The tempest, or, The enchanted island a comedy, as it is now acted at His Highness the Duke of York's Theatre.
Dryden, John, 1631-1700., Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Tempest., D'Avenant, William, Sir, 1606-1668.

ACT V.

Enter Prospero and Miranda.
Prosp.
YOu beg in vain; I cannot pardon him,
He has offended Heaven.
Mir.

Then let Heaven punish him.

Prosp.

It will by me.

Page  73
Mir.

Grant him at least some respite for my sake.

Prosp.
I by deferring Justice should incense the Deity
Against my self and you.
Mir.

Yet I have heard you say, The Powers above are slow In punishing, and shou'd not you resemble them?

Prosp.
The Powers above may pardon or reprieve,
As Sovereign Princes may dispense with Laws,
Which we, as Officers, must execute. Our Acts of grace
To Criminals are Treason to Heavens prerogative.
Mir.

Do you condemn him for shedding blood?

Prosp.

Why do you ask that question? you know I do.

Mir.
Then you must be condemn'd for shedding his,
And he who condemns you, must dye for shedding
Yours, and that's the way at last to leave none living.
Prosp.
The Argument is weak, but I want time
To let you see your errours; retire, and, if you love him,
Pray for him.
[He's going.
Mir.

O stay, Sir, I have yet more Arguments.

Prosp.

But none of any weight.

Mir.

Have you not said you are his Judge?

Prosp.

'Tis true, I am; what then?

Mir.
And can you be his Executioner?
If that be so, then all men may declare their
Enemies in fault; and Pow'r without the Sword
Of Justice, will presume to punish what e're
It calls a crime.
Prosp.
I cannot force Gonzalo or my Brother, much
Less the Father to destroy the Son, it must
Be then the Monster Caliban, and he's not here,
But Ariel strait shall fetch him.
[Enter Ariel.
Ariel.
My potent Lord, before thou call'st, I come,
To serve thy will.
Prosp.

Then Spirit fetch me here my salvage Slave.

Ariel.

My Lord, it does not need.

Prosp.

Art thou then prone to mischief, wilt thou be thy self the Executioner?

Ariel.
Think better of thy aiery Minister, who
For thy fake, unbid, this night has flown
Page  74 O're almost all the habitable World.
Prosp.

But to what purpose was all thy diligence?

Ariel.
When I was chidden by my mighty Lord for my
Neglect of young Hippolito, I went to view
His body, and soon found his soul was but retir'd,
Not sally'd out, and frighted lay at skulk in
Th'inmost corner of his scarce-beating heart.
Prosp.

Is he not dead?

Ariel.

Hear me my Lord! I prun'd my wings, and, fitted for a journey, from the next Isles of our Hesperides, I gather'd Moly first, thence shot my self to Palestine, and watch'd the trickling Balm, which caught, I glided to the British Isles, and there he purple Panacea found.

Prosp.

All this to night?

Ariel.
All this, my Lord, I did,
Nor was Hippolito's good Angel wanting, who
Climbing up the circle of the Moon,
While I below got Simples for the Cure, went to
Each Planet which o're-rul'd those Herbs,
And drew it's virtue to increase their pow'r:
Long e're this hour had I been back again,
But that a Storm took me returning back
And flag'd my tender Wings.
Prosp.
Thou shalt have rest my spirit,
But hast thou search'd the wound?
Ariel.
My Lord I have, and 'twas in time I did it; for
The soul stood almost at life's door, all bare
And naked, shivering like Boys upon a Rivers
Bank, and loth to tempt the cold air, but I took
Her and stop'd her in; and pour'd into his mouth
The healing juice of vulnerary Herbs.
Prosp.

Thou art my faithful servant.

Ariel.
His only danger was his loss of blood, but now
He's wak'd, my Lord, and just this hour
He must be dress'd again, as I have done it.
Anoint the Sword which pierc'd him with this
Weapon-Salve, and wrap it close from air till
I have time to visit him again.
Page  75
Prosp.
It shall be done, be it your task, Miranda, because your
Sister is not present here, while I go visit your
Dear Ferdinand, from whom I will a while conceal
This news, that it may be more welcome.
Mir.
I obey you, and with a double duty, Sir: for now
You twice have given me life.
Prosp.

My Ariel, follow me.

[Exeunt severally.
[Hippolito discovered on a Couch, Dorinda by him.
Dor.

How do you find your self?

Hip.
I'm somewhat cold, can you not draw me nearer
To the Sun, I am too weak to walk?
Dor.
My Love, I'le try.
[She draws the chair nearer the Audience.
I thought you never would have walk'd agen,
They told me you were gone away to Heaven;
Have you bin there?
Hip.

I know not where I was.

Dor.
I will not leave you till you promise me you
Will not dye agen.
Hip.

Indeed I will not.

Dor.
You must not go to Heav'n unless we go together,
For I've heard my Father say that we must strive
To be each others Guide, the way to it will else
Be difficult, especially to those who are so young.
But I much wonder what it is to dye.
Hip.
Sure 'tis to dream, a kind of breathless sleep
When once the Soul's gone out.
Dor.

What is the Soul?

Hip.

A small blew thing that runs about within us.

Dor.
Then I have seen it in a frosty morning run
Smoaking from my mouth.
Hip.

But if my soul had gone, it should have walk'd upon A Cloud just over you, and peep'd, and thence I would have Call'd you.

Dor.

But I should not have heard you, 'tis so far.

Hip.
Why then I would have rain'd and snow'd upon you,
And thrown down Hail-stones gently till I hit you,
And made you look at least. But dear Dorinda
Page  76 What is become of him who fought with me?
Dor.
O, I can tell you joyful news of him,
My Father means to make him dye to day,
For what he did to you.
Hip.

That must not be, my dear Dorinda; go and beg your Father, he may not dye, it was my fault he hurt me,

I urg'd him to it first.

Dor.

But if he live, he'll never leave killing you.

Hip.

O no! I just remember when I fell asleep I heard Him calling me a great way off; and crying over me as You wou'd do, besides we have no cause of quarrel now.

Dor.

Pray how began your difference first?

Hip.

I fought with him for all the Women in the World.

Dor.
That hurt you had was justly sent from Heaven,
For wishing to have any more but me.
Hip.
Indeed I think it was, but I repent it, the fault
Was only in my blood, for now 'tis gone, I find
I do not love so many.
Dor.
In confidence of this, I'le beg my Father, that he
May live, I'm glad the naughty blood, that made
You love so many, is gone out.
Hip.

My Dear, go quickly, lest you come too late.

[Exit. Dor.
Enter Miranda at the other door, with Hippolito's Sword wrapt up.
Hip.
Who's this who looks so fair and beautiful, as
Nothing but Dorinda can surpass her? O!
I believe it is that Angel, Woman,
Whom she calls Sister.
Mir.
Sir, I am sent hither to dress your wound,
How do you find your strength?
Hip.

Fair Creature, I am faint with loss of blood.

Mir.

I'm sorry for't.

Hip.

Indeed and so am I, for if I had that blood, then Should find a great delight in loving you

Mir.

But, Sir, I am anothers, and your love is given Already to my Sister.

Hip.

Yet I find that if you please I can love fll a little.

Page  77
Mir.

I cannot be unconstant, nor shou'd you.

Hip.

O my wound pains me.

Mir.

I am come to ease you.

[She unwraps the Sword.
Hip.
Alas! I feel the cold air come to me,
My wound shoots worse than ever.
[She wipes and anoints the Sword.
Mir.

Does it still grieve you?

Hip.

Now methinks there's something laid just upon it.

Mir.

Do you find no ease?

Hip.
Yes, yes, upon the sudden all the pain
Is leaving me, sweet Heaven how I am eas'd!
Enter Ferdinand and Dorinda to them.
Ferd. to Dor.
Madam, I must confess my life is yours,
I owe it to your generosity.
Dor.
I am o'rejoy'd my Father lets you live, and proud
Of my good fortune, that he gave your life to me.
Mir.

How? gave his life to her!

Hip.
Alas! I think she said so, and he said he ow'd it
To her generosity.
Ferd.

But is not that your Sister with Hippolito?

Dor.

So kind already?

Ferd.
I came to welcome life, and I have met the
Cruellest of deaths.
Hip.

My dear Dorinda with another man?

Dor.

Sister, what bus'ness have you here?

Mir.

You see I dress Hippolito.

Dor.

Y'are very charitable to a Stranger.

Mir.
You are not much behind in charity, to beg a pardon
For a man, whom you scarce ever saw before.
Dor.
Henceforward let your Surgery alone, for I had
Rather he should dye, than you should cure his wound.
Mir.
And I wish Ferdinand had dy'd before
He ow'd his life to your entreaty.
Ferd. to Hip.
Sir, I'm glad you are so well recover'd, you
Keep your humour still to have all Women.
Hip.
Not all, Sir, you except one of the number,
Your new Love there, Dorinda.
Mir.
Ah Ferdinand! can you become inconstant?
Page  78 If I must lose you, I had rather death should take
You from me than you take your self.
Ferd.
And if I might have chose, I would have wish'd
That death from Prospero, and not this from you.
Dor.
I, now I find why I was sent away,
That you might have my Sisters company.
Hip.
Dorinda, kill me not with your unkindness,
This is too much, first to be false your self,
And then accuse me too.
Ferd.
We all accuse each other, and each one denys their guilt,
I should be glad it were a mutual errour.
And therefore first to clear my self from fault,
Madam, I beg your pardon, while I say I only love
Your Sister.
[To Dorinda.
Mir.
O blest word!
I'm sure I love no man but Ferdinand.
Dor.

Nor I, Heav'n knows, but my Hippolito.

Hip.
I never knew I lov'd so much, before I fear'd
Dorinda's constancy; but now I am convinc'd that
I lov'd none but her, because none else can
Recompence her loss.
Ferd.
'Twas happy then you had this little tryal.
But how we all so much mistook, I know not.
Mir.
I have only this to say in my defence: my Father sent
Me hither, to attend the wounded Stranger.
Dor.

And Hippolito sent me to beg the life of Ferdinand.

Ferd.
From such small errours, left at first unheeded,
Have often sprung sad accidents in love:
But see, our Fathers and our friends are come
To mix their joys with ours.
Enter Prospero, Alonzo, Antonio, Gonzalo.
Alon. to Prosp.
Let it no more be thought of, your purpose
Though it was severe was just. In losing Ferdinand
I should have mourn'd, but could not have complain'd.
Prosp.

Sir, I am glad kind Heaven decreed it otherwise.

Dor.
O wonder!
Page  79 How many goodly Creatures are there here!
How beauteous mankind is!
Hip.

O brave new World that has such people in't!

Alon. to Ferd.
Now all the blessings of a glad Father
Compass thee about,
And make thee happy in thy beauteous choice.
Gonz.
I've inward wept, or should have spoke e're this.
Look down sweet Heav'n, and on this Couple drop
A blessed Crown, for it is you chalk'd out the
Way which brought us hither.
Ant.
Though penitence forc'd by necessity can scarce
Seem real, yet dearest Brother I have hope
My blood may plead for pardon with you, I resign
Dominion, which 'tis true I could not keep,
But Heaven knows too I would not.
Prosp.
All past crimes I bury in the joy of this
Blessed day.
Alonz.
And that I may not be behind in justice, to this
Young Prince I render back his Dukedom,
And as the Duke of Mantua thus salute him.
Hip.
What is it that you render back, methinks
You give me nothing.
Prosp.
You are to be Lord of a great People,
And o're Towns and Cities.
Hip.

And shall these people be all Men and Women?

Gonz.

Yes, and shall call you Lord.

Hip.
Why then I'le live no longer in a Prison, but
Have a whole Cave to my self hereafter.
Prosp.
And that your happiness may be compleat,
I give you my Dorinda for your Wife, she shall
Be yours for ever, when the Priest has made you one.
Hip.

How can he make us one, shall I grow to her?

Prosp.

By saying holy words you shall be joyn'd in marriage To each other.

Dor.
I warrant you those holy words are charms.
My Father means to conjure us together.
Prosp. to his daughter.
My Ariel told me, when last night you quarrel'd,
You said you would for ever part your beds,
Page  80 But what you threaten'd in your anger, Heaven
Has turn'd to Prophecy.
For you, Miranda, must with Ferdinand,
And you, Dorinda, with Hippolito lye in
One Bed hereafter.
Alonz.
And Heaven make those Beds still fruitful in
Producing Children to bless their Parents
Youth, and Grandsires age.
Mir. to Dor.
If Children come by lying in a Bed, I wonder you
And I had none between us.
Dor.
Sister it was our fault, we meant like fools
To look 'em in the fields, and they it seems
Are only found in Beds.
Hip.
I am o'rejoy'd that I shall have Dorinda in a Bed,
We'll lye all night and day together there,
And never rise again.
Ferd.
aside to him.

Hippolito! you yet are ignorant of your great Happiness, but there is somewhat which for

Your own and fair Dorinda's sake I must instruct
You in.
Hip.
Pray teach me quickly how Men and Women in your
World make love, I shall soon learn
I warrant you.
[Enter Ariel driving in Steph. Trinc. Must. Vent. Calib. Syc.
Prosp.
Why that's my dainty Ariel, I shall miss thee,
But yet thou shalt have freedom.
Gonz.
O look, Sir, look the Master and the Saylors—
The Bosen too—my Prophecy is out, that if
A Gallows were on land, that man could n'ere
Be drown'd.
Alonz. to Trinc.
Now Blasphemy, what not one Oath ashore?
Hast thou no mouth by land? why star'st thou so?
Trinc.

What more Dukes yet, I must resign my Dukedom, But 'tis no matter, I was almost starv'd in't.

Must.

Here's nothing but wild Sallads without Oyl or Vinegar.

Steph.

The Duke and Prince alive! would I had now our gallant Ship agen, and were her Master, I'd willingly give all my Island for her.

Vent.

And I my Vice-Roy-ship.

Page  81
Trinc.
I shall need no hangman, for I shall e'en hang
My self, now my friend Butt has shed his
Last drop of life. Poor Butt is quite departed.
Ant.

They talk like mad men.

Prosp.
No matter, time will bring 'em to themselves, and
Now their Wine is gone they will not quarrel.
Your Ship is safe and tight, and bravely rigg'd,
As when you first set Sail.
Alonz.

This news is wonderful.

Ariel.

Was it well done, my Lord?

Prosp.

Rarely, my diligence.

Gonz.

But pray, Sir, what are those mishapen Creatures?

Prosp.
Their Mother was a Witch, and one so strong
She would controul the Moon, make Flows
And Ebbs, and deal in her command without
Her power.
Syc.

O Setebos! these be brave Sprights indeed.

Prosp. to Calib.

Go Sirrah to my Cell, and as you hope for Pardon, trim it up.

Calib.
Most carefully. I will be wise hereafter.
What a dull fool was I to take those Drunkards
For Gods, when such as these were in the world?
Prosp.
Sir, I invite your Highness and your Train
To my poor Cave this night; a part of which
I will imploy in telling you my story.
Alonz.

No doubt it must be strangely taking, Sir.

Prosp.
When the morn draws I'le bring you to your Ship,
And promise you calm Seas and happy Gales.
My Ariel, that's thy charge: then to the Elements
Be free, and fare thee well.
Ariel.

I'le do it Master.

Sings.
Where the Bee sucks there suck I,
In a Cowslips Bell, I lye,
There I couch when Owls do cry,
On the Swallows wing I flye
After Summer merrily.
Merrily, merrily shall I live now
Vnder the Blossom that hangs on the Eough.
Page  82
Syc.

I'le to Sea with thee, and keep thee warm in thy Cabin.

Trinc.

No my dainty Dy-dapper, you have a tender consti∣tution, and will be sick a Ship-board. You are partly Fish and may swim after me. I wish you a good Voyage.

Prosp.

Now to this Royal Company, my servant, be visible, And entertain them with a Dance before they part.

Ariel.
I have a gentle Spirit for my Love,
Who twice seven years hath waited for my Freedom,
It shall appear and foot it featly with me.
Milcha, my Love, thy Ariel calls thee.
[Enter Milcha.
Milcha.

Here!

[They dance a Saraband..
Prosp.
Henceforth this Isle to the afflicted be
A place of Refuge as it was to me;
The Promises of blooming Spring live here,
And all the Blessings of the rip'ning year;
On my retreat let Heaven and Nature smile,
And ever flourish the Enchanted Isle.
[Exeunt.