A care-cloth: or a treatise of the cumbers and troubles of marriage intended to aduise them that may, to shun them; that may not, well and patiently to beare them. By William Whately, preacher of the word of God in Banbury, in Oxfordshire.

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Title
A care-cloth: or a treatise of the cumbers and troubles of marriage intended to aduise them that may, to shun them; that may not, well and patiently to beare them. By William Whately, preacher of the word of God in Banbury, in Oxfordshire.
Author
Whately, William, 1583-1639.
Publication
London :: Printed by Felix Kyngston for Thomas Man,
1624.
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Subject terms
Christian life -- Early works to 1800.
Sermons, English -- 17th century.
Marriage -- Religious aspects -- Early works to 1800.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A14992.0001.001
Cite this Item
"A care-cloth: or a treatise of the cumbers and troubles of marriage intended to aduise them that may, to shun them; that may not, well and patiently to beare them. By William Whately, preacher of the word of God in Banbury, in Oxfordshire." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A14992.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 16, 2024.

Pages

Page [unnumbered]

AN ADVERTISEMENT TO THE READER.

VNderstand, good Reader, that in a former Treatise about the duties of the married, intitled, A Bride bush, I did occasionally deliuer two posi∣tions: One this; The sinne of a∣dulterie dissolueth the bond, and annihilateth the couenant of Ma∣trimonie. Another this; The sinne of wilfull desertion doth likewise dissolue the bond of Matrimony. Giue me leaue now to aduertise thee of such reasons, as haue been obiected vnto me against these two positions. A∣gainst the first thus: Whatsoeuer man and woman may lawfully conuerse together in matrimoniall societie, be∣twixt them the bond of matrimony remaineth vndis∣solued: for vpon this bond, the lawfulnesse of that so∣cietie depends, as vpon the next and immediate cause thereof. Now man and wife, euen after the sinne of adulterie committed by one, or both of them, may law∣fully conuerse together in matrimoniall societie: For who can thinke, that Dauid sinned, in knowing any other of his wiues, after his offence with Bathsheba? Or if any man or woman hauing transgressed in this kind so secretly, that none doth know of it, shall after forsake the sinne, and without reuealing it to the yoke-fellow, continue to render due beneuolence; who can say, that such societie is vnlawfull? Therefore betwixt

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man and wife, euen after the sinne of adulterie, the bond of marriage remaineth vndissolued, and therefore the contrary position ought not to be holden. Against the second thus: He that puts away his wife not for whore∣dome, and marries another, is guiltie of wilfull deserti∣on, (yea, and of adultery too:) For, is it not all one to depart from ones wife, with a mind of neuer returning, and to put away his wife from him, with a mind of ne∣uer reaccepting her? Now after such putting away of a mans wife, and marrying another, the bond of matri∣mony remaineth vndissolued: for our Sauiour saith, That he which marries a woman so put away,* 1.1 commits adultery; which could not be, vnlesse the bond betwixt her, and her former husband remained vndissolued. Therefore at least after some desertion (yea, and adul∣tery too) the bond of matrimony remaineth vndissol∣ued; and therfore the contrary position must be denied. Sweyed by these arguments (to which, I confesse, that I cannot make a satisfying answere) I depart from these opinions, wishing that I had not written them, and that no man, by what I haue written, would imbolden him∣selfe, in such cases, to take at least a doubtfull, and an hazzardfull liberty. So praying God to giue vs a right vnderstanding in all things, I bid thee farewell.

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