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Author: Guevara, Antonio de, Bp., d. 1545?
Title: A looking glasse for the court. Composed in the Castilian tongue by the Lorde Anthony of Gueuarra Bishop of Mondouent, and chronicler to the Emperour Charles. And out of Castilian drawne into Frenche by Anthony Alaygre. And out of the French tongue into Englishe by Sir Fraunces Briant Knight one of the priuy Chamber, in the raygne of K. Henry the eyght.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Rights/Permissions:

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Print source: A looking glasse for the court. Composed in the Castilian tongue by the Lorde Anthony of Gueuarra Bishop of Mondouent, and chronicler to the Emperour Charles. And out of Castilian drawne into Frenche by Anthony Alaygre. And out of the French tongue into Englishe by Sir Fraunces Briant Knight one of the priuy Chamber, in the raygne of K. Henry the eyght.
Guevara, Antonio de, Bp., d. 1545?, Tymme, Thomas, d. 1620,, Bryan, Francis, d. 1550,

Imprinted at London: [By Thomas East] for William Norton, 1575.
Alternate titles: Menosprecio de corte. English Menosprecio de corte. Dispraise of the courtiers life.
Notes:
A translation of: Menosprecio de corte.
Printer's name from STC; colophon reads: Printed by VVilliam Norton.
Running title reads: A dispraise of the courtiers life.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Courts and courtiers -- Early works to 1800.
Country life -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A02315.0001.001

Contents
title page
illustration
¶To the Right honorable, Iohn, Lord Russell, sonne and heire ap∣parant to the right Noble Fraunces, Earle of Bedforde, one of the Queenes Maiesties priuie Counsaile, and Knight of the most ho∣norable order of the Garter.
To the Reader.
¶A Table contayning briefly the summe of euery Chapter.
To the right reuerend and worthy Prelate my Lorde VVillyam de Prat, bishop of Clere∣mount, Antony Alaygre sen∣deth greting.
A dispraise of the life of the Courtier, and a commendaci∣on of the life of the husbandman, composed in the Castilian toungue, by the reuerend father in God, the Lord Antony of Gueuera, bishop of Mondouent, and Chronicler to the Emperour Charles. And out of Castilian drawen into Frēch by Anthony Alaygre, & now out of the Frēch tongue into our maternall language, by sir Fraunces Bryant knight, one o king Henry the .viii. most hono∣rable chamber.
The first Chapiter. Of certaine Courtiers which ought to complaine of none, but of them selues.
The second Chapiter ¶ How that none ought to counsell a other to go to the Court, nor when he is there to come from it, but euery man to chose the life that best he liketh.
The .iij. Chapiter. ¶How that a Courtier ought to leaue the Court for not beyng in fauor, but beyng out of the Court already that he ought not to seeke entertain∣ment there againe that he may be more vertuous.
The .iiii. Chapiter. Of the life that the Courtier ought to leade, after that he hath lefte the Court.
The .v. Chapiter. ¶That the rusticall lyfe is more quiet and restfull and more beneficiall then that of the court.
The .vj Chapiter. ¶That in the village the dayes seeme more long, and the ayer more clere and better. And the houses more easy and restful than in the court.
The .vij. Chapiter. ¶That commonly the inhabitaunts of the villages be more happy then courtiers.
The .viij Chapiter. ¶That in princes courtes the custome and vse is to speake of God and liue after the worlde.
The .ix. Chapiter. ¶In the court fewe amend, but many waxe worse.
The .x. Chapiter. ¶That a man cannot liue in the court, without to trouble himselfe or some other.
The xi. Chapiter. ¶That in the court those that be graue are praised and wel esteemed, and the other that doe the contrary not regarded.
The xii. Chapiter. ¶ That in the court of princes all say wee will doe it, but none doe it.
The .xiij. Chapiter. ¶ That there is a smal nomber of them that be good in the court, and a great nomber of good in the com∣mon wealth.
The .xiiij. Chapiter. ¶Of many affaires in the court, and that there be better husbandmen, then commonly is of courtiers.
The xv. Chapiter. ¶That among courtiers is neither kept amitie nor faithfulnes: And how much the Court is full of trauail, of enuy and rancour.
The .xvi. Chapiter. ¶By how much the common wealthes and the courtes of the tyme passed were more perfite then the courtes of the tyme present.
The .xvij. Chapiter. ¶Of diuers noble and valiaunt men, that left the court and the great cities and drew them to their proper houses, more by will, then by necessitie.
The xviij. Chapiter. ¶The aucthor complayneth with great reason, of the yeares that he lost in the court.
The xix. Chapiter. ¶ The aucthor maketh accoumpt of the vertues that he lost in the court, and of the eull customes that he lear∣ned there.
The .xx. Chapiter. The Auctour taketh his leaue of the world with great eloquence.
colophon