Here beginneht [sic] a merye iest of a man that was called Howleglas, and of many marueylous thinges and iestes that he dyd in his lyfe, in Eastlande and in many other places

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Title
Here beginneht [sic] a merye iest of a man that was called Howleglas, and of many marueylous thinges and iestes that he dyd in his lyfe, in Eastlande and in many other places
Publication
[Imprynted at London :: In Tamestrete at the Vintre on the thre Craned wharfe by Wyllyam Copland],
[1560?]
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http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A00434.0001.001
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"Here beginneht [sic] a merye iest of a man that was called Howleglas, and of many marueylous thinges and iestes that he dyd in his lyfe, in Eastlande and in many other places." In the digital collection Early English Books Online 2. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A00434.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 22, 2024.

Pages

¶ Howe Howleglas gat bread for. his mother.

AS Howleglas mother was thus wtout bred thā be thought howleglas how he might best get bread for her. Than went he out of ye village to a towne thereby called stafforde, & went into a bakers house, where he asked ye baker if he wold send his lord for .iii.s. bread. som whit and some rye, & he named a lorde that was of an other land, but he at that tyme was lodged at an Inne in the towne, & bad the baker let one go with him & that he should haue his money & the baker was content. And than Howleglas gaue ye baker a bagge that had a hole in ye botom, & therin put he the bread & so departed with the bakers ladd & whan he was in an other streat he let fal .iii. whyte loues at the hole in ye durt. And than bad howleglas to the bakers seruaunt sete downe the bagge & goo fetch me other whyte breade for this, for I dare not bere it to my lord. And than went ye bakers seruaūt home to chaunge the bread, and in the meane whyle went Howleglas wt the sacke of bread home to hys mothers. And whan the bakers seruaūt came again to the place and found not Howleglas, he retourned home againe & told his master how Howleglas hade

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serued him. A than the baker heard that Howleglas was gon his way with his bread: than ran ye baker to the Inne that Howleglas named him, & asked the ser¦uātes of the lordes for Howleglas, but the said ther came none suche, & than knew the baker that he was deceyued & so returned home. Than said Howleglas to his mother, eate and make mery now you haue it & whan you haue nomore ye must faste.

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