Steven. page 248, 249.
  • He assembleth a Councel against the doctrine received in the Roman Church. page 249
  • Cyrillus of Alexandria is exhorted by Cele∣stin Bishop of Rome to proceed against Nestorius page 346
  • He presided in the first Councel of Ephesus in his own name, not as Legat of Celestin. page 349
  • Cyril of Jerusalem is the first that appealed from a Councel. page 358
  • The mystagogical Catecheses are falsly as∣cribed unto him page 790
    D
  • THe Popes would put their Decretals a∣mong Canonical Scriptures. Page 208. &c.
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Pope Nicholas the I. puts them above Scri∣pture. Page 209, 210
  • Gregory the I. speaks much like that Nicholas. Page 210
  • Décretal of Innocent the I. forbidding the mariage of Clerks. Page 207
  • Decretals of the three first Ages are supposi∣titious, and forged by Ruulphus Bishop of Ments. Page 246, 261
  • Of the authoritie of Decretals, and why Du Perron would make no use of them to prove the Popes primacie. Page 253
  • For the interpretation of Decretals publick Schools were erected, an honour not de∣ferred unto holy Scripture. Page 252
  • How arrogant Decretals are. ibid.
  • Decretals in many things agree not with the Roman Church. Page 253
  • Barbarous language of the Decrees and De∣cretals. Page 255
  • Scripture is prophaned in them. ibid. &c.
  • Ignorance of the Author in History. Page 257
  • Their falshood. Page 258
  • Acknowledged by the Doctors of the Roman Church. ibid.
  • When, and by whom, and why they were forged. Page 263, 264
  • Decretal of Telesphorus, a false and supposi∣titious piece. Page 519, 520
  • The Roman Decree calls a second mariage Fornication. Page 72
  • Hinkman Archbishop of Rhemes, acknow∣ledgeth not the Decretals. Page 209, 263
  • A notorious falsification of a Canon of the Milevitan Councel by Gratian. Page 324. &c.
  • The like of a Canon of the Councel of Chal∣cedon. Page 371, 372
  • How the Dedication or Consecration of Churches is celebrated. Page 424
  • Dennis or Dionysius Alexandrin joyns with Cyprian against Steven Bishop of Rome. He dedicates his Apologie to Steven Bi∣shop of Rome. Page 251
  • The Book of Dennis sirnamed Areopagita of the Hierarchy of the Church, is contrary to the Papal Monarchy. Page 212, 240
  • When the Books of that Dennis were writ∣ten. Page 779
  • An absurd conjecture of Du Perron. ibid.
  • Fable of Dennis held Patron of France. Page 400
  • He preacheth the Gospel in Paris in the year of our Lord 252. Page 844
  • Those Deaconesses that St. Paul speaks of, made no vow of Celibat. Page 473
  • The Death of Gods children, and that of In∣fants born in Gods Covenant, is not a sa∣tisfactory pain. Page 600, 601
  • How we must understand the depositions and restaurations of Bishops made by a Patri∣arch out of his Patriarchat. Page 299, 346, 349, 350
  • What a Diocese was in the ancient Church Page 366
  • That Nicolas the I. corrupteth the word Di∣ocese in a Canon of Chalcedon, turning the singular to a plural. Page 367
  • Dioscorus Patriarch of Alexandria presideth in the second Councel of Ephesus. Page 354
  • He excommunicateth Leo Bishop of Rome. Page 300
  • Useless Disputes in Christian Religion are causes of Atheism. Page 3
  • The Roman Church by the distinction of meats imitateth the ancient Hereticks. Page 47, 70
  • Of the prohibition of eating blood & stran∣gled things. See Meats. Page 70
  • Dominick whipt himself three times a day with an iron chain. Page 503, 594
  • Dominicans. Their first comming into Eng∣land. Page 635
  • Dulia, when it is taken for a Religious ser∣vice, belongeth to God only. Page 404
  • Athanasius and Theodoret condemn those that defer dulia unto the creature, Page 407, 408
  • Perpetual duration cannot be a mark of the Church, and fits not the Roman Church. Difference between duration and antiqui∣ty. Page 110, 111.
    E
  • COntention concerning Easter-day. Page 242, 268
  • The Book of Ecclesiasticus is not Canonical, nor of Solomon, and containeth errours rejected by the Roman Church. Absurdi∣ties in it. Page 182
  • St. Austins opinion concerning Ecclesiasti∣cus: Page 204, 205
  • Edmund Archbishop of Canterbury twice declared not fit to be admitted Saint. But the third time he is canonized. Page 648, 652
  • Absurd words of the Bull of Canonization. Page 652, 753
  • Queen Blanch worshippeth his relicks, and puts him in mind of the good she had done him. Page 653
  • Edward King of England Canonized 200 years after his death. Page 631
  • Edward the I. a valiant and hardy Prince, makes bold with the Revenue of Abbies and Priories, Page 657
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Election of Popes was done in old time by the will of the Emperours. Page 101
  • Foul ways in the election of Popes of the last Ages. Page 108
  • In the ancient Church the Priest did not lift up the Host above his head, but the Priest turning himself towards the people, took up the dish with both his hands. Page 768
  • Constitution of Adrian the first, and Leo the eighth, that a Pope be not elected, but by the Emperors will. Page 101
  • Three Popes deposed by Henry the second. Page 103
  • Henry the fourth deposeth Gregory the 7th. Page 104
  • The Emperour Honorius judgeth of a Schism between two Bishops of Rome, Boniface, and Eulalius. He useth both as his Subjects. Page 327, 328
  • His Imperial Law provideth against the Schisms of the Roman. See Page 328
  • The Emperour Theodosius the second, go∣verns the first Council of Ephesus, and presideth in it. Page 350
  • Represseth and punisheth Bishops. Page 352
  • Giveth to Dioscorus, Patriarch of Alexan∣dria, the Presidency above the Legats of the Bishop of Rome. Page 354
  • He gives power to Count Helpidius to impri∣son the Bishops of the Council. Page 355
  • Obedience of Leo the first, Bishop of Rome to the Emperour Martian. Page 364
  • Pope John sent Embassador by King Theodo∣rick to the Emperour Justin. Page 379
  • King Athalarick makes a constitution that the Pope give three thousand pounds for his entry. Page 380
  • Justinian continues the same constitution. Page 380
  • Athalarick by an express Law set against the Popes house, forbids Simony in the electi∣on of Popes. Page 380
  • Agapet sent Embassador by King Theodat. ibid.
  • Epiphanius preferreth St. James before the other Apostles. Page 311
  • He tears a vail, where an image was painted. ibid. Page 442
  • Condemneth all Statues and pictures of men. ibid.
  • He condemneth Hereticks that worshipped the Virgin Mary, and called her Queen of heaven. Page 41
  • And those that worshipped Angels. ibid.
  • He sets the Angels above the Virgin Mary. ibid.
  • Opinions of Epiphanius rejected by the Ro∣man Church. Page 140. &c.
  • How the Holy Communion is celebrated in Ethiopia. Page 22. 775
  • Eucharist judged necessary to children after Baptism. Page 126
  • Pope Eugenius comes to Paris: Giveth to Peter Amerin the Archbishoprick of Bourges in spite of King Lewis the eighth. Page 632
  • He excommunicates Lewis, and puts his per∣son in interdict three whole years. ibid.
  • Eugenius the fourth deposed by the Council of Basil, retains the Popedom in spite of the Council. Page 207, 208
  • Opinions of Eusebius of Cesarea contrary to the Roman Church. Page 138
  • Vindication of Eusebius against the calum∣nies of Du Perron. Page 241, 242, &c.
  • Reasons why he is so much hated and con∣demned as an Arrian by the Cardinals Ba∣ronius and Du Perron, Page 243, 244.
  • He calls Jesus Christ a second essence, and a second God. Page 243
  • He is suspected of Arianism. ibid.
  • He is contrary to images, and calls them an Heathenish custom. Page 40
  • Eutyches his Heresie; he is deposed by Fla∣vian Patriarch of Constantinople. This gave occasion to the second Council of Ephesus. Page 353
  • What the Exarchs were in the ancient Church. Page 366
  • Excommunication used to recover things lost. Page 35
  • It is not to be pronounced against an Univer∣sity, Colledge, &c. Page 242
  • A Superiour might be excommunicated, by an inferiour. Page 244, 337
  • How the word of excommunication must be understood, when in old time a Superior was excommunicated by an inferior. Page 244, 350, 322
  • Popes excommunicated by other Bishops. Page 360, 361, 643
  • Bishops of what place soever they were, and though never so small, might excommuni∣cate an Heretick Bishop. Page 377
  • Menas Patriarch of Constantinople excommu∣nicated Pope Vigilius. Page 381
  • Dioscorus of Alexandria excommunicateth Pope Leo. Page 300
  • Pope Innocent the first, excommunicateth At∣ticus Bishop of Constantinople, who ne∣vertheless remained in his See. Page 323
  • The Bishops of Rome excommunicate Acaci∣us, who nevertheless remained peaceable possessour of his Patriarchal See. Page 361
  • The Popes Gelasius and Hormisdas excommu∣nicatePage  [unnumbered] all the Oriental Churches; only because they kept the name of Acacius de∣ceased in their Ecclesiastical Tables. That excommunication lasted fourty years. Page 379
  • Excommunication of Friderick the second, publisht at Paris in ambiguous terms. Page 649
    F.
  • FOur texts of Scripture falsified by du Perron. Page 176
  • Two other falsifications in the same Page. ibid.
  • Du Perron saith falsly, that St. Paul hath ex∣cused his low stile. Page 190
  • Falsification of a text of the Epistle to the Galatians. Page 218
  • Falsification of a text of Deuteronomy. Page 383
  • A text of Matth. 22. falsly alledged. ibid.
  • Four texts of Scripture falsly alledged in du Perrons speech pronounced in the full As∣sembly of the States at Paris. Page 386
  • A text, 1 Cor. 14. falsified. Page 396
  • The same text falsified otherwise in another place. ibid.
  • A text, 1 Cor. 13. falsified both in words and sense. Page 397
  • He falsifieth 2 Cor. 11. translating 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉ig∣norant. Page 190
  • A text of St. Peter falsified. Page 198
  • A text, 1 Cor. 4. falsified. ibid.
  • He affirmeth falsly, that in Scripture Priests abstained from their wives. Page 481
  • He affirmeth falsly, that St. Peter spake of wives, when he said to Christ, Behold we have left all. Page 482
  • Falsification of a Text, 1 Tim. 4. where he makes St. Paul to say, prohibentes ab∣stinere, adding this word prohibentes. Page 487
  • A text, Tit. 3. falslely alledged. Page 552
  • A text falsified, 1 Cor. 7. But now they are Saints. Page 667
  • A text of Joshua falsly alledged. Page 777
  • He maintains, against all truth, that Moses and Aaron, speaking to the stone, wor∣shipped the stone. Page 781
  • Gregory the first falsified. Page 198
  • And St. Hierome. Page 200
  • And St. Ambrose. Page 217
  • St. Cyril of Jerusalem falsified. Page 234
  • And Athanasius. ibid.
  • St. Chrysostom falsly alledged. Page 235
  • Two texts of St. Cyprian falsified. ibid. Page 236
  • Leo the first, Bishop of Rome, falsified. Page 236, 525
  • Epistle of Pope Anastasius falsified. Page 244
  • St. Ireneus falsified. Page 244
  • A text of Cyprian clipt. Page 250
  • Socrates falsified. Page 270
  • A place of Notitia Imperii falsified. Page 273
  • A notorious depravation of a Canon of Nice. Page 273, 274
  • Verses of Gregory Nazianzen falsly transla∣ted. Page 274
  • Three falsifications of a place of Socrates. Page 293
  • St. Ambrose falsified. Page 294
  • Evagrius falsly alledged. ibid.
  • And the Council of Chalcedon. Page 295
  • Allegations falsly affirmed to have been made in the Council of Chalcedon. Page 299
  • St. Basil twice falsified. Page 295
  • And once more. ibid.
  • A place of Ambrose clipt. Page 315
  • Fiction and lie of Cardinal Du Perron. Page 316
  • He alledgeth Letters of Chrysostom to Inno∣cent the first, which are known not to be written to Innocent, but to the Bishops in general. Page 320
  • Cedrenus falsly alledged. Page 321
  • And so Prosper and Marcellinus Comes. Page 321, 322
  • A place of Innocent to Victricius falsly al∣ledged. Page 336
  • St. Austins Epistles falsly alledged. Page 332
  • A place of the 96. Epistle of St. Austin fal∣sified. ibid.
  • Another falsification in the citation of the 162. Epistle of St. Austin. Page 332. 333
  • Falsification in the allegation of the sixth Councel of Carthage. Page 333
  • Justinian's Novel falsly alledged. Page 334
  • Du Perron, after Baronius, brings an Epistle of St. Austin manifestly false. Page 335, 336
  • A place of Fulgentius ill translated. Page 336
  • A place of Optatus falsified. ibid.
  • A place of an Epistle of Chrysostom falsified. Page 337
  • Two falsifications in a place of Liberatus. Page 347
  • He saith falsely that the precedence which Dioscorus had in the Council of Ephesus, was declared a tyrannie. Page 354
  • Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, falsly alledged. Page 357
  • Socrates falsified. Page 358
  • Another Falsification of the same place. ibid.
  • A place of Evagrins clipt. Page 376
  • St. Hilary alledged against his sense, and against truth. Page 183
  • Words of Anthimus clipt, and ill translated. Page 384
  • Place of Athanasius depraved. Page 384
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Photius falsly alledged. ibid.
  • Basil falsified. Page 395
  • A place of Thedoret clipt, by the omission of the word St. Michael. Page 405
  • Eusebius falsly alledged. Page 410
  • A place of Origen horribly clipt and falsified. Page 414
  • Ambrose falsified. Page 420
  • Gregory Nazianzen falsified. Page 426
  • A place of Epiphanius wrested. Page 427
  • Chrysostom falsified. Page 461
  • A Canon of Ancyra falsified in the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 484
  • The Elberin Council falsified. Page 486, 487
  • Epiphanius clipt and falsified. Page 489, 490
  • Places of Eusebius clipt and falsified. Page 490, 410
  • A place of Hierom falsified with this addition, that Hierom beat his brest with a stone till blood came. Page 502, 503
  • A place of Basil falsified, with the addition of the word only, and corrupted in the sense. Page 526, 527
  • Another place of Basil falsified in the same manner. Page 527
  • Chrysostom clipt. Page 531
  • A place of Patriarch Jeremiah, and another of the German Doctors falsified. Page 532
  • The Cardinal in his speech before the States at Paris falsly alledged the Council of Constance. Page 545, &c.
  • Cyprian falsified. Page 532. 554
  • Ambrose clipt. ibid.
  • Austin corrupted in the sense, and falsified in the words. Page 689
  • Ambrose falsified. Page 711
  • A place of the third Council of Carthage falsified. Page 692
  • Justin Martyr corrupted, not in the words, but in the sense. Page 716
  • Ambrose falsified. Page 722
  • Theodoret falsly translated. Page 724, 725
  • Horrible depravation of a place of Austin, 12. chap. of the Book against Adimantus. Page 738
  • The Canon Hoc est taken out of Austin clipt. Page 741
  • German the Patriach falsified. Page 774
  • Nicholas Pectoras falsified. ibid.
  • Theodoret falsly translated. Page 781
  • In one place of Cyril of Alexandria three falsifications. Page 790, &c.
  • Four falsifications in another place of Cyril. Page 791
  • Hilary wrested. Page 791
  • Aristotle falsly alledged. Page 789
  • A place of Calvin falsified. Page 383
  • Another falsely alledged. ibid.
  • Fasting free in Scriptures. Page 507
  • Divers customs of ancient Christians in fast∣ing. Page 508
  • Fasts of Montanists. Page 509, &c.
  • Ancient fasts were free. Page 509
  • The Devil adviseth to fast. Page 511, 512
  • The Jesuits fast but little. Page 512
  • Fasting upon Saturday and Sunday condem∣ned by the ancient Fathers and Councils. Page 514, 519, 134, 339
  • Aerius did ill to trouble the Church about fasting. Page 505
  • Praise of fasting. Page 506
  • What we find amiss in the fasts of the Pa∣pists. Page 506
  • Fasts upon weeks days in the ancient Church upon Wednesdays and Fridays. Page 512
  • Absurdities and abuses of fasting in the Ro∣man Church. Page 512
  • A strange kind of Fast, consisting not in so∣briety, but in distinction of meats. Page 512
  • In the Roman Church carowsing breaks not a fast. Page 512
  • What persons are not obliged to fast. Page 513
  • Of the Fathers, and their authority. Page 120
  • To what end, and how we alledge Fathers. Page 710
  • Difficulty about judging of the doubts of Faith, by the testimony of Fathers. Page 120
  • The Roman Church condemneth the Fa∣thers, even in the things about which they agree. Page 121
  • Bellarmin, Baronius, Gregorius de Valentia, Maldonat, Villa, Vincentius, condemn the Fathers. 122, 123, 124
  • Particular opinions of the Fathers, in which they dissent from the Roman Church. Page 133, &c.
  • Du Perron correcteth St. Austin. Page 220
  • He accuseth the Fathers of wresting the Scripture to their advantage. Page 221
  • And useth them as men without faith and conscience. Page 416, &c.
  • He takes in the Fathers that which is evil, and leaveth that which is good. ibid.
  • Examination of Du Perrons shift that the Fathers spake darkly of the Eucharist be∣fore the Catechumens and Infidels. Page 756
  • Felicissimus a Priest of Carthage, stirreth a Schism against Cyprian. Page 247
  • Pope Felix put out of the Dypticks. Page 361
  • The Feast of the dedication, in winter, Joh. 10. Page 203
  • Feast of the conception of the Virgin Mary. Page 130
  • The fire came down from heaven upon the Page  [unnumbered] dedication of Solomons Temple, was out long before the ruine of that Temple. Page 161
  • Flavian remains a peaceable possessor of the Patriarchat of Antioch against the will of the Bishop of Rome, who in the end consents to it, not daring to oppose him. Page 316
  • Of those that whip themselves for their own selves, or for others. Rhenanus saith, that this Flagellation comes from the Lacede∣monians. Page 499
  • Examples of Flagellation. Page 503
  • Expositions of these texts, The flesh profi∣teth nothing, &c. And except you eat my flesh, &c. Page 707
  • Faith consisteth in knowledge. Page 812
  • Implicite Faith, grounded upon the Faith of others, whence it comes. Page 811
  • Faith Theological, and not Theological, of Bellarmine. Page 433
  • The Council of Constance determineth, that one is not obliged to keep faith to Here∣ticks. Page 31
  • Fermosus dispenseth from keeping an oath. Page 27
  • He is declared after his death an unlawfull Pope, and his body dragged into the Ty∣ber. ibid.
  • The Roman Church, teaching perjury, fol∣lows the old Hereticks. Page 45
  • The Pope authorizeth perjury, and dispen∣seth from oaths. Page 84
  • Ʋrban the second, forbids to keep faith to excommunicate persons. Page 104
  • Jesuites teach perjury before Judges. Page 542, 543
  • St. Francis, of him and his rule; How absurd and impious it is. Page 497
  • He wallows in the mire. Page 497
  • His perfection. Page 504
  • He is said to have gone beyond Christ. ibid.
  • Franciscans their first coming into England. Page 647
  • They were exactors of moneys, and the Popes Factors. ibid.
  • Their sudden increase. Page 647
  • Their equipage. Page 653
  • The language of the Franks was that of Ghelders. Page 843, 844
  • The French Nobility and Gentry in the time of Lewis the ninth, make a League against the Pope, and oppose his exactions. Page 653
  • General lamentation and murmure against the Pope, among the French people, du∣ring the imprisonment of Lewis the ninth. Page 655
  • Frederick Barbarossa trodden under the feet of Pope Alexander the third. Page 105
  • He holds the Popes left stirrup instead of the right. Page 632
  • Being excommunicated, he goes into Syria, and conquereth Jerusalem; but the inju∣ries done to him by the Pope, force him to leave Syria. Page 640
  • The Templers endeavour to deliver him to the Sultan. Page 640
  • He extorteth his absolution from the Pope. ibid.
  • He is a rare example of patience and meek∣ness. ibid.
  • His excommunication is pubisht in all the Provinces subject to the Pope. Page 649
  • He is degraded from the Empire in the Coun∣cil of Lyons, by Innocent the fourth. Page 650
  • Innocent corrupteth four of Fredericks ser∣vants to stab him. Page 652
  • His death. Page 658
  • His sons, and his bones are excommunicated. ibid.
  • Frumentius Preacheth in India without ordi∣nary calling. Page 91
  • Fulbert Bishop of Chartres corrupteth an excellent text of St. Austin. Page 738
    G.
  • GElasius Cyzicenus hath written the Acts of the Council of Nice. A place of that Gelasius falsified, and contrary to the truth of the History. Page 271
  • Opinions of Pope Gelasius rejected by the Church of Rome. Page 142
  • Pope Gelasius affirmeth against truth, that Pope Innocent absolved St. Chrysostom. Page 322
  • He is a sworn enemy to the memory of Aca∣cius Patriarch of Constantinople, so far as to excommunicate all the Oriental Chur∣ches, because in their Ecclesiastical Tables they had the name of Acacius written. Page 377
  • The Greek Churches accuse him of pride. Page 378, 399
  • He teacheth that absolution cannot be given to the dead. Page 142
  • He forbids baptizing at any other time but Easter and Pentecost. Page 377
  • He alledgeth Scripture in derision. Page 378
  • He makes bitter invectives against the Coun∣cil of Chalcedon. Page 379
  • He saith that all that Universal Councils say, must not always be believed. Page 379
  • He disputes against Christ about the blasphe∣my against the holy Ghost, Page 378
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • He maintains that Scripture is not alwayes perfect. Page 377
  • He acknowledgeth that Popes are subject unto Emperors in civil matters, and that they must not meddle with temporal bu∣sinesses. Page 378
  • He threatens the Emperor Anastasius to be his accuser in the day of judgement. ibid.
  • He assumeth to himself that which Christ saith, He that is not with me, is against me. ibid.
  • He renounceth all Ecclesiastical Canons made in favour of the Church of Rome. Page 379
  • He is contrary to Transubstantiation. Page 142
  • He condemneth the Communion under one kind. Page 142, 796
  • Genebrard speaketh disgracefully of the life and succession of the Popes. Page 101
  • A notable example of Gennadius Patriarch of Constantinople, shewing that he was no subject of the Bishop of Rome. Page 375
  • Genserick King of the Vandals conquereth Spain in the year 408. and leaveth it to the Visigoths. 845
  • St. George was an Arian, enemy to Athana∣sius. Page 400
  • Gerbert Archbishop of Rhemes promoted to the Popedom by a paction with the Devil. Page 102
  • The Epistle ascribed to St. Ambrose, which speaketh of Gervasius and Protasius, is false. Page 420, 450
  • Confutation of the distinction of grace ge∣neral and sufficient, and grace effectual; whereof the one gives power to do, the other giveth to do. Page 474
  • The Emperour Gratian leaveth the title of Pontifex Maximus in the year Page 385. 311
  • Gratian preacheth the Gospel at Tours a∣mong the Pagans in the year Page 253. 844
  • Gregory the I. did not believe that by the Church of the elect the Roman is under∣stood. Page 7 & 8
  • Arrogant words of Pope Gregory the I. Page 210
  • He acknowledgeth three chairs of St. Peter equal. Page 226
  • He was offended with that title of universal Bishop. Page 381
  • He praiseth the parricide of Phocas. ibid.
  • He speaks to the Bishops of Alexandria and Antioch, as to his equals. Page 311
  • He chideth Serenus an Image-breaker. Page 451
  • How he speaks of a Priest that abstained from his wife. Page 492
  • Pope Gregory the II. declareth some meats unclean. Page 512
  • Pope Gregory the VII. degradeth married Priests. Page 494
  • What opposition arose upon that ibid.
  • He was the first that made bold to degrade an Emperour, but he sped ill by it. His confession in his death. Page 630
  • Gregory the VIII. taken by Celestus the II. is condemned to perpetual prison. Page 104
  • Gregory the IX. excommunicates Frederick the II. Receiveth two thousand ounces of gold to absolve him. He turneth the Cros∣sed against him. He giveth the Empire to Robert, brother to Lewis IX. King of Fravce, who refuseth that gift. Page 640, 641
  • His miserable end. Page 647
  • Grgory Nazianzn had opinions which the Roman Church alloweth not. Page 137
  • He wisht that there were no primacy in the Church. Page 302, 303
  • He is promoted to the Patriarchat of Con∣stantinople by Peter Patriarch of Alexan∣dria, without the advice of the Bishop of Rome. Page 305
  • He doubts whether the Saints hear our pray∣ers. Page 393
  • He is the first of the Fathers in whom pray∣ers to the Saints are found. ibid.
  • Opinions of Gregory of Nyssa not approved in the Roman Church. Page 140, 783, &c.
  • That Catechetical Oration which is among his works, was corrupted by the Eutychi∣ans. ibid.
  • Gregorius Thaumaturgus giveth rules about Penitence. Page 525
  • Gregorius Turonensis mistaken in history. Page 334
  • Gregorius de Valentia Jesuit, censureth the Fathers upon the point of Transubstanti∣ation. Page 124
  • He holds that God exacteth of us more satis∣faction then is requisite, according to the rigour of justice. Page 606.
  • He despiseth satisfactions. Page 620
  • He taxeth Scripture of insufficiencie. Page 148
    H
  • HEnry the I. of England maintains that the investitures belong unto him. He banish∣eth Anselm. Page 631
  • Henry the II. of England invadeth Ireland by the Popes permission, upon condition that every house pay a penny to the Pope. Page 632
  • He prohibits appeals to Rome, and the bring∣ing of any Mandat from Rome, and the exacting of Peters pence in England. Page 633
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • In his reconciliation with Thomas of Canter∣bury, he holds his horses bridle twice. ibid.
  • Four of his Courtiers kill Thomas in the Church of Canterbury. Page 634
  • His submissions, even to be whipt by the Monks. ibid.
  • Henry the III. of England makes homage of his Crown to the Pope. Page 641
  • Pope Honorius declares him major. ibid.
  • His submission to Legat Otho, whose knees he touched with his head. Page 643
  • In a Feast at Westminster he yields the royal chair unto the Legat. Page 646
  • His low mind to suffer his Kingdome to be eaten up by the Popes servants. Page 650
  • Notable letters of Henry to Pope Innocent IV. Page 655
  • Henry IV. Emperour, and his miserable end in his old age. Page 631
  • Henry Archbishop of York poysoned in the chalice of the Sacrament. Page 632
  • Whether the societies of hereticks ought to be called Churches. Page 12
  • Whether hereticks may be saved. Page 14
  • Opinions of St. Hierome not approved in the Church of Rome. Page 141
  • Du Perron calumniates Hierome. Page 200
  • Hierome makes all Bishops equal. Page 309
  • Hierome calls Rome Babylon, and the harlot in scarlet, and the Clergy of Rome the Se∣nat of the Pharisees. ibid.
  • He saith that the offices of Priest and Bishop are one and the same. Page 310
  • He praiseth the poverty and simplicity of the ancient Bishops of Rome. ibid.
  • Hierome believed that the Saints deceased hear not our prayers. Page 194
  • His vehemencie against Matrimony Page 416
  • He saith that the Fathers writing against the Pagans, write often against their own sense. Page 415.
  • He accuseth St. Paul of fraud and dissem∣bling. Page 417
  • He speaks of him with contempt. ibid.
  • He taxeth him of lye, and is therefore bla∣med by St. Austin. ibid.
  • In the midst of his austerity his heart was set upon unlawful lust. Page 502
  • He is whipt before Christs throne for being a Cueroman. Page 503
  • He forbids altogether to eat flesh and drink wine. Page 511
  • And contradicteth St. Paul. ibid.
  • Hilary Bishop of Poitiers. His opinions which the Roman Church alloweth not. Page 138
  • Hilary Bishop of Arles. His quarrel with Leo I. Bishop of Rome. The Emperour Valentinian gives sentence in favour of Leo. Page 363
  • Impiety of Pope Hormisdas, in alledging Scripture. His pertinacie to hold the Oriental Churches so long excommunica∣ted for the only table of Acacius written in their Records. Page 379
  • Hosius Bishop of Cordova, beloved of the Emperour Constantine, and imployed to oppose Arius, without the advice of the Bishop of Rome. Page 268
  • He presideth in the Councel of Nice. Page 271
  • Hosius sate not there as a Legat of the Bi∣shop of Rome, as Du Perron affirmed. ibid.
  • He made the Symbol of Nice. Page 302.
    I.
  • FAble of St. James the Apostle beheaded, and his body transported from Jerusalem to Compostella, confuted by Baronius. Page 400
  • The Church of Jerusalem Mother of all Churches. Page 308
  • Jesus Christ, wherein we must imitate him. Page 116
  • He alone was exempt from original sin. Page 129, 130
  • He is the only Mediator. Page 429, &c.
  • Opinions of St. Ignatius rejected by the Ro∣man Church. Page 134
  • Ignorances of Cardinal Du Perron in Scripture.
  • Du Perron esteemed that Jesus Christ spake Greek with his disciples. Page 5
  • He takes the custome to deliver a malefactor at Easter for a tradition. Page 160
  • He takes the Fable of the continual fire upon the Altar confirmed by miracle in the time of the transmigration, for an history. Page 161. 227
  • He calls the Books of the Old Testament a Rabbinical supputation. Page 202
  • And will have the Books of Esdras to have been inclosed within the Ark of the Co∣venant. ibid.
  • He knew not that the immortality of the soul is proved in the Books of Moses. Page 160
  • Another notorious ignorance. Page 228
  • He believed that the Epstle to the Hebrews was written to the Church of Jerusalem peculiarly. ibid.
  • His false opinion that the Epistle to the Gala∣tians was written before that to the Ro∣mans. ibid.
  • He affirmeth that these words, He shall bap∣tize you with the holy Ghost and with fire,Page  [unnumbered] were spoken by Christ, whereas they were spoken by John the Baptist. Page 673
  • Another ignorance. ibid.
  • He knew not whether Christ celebrating the holy Communion with his Disciples was sitting or standing. Page 776
  • He will have Moses and Aaron to have wor∣shipped the stone when they spake to the stone. Page 777
  • Ignorance of the Cardinal in Philosophy.
  • In pag. 17. ad 222. and 385.
  • He was ignorant that all Faith is relative. Page 404
  • He understood not what Councel is. Page 472
  • He believed that the actions of the under∣standing, and the spiritual manducation, are done without the intellect. Page 789
  • He saith that money is a thing not real, but intentional. ibid.
  • He thought that the habits and operations of the intellect are not real. Page 790
  • He teacheth, that from the Genius to the Species, one may argue affirmatively. Page 792
  • He maintains that this word substance signifi∣eth accidents. Page 727
  • He puts two substances in bread; the one in∣ternal and invisible, the other external and visible.
  • Ignorance of the Cardinal in the Greek tongue, and in the Latine Grammar.
  • He knew not that the Aorist of the Greek in∣finitive hath commonly a present significa∣tion. Page 154
  • He interprets 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 and 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉trans∣marinos; whereas it signifieth dwelling by the sea-side and Islanders. Page 310
  • And 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉reverencing, whereas it signi∣nifies thinking. ibid.
  • He believeth that 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, John 1.30. signifi∣eth hath been done. He interprets 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉venerable, whereas it signifieth hoary. Page 275
  • He interprets 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉because, whereas it signi∣fieth although. Page 293
  • He interprets 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉convocate, where∣as it signifieth call, or invite to come. ibid.
  • He interprets fumosum typhum, a smoaky whirlwind, whereas it signifieth the fu∣mous or vain pride. It seems he mistakes 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 for 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 336
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he interprets judgement, whereas in the place which he alledgeth, the word sig∣nifies a vote or advice. Page 337
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translates studious, whereas it signfies expetitus, desired by all, taking 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 for 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 338
  • Concilio evocato, he translates, having convo∣cated a Councel, whereas it signifieth ha∣ving called the Councel to himself, for the Councel was assembled before. Page 347
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, he translates humane things, whereas it signifieth, the men that are upon earth. Page 410
  • A Greek place of Origen ill translated. Page 415
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, he translates, men of good will, whereas it signifieth men with choise or liberty of will. Page 415
  • He corrupts a place of Chrysostome upon Tit. 1. joyning with 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 477
  • He translateth the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 in the Councel of Ancyra, having been received, whereas it signifieth having received, or having obliged themselves with promise, or having undertaken. Page 484
  • He did not understand the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 in the Councel of Nice, which signifieth not uxorem, but associatam, or adjunctam, and that without mariage. Page 485
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translateth, a Priest that hath been married, whereas it signifi∣eth a married Priest. Page 488
  • He hath ill translated the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 490
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translateth, that hath been com∣posed, instead of that is composed. Page 718
  • He mis-interpreteth a place of Theodoret out of ignorance of the Greek phrase. Page 725
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 in Theodorets Dialogues he transla∣teth a beggar, whereas Theodoret meaneth a contributor, or one that payeth his shot. Page 734
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translateth consecration, whereas it signifieth in the Fathers, the shewing of the bread unto the people. Page 774
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translateth then, whereas it signi∣fieth wholly, or altogether, and sometimes lately. Page 775
  • By 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, which signifieth a sacred ceremony, he understands the Sacrament, and by the Sacrament he understands Christ. Page 791
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translateth swallowing, which signifieth consuming or spending ibid.
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translates impiety, instead of ill thoughts, or ill counsel. ibid.
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 he translates are presupposed, instead of assumed. ibid.
  • Posteri he translates posteriours instead of posterity. Page 236
  • Convenire ad Ecclesiam, he translates to agree with the Church, instead of coming from divers parts unto the Church. Page 224
  • Suffragator he translates a giver of advice, whereas it signifieth, one that helpeth with Page  [unnumbered] his vote or intercession. Page 420
  • He knew not that in the figure of Grammar called 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, one of the substantives is put for an adjective. Page 671
  • He understood not the signification of Ar∣chitriclin. Page 705
  • Ignorance in expounding this verse of Vir∣gil, Crimine ab uno disce omnes. Page 742
  • He confounds 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 with 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Page 798
  • Ignorance in Chronology.
  • He took the second convocation of Bishops at Constantinople for the first. Page 308
  • Ignorance in Geography.
  • He saith that Idumea is seated at the West of Judea. Page 385
  • He puts Babylon in Assyria, whereas it is in Chaldea. Page 233
  • Ignorance in Hebrew.
  • He discerned not that sarbet sarbancel are words that signifie nothing in Hebrew, and that we must read in Origines Shebet sar bene el, that is, the scepter of the Prince of Gods children. Page 203
  • Onias he interprets the strength of the people, whereas it signifieth, God is my strength. Page 191
  • Rabbi he interprets many, whereas it signifi∣eth Master and Doctor. Page 321
  • He was mistaken when he put Sammai be∣fore Hillel. Page 156
  • Ignorance in the Fathers and Church-history.
  • He affirmeth ignorantly, that before Hie∣roms time none of the Latine or Western Church rejected the Book of Maccabees. Page 196
  • He mistakes a particular Councel assembled in Italy for the Councel of Sardica. Page 300
  • He mistakes the Councel of Rome under Da∣masus for that of Constantinople, and Theodosius for Gratian. Page 306
  • He affirmeth falsly that Flavianus and Pau∣linus were cited to Rome by the Pope. Page 316
  • And that Chrysostome appealed to Innocent the I. by Letters. Page 320, 321
  • He understood not that word of transmari∣nas Ecclesias in the 162. Episte of St. Austin. Page 304
  • He thought that the Councels of Christians gave Laws to the Pagans. Page 405
  • That Christ spake Greek, and used the word 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 among his disciples. Page 5
  • That in the ancient Church an inferiour could not excommunicate one greater then himself. Page 244
  • That all the Churches of the Empire were called suburbicary. Extream ignorance! Page 273, 274
  • He mistakes one Alnulfus for another. Page 330
  • He falsly supposeth that the Council of Sar∣dica was held part, or an Appendix of the Council of Nice. Page 298, 334
  • And that the Roman Church cited the Ca∣nons of Sardica, as belonging to the Council of Nice. Page 334
  • Great ignorance in History, to believe that the Bishop of Rome in St. Austins time had the power to send bands of souldiers into Africa. Page 336
  • He saith that a Bishop of Alexandria was ab∣sent, when the same was dead, and his See vacant. Page 371
  • Ignorance about the names of Emperours, set in the title of Imperial Laws. Page 363
  • He confoundeth the whole History of Sylve∣rius and Vigilius, and makes the Eutychi∣an letters of Vigilius to be written before the death of Sylverius, though they were written a long time after. Page 385
  • He was ignorant of the origine of Lent, and of the sense of the word Quadragesima. Page 517
  • He knew not what women were those Asso∣ciate or Adjoyned, that are mentioned in the Councel of Nice. Page 485
  • Against all reason and likelyhood he makes the first Councel of Constantinople, which was universal, to be but an Appendix of the Councel of Rome, which was particu∣lar. Page 306
  • Images of God made by the ancient Hereticks. Page 39
  • Images of God. The old Heathen Romans had no Images of God, for the space of 170. years. Page 436
  • It is but lately that the Roman Church hath begun to make images of God. Page 437, 438
  • Impious excuses brought for that. In what habit God is represented. Page 438
  • The Emperour Adrian built Churches with∣out images for Christians. Page 441
  • The Heathen excused their images with the same reasons as are used now in the Ro∣man Church. Page 39
  • The Heathen called Images the books of Ide∣ots. Page 39 449, 450.
  • The attire of Images is derived from Paga∣nism. Page 51
  • Of the words Image and Idol. Page 437
  • The Jews have abhorred Images ever since they returned from the Captivity of Ba∣bylon. Page 439
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • The ancient Christians had neither Images nor Painters. Page 440
  • The Eliberin Council prohibits Images, and is therefore taxed by Melchior Canus of imprudence and impiety. Page 441
  • They are condemned also by the Council of Franckford. Page 445
  • And by that of Paris. ibid.
  • Eusebius calls the images of Cesarea a Pagan custom. Page 442
  • Epiphanius, Ambrose, Hierom, Austin, con∣demn images, Page 442, &c.
  • We object the same things as the Fathers did against the images of God and Saints. Page 442
  • The second Council of Nice commands the adoration of Images. Page 445
  • Paps of flesh grow upon the image of the Virgin Mary. Page 635
  • The eighth Council of Constantinople com∣mands that the image of Jesus Christ be a∣dored. Page 27
  • The Doctors of the Roman Church will have us to adore the Cross with the cult of La∣tria. Page 446
  • Birth and progress of Images. Page 451, 452
  • What moved the Popes to be Patrons of I∣mages. Page 452
  • Image of Jesus Christ in Cesarea of Philippi. ibid.
  • Reasons of the Roman Church for the ado∣ration of Images. Page 448
  • Custom of covering images in Lent, whence it came. Page 771
  • Why Images were removed from the Temples of the Reformed Churches. Page 811, 812
  • Immortality of the soul, proved out of the five Books of Moses against Du Perron. Page 160
  • Impossibility of being without sin, doth not excuse the sinner. Page 474
  • Incense in Churches, Lactantius and Arnobius despise it and jear it. Page 444
  • Of Indulgences and treasure of the Church. Page 463, &c.
  • Horrible abuse in Indulgences. Page 464
  • What a plenary indulgence is. ibid.
  • Indulgences disgrace and clip the benefit of Christ. Page 467, 468
  • Many Doctors of the Roman Church con∣fess that the doctrine of Indulgences is new and unknown to Antiquity. Page 466, 467
  • Why the Ancients speak so seldom of Indul∣gences, and the new Doctors so often. Page 466
  • Signification of the word indulgence in the ancient Church. Page 568
  • Indulgences to the dead by way of suffrages. Page 579
  • Judgement of Cajetan, Roffensis, and Na∣varrus about Indulgences. Page 580
  • Effect of Indulgences. Page 621
  • Innocent the first, Bishop of Rome, did not make himself judge of the cause of Chry∣sostom, and could not help him. Page 320
  • His Deputies to the Emperour are sent back with contempt. ibid.
  • He never excommunicated the Emperour Arcadius, nor Eudoxia his wife. Page 321
  • He excommunicates Atticus Patriarch of Con∣stantinople, who kept his place nothing the less. Page 323
  • His Epistles inserted among those of Austin, are absurd and suspected of falshood. Page 342
  • Errour of Innocent about the necessity of administring the Eucharist to infants, Page 343, 344
  • His ignorance and his Decretal forbidding Clerks to marry. Page 207
  • Innocent the third Excommunicates John King of England, deposeth him and puts England in interdict; bestoweth it upon Philip August, upon condition of conquer∣ing it. He receiveth homage from King John, and makes England a Fee of the Roman Church, and the King his vassal. Page 636, &c.
  • He publisheth the Croisada between the Waldenses and Albigenses. Page 638
  • He excommunicates the Barons of England. Page 639
  • He assembleth the Council of Lateran where Transubstantiation is establisht, and the power of dispossessing Princes is attribu∣ted to the Pope, and a degree of glory in Paradise is given above other Saints to them that should cross themselves for the voyage of Syria. Page 639. 28, 29
  • His ignorance in deriving the word Pascha from passion. Page 168
  • He saith that the suffrage of Saints is neces∣sary to us. Page 418
  • He did not believe the absolute necessity of the Baptism of water. Page 670
  • Innocent the fourth his Wardrobe is burnt, and in it his Charter of England. Page 649
  • His arrogant words against the Kings of France and England. Page 649
  • He makes a Sermon at Lions. ibid.
  • He deposeth the Emperour Frederick the second. Page 650
  • His death. Page 657
  • Intention requisite in him that conferreth the Sacrament. Page 108, 109, 576, 674
  • Intention habitual or virtual. Page 802
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • What the Interdict is in the Roman Church. France put under an interdict, by Pope Julius the second. Page 33
  • An Interdict put upon Normandy by Walter Archbishop of Roven for the space of two years. Page 635
  • The person of Lewis the seventh of France put under an interdict by Pope Eugenius. Page 632
  • An interdict put upon England. Page 636
  • The Roman Church is not an infallible inter∣preter of Scripture. Page 64. &c.
  • Two sorts of judges of the sense of Scrip∣ture. Page 65
  • Many things in Scripture need no interpre∣tation. Page 64
  • Seven differences between our interpretati∣ons, and them of the Roman Church. Page 67
  • Impious and profane interpretations of the Roman Church. Page 68
  • Investitures causes of great troubles under the Papal Empire. Page 33. 629, 630, &c.
  • Pope Paschal yieldeth the investitures to the Emperour Henry the fifth. Page 632
  • Invocation of Saints. See Saints.
  • Du Perron confesseth that in the Fathers be∣fore the first Council, no invocation of Saints is to be found. Page 409. 388
  • Difference between the Intercession and the invocating of Saints, and that Du Perron confounds those two things. ibid.
  • Paction of Cyprian with Cornelius that the first deceased should pray for the outliver. Page 393
  • That Saints must not be invocated, Page 402, &c.
  • Invocation of Saints condemned by the Fa∣thers. Page 406, &c.
  • Especially by Origen. Page 407, 411, &c.
  • Chrysostom contrary to it. Page 420, &c.
  • Some places in Chrysostom falsified to esta∣blish the invocation of Saints. Page 422, 423
  • Athanasius contrary to praying to Saints and Angels. Page 423, &c.
  • Austin contrary to the invocation of Saints. Page 424
  • And Epiphanius. Page 425, &c.
  • And Hierome. Page 426
  • John King of England quarrels with Pope Innocent the third, about the election of an Archbishop. Page 636
  • John deposed by the Pope, and his Kingdom given to Philip August for the remission of his sins. ibid.
  • King John humbleth himself, and makes his Crown tributary to the Pope. Page 637
    • He makes homage to the Pope. ibid.
  • Kneels before the Archbishop to obtain ab∣solution. Page 638
  • Sends to Admiral Murmelin Mahumetan to crave help against the Popes oppression. Page 638
  • He makes a second Homage, and gets the Charter renewed, which is sealed with gold. ibid.
  • Pope John the tenth, a man of prodigious wickedness. Page 101
  • John the twelfth deposed by the Emperour Otho for his crimes. Page 101
  • Taken in adultery, and so beaten by the De∣vil, that he dyeth of it. ibid.
  • Createth infants Bishops; Drinks the Devils health, &c. ibid.
  • John the fifteenth, having killed two Popes, gets the Popedom by violence and bribery. Page 102
  • John the eighteenth buyeth the Popedom. ibid.
  • John the two and twentieth, electeth him∣self Pope. Page 106
  • Denieth that souls see God before the re∣surrection. Page 106
  • He is excused by Bellarmine. Page 393
  • John the three and twentieth, deposed. He denied the immortality of the soul. Page 99
  • John of Antioch deposeth Cyrillus of Alex∣andria, and Cyrillus in revenge deposeth him. Page 349
  • Josephus makes Hercules, the Monster killer, son in Law to one of Abrahams daughters. Page 187
  • Irenaeus, some of his opinions not approved by the Church of Rome. Page 136
  • Du Perron in the fifth chap. of the fourth Ob∣servation against King James, p. 719. saith that Ireneus said such things, which had he said in our days, he should be held an Arrian. ibid.
  • A man is irregular if he cannot drink wine, or if he be gelded, not if he be a Sodo∣mite. Page 564
  • The Jubilee was instituted by Pope Boniface the eighth. Page 29
  • It is the most famous, and the most lucrative Fair of Babylon. Page 29
  • The Book of Judith is fabulous. Absurdities of the said Book. Page 178, &c.
  • It is not Canonical. ibid.
  • Julius the first, Bishop of Rome, chosen Ar∣bitrator in the cause of Athanasius against the Oriental Bishops, abuseth his autho∣rity. Page 290, &c.
  • The Oriental Bishops rebuke him for his au∣daciousness. Page 291
  • And tell him that all Bishops are equal. Page 291
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Justin Martyr his opinions, in which he is dissenting from the Roman Church. Page 131
  • Justin the Emperour makes the Patriarchs of Constantinople to bow under the Bishop of Rome, and causeth the name of Acacius to be rased out of the Diptychs of Con∣stantinople. Page 379
  • Justification by faith alone, is odious to the Roman Church. Page 132
  • The Emperour Justinian made many Laws and Constitutions about Christian Faith and Ecclesiastical Policy. Page 380
    K.
  • OF killing Kings rather then reveal a Confession. Page 542. &c.
  • Kings and Emperours degraded and deposed, and their Crowns enslaved by Popes. Page 545
  • The Council of Constance speaks not of Kings, and secureth not their life. Page 546
  • The power of Kings is of divine institution. Page 548
  • By the Kingdom of heaven often the Church is understood. And the keys of the King∣dom of heaven are the power to Govern the Church. Page 556, 557
  • Two sorts of keys in the word of God. Page 556, 557
  • The key of the Kingdom of heaven signifie the Government of the Church. Page 557
  • Abuse of the keys in the Roman Church. Page 573, &c.
  • The power of the keys is given to all the A∣postles. Page 224
    L.
  • LActantius his opinions in which the Ro∣man Church dissents from him. Page 142
  • He condemneth Images. Page 441
  • He calls them great puppets before whom incense is burnt. Page 444
  • Latria and Dulia, in what sense St. Austin ust that distinction. Page 431
  • The Roman Church in the Psalter of the Vir∣gin Mary deferreth unto her the service of Latria. Page 434
  • Absurdities of the distinction of Latria and Dulia. Page 446, 447
  • The Narrative of Lazarus and Dives is not an History but a Parable. Page 399
  • Lent is not instituted by God. Page 515
  • Texts of Scripture upon which Du Perron groundeth Lent. Page 515, &c.
  • True origine of Lent. Page 516
  • Diversity of customs about Lent. Page 517, &c.
  • Lent is little observed by the Pope, and Car∣dinals. Page 521
  • The Emperour Leo makes a Law that the Church of Constantinople be the first of all Churches. Page 363
  • Leo the ninth Pope is overcome in battel, and taken. Page 103
  • Liberius Bishop of Rome submitteth himself to Athanasius. Page 301
  • He is sent into exile by the Emperour. ibid.
  • He fell into the Heresie of the Arians, and subscribed their confession. ibid.
  • The Limbus of infants came from the Pela∣gians. Page 44
  • Confutation of Limbus. Page 669, &c.
  • A Bishop of Lincoln cals the Pope Antichrist, and detesteth the Roman Court. His Let∣ters to Pope Innocent the fourth. Words of indignation of the Pope against him. Being dead he appeareth by night to Pope Innocent the fourth, who dieth out of fright at that apparition. Page 656, 657
  • Linus first Bishop of Rome after St. Peter. Page 240
  • Liturgie of Ethiopia described out of Al∣varez. Page 775
  • Lewis the seventh of France, excommuni∣cated by Pope Eugenius, and his person put under an interdict. His oath upon re∣licks. Of which oath he is absolved by Ber∣nard Abbot of Clervaux. His unfortunate voyage into the Levant. Page 632
  • He passeth into England to visit the relicks of Thomas Becket. Page 635
  • His vows and prayers to Thomas to avoid the perils of the sea. ibid.
  • Lewis the eighth of France, son to Philip August passeth into England to the help of the Barons. Page 640
  • Lewis the ninth stops the moneys levied in France by the Pope. Page 646
  • He buyeth with a great summ of money the crown of thorns from Baldwin Emperor of Constantinople, and from the Venetians a piece of the true Cross. Page 446
  • He meets with Pope Innocent the fourth at Clugny, and another time at Lyons, whence the King returneth with great in∣dignation. Page 650, 651
  • The Pope gives him leave to levy upon the Clergy the tenth part of their revenue. And he to requite him, giveth the Pope leave to levy the twentieth part for three years. Page 652
  • He prohibits the Popes exactions, and sends back his Legats with division. Page 653
  • He imbarques himself at Marseille for the voyage of the Holy Land. Ill success of his affairs. His imprisonment. The mourn∣ing Page  [unnumbered] of France, which at the same time is exhausted with the Popes exactions, who thereby hindereth the Kings relief. Page 654, 655
  • Lamentation of the French people. ibid.
  • Lewis the ninth commandeth that the Pope be expelled out of Lions. Page 655
  • Lewis the twelfth assembleth a Council at Pisa against Pope Julius the second. Page 33
  • Lewis Vives complaineth of the superstition of Christians about serving the Saints. Page 429
  • The Moral Law is nothing else but the Law of Nature. Page 439
  • Confutation of the Looking Glass in the es∣sence or face of God. Page 388, 389
    M
  • THe Book of Maccabees is fabulous, and full of absurdities. Page 185, &c.
  • St Paul excuseth not the lowness of his stile, as the Author of the second book of Mac∣cabees. Page 190
  • Opinion of Gregory the first, about the Mac∣cabees. Page 207
  • Christ, Joh. 6. speaks not of the Sacrament, or of oral manducation. Page 705
  • Comparison between the corporal and the spiritual manducation. Page 708
  • The oral manducation exposeth Christ to contempt, and is full of contradictions. Page 708, 709
  • All the Fathers acknowledge a spiritual man∣ducation of Christ, and reject the corpo∣rall. Page 751
  • St. Austin more then any. Page 752, 753
  • The wicked eat not the flesh of the Lord. Page 754, 755
  • The Fathers of the Old Testament ate the same meat as we do. Page 760
  • The Fathers acknowledge the same participa∣tion to the body of Christ in Baptism, as in the Lords Supper. Page 767
  • The Spiritual manducation is real. Page 791
  • Christ in the Communion is eaten and ap∣prehended by faith in the Sacrament as dying for us. Page 790
  • Reason why the Fathers never speak of eat∣ing the Godhead. ibid.
  • Manfred Son to Frederick the second, de∣feats the Popes Army, who causeth the Croisada to be preacht against him. Page 657
  • St. Margaret never was in the world. Page 400
  • Marosia and Theodora, Harlots, have long ruled the Papal See. Page 99
  • Marriage. See Celibat.
  • The dissolution of Marriages sprung from ancient Hereticks. Page 50
  • They that have not the gift of continence, ought to marry. Page 469 &c.
  • Prophets and Apostles married. Page 470. &c.
  • Mrriage cleared from the disgrace which Du Perron puts upon it. Page 470, 476
  • Marriage of Clerks approved by the Coun∣cil of Nice. Page 484
  • Baronius and Du Perron confesse that in the time of the Apostles, Bishops were mar∣ried. Page 478
  • Marriage of Clerks approved by the Elibe∣rin Council. Page 487
  • And by that of Gangra. Page 488
  • And by the Emperour Constantine. Page 488
  • And by Syricius, Socrates, Hierome. Page 488, 489
  • And by Epiphanius Page 489, 490
  • And by Athanasius, Theodoret, Austin, Pope Pelagius, Isidorus. By the Council of Anjou, and by that of Trulla. And by Pope Gregory the first. Page 490, 491, 492
  • Examples of Bishops married. Page 492, &c.
  • Synesius Bishop of Cyrene married. Page 493
  • Confession of the Adversaries. Page 494, 495
  • The marriage of Clerks is hold less tolerable in the Roman Church then fornication and Sodomy. Page 479
  • St. Martial a supposititious Saint that ne∣ver was, is put in the number of the A∣postles by that intruder and wicked Pope, John the twentieth. Page 103. 399
  • Pope Martin the fifth, his proud titles. Page 32
  • Another Martin is the plague of England, the executioner of the Popes horrible ex∣actions and extortions in England. Page 648
  • The Mass is contrary to Christs institution. Page 37
  • Impious prayer in the Mass. Page 413
  • One cannot tell what the Priest breaks in the Mass. Page 696
  • Nor what is poured in it. Page 698
  • Of the two cups. Luke 22. Page 699, 670
  • Opposition of the Mass with the Lords Supper. Page 701
  • Examination of the Mass by the Institution of the Lords Supper. Page 702, &c.
  • That Mass which is called Secret, was un∣known in the ancient Church. Page 146
  • The Sacrifice of the Mass serves only to re∣mit the temporal pain of sins already pardoned. Page 683
  • Why part of the Mass is said in a low voice, and with a deep silence. Page 747
  • Why the Mass is said in Latine. Page 828, &c.
  • Clauses of the Mass which would offend the hearers if they were understood. Page 828, 829, &c.
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • In the Mass Christ is compared to a beast. Page 829
  • The Canon of the Mass is contrary to tran∣substantiation. Page 730
  • Efficacy of the Mass ex opere operato. Page 802
  • Private Masses are contrary to Christs in∣stitution, to the practice of the ancient Church, to the Canons of the Roman Church, and to the very words of the Mass. Page 804
  • Shamefull traffick of private Masses. Page 804, 805
  • Miracles are no marks of the true Church. Page 114
  • Of the miracles of Hereticks. Page 114
  • Of false miracles. Page 115
  • The Government of the Universal Church must not and cannot be Monarchical. Page 211. &c.
  • Monks, when the Monastical profession be∣gan at Rome and in Gauls, and by whom. Page 318
  • Monks of Syria and Egypt Anthropomor∣phites. Page 501
  • Their origine and discipline. Page 500
  • Their rules grounded upon Scripture curi∣ously applied. Page 501
  • They durst not piss without leave. Page 501
  • Were beaten by the devil. ibid.
  • Their beginning at Rome. Page 501
  • The people of Rome abhorred them. Page 502
  • The Montanists were authors of austere fasts. They disputed with the Orthodox Chri∣stians with the same reasons that the Ro∣manists use against us. Page 507
  • The multitude and large extent is not a mark of the true Church. Page 111
  • Du Perrons reason against us for it. Page 113, 114
  • The mysterie of the Sacrament was hid to the Penitents and Catechumens. Page 146
  • The Church ought not to be troubled about a question of meats. Page 505
  • Abstinence from meat is a weakness. Page 506
  • Distinction of meats abolisht by the Apostle. Page 506, 507
  • Yet we must use it to edification. ibid.
  • Ancient Hereticks excused their distinction of meats with the very reasons of the Ro∣man Church. Page 508
  • Of the prohibition of blood, and things strangled. ibid.
  • The Council of Ancyra forbids abstinence from flesh. Page 509
  • Meats unclean by the Popes judgement. Page 512
    N.
  • Navarrus his judgement concerning Indul∣gences. Page 579
  • Nectarius is created Patriarch of Constanti∣nople without the advice of the Patriach of Rome. Page 308
  • He abolisheth the Penitentiary Priest and the secret Confessions without the advice of the Bishop of Rome. Page 311
  • Nestorius being Patriarch of Constantinople, governeth the Church of all the world. His heresie and his condemnation. Page 346
  • He is banisht by the Emperour by the advice of John of Antioch. Page 352
  • Nicolas the first Pope denieth the truth to be in the multitude. Page 112
  • He falsifieth a Canon of the Council of Chal∣cedon. Page 359
  • He abuseth Scripture to maintain the Popes primacy. Page 360
  • He attributes to Christ infirm actions. Page 504
  • Pope Nicolas the second, reduceth the Church of Milan to his obedience, and takes from the Clerks their wives, Anno Christi, MLVIII. Page 314
  • Novatus and Novatianus, both of them Schismaticks. Page 247
  • Novatian chosen Bishop of Rome by a clan∣destine election. Page 247, &c.
  • He admitteth not those that are fallen to a publick penitence. Page 661
  • An Interdict put upon Normandy, for the space of two years by Walter Archbishop of Roven. Conditions of agreement be∣tween him and King Richard. Page 635
    O.
  • THe Ambrosian Office different from the Roman. Page 313
  • And was more esteemed then the Roman for a great while: till the year 771. when Pope Adrian condemned the Ambrosi∣an Office. Page 313
  • A trial of both the Offices by a miracle. ibid.
  • The Ambrosian office lasted till the time of Charlemain. Page 845
  • The Mozarabick Office abolisht in Spain a∣bout the year, MLXXX. and the Roman establisht. Page 314, 845
  • Oath. The Roman Church swearing by the Creatures, imitateth the ancient Here∣ticks. Page 44
  • The ancient Christians did not swearPage  [unnumbered] at all. Page 128
  • The Pope dispenseth from Oaths. Page 27, 99
  • How religiously an oath ought to be kept. Page 100
  • Oath of Bishops in their consecration. Page 37
  • Offerings of the people upon the holy Table, and how they were disposed. Page 768
  • The Form of the Ordination of Readers in the Roman Church. Page 825
  • The holy Orders in the Roman Church, how uncertain, being grounded upon the inten∣tion of him that conferreth them. Page 108
  • Origen is against the invocation of crea∣tures. Page 411
  • Judgement of the ancient Church about O∣rigen. Page 411, 412
  • None of his adversaries ever blamed him for rejecting Images, and Transubstantiation, and invocation of creatures. Page 412
  • Praises of Origens Books against Celsus. Page 413
  • He rejects Images. Page 441
  • And Transubstantiation. Page 723
  • Du Perron is very sharp against him. Page 411, 724
  • The Ossenian hereticks taught to pray in dark words. Page 810, 811
    P
  • PAganism and Papism how like. Page 52, 53
  • God never forgiveth the fault, but he remits the pain. It is false that in sin there is both poena & culpa. Page 595
  • Three sorts of pain. Page 592
  • Pain of loss, and pain of sense. Page 669
  • How the Archiepiscopal Pall is made, and for how much it is sold. Page 110
  • Councel of Paphnutius Bishop of Thebaid, about the mariage of Priests, followed by the first Councel of Nice. Page 484.
  • In what sense Pastors forgive sins. Page 551, &c.
  • The repenting sinner hath obtained pardon of God before he presents himself before the Priest. Page 552
  • Pastors cannot forgive sins in Gods judge∣ment. Page 555
  • Confession of the Adversaries. Page 563, 570
  • Testimony of Fathers. Page 567, &c.
  • Pardon of sins in the Roman Church is sepa∣rated from the preaching of the Gospel. Page 577
  • Pardon upon condition of committing some wicked act. Page 587, 588
  • God pardoneth not by halfs. Page 593
  • Parish. What that word signifieth in the an∣cient Church. Page 366, 367
  • Pope Paschates the II. his cruelty to Henry the IV. How Henry the V. used him, and made him quit the investiture. Page 104, 632
  • Four Patriarchs equal in power, pretending that to each of them belonged the care of all the Churches of the Empire. Page 295
  • Each of them qualified Head of the universal Church. Page 295
  • All of them together held for one Head of the Universal Church of the Empire. Page 296
  • What the Patriarchs were. Page 366, 341
  • Their Order changed in the I. Councel of Constantinople. Page 308
  • And in that of Chalcedon without the advice of the Bishop of Rome. Page 367
  • Paulin and Flavian competitors of the Bi∣shoprick of Antioch. Page 316
  • Popery imitates Pelagianism. Page 43
  • Africa troubled by the heresie of Pelagius and Celestius. Page 324
  • Signification of the word Penitence in holy Scripture. Page 658 &c.
  • In the Fathers the word Penitence is found in the singular number only. Page 661
  • The Fathers call publick penitence exomologe∣sis, and a second plank after the shipwrack. ibid.
  • The Fathers take the word Penitence two wayes. Page 660
  • Four degrees of Penitence in the ancient Church. Page 524, 525.
  • The ordering of publick penitence in the an∣cient Church. ibid.
  • The penitence of the Ancients how different from that of the Church of Rome. Page 353, 610, 611, 146, 147
  • The Fathers speak not of secret absolution. Page 553
  • When bodily penance was first exchanged for pecuniary. Page 104
  • Extravagant penances. Page 585. &c.
  • To whip ones self singing. Page 586
  • Penitence without satisfaction. Page 587
  • Redeem satisfaction with money. ibid.
  • The way how to be dispensed from penances imposed by the Priest. Page 612
  • Leo the X. condemneth Luther for saying that a new life is the best penitence. Page 659
  • Amendment of life is better then bodily pe∣nances. Page 659
  • The Novatians admitted not those that were fallen to publick penance. Page 661
  • Tertullian and Ambrose were of opinion that penitence can be done but once. ibid.
  • Impious penances. Page 587, 588
  • Of the Sacrament of Penitence. Page 555
  • It is very lucrative to the Church of Rome. Page 673
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Du Perron placing the Sacrament of Penitence in the Absolution only, contradicteth the Councels of Florence and Trent. Page 533
  • The parts of the pretended Sacrament of Penitence are no Sacraments, nor parts of a Sacrament. Page 534
  • Davids penitence was no Sacrament. ibid.
  • There is no Sacrament of penitence. Page 635. &c.
  • In the 20. of Joh. ver. 23. Whose sins soever you pardon, &c. the Sacrament of penitence is not instituted. Page 552, 553
  • The Jesuit Pererius opposeth the consent of the Fathers upon the point of Predestina∣tion. Page 127
  • Du Perron his Journey to Rome. Page 109
  • His behaviour in the States of Paris. Page 544
  • Summary of his Speech to the States. Page 545
  • His ignorance in correcting Erasmus and Calvin. Page 232
  • His ridiculous distinction between the nego∣tiating and the judiciary person of the Pope. Page 329
  • He saith that God marketh or sealeth the E∣lect, not in them, but in himself. Page 9
  • He saith that the merit of Faith is greater, where there is less intelligence. Page 46
  • He confesseth that by the communion under one kind, the signification of the Sacra∣ment is diminished. Page 802
  • He makes bold to condemn all the Bishops of Africa, among whom were those holy men, Aurelius and Austin. Page 335
  • He blames the Emperour Constantine for not deferring enough to the Pope. Page 339
  • The absurd interpretation which he giveth to the 8th. Canon of Chalcedon. Page 372, 373
  • Notorious absurdities of Du Perron upon the prayer for the dead in the Mass. Page 458
  • He frameth an absolute Faith and a relative Faith; a Faith Theological, and a Faith not Theological. Page 433
  • He alledgeth Scripture in derision of Lent. Page 515, 516
  • His absurd proofs for St. Peters Primacy. Page 235, 236
  • He saith that the word substance signifieth the accidents. Page 727
  • He speaks of St. Austins Treatises upon St. John with contempt. Page 758
  • He disputes against St. Austin. Page 762
  • He proves by the Quatrains of Pibrac, that the Apostles sitting at the Table adored the hoast. Page 776
  • He holds that the spiritual manducation is done without the soul. Page 789
  • His manner of disputing, and what con∣troversies he avoids with all his pow∣er. Page 550, 551
  • He saith that God, after the Consecration, preserveth the bread in the universal lati∣tude of being. Page 720, 721
  • To excuse that Prayer on the Mass for the souls that sleep in peace, he saith that they sleep in peace, not in regard of themselves, but in regard of the Church. Page 458
  • He calls Purgatory a Metaphorical fire. Page 460
  • He accuseth Scripture of absurdities. Page 160
  • He saith that the greater the ignorance is, the greater is the merit of Faith. Page 812
  • Impious doctrines of Card. Du Perron.
  • His impious Exposition of the Text Tu es Petrus, &c. Page 221
  • He accuseth the Apostles of ignorance. ibid.
  • He saith that this proposition, The Church is founded upon Christ, is not a propositi∣on of perpetual truth, and that it was not from the beginning. Page 221, 222
  • He makes two sorts of Christian Faith, abso∣lute and relative. Page 404
  • He accuseth the Fathers of dissimulation and hypocrisie. Page 413
  • He saith that one should suffer his King to be killed, yea and Christ himself, rather then reveal a Confession. Page 543
  • He maintaineth that the Church hath autho∣rity to change the Commandements of God, and to dispense from them 70. Page 795 797
  • And that the Church may add unto Scrip∣ture. Page 148, 149
  • He makes two sorts of redemption of our souls; the one original, the other appli∣cative. Page 691
  • He maintains that in the Books of Moses the immortality of the soul is not to be found. Page 160
  • He hath gathered all the absurdities that he could pick out of Scripture. Page 175
  • He maintains that the precept of the Apo∣stle, Let the Bishop be husband of one wife, was but for a time. Page 478
  • In the same manner as in his Speech to the States of Paris, he maintained that the A∣postles command, Let every soul be subject to the higher powers, was but provisional. Page 548
  • He saith that the Sacraments of the old Te∣stament were but vain monuments and cenotaphia. Page 763
  • St. Peter had no Successor in his power over the Universal Church. Page 95
  • Comparison of St. Peter and the Pope. Page 97. &c.
  • St. Peter had no power of jurisdiction over Page  [unnumbered] the other Apostles; and in what sense he was the first among them. Page 214
  • Authorities of Fathers upon that subject. Page 216, &c.
  • Examination of the Text, Thou art Peter. Page 218. &c.
  • And of this, Simon lovest thou me? Page 224
  • How St. Peter is the foundation of the Church. Page 220, 221
  • Of St. Peters fabulous combat with Simon Magus. Page 227, 228
  • Fables about the death and form of punish∣ment, and burial of St. Peter. Page 230
  • Athanasius saith, that his throat was cut, not that he was crucified. Page 230
  • The next successors of St. Peter at Rome are doubtfull. ibid.
  • Absurd proofs of Du Perron for the Popes primacy. Page 232, &c.
  • It matters not for the Popes primacy, whe∣ther St. Peter was at Rome, or died there. Page 226
  • Reasons that make us doubt of St. Peters abode at Rome. Page 227, &c.
  • The time of his abode at Antioch and Rome cannot be found. Page 232. 233.
  • Three Chairs of St. Peter, and all three equal, by the confession of Gregory the first. Page 226
  • St. Petronel St. Peters daughter. Page 470
  • Petrus Rubeus raiseth three thousand pounds for the Pope in Scotland. Page 647
  • Popery imitates Pharisaism. Page 42, 43
  • Pharisees and Scribes were not the same or∣der. Page 156
  • Philip August King of France hath England given him by Pope Innocent the third, for the remission of his sins, upon condition of conquering the same, with his own costs and danger. Page 636, 637
  • He raiseth for that end a powerfull Army, but is prohibited to go on that work by the Pope, who doth not defray his char∣ges. Page 637, 638
  • His generous language, upon that the Pope called England his patrimony. Page 638
  • Against the Popes will he sends his son Lewis to help the English Barons. Page 640
  • The Emperour Phocas peferreth the prima∣cy to Boniface the third. His parricide ap∣proved by Pope Gregory the first. Page 381
  • Pope Pius the second acknowledgeth, that in the first Ages the Roman Church was little regarded. Page 245
  • He confesseth that the ancient Councils were convocated without the Popes authority. Page 251, 252
  • His opinion is, that wives should be restored unto Clerks. Page 495
  • Polycarpus Bishop of Smyrna comes to Rome and conferreth with Anicetus Bishop of Rome. Page 242
  • Being dead a Martyr, the Jews fear lest he be adored by the Christians. Page 406, 407
  • Polycrates Bishop of Ephesus resisteth Victor Bishop of Rome. Page 242
  • The title of Summus Pontifex was one of the titles of the Pagan Emperors: Gra∣tian the Emperor quits it. Page 311
  • True source and origine of the Popes prima∣cy. Page 367
  • Usurpation, and proud titles of Popes. Page 584.
  • Arrogant titles of Martin the fifth. Page 32
  • Aurelius Bishop of Carthage is called the holy Pope, and his Holiness. Page 329
  • The Popes power over the temporal of Princes establisht by the Council of La∣teran. Page 28
  • In what time the Pope began to raise his tem∣poral power. Page 323, 324
  • By what means the Popes have increased their temporal Empire. Page 629
  • The Popes dispense from keeping oaths. Page 72, 99, 100
  • The title of God ascribed to the Pope, and the right of Canonizations, and the kissing of his feet, come from the Pagan Empe∣rors. Page 50
  • The Popes give a glory to some above the other Saints, and bear themselves as accu∣sers in the day of Judgement. Page 29
  • They dispense of the precept, Poenitentiam agite. Page 575
  • They dispense against the Apostle, and change the commandments of God. Page 37, 71, 564
  • The Pope is called the foundation of the Church. Page 97
  • He assumeth the power of adding to the Symbol. Page 148
  • Impious titles that Thomas Aquinas gives to the Pope. Page 573
  • Why the Popes would never be present at Universal Councils. Page 349
  • Why Popes entring to the Popedom, and ta∣king a new name, never take the name of Peter; yea if one had the name of Peter before he was Pope, he leaveth it. Page 98
  • Two Popes, Liberius and Felix, sitting toge∣ther without a Schism, in the Bishop of Romes Chair. Page 302
  • The Pope is not Successor of St. Peter in the quality of Apostle, or head of the Univer∣sal Church. Page 95, 96, 213, &c.
  • The first Bishops of Rome were elected by the Page  [unnumbered] suffrages of the people. Page 240
  • Comparison of the Popes of this time with the ancient Bishops of Rome. Page 98, 99
  • All the Countryes that Princes conquer to the Christian Faith by force of arms, are challenged by the Pope as his. Page 632
  • Popes deposed by the Emperours of Germany. Page 101
  • Three Popes deposed in the Councel of Con∣stance, An. 1414. Page 107
  • Height of the greatness and glory of Popes. Page 98
  • Two Popes, Adrian the IV. and Marcel. II. confess that a Pope cannot be saved. Page 108
  • Popes excommunicated by other Bishops. Page 360, 361
  • The Pope dying asketh absolution of his Con∣fessor. Page 565
  • The Pope forgiveth himself. Page 574
  • Impiety of Navarrus, saying that the Pope may sell the remission of sins. Page 578, 579
  • Popes Hereticks, erreneous, Idolaters.
  • Liberius and Felix Bishops of Rome, Arians. Page 302
  • Innocent the I. erreth in his opinion that the Eucharist is necessary to infants. Page 99
  • Boniface by his Legats brings forth false Ca∣nons in the VI. Councel of Carthage. Page 329, 330
  • Pope Leo's Legats bring forth in the Councel of Chalcedon a falsified Canon of Nice. Page 369
  • A false and supposititious Epistle of the Coun∣cel of Chalcedon to Leo forged in the Popes favour. Page 374
  • Real Presence in the Eucharist, and Transub∣stantiation.
  • Exposition of these words, This is my body. Page 701
  • How many figures the Romanists forge in this matter. Ibid.
  • Circumstances of the action of the Lords Supper contrary to Transubstantiation. Page 702, &c.
  • The end of the Sacrament overthrown by Transubstantiation. Page 709
  • Testimony of the Fathers. Page 710, 723, &c.
  • The word Transubstantiation establisht in the year 1214. Page 723
  • Of what change the Fathers speak. Page 723
  • Canon of the Mass contrary to Transubstan∣tiation. Page 730
  • The Fathers call the consecrated bread and wine, signs, figures, tyes, and Symboles. Page 572
  • Councels contrary to Transubstantiation. Page 745
  • A Canon of the third Councel of Carthage contrary to Transubstantiation. Ibid.
  • The seventh Councel of Constantinople con∣trary to Transubstantiation. Page 746
  • The High Priest of the Church of Israel was a figure of Christ our High Priest. Page 212
  • The calling of Priests. Corruption of their charge. Page 89, 94
  • A Priest being in mortal sin, may yet give ab∣solution. Page 565
  • Priests have not the power to impose bodily or pecuniary pains. Page 611
  • The penitentiary Priest abolisht by Necta∣rius. Page 528
  • Du Perron did not understand that History. Page 529
  • We are sooner heard by our prayers then by the intercession of others. Page 423
  • What Prayer is. Page 814
  • Prayer must be made with faith and intelli∣gence. Page 814, 815
  • Excellent art of the Prayer that Christ gave to his Disciples. Page 815
  • Prayer for the dead in the ancient Church was done for another end then to fetch souls out of Purgatory. Page 455, &c.
  • The ancient Church prayed for the Saints, Martyrs, &c. Page 456, 457
  • Epiphanius expounding the utility of prayer for the dead, saith nothing of Purgatory. Page 457
  • The prayer in the Mass for them that sleep, and how Du Perron excuseth it. Page 458
  • End for which the Ancients prayed for the dead. Page 458, 459, &c.
  • Ancient prayers for those whom they believ∣ed not to be in torment. Ibid.
  • Prayers for a deceased Cardinal, speak not of Purgatory. Page 462, 463
  • Prayers in a language not understood. See Tongue.
  • Prayers in a barbarous language and dark words come from the Ossenian hereticks. Page 46, 810, 811
  • Prayers of private persons in a tongue not known to themselves. Page 813, &c.
  • Absurdities which they fall into, that pray in Latin which they understand not. Page 813, 814
  • Prayers in an unknown tongue condemned. Page 814, 815
  • They are contrary to the practice of the Church of the Old Testament. Page 822
  • In the Ancient Church every one prayed in his own tongue. Page 816
  • The ancient custom of praying standing from Easter to Pentecost, is contrary to the cu∣stome of the Apostles. Page 163
  • Pope Julius the first pretends to primacy by vertue of a Canon which forbids to make ordinances for the Church without the Bi∣shop Page  [unnumbered] of Rome. That Canon is examined. Page 292, 293
  • That Canon overthroweth the Popes prima∣cy; And the following Popes have re∣nounced it. Page 293
  • Athanasius and Meletius governed the Church of all the world. Page 302, 345
  • Gregory Nazianzen wished that there had been no Primacy in the Church. Page 302, 303
  • The Bishops of Gauls, called head. Page 305
  • Basil deferreth the primacy to the Insular Bishops. Page 304
  • Prohibition by the fourth Council of Car∣thage to call any Bishop Prince of Bishops or Soveraign Bishop. Page 338
  • What was the primacy and order among Bishops in Austins time. Page 340
  • Law of Theodosius the second, contrary to the primacy of the Bishop of Rome. Page 341
  • Leo the first, in his Epistles takes no other title but that of Bishop of the City of Rome. Page 362
  • The Emperor Leo decreeth that the Church of Constantinople have the primacy over all other Churches. Page 363
  • The 28. Canon of the Council of Chalcedon equals the Patriarch of Constantinople with that of Rome in all things, even in Eccle∣siastical matters. Page 368
  • Procession of the Holy Ghost; the dispute a∣bout it with the Grecians, proceeds out of animosity. Page 163
  • Purgatory came from the Pagans. Page 46
  • That Purgatory which the Fathers speak of, is the fire of the day of Judgement, through which they make the Saints to pass, even the holy Virgin Mary. Page 459
  • Du Perron seemeth to laugh at Purgatory, calling it a Metaphorical fire. Page 460
  • The Fathers hold that souls separated can suffer no punishment. Page 461
  • Purgatory of Gregory the first, in Baths and River, and at the wind. Page 461, 462
  • Roffensis acknowledgeth that among the An∣tients there was no mention of Purgatory, nor of indulgences to the dead. Page 580
    R.
  • THe Romanists exalt in hyperbolical words the ransom that Christ paid, that they may more speciously debase it. Page 594, 595
  • Bellarmine esteemeth not that the satisfaction of Christ be actual. Page 594
  • He saith that Christ did not satisfie for our whole pain. Page 594
  • What words are used in the ordination of Readers. Page 825
  • Reading of Scripture forbidden by the Do∣ctors appointed by the Council of Trent, confirmed by Popes. Page 35, 167
  • Herein the Roman Church followeth anci∣ent Hereticks. Page 45
  • Order taken by the Council of Trent to hin∣der the reading of Scriptures. Page 167
  • God hath commanded the reading of Scrip∣tures. Page 168
  • Reading of Scripture recommended by the Fathers, to women, artificers, &c. Page 171, 172, &c.
  • The abstinence of the Rechabites makes no∣thing for the Fasts of the Roman Church. Page 508
  • In what sense a man may redeem his own sins. Page 615
  • Du Perron makes two sorts of redemption, the one original the other applicative. Page 691
  • That applicative redemption is a Chimaera. ib.
  • False Religion loveth obscurity; the true, lay∣eth open her doctrine. Page 810
  • Another difference. Page 811, 812
  • When Christian Religion was spread in Gauls. Page 843
  • The Roman Religion holds things for good, which in Civil conversation should be held unreasonable. Page 814
  • Relicks for the use of women with child, came from the Pagans. Page 51
  • Pope Innocent the 4th. having drained Eng∣land of money, sends them in recompence a bottle full of Christs blood. Page 654
  • Lewis the ninth, buyeth the Crown of thorns and a piece of the true Cross. Page 646
  • In old time the remnant of the sacred bread was either burnt, or given to little chil∣dren to eat. Page 773
  • Reservation of the Sacrament was forbidden. Page 774
  • Rest of Esther contains things contrary to the Book of Esther. Page 184
  • Earl Richard, brother to K. Henry the third of England, crosseth himself for the voyage of Syria. He detesteth the Popes wicked∣ness. Page 545, 646
  • Riculphus was the forger and inventer of Decretals. Page 263, 246
  • How the Romans were clad according to their diverse qualities, Page 187
  • The Roman was the Language of Countrey People in Gauls. Page 843
  • Whether Rome be called Babylon by St. Peter. Page 233
  • The Roman Church must not be called univer∣sal. Page 117
  • Ruffinus is injuriously handled by Du Perron. Page 244
  • Du Perron misuseth him wrongfully about the word suburbicary. Page 273, 274
Page  [unnumbered]
    S.
  • SAbbath changed into Sunday, even in the Apostles time. Page 162
  • How the word Sacrament is taken by the Fa∣thers. Page 731, &c.
  • Several significations of the word Sacrament. ibid.
  • Du Perron calls the Sacraments of the Old Testament, vain monuments, and cenota∣phia. Page 763
  • To look upon the Sacrament was forbidden to Catechumens and Penitents. Page 769, 770
  • Sacrifice. See Mass.
  • What are the true Sacrifices. Page 425
  • The Sacrifice of the Eucharist. Page 680, 681
  • In what respect the sacrifice of beasts was propitiatory. Page 616
  • The Sacrifice of the Mass was not instituted by Christ. Page 681, &c.
  • In what sense, and for what reasons the Fa∣thers called the Lords Supper a Sacrifice. Page 687, 692 &c.
  • Du Perron wandereth from the question. Page 680
  • An absurd proof of the Sacrifice of the Mass in the Council of Trent, by these words, Hoc facite, Do this. Page 681
  • The death of Christ is the only propitiatory Sacrifice for our sins. Page 682
  • Of the commemoration, and application of the Sacrifice of Christ. Page 686, &c.
  • Opposition of the Mass, with the Sacrifice of the Lords death. Page 691
  • Sacrifices or oblations for sins are no more necessary. Page 683
  • The difference between Sacrifice and Sacra∣ment. Page 805
  • Holiness in doctrine, which the Romanists put among the marks of the Church, can∣not serve the turn of the Roman Church. Page 84, 85
  • Difference between the holiness, and the truth of a doctrine. ibid.
  • The doctrine of the Roman Church is not holy since it teacheth vices. ibid.
  • Saints. See Invocation of Saints and Canoni∣zation.
  • Before the year of Christ 375. there was no Invocation of Saints. Page 428
  • The titles and offices attributed unto Saints, are an imitation of Heathens. Page 51
  • The Saints know not our hearts. Page 388, &c.
  • Texts of Scripture upon that Subject. Page 389, &c.
  • Places of Fathers. Page 391, &c.
  • Doubt of Gregory Nazianzen about this question. Page 393
  • Imaginary Saints, that never were, are wor∣shipped in the Roman Church. Page 103, 399, &c.
  • Old Saints are contemned, and the late ones more esteemed. Page 402
  • They that are not yet admitted Saints, are declared Beati, which is a degree and ex∣pectative of holiness. Page 401, 402
  • The Roman Church is not contented to call upon Saints, but makes them also our Redeemers. Page 429
  • Some condemn not invocation of Saints, but think it to be unnecessary. The true ho∣nour which ought to be given unto Saints. Page 429
  • The incredible fervency of the Roman Church, about the worship of Saints. ibid.
  • Lewis Vives complains of it. ibid.
  • Bellarmine saith, that the Saints are in some respect our Redeemers. Page 594
  • Opinion of the Fathers, that all Saints must pass through the fire of the last judge∣ment. Page 392
  • What knowledge Saints have of things done in the world below.
  • Opinion of the Fathers about that: Chryso∣stom and Austin vary about that question. Page 391, &c.
  • And Gregory Nazianzen. Page 393
  • Du Perron saith, that the Church hath not yet determined any thing about that. Page 392
  • Saracens abolish the Kingdom of the Goths in Spain. Page 845
  • Some kinds of Satisfaction very gentle. Page 586
  • Some Satisfactions are crimes. Page 610. 587, &c.
  • Two kinds of Satisfaction. Page 590
  • The Roman Church holds, that we can sa∣tisfie God with our own merit, ex con∣digno, by equality, and equipollence. Page 591, 605, &c.
  • And that God exacteth of us more satisfa∣ction then the rigour of Justice requireth. Page 606
  • Unjust Satisfactions. Page 607
  • Exchange of bodily Satisfactions into pecu∣niary. Page 609, 586
  • Uncertainty of the Satisfactions of the Ro∣man Church. Page 611
  • A sinner may say to a Priest, I will have none of thy penance, for I choose rather to sa∣tisfie in Purgatory. Page 612
  • A sinner may say to God, Thou wilt pardon Page  [unnumbered] me wholly by Christ, &c. But I will not have so great a liberality, &c. Doctrine of Bellarmine. Page 467, 468
  • Means to be dispensed from satisfying. Page 612
  • Christs satisfaction is not applied by our sa∣tisfactions. Page 613
  • Gregory of Valentia despiseth satisfactions, Page 620
  • None can satisfie for another. Page 621
  • In what sense the Fathers take the word sa∣tisfaction, and that they make two sorts of them, the one towards God, the other towards the Church. Page 662
  • Satisfaction is made to God by humility, and by craving pardon. Page 663
  • In what sense St. Paul saith that he suffers, that which is wanting to the sufferings of Christ. Page 623
  • Places of Fathers to that purpose. Page 624
  • Confession of Estius, Doctor of Doway. ibid.
  • The Pope affirmeth himself to be the Keeper and Steward of the Treasure of the super-abounding satisfactions of the Saints. Page 30
  • Saturninus Preacheth the Gospel at Tolosa, An. Dom. 252. Page 844
  • Satyrus brother of St. Ambrose not baptized, hangs the Sacrament at his neck, and throweth himself into the sea. Page 769
  • Scotland will not receive the Popes Legat, saying that never Legat entred into it. Page 644
  • But soon after, another that bore not the title of Legat, entred into it, and exhau∣sted the Kingdom of money. Page 647
  • Prohibition to read Scripture. Page 35, 167, 90
  • Scripture is contrary to the Church of Rome. Page 36, 37
  • Scriptures authority above the Church. Page 55.
  • Invectives of the Romanists against Scrip∣ture. Page 57, 61
  • They compare it to dumb men, and to actors of dumb shews. Page 61
  • The Church gives no authority to Scripture. ibid.
  • The pretended authority of the Church to interpret Scripture infallibly. Page 64, &c.
  • Perfection of Scripture. Page 152
  • Testimonies of the Fathers for that purpose. Page 157, &c.
  • It is wrongfully accused of obscurity. Page 173
  • The Fathers affirm that it is clear. ibid.
  • And that it expounds it self. Page 174
  • Vindication of the purity of Scripture against Du Perrons accusations and falsifications. Page 175
  • Wonderfull Arts of Satan to suppress Scrip∣ture, or take all authority from it. Page 209
  • Blasphemie of Nicolas the first against Scri∣pture. ibid.
  • And of Cardinal Ximines against the Hebrew and Greek texts of Scripture. Page 172
  • Epithetes which the Roman Church gives to Scripture. Page 149, 150
  • Confession of the Doctors of the Roman Church for the perfection and authority of Scripture. Page 158
  • Whether the learned only ought to read it. Page 168, &c.
  • Sixtus Senensis saith, that to give Liberty to Shoo-makers, Fullers, &c. to read Scripture, is casting holy things unto Dogs. Page 170
  • Why the people of the Roman Church are frighted from reading Scripture. Page 811
  • It ought to be read by all sorts of persons, and in a known tongue. Page 828, &c.
  • In the ancient Church the Holy Scripture was set on the Table at the entry of Councils. Page 352
  • Instead of that it is laid at the Popes feet in the entry of the late Councils. ibid.
  • Pope Gelasius the first, alledgeth Scripture in derision. Page 377
  • And maintains that the word of God in the Scripture is not always fulfilled. Page 378
  • Scripture wickedly alledged by Pope Hor∣misdas. Page 379
  • Schisms in the Popedom. Page 101, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107
  • Schisms between three Popes, Gregory the twelfth, Benedict the thirteenth, and John the twenty-third. Page 107
  • Schism between Eugenius and Felix. Page 108
  • Schism between Damasus and Ʋrsicius, with much slaughter. Page 302
  • Schism between Boniface and Eulalius. Page 327
  • Description of Schism and Schismaticks: And whether Schismaticks can be saved. Page 13, 14
  • How God marketh his Elect with his Seal. Page 9
  • Papism imitates Semipelagianism. Page 44
  • Septimania, The Romans called so in Lan∣guedoc, and a little part of Guyenne. Page 844
  • Serenus Bishop of Marseille breaks Images. Page 451
  • Gregory the first chides him for it. ibid.
  • The brazen Serpent was not an Image of Christ, and was not worshipped. Page 439
  • Publick Service was spoken aloud in the an∣cient Church. Page 146
  • Why it is celebrated in an unknown tongue by Hereticks. Page 811
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Publick service in a tongue not understood, contrary to the word of God and reason. Page 817
  • And to the practice of the Church of the Old Testament. Page 822
  • Publick Service must be celebrated with a clear voice. Page 820
  • The Ancient Christian Church over all the world used an intelligible Language in the publick service. Page 823
  • In Russia and Moravia Divine service is cele∣brated in the Dalmatick Language. Page 826
  • Among the Abyssins in the Ethiopick tongue. Page 826
  • In Greek in Greece. Page 825
  • Why Divine Service is said in Latine. Page 826, 827, 828
  • How the Latin Service got into France and Spain. Page 843
  • How it got into England and Germany. Page 846
  • And into Africk. Page 849
    • Sidonius Apollinaris, Of him and his E∣pistles. Page 363
  • In all his Epistles to the Bishops of Gauls no trace is seen of the Popes primacy. ibid.
  • He attributes to Lupus Bishop of Troyes the titles which the Pope assumeth. ibid.
  • He preacheth at Bourges, and complains of the decay of the Latine tongue. Page 844
  • Two sorts of signs according to Du Perron, some of a thing absent, some of a present which appeareth not. Page 743
  • All signs are helps to know, not hinderances and coverings. Page 743, 744
  • Two Simeons Stilites, and their prodigious lives. Page 500
  • Statue erected at Rome to Simon Magus. Page 227, &c.
  • He caused his Statue, and that of his concu∣bine, to be worshipped by his Disciples. Page 39
  • Simoniack Popes, and therefore unlawfull by the Rules of the Roman Church. Page 99
  • Why Heresie and Idolatry, and Atheism, and scorning, are not set among mortal sins in the Roman Church. Page 538
  • St. Paul had the power to lead about with him a sister, wife, that is, a Christian wo∣man joyned to him in Marriage. Page 471
  • Ridiculous distinction of Du Perron, who saith that a man that sleeps not in respect of himself, may sleep in respect of ano∣ther. Page 858
  • Socrates the Historian is wrongfully charged with Novatianism. Page 321
  • Spiridion a married Bishop. Page 492, 493
  • He serveth pork before a stranger in Lent. Page 511
  • Spittle in Baptism came from the Pagans. Page 53
  • Of the Suburbicary Countreys and Chur∣ches. Du Perron did not understand that word. Page 274
  • Succession of Chairs, that it is not a mark of the true Church. Page 85, &c.
  • In what sense Tertullian and Irenaeus prove their doctrine by the succession. Page 87
  • Of the succession of the Pastors of our Chur∣ches. Page 89, &c.
  • The Papal chair was vacant, and without suc∣cessor for two years. Page 105
  • And a little after, two years and a half. Page 106
  • Succession of the Papal Chair interrupted for many years, in which, of three contend∣ing Popes, one could not tell which was the Lawfull. Page 106. 107
  • Succession of the Popedom broken under Eugenius. Page 107, &c.
  • The first Bishops of Rome are uncertain. Page 230
  • The Succession of the Church consisteth in the Conformity with the Doctrine of the Apostles. Page 86
  • Succession of St. Peter in the Primacy is not of Divine Right, according to Bellar∣mine. Page 211
  • Examples in which Superstition changeth the precepts of piety into exteriour gestures. Page 658
  • Superstition counterfeiteth true Religion, but cannot attain to the purity of conscience, nor to the brightness of truth. Page 626
  • Lords Supper. vide Coena.
  • Pope Stephen the eighth condemned by Baro∣nius. Page 100
  • Stephen Bishop of Rome calls Cyprian false Christ, and false Apostle. Page 249
  • The Book of Susanna is fabulous. The ab∣surdies of the same. Page 183, 200
  • Sylverius, he is deprived of the Popedom by Vigilius, who bought it of Belizari∣us. Page 99
  • Sylvester the second, made Pope by a com∣pact from the Devil. Page 102
  • Sylvester the third made Pope, being ten or twelve years old. Page 103
  • Symmachus recommends Pagan Religion for the Antiquity. Page 119
  • 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, that word signifying an asso∣ciate or adjoyned person, was not under∣stood by Cardinal Du Perron. Page 485, 486
Page  [unnumbered]
    T.
  • IN old time there was but one Table or Altar in a Church, and that Table of wood, which might be removed. Page 768
  • Telesphorus Bishop of Rome, ordaineth the Fast of Lent for the Clerks of Rome. Page 242
  • To none but God temples must be consecra∣ted. Page 777
  • Our bodies are Temples of God. ibid.
  • Tertullian, many of his opinions rejected by the Church of Rome. Page 155
  • He condemneth Zepherinus Bishop of Rome. Page 246, 278
  • He calls the Roman Bishop, Bishop of Bi∣shops; but it is in scorn. ibid.
  • He is contrary to Transubstantiation. Page 733
  • How Du Perron corrupteth an excellent Te∣stimony of Tertullian. ibid.
  • Opinions of Theodoret not approved by the Church of Rome. Page 140
  • Places of Theodoret against Transubstantiati∣on. Page 724, 725
  • Vindication of Theodoret against the accusa∣tions of Du Perron, and Gregorius de Va∣lentia. Page 726
  • Theophania or Christmas day was celebrated in the Church upon the sixth of January. Page 340
  • Theophilus of Alexandria a persecutor of Chrysostom. Page 319
  • He was not subject to the Bishop of Rome. Page 323
  • Thomas Aquinas, his reasons examined about the judiciary absolution. Page 570
  • He accuseth Christ of importunity. Page 573, &c.
  • He applyeth to the Pope that which is said of Christ, Of his fulness we all receive. Page 574
  • He saith that the Pope can make a new edi∣tion of the Creed. Page 71
  • Thomas Becket, being Lord Chancellor, is invested by King Henry the second with the Archbishoprick of Canterbury. Page 633
  • He retireth to Sens. Excommunicates all that maintain the Kings Rights. Page 633
  • In his reconciliation with the King, he makes him twice hold his horses bridle. Page 633
  • He is slain by four of the Kings Servants. Page 634
  • He is Sainted by the Pope. His relicks do miracles. Lewis the seventh of France comes to worship them. Page 634, 635
  • Pope Alexanders Letters whereby he com∣mands him to be worshipped. Page 406
  • Thuanus, in the first Book of his History de∣scribes the abuse of Papal Indulgences. Page 463, 464.
  • He makes a memorable Narrative of Cardi∣nal Simia, and Pope Julius the third. Page 109
  • Tinel is a custom at Rome to give the posie about, and make the Banket to go from house to house. Page 521
  • Tobit is no Canonical Book. Absurdities of the same. Page 178
  • Old Hereticks grounded themselves upon Traditions, and upon the unwritten word. Page 38
  • Of Traditions, and the power of the Church to add to Scripture. Page 148, &c.
  • In the Roman Church Traditions are of grea∣ter authority then Scripture. Page 149, 209 &c.
  • Why Traditions are preferred before the ho∣ly Scripture. Page 150
  • Moses gave not unwritten Traditions to the people of Israel. Page 153
  • What Traditions ought to be received. Page 151
  • What Traditions the Fathers admit. Page 162, 163
  • Traduction of the Bible. See Version.
  • The Roman Church praying in a tongue not understood, imitates the ancient Hereticks. Page 46
  • The ancient Church over all the world used an intelligible tongue in Gods service. Page 128. & seq.
  • A strange language is rather a mark of a curse then of a blessing. Page 819
  • The Latin tongue was once more usual in Gauls, then that of Gauls. Page 843, &c.
  • By what means the Latin tongue came to be used in the Divine Service in France, and Spain. ibid, &c.
  • When and how Latin was corrupted. Page 844, 845
  • The Latin tongue once usual and familiar in Spain. Page 845
  • The Jewish tongue though degenerated from Hebrew, is yet called Hebrew in the New Testament. Page 822, 823
  • Traffick of Absolutions and dispensations. Page 35, 557, &c.
  • And of the remission of sins. Page 577, 609
  • Shamefull traffick of holy things in the Ro∣man Church. Page 578
  • Cardinal Tolet excuseth it. Page 578
  • Infamous plundering and exactions of the Pope in England. Page 644, 645, &c.
  • Merchandize under colour of a Croisade, and dispensing from the vow. Page 647
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • A noorious precedent of sordid exaction. Page 653, 654
  • Ancient Hereticks believed Transubstantia∣tion. Page 49
  • The sixth Council of Carthage contrary to Transubstantion, falsified in the Latin Tomes. Page 338
    V.
  • LEtters of the Emperour Valentinian the third, deferring the primacy to the Bi∣shop of Rome. Page 362
  • Vices and baseness of that Emperour. Page 361
  • The Emperour Theodosius despiseth the Let∣ters of that Monster, written in the be∣half of Leo the first, Bishop of Rome. Page 362
  • These Letters were extorted. Page 362
  • He constrains Hilary Bishop of Arles to yield to Leo. ibid.
  • The Emperor Valentinian died without Bap∣tism. Page 670
    • Varro condemneth Images of the Gods. Page 436
  • The Vulgar version authorized by the Coun∣cil of Trent, is false and full of corrupti∣ons. Page 34
  • It cannot be comparable to the Hebrew and Greek originals. Page 171, 172
  • Anciently the Bible was translated into all Languages. Page 170, 171
  • Horrible blasphemy of Cardinal Ximenes, comparing the Hebrew and Grek Text of Scripture to two thieves, and the Vulgar Latin version to Christ. Page 172
  • The vulgar Latin version hath falsified the words of the institution of the Lords Sup∣per. Page 35. 695
  • That falsification troubleth the sense. Page 698
  • Eight thousand texts corrected in the Latin Bible. Page 34
  • In the end of the third chapter of the rest of Esther, the Vulgar version clips a clause, as contrary to the kissing of the Popes Feet. Page 35
  • Other corruptions. ibid.
  • Veronica, or Christs face on a cloth being carried in Procession, turns it self the beard upwards. Page 641
  • Praying to that cloath. Page 641, 446
  • Victor the first Bishop of Rome separates all the Oriental Churches from his Commu∣nion for the question about Easter day. Page 242
  • The Oriental Bishops, and Irenaeus resist him. Page 242
  • His excommunication was without effect. Page 242, 243
  • Victor the second and third poisoned in the Chalice. Page 103, 104
  • Of the adoration of the Virgin Mary a∣mong Hereticks. Page 41
  • St. Epiphanius sharply rebuketh those that worship the Virgin Mary, and those that call her Queen of heaven. Page 426
  • Blasphemy of some that in the Virgin Mary was fulfilled that which Ahasuerus promi∣sed to Queen Esther, to give her half his Kingdom. Page 433
  • Blasphemies of the Romanists, under pre∣tence of honouring the Virgin Mary. Page 434
  • She was not free from sin. Page 129, 130
  • Pope Vigilius excommunicated by the Bi∣shops of Africk. Page 244, 335
  • He usurpeth the Popedom with money. Page 99
  • He kills Sylverius his predecessor. ibid.
  • Villa Vincentius, an Augustinian Monk, cen∣sureth the Fathers. Page 125
  • Vincentius Lirinensis. Page 82, 83
  • Virginity, the advantage of it above Matri∣mony. Page 469
  • Whether the Church be always in sight. Page 15, &c.
  • The Visigeths in Spain observed the Moza∣rabick Service. Page 845
  • Ʋnion, it is not a mark of the true Church. Page 116
  • The word unus in Latin, as also 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉 in Greek, signifie one alone, or only. Page 430▪ 705, &c.
  • Vocation of Pastors. See Succession.
  • In the time of Christ and his Apostles, ma∣ny have preacht without ordinary calling, as Aedesius and Frumentius in India. Page 90, 91, &c.
  • Difference between a charge, and the ways to enter into it. Page 92
  • Our advantage in this cause above the Ro∣man Church. Page 93, 94
  • An Archbishop of five years of age, Page 101
  • Of the creation or election of Popes. Page 108 109
  • Means how Cardinals, and other Prelates, attain to their charges. Page 109
  • How Archbishops receive the Pall. Page 110
  • How and how far vows ought to be kept. Page 473. &c.
  • Rashness of the vow of Celibat. Page 474
  • Form of the vow of a Novice Dominican when he becomes a Profess. Page 475
  • Ʋrban the second usurpeth investitures. Page 631
  • Page  [unnumbered]
  • Ʋrsula, an imaginary Saint, that never was in the world. Page 390, 400
    W.
  • THe Ancient Church used not a round wafer upon the holy Table, but a good quantity of bread for the whole Congre∣gation to communicate. Page 768
  • Scripture takes often the word washing for the remission of sins, and for regenerati∣on. Page 551, 552
  • Whip ones self. See Flagellation.
  • Of the Widows servants of Churches, and of their vow. Page 473
  • The Roman Church puts good works among penances. Page 608
  • They are not meritorious. Page 616, 617, &c.
  • Wisdom of Solomon, the book so entituled, is Apocrypha, and falsly attributed to Solo∣mon. Page 181
  • Absurdities and untruths in it. Page 181, 182
  • Austin reprehended for alledging it. Page 199
  • It is held to be made by Sirach. Page 199
  • St. Austins opinion about it. Page 204
  • Whole habitual, there is no such thing, it is a conceit of Du Perrons invention. Page 82
    Z.
  • POpe Zachary declareth many sorts of meats unclean. Page 512.
  • Zepherinus Bishop of Rome reproved by Ter∣tullian. Page 246