The tempest, or, The enchanted island a comedy, as it is now acted at His Highness the Duke of York's Theatre.
Dryden, John, 1631-1700., Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616. Tempest., D'Avenant, William, Sir, 1606-1668.
Page  31

ACT III.

Enter Prospero and Miranda.
Prosp.

EXcuse it not, Miranda, for to you (the elder, and, I thought the more discreet) I gave the conduct of your Sister's actions.

Mir.

Sir, when you call'd me thence, I did not fail to mind her of her duty to depart.

Prosp.

How can I think you did remember hers, when you forgot your own? did you not see the man whom I command-ed you to shun?

Mir.

I must confess I saw him at a distance.

Prosp.
Did not his Eyes infect and poyson you?
What alteration found you in your self?
Mir.

I only wondred at a sight so new.

Prosp.
But have you no desire once more to see him?
Come, tell me truly what you think of him?
Mir.

As of the gayest thing I ever saw, so fine that it ap∣pear'd more fit to be belov'd than fear'd, and seem'd so near my kind, that I did think I might have call'd it Sister.

Prosp.

You do not love it?

Mir.

How is it likely that I should, except the thing had first lov'd me?

Prosp.
Cherish those thoughts: you have a gen'rous soul;
And since I see your mind not apt to take the light
Impressions of a sudden love, I will unfold
A secret to your knowledge.
That Creature which you saw, is of a kind which
Nature made a prop and guide to yours.
Mir.

Why did you then propose him as an object of terrour to my mind? you never us'd to teach me any thing but God-like truths, and what you said I did believe as sacred.

Prosp.
I fear'd the pleasing form of this young man
Might unawares possess your tender breast,
Page  32 Which for a nobler Guest I had design'd;
For shortly, my Miranda, you shall see another of his kind,
The full blown-flower, of which this youth was but the
Op'ning-bud. Go in, and send your sister to me.
Mir.

Heav'n still preserve you, Sir.

[Ex. Miranda.
Prosp.
And make thee fortunate.
Dorinda now must be examin'd too concerning this
Late interview. I'm sure unartful truth lies open
In her mind, as Crystal streams their sandy bottom show.
I must take care her love grow not too fast,
For innocence is Love's most fertile soil,
Wherein he soon shoots up and widely spreads,
Nor is that danger which attends Hippolito yet overpast.
[Enter Dorinda.
Prosp.
O, come hither, you have seen a man to day,
Against my strict command.
Dor.

Who I? indeed I saw him but a little, Sir.

Prosp.

Come, come, be clear. Your Sister told me all.

Dor.
Did she? truly she would have seen him more than I,
But that I would not let her.
Prosp.

Why so?

Dor.
Because, methought, he would have hurt me less
Than he would her. But if I knew you'd not be angry
With him, I could tell you, Sir, that he was much to blame.
Prosp.

Hah! was he to blame?

Tell me, with that sincerity I taught you, how you became so bold to see the man?

Dor.

I hope you will forgive me, Sir, because I did not see him much till he saw me. Sir, he would needs come in my way, and star'd, and star'd upon my face; and so I thought I would be re∣veng'd of him, and therefore I gaz'd on him as long; but if I e're come neer a man again—

Prosp.

I told you he was dangerous; but you would not be warn'd.

Dor.

Pray be not angry, Sir, if I tell you, you are mistaken in him; for he did me no great hurt.

Prosp.

But he may do you more harm hereafter.

Page  33
Dor.
No, Sir, I'm as well as e're I was in all my life,
But that I cannot eat nor drink for thought of him.
That dangerous man runs ever in my mind.
Prosp.

The way to cure you, is no more to see him.

Dor.
Nay pray, Sir, say not so, I promis'd him
To see him once agen; and you know, Sir,
You charg'd me I should never break my promise.
Prosp.

Wou'd you see him who did you so much mischief?

Dor.
I warrant you I did him as much harm as he did me,
For when I left him, Sir, he sigh'd so as it griev'd
My heart to hear him.
Prosp.
Those sighs were poysonous, they infected you:
You say they griev'd you to the heart.
Dor.

'Tis true; but yet his looks and words were gentle.

Prosp.
These are the Day-dreams of a maid in love,
But still I fear the worst.
Dor.
O fear not him, Sir,
I know he will not hurt you for my sake;
I'le undertake to tye him to a hair,
And lead him hither as my Pris'ner to you.
Prosp.
Take heed, Dorinda, you may be deceiv'd;
This Creature is of such a Salvage race,
That no mild usage can reclaim his wildness;
But, like a Lyon's whelp bred up by hand,
When least you look for't, Nature will present
The Image of his Fathers bloody Paws,
Wherewith he purvey'd for his couching Queen;
And he will leap into his native fury.
Dor.

He cannot change from what I left him, Sir.

Prosp.
You speak of him with too much passion; tell me
(And on your duty tell me true, Dorinda)
What past betwixt you and that horrid creature?
Dor.

How, horrid, Sir? if any else but you should call it so, indeed I should be angry.

Prosp.

Go too! you are a foolish Girl; but answer to what I ask, what thought you when you saw it?

Dor.
At first it star'd upon me and seem'd wild,
And then I trembled, yet it look'd so lovely, that when
Page  34
I would have fled away, my feet seem'd fasten'd to the ground,
Then it drew near, and with amazement askt
To touch my hand; which, as a ransom for my life,
I gave: but when he had it, with a furious gripe
He put it to his mouth so eagerly, I was afraid he
Would have swallow'd it.
Prosp.

Well, what was his behaviour afterwards?

Dor.
He on a sudden grew so tame and gentle,
That he became more kind to me than you are;
Then, Sir, I grew I know not how, and touching his hand
Agen, my heart did beat so strong as I lackt breath
To answer what he ask'd.
Prosp.

You have been too fond, and I should chide you for it.

Dor.

Then send me to that creature to be punisht.

Prosp.
Poor Child! thy passion like a lazy Ague
Has seiz'd thy blood, instead of striving thou humour'st
And feed'st thy languishing disease: thou fight'st
The Battels of thy Enemy, and 'tis one part of what
I threatn'd thee, not to perceive thy danger.
Dor.
Danger, Sir?
If he would hurt me, yet he knows not how:
He hath no Claws, nor Teeth, nor Horns to hurt me,
But looks about him like a Callow-bird
Just straggl'd from the Nest: pray trust me, Sir,
To go to him agen.
Prosp.
Since you will venture,
I charge you bear your self reserv'dly to him,
Let him not dare to touch your naked hand,
But keep at distance from him.
Dor.

This is hard.

Prosp.
It is the way to make him love you more;
He will despise you if you grow too kind.
Dor.
I'le struggle with my heart to follow this,
But if I lose him by it, will you promise
To bring him back agen?
Prosp.
Fear not, Dorinda;
But use him ill and he'l be yours for ever.
Dor.

I hope you have not couzen'd me agen.

[Exit Dorinda.
Page  35
Prosp.
Now my designs are gathering to a head.
My spirits are obedient to my charms.
What, Ariel! my servant Ariel, where art thou?
[Enter Ariel.
Ariel.

What wou'd my potent Master? here I am.

Prosp.
Thou and thy meaner fellows your last service
Did worthily perform, and I must use you in such another
Work: how goes the day?
Ariel.

On the fourth, my Lord, and on the sixth you said our work should cease.

Prosp.
And so it shall;
And thou shalt have the open air at freedom.
Ariel.

Thanks my great Lord.

Prosp.
But tell me first, my spirit,
How fares the Duke, my Brother, and their followers?
Ariel.
Confin'd together, as you gave me order,
In the Lime-Grove which weather-fends your Cell;
Within that Circuit up and down they wander,
But cannot stir one step beyond their compass.
Prosp.

How do they bear their sorrows?

Ariel.
The two Dukes appear like men distracted, their
Attendants brim-full of sorrow mourning over 'em;
But chiefly, he you term'd the good Gonzalo:
His tears run down his Beard, like Winter-drops
From Eaves of Reeds, your Vision did so work 'em,
That if you now beheld 'em, your affections
Would become tender.
Prosp.

Dost thou think so, Spirit?

Ariel.

Mine would, Sir, were I humane.

Prosp.
And mine shall:
Hast thou, who art but air, a touch, a feeling of their
Afflictions, and shall not I (a man like them, one
Who as sharply relish passions as they) be kindlier
Mov'd than thou art? though they have pierc'd
Me to the quick with injuries, yet with my nobler
Reason 'gainst my fury I will take part;
The rarer action is in virtue than in vengeance.
Go, my Ariel, refresh with needful food their
Page  36 Famish'd bodies. With shows and cheerful.
Musick comfort 'em.
Ariel.

Presently, Master.

Prosp.

With a twinckle, Ariel.

Ariel.
Before you can say come and go,
And breath twice, and cry so; so,
Each spirit tripping on his toe,
Shall bring 'em meat with mop and moe,
Do you love me, Master, I, or no?
Prosp.
Dearly, my dainty Ariel, but stay, spirit;
What is become of my Slave Caliban,
And Sycorax his Sister?
Ariel.
Potent Sir!
They have cast off your service, and revolted
To the wrack'd Mariners, who have already
Parcell'd your Island into Governments.
Prosp.
No matter, I have now no need of 'em;
But, spirit, now I stay thee on the Wing;
Haste to perform what I have given in charge:
But see they keep within the bounds I set 'em.
Ariel.
I'le keep 'em in with Walls of Adamant,
Invisible as air to mortal Eyes,
But yet unpassable.
Prosp.

Make hast then.

[Exeunt severally.
Enter Alonzo, Antonio, Gonzalo.
Gonz.
I am weary, and can go no further, Sir,
My old Bones ake, here's a Maze trod indeed
Through forth-rights and Meanders, by your patience
I needs must rest.
Alonz.
Old Lord, I cannot blame thee, who am my self feiz'd
With a weariness to the dulling of my Spirits:
Sit and rest.
[They sit.
Even here I will put off my hope, and keep it no longer
For my Flatterers: he is drown'd whom thus we
Stray to find, and the Sea mocks our frustrate
Search on Land; well! let him go.
Page  37
Ant.
Do not for one repulse forego the purpose
Which you resolv'd t'effect.
Alonz.
I'm faint with hunger, and must despair
Of food, Heav'n hath incens'd the Seas and
Shores against us for our crimes.
[Musick.
What! Harmony agen, my good friends, heark!
Anto.
I fear some other horrid apparition.
Give us kind Keepers, Heaven I beseech thee!
Gonz.
'Tis chearful Musick, this, unlike the first;
And seems as 'twere meant t'unbend our cares,
And calm your troubled thoughts.
Ariel invisible Sings.
Dry those eyes which are o're flowing,
All your storms are over-blowing:
While you in this Isle are bideing,
You shall feast without providing:
Every dainty you can think of,
Ev'ry Wine which you would drink of,
Shall be yours; all want shall shun you,
Ceres blessing so is on you.
Alonz.

This voice speaks comfort to us.

Ant.
Wou'd 'twere come; there is no Musick in a Song
To me, my stomack being empty.
Gonz.
O for a heavenly Vision of Boyl'd,
Bak'd, and Roasted!
Enter eight fat Spirits, with Cornu-Copia in their hands.
Alonz.

Are these plump shapes sent to deride our hunger?

Gonz.
No, no: it is a Masque of fatten'd Devils, the
Burgo-Masters of the lower Region.
[Dance and vanish.
O for a Collop of that large-haunch'd Devil
Who went out last!
Ant.
going to the door. My Lord, the Duke, see yonder.
A Table, as I live, set out and furnisht
With all varieties of Meats and fruits.
Page  38
Alonz.
'Tis so indeed, but who dares tast this feast,
Which Fiends provide, perhaps, to poyson us?
Gonz.

Why that dare I; if the black Gentleman be so ill∣natur'd, he may do his pleasure.

Ant.
'Tis certain we must either eat or famish,
I will encounter it, and feed.
Alonz.

If both resolve, I will adventure too.

Gonz.
Then good my Lord, make haste,
And say no Grace before it, I beseech you,
Because the meat will vanish strait, if, as I fear,
An evil Spirit be our Cook.
[Exeunt.
Enter Trincalo and Caliban.
Trinc.
Brother Monster, welcome to my private Palace.
But where's thy Sister, is she so brave a Lass?
Calib.

In all this Isle there are but two more, the Daughters of the Tyrant Prospero; and she is bigger than 'em both. O here she comes; now thou may'st judge thy self, my Lord.

[Enter Sycorax.
Trinc.

She's monstrous fair indeed. Is this to be my Spouse? well she's Heir of all this Isle (for I will geld Monster). The Trincalos, like other wise men, have anciently us'd to marry for Estate more than for beauty.

Sycorax.

I prithee let me have the gay thing about thy neck, and that which dangles at thy wrist.

[Sycorax points to his Bosens Whistle, and his Bottle.
Trinc.

My dear Blobber-lips; this, observe my Chuck, is a badge of my Sea-Office; my fair Fuss, thou dost not know it.

Syc.

No, my dread Lord.

Trinc.

It shall be a Whistle for our first Babe, and when the next Shipwrack puts me again to swimming, I'le dive to get a Coral to it.

Syc.

I'le be thy pretty child, and wear it first.

Trinc.

I prithee sweet Babby do not play the wanton, and cry for my goods e're I'm dead. When thou art my Widow, thou shalt have the Devil and all.

Syc.

May I not have the other fine thing?

Page  39
Trinc.

This is a sucking-Bottle for young Trincalo.

Calib.

This is a God a mighty liquor, I did but drink thrice of it, and it hath made me glad e're since.

Syc.

He is the bravest God I ever saw.

Calib.
You must be kind to him, and he will love you.
I prithee speak to her, my Lord, and come neerer her.
Trinc.
By this light, I dare not till I have drank: I must
Fortifie my stomack first.
Syc.

I shall have all his fine things when I'm a Widow.

[Pointing to his Bottle, and Bosens Whistle.
Calib.

I, but you must be kind and kiss him then.

Trinc.

My Brother Monster is a rare Pimp.

Syc.

I'le hug thee in my arms, my Brother's God.

Trinc.

Think o'thy soul Trincalo, thou art a dead man if this kindness continue.

Calib.

And he shall get thee a young Sycorax, wilt thou not, my Lord?

Trinc.
Indeed I know not how, they do no such thing in my
Country.
Syc.

I'le shew thee how: thou shalt get me twenty Sycoraxes; and I'le get thee twenty Calibans.

Trinc.

Nay, if they are got, she must do't all her self, that's certain.

Syc.
And we will tumble in cool Plashes, and the soft Fens,
Where we will make us Pillows of Flags and Bull-rushes.
Calib.

My Lord, she would be loving to thee, and thou wilt not let her.

Trinc.

Ev'ry thing in its season, Brother Monster; but you must counsel her; fair Maids must not be too forward.

Syc.

My Brother's God, I love thee; prithee let me come to thee.

Trinc.

Subject Monster, I charge thee keep the Peace be∣tween us.

Calib.

Shall she not taste of that immortal Liquor?

Trinc.

Umph! that's another question: for if she be thus fli∣pant in her Water, what will she be in her Wine?

[Enter Ariel (invisible) and changes the Bottle which stands upon the ground.
Page  40
Ariel.

There's Water for your Wine.

[Exit Ariel.
Trinc.
Well! since it must be so.
[Gives her the Bottle.
How do you like it now, my Queen that
[She drinks.
Must be?
Syc.

Is this your heavenly liquor? I'le bring you to a River of the same.

Trinc.

Wilt thou so, Madam Monster? what a mighty Prince shall I be then? I would not change my Dukedom to be great Turk Trincalo.

Syc.

This is the drink of Frogs.

Trinc.

Nay, if the Frogs of this Island drink such, they are the merryest Frogs in Christendom.

Calib.
She does not know the virtue of this liquor:
I prithee let me drink for her.
Trinc.

Well said, Subject Monster.

[Caliban drinks.
Calib.

My Lord, this is meer water.

Trinc.
'Tis thou hast chang'd the Wine then, and drunk it up,
Like a debauch'd Fish as thou art. Let me see't,
I'le taste it my self. Element! meer Element! as I live.
It was a cold gulp such as this which kill'd my famous
Predecessor old Simon the King.
Calib.

How does thy honour? prithee be not angry, and I will lick thy shoe.

Trinc.

I could find in my heart to turn thee out of my Domi∣nions for a liquorish Monster.

Calib.

O my Lord, I have found it out; this must be done by one of Prospero's spirits.

Trinc.

There's nothing but malice in these Devils, I never lov'd 'em from my Childhood. The Devil take 'em, I would it had bin holy-water for their sakes.

Syc.

Will not thy mightiness revenge our wrongs, on this great Sorcerer? I know thou wilt, for thou art valiant.

Trinc.

In my Sack, Madam Monster, as any flesh alive.

Syc.

Then I will cleave to thee.

Trinc.

Lovingly said, in troth: now cannot I hold out against her. This Wife-like virtue of hers, has overcome me.

Syc.

Shall I have thee in my arms?

Trinc.
Thou shalt have Duke Trincalo in thy arms:
Page  41 But prithee be not too boistrous with me at first;
Do not discourage a young beginner.
[They embrace.
Stand to your Arms, my Spouse,
And subject Monster;
[Ent. Steph. Must. Vent.
The Enemy is come to surprise us in our Quarters.
You shall know Rebels that I'm marry'd to a Witch,
And we have a thousand Spirits of our party.
Steph.
Hold! I ask a Truce; I and my Vice-Roys
(Finding no food, and but a small remainder of Brandy)
Are come to treat a peace betwixt us,
Which may be for the good of both Armies,
Therefore Trincalo disband.
Trinc.

Plain Trincalo, methinks I might have been a Duke in your mouth, I'le not accept of your Embassy without my title.

Steph.
A title shall break no squares betwixt us:
Vice-Roys, give him his stile of Duke, and treat with him,
Whilst I walk by in state.
[Ventoso and Mustacho bow whilst Trincalo puts on his Cap.
Must.
Our Lord and Master, Duke Stephano, has sent us
In the first place to demand of you, upon what
Ground you make war against him, having no right
To Govern here, as being elected only by
Your own voice.
Trinc.
To this I answer, that having in the face of the world
Espous'd the lawful Inheritrix of this Island,
Queen Blouze the first, and having homage done me,
By this hectoring Spark her Brother, from these two
I claim a lawful Title to this Island.
Must.

Who, that Monster? he a Hector?

Calib.

Lo! how he mocks me, wilt thou let him, my Lord?

Vent.

Lord! quoth he: the Monster's a very natural.

Syc.

Lo! lo! agen; bite him to death I prithee.

Trinc.
Vice-Roys! keep good tongues in your heads
I advise you, and proceed to your business, for I have
Other affairs to dispatch of more importance betwixt
Queen Slobber-Chops and my self.
Must.

First and foremost, as to your claim that you have an∣swer'd.

Page  42
Vent.
But second and foremost, we demand of you,
That if we make a peace, the Butt also may be
Comprehended in the Treaty.
Must.

Is the Butt safe, Duke Trincalo?

Trinc.

The Butt is partly safe: but to comprehend it in the Treaty, or indeed to make any Treaty, I cannot with my ho∣nour, without your submission. These two, and the Spirits under me, stand likewise upon their honours.

Calib.
Keep the liquor for us, my Lord, and let them drink
Brine, for I will not show 'em the quick freshes of the Island.
Steph.

I understand, being present, from my Embassadors what your resolution is, and ask an hours time of deliberation, and so I take our leave; but first I desire to be entertain'd at your Butt, as becomes a Prince, and his Embassadors.

Trinc.
That I refuse, till acts of Hostility be ceas'd.
These Rogues are rather Spies than Embassadors;
I must take heed of my Butt. They come to pry
Into the secrets of my Dukedom.
Vent.

Trincalo you are a barbarous Prince, and so farewel.

[Exeunt Steph. Must. Vent.
Trinc.

Subject Monster! stand your Sentry before my Cel∣lar; my Queen and I will enter and feast our selves within.

Syc.

May I not marry that other King and his two subjects, to help you anights?

Trinc.
What a careful Spouse have I? well! if she does
Cornute me, the care is taken.
When underneath my power my foes have truckl'd,
To be a Prince, who would not be a Cuckold?
[Exeunt.
Enter Ferdinand, and Ariel (invisible.)
Ferd.
How far will this invisible Musician conduct
My steps? he hovers still about me, whether
For good or ill I cannot tell, nor care I much;
For I have been so long a slave to chance, that
I'm as weary of her flatteries as her frowns,
But here I am—
Ariel.

Here I am.

Page  43
Ferd.
Hah! art thou so? the Spirit's turn'd an Eccho:
This might seem pleasant, could the burthen of my
Griefs accord with any thing but sighs.
And my last words, like those of dying men
Need no reply. Fain I would go to shades, where
Few would wish to follow me.
Ariel.

Follow me.

Ferd.
This evil Spirit grows importunate,
But I'le not take his counsel.
Ariel.

Take his counsel.

Ferd.

It may be the Devil's counsel. I'le never take it.

Ariel.

Take it.

Ferd.
I will discourse no more with thee,
Nor follow one step further.
Ariel.

One step further.

Ferd.
This must have more importance than an Eccho.
Some Spirit tempts to a precipice.
I'le try if it will answer when I sing
My sorrows to the murmurs of this Brook.
He Sings.
Go thy way.
Ariel.

Go thy way.

Ferd.

Why should'st thou stay?

Ariel.

Why should'st thou stay?

Ferd.
Where the Winds whistle, and where the streams creep,
Vnder yond Willow-tree, fain would I sleep.
Then let me alone,
For 'tis time to be gone.
Ariel.

For 'tis time to be gone.

Ferd.
What cares or pleasures can be in this Isle?
Within this desart place
There lives no humane race;
Fate cannot frown here, nor kind fortune smile.
Ariel.
Kind Fortune smiles, and she
Has yet in store for thee
Some strange felicity.
Follow me, follow me,
And thou shalt see.
Page  44
Ferd.
I'le take thy word for once;
Lead on Musician.
[Exeunt and return.
Scene changes, and discovers Prospero and Miranda.
Prosp.

Advance the fringed Curtains of thine Eyes, and say what thou seest yonder.

Mir.
Is it a Spirit?
Lord! how it looks about! Sir, I confess it carries a brave form.
But 'tis a Spirit.
Prosp.

No Girl, it eats and sleeps, and has such senses as we have. This young Gallant, whom thou see'st, was in the wrack; were he not somewhat stain'd with grief (beauty's worst Cancker) thou might'st call him a goodly person; he has lost his company, and strays about to find 'em.

Mir.

I might call him a thing divine, for nothing natural I ever saw so noble.

Prosp.

It goes on as my Soul prompts it: Spirit, fine Spirit. I'le free thee within two days for this.

Ferd.

She's sure the Mistress, on whom these airs attend. Fair Excellence, if, as your form declares, you are divine, be pleas'd to instruct me how you will be worship'd; so bright a beauty cannot sure belong to humane kind.

Mir.

I am, like you, a mortal, if such you are.

Ferd.

My language too! O Heavens! I am the best of them who speak this speech, when I'm in my own Country.

Prosp.

How, the best? what wert thou if the Duke of Sa∣voy heard thee?

Ferd.

As I am now, who wonders to hear thee speak of Savoy: he does hear me, and that he does I weep, my self am Savoy, whose fatal Eyes (e're since at ebbe) beheld the Duke my Fa∣ther wrackt.

Mir.

A lack! for pity.

Prosp.
At the first sight they have chang'd Eyes, dear Ariel,
I'le set thee free for this—young, Sir, a word.
With hazard of your self you do me wrong.
Mir.
Why speaks my Father so urgently?
This is the third man that e're I saw, the first whom.
Page  45 E're I sigh'd for, sweet Heaven move my Father
To be inclin'd my way.
Ferd.
O! if a Virgin! and your affection not gone forth,
I'le make you Mistress of Savoy.
Prosp.
Soft, Sir! one word more.
They are in each others powers, but this swift
Bus'ness I must uneasie make, lest too light
Winning make the prize light—one word more.
Thou usurp'st the name not due to thee, and hast
Put thy self upon this Island as a spy to get the
Government from me, the Lord of it.
Ferd.

No, as I'm a man.

Mir.
There's nothing ill can dwell in such a Temple,
If th' Evil Spirit hath so fair a house,
Good things will strive to dwell with it.
Prosp.
No more. Speak not you for him, he's a Traytor,
Come! thou art my Pris'ner and shalt be in
Bonds. Sea-water shalt thou drink, thy food
Shall be the fresh-Brook-Muscles, wither'd Roots,
And Husks, wherein the Acorn crawl'd; follow.
Ferd.
No, I will resist such entertainment
Till my Enemy has more power.
[He draws, and is charm'd from moving.
Mir.
O dear Father! make not too rash a tryal
Of him, for he's gentle and not fearful.
Prosp.
My child my Tutor! put thy Sword up Traytor,
Who mak'st a show, but dar'st not strike: thy
Conscience is possest with guilt. Come from
Thy Ward, for I can here disarm thee with
This Wand, and make thy Weapon drop.
Mir.

Beseech you Father.

Prosp.

Hence: hang not on my Garment.

Mir.
Sir, have pity,
I'le be his Surety.
Prosp.
Silence! one word more shall make me chide thee,
If not hate thee: what, an advocate for an
Impostor? sure thou think'st there are no more
Such shapes as his?
Page  46 To the most of men this is a Caliban,
And they to him are Angels.
Mir.
My affections are then most humble,
I have no ambition to see a goodlier man.
Prosp.
Come on, obey:
Thy Nerves are in their infancy agen, and have
No vigour in them.
Ferd.
So they are:
My Spirits, as in a Dream, are all bound up:
My Father's loss, the weakness which I feel,
The wrack of all my friends, and this man's threats,
To whom I am subdu'd, would seem light to me,
Might I but once a day through my Prison behold this maid:
All corners else o'th' Earth let liberty make use of:
I have space enough in such a Prison.
Prosp.
It works: come on:
Thou hast done well, fine Ariel: follow me.
Heark what thou shalt more do for me.
[Whispers Ariel.
Mir.
Be of comfort!
My Father's of a better nature, Sir,
Than he appears by speech: this is unwonted
Which now came from him.
Prosp.
Thou shalt be as free as Mountain Winds:
But then exactly do all points of my command.
Ariel.

To a Syllable.

[Exit Ariel.
Prosp. to Mir.
Go in that way, speak not a word for him:
I'le separate you.
[Exit Miranda.
Ferd.
As soon thou may'st divide the waters
When thou strik'st 'em, which pursue thy bootless blow,
And meet when 'tis past.
Prosp.
Go practise your Philosophy within,
And if you are the same you speak your self,
Bear your afflictions like a Prince—That Door
Shews you your Lodging.
Ferd.

'Tis in vain to strive, I must obey.

[Exit. Ferd.
Prosp.
This goes as I would wish it.
〈◊〉〈◊〉 my second care, Hippolito.
〈◊〉 not need to chide him for his fault,
Page  47 His passion is become his punishment.
Come sorth, Hippolito.
[Enter Hippolito.
Hip. entring.

'Tis Prospero's voice.

Prosp.

Hippolito! I know you now expect I should severely chide you: you have seen a woman in contempt of my com∣mands.

Hip.
But, Sir, you see I am come off unharm'd;
I told you, that you need not doubt my courage.
Prosp.

You think you have receiv'd no hurt.

Hip.
No, none Sir.
Try me agen, when e're you please I'm ready:
I think I cannot fear an Army of 'em.
Prosp.
How much in vain it is to bridle Nature!
[Aside.
Well! what was the success of your encounter?
Hip.
Sir, we had none, we yielded both at first,
For I took her to mercy, and she me.
Prosp.

But are you not much chang'd from what you were?

Hip.
Methinks I wish and wish! for what I know not,
But still I wish—yet if I had that woman,
She, I believe, could tell me what I wish for.
Prosp.

What wou'd you do to make that Woman yours?

Hip.
I'd quit the rest o'th' world that I might live alone with
Her, she never should be from me.
We too would sit and look till our eyes ak'd.
Prosp.

You'd soon be weary of her.

Hip.

O, Sir, never.

Prosp.
But you'l grow old and wrinckl'd, as you see me now,
And then you will not care for her.
Hip.

You may do what you please, but, Sir, we two can ne∣ver possibly grow old.

Prosp.

You must, Hippolito.

Hip.

Whether we will or no, Sir, who shall make us?

Prosp.

Nature, which made me so.

Hip.
But you have told me her works are various;
She made you old, but she has made us young.
Prosp.
Time will convince you,
Mean while be sure you tread in honours paths,
That you may merither, and that you may not want
Page  48 Fit occasions to employ your virtue, in this next
Cave there is a stranger lodg'd, one of your kind,
Young, of a noble presence, and as he says himself,
Of Princely birth, he is my Pris'ner and in deep
Affliction, visit, and comfort him; it will become you.
Hip.

It is my duty, Sir.

[Exit Hippolito.
Prosp.

True, he has seen a woman, yet he lives, perhaps I took the moment of his birth amiss, perhaps my Art it self is false: on what strange grounds we build our hopes and fears, mans life is all a mist, and in the dark, our fortunes meet us.

If Fate be not, then what can we foresee,
Or how can we avoid it, if it be?
If by free-will in our own paths we move,
How are we bounded by Decrees above?
Whether we drive, or whether we are driven,
If ill 'tis ours, if good the act of Heaven.
[Exit Prospero.
Enter Hippolito and Ferdinand. Scene, a Cave.
Ferd.
Your pity, noble youth, doth much oblige me,
Indeed 'twas sad to lose a Father so.
Hip.
I, and an only Father too, for sure you said
You had but one.
Ferd.

But one Father! he's wondrous simple!

[Aside.
Hip.
Are such misfortunes frequent in your world,
Where many men live?
Ferd.
Such we are born to.
But gentle youth, as you have question'd me,
So give me leave to ask you, what you are?
Hip.

Do not you know?

Ferd.

How should I?

Hip.
I well hop'd I was a man, but by your ignorance
Of what I am, I fear it is not so:
Well, Prospero! this is now the second time
You have deceiv'd me.
Ferd.
Sir, there is no doubt you are a man:
But I would know of whence?
Page  49
Hip.

Why, of this world, I never was in yours.

Ferd.

Have you a Father?

Hip.

I was told I had one, and that he was a man, yet I have bin so much deceived, I dare not tell't you for a truth; but I have still been kept a Prisoner for fear of women.

Ferd.

They indeed are dangerous, for since I came I have be∣held one here, whose beauty pierc'd my heart.

Hip.

How did she pierce? you seem not hurt.

Ferd.
Alas! the wound was made by her bright eyes,
And festers by her absence.
But to speak plainer to you, Sir, I love her.
Hip.

Now I suspect that love's the very thing, that I feel too! pray tell me truly, Sir, are you not grown unquiet since you saw her?

Ferd.

I take no rest.

Hip.
Just, just my disease.
Do you not wish you do not know for what?
Ferd.

O no! I know too well for what I wish.

Hip.
There, I confess, I differ from you, Sir:
But you desire she may be always with you?
Ferd.

I can have no felicity without her.

Hip.
Just my condition! alas, gentle Sir,
I'le pity you, and you shall pity me.
Ferd.
I love so much, that if I have her not,
I find I cannot live.
Hip.
How! do you love her?
And would you have her too? that must not be:
For none but I must have her.
Ferd.
But perhaps, we do not love the same:
All beauties are not pleasing alike to all.
Hip.
Why are there more fair Women, Sir,
Besides that one I love?
Ferd.

That's a strange question. There are many more be∣sides that beauty which you love.

Hip.

I will have all of that kind, if there be a hundred of 'em.

Ferd.

But noble youth, you know not what you say.

Hip.
Sir, they are things I love, I cannot be without 'em:
O, how I rejoyce! more women!
Page  50
Ferd.

Sir, if you love you must be ty'd to one.

Hip.

Ty'd! how ty'd to her?

Ferd.

To love none but her.

Hip.
But, Sir, I find it is against my Nature.
I must love where I like, and I believe I may like all,
All that are fair: come! bring me to this Woman,
For I must have her.
Ferd.
His simplicity
Is such that I can scarce be angry with him.
[Aside.
Perhaps, sweet youth, when you behold her,
You will find you do not love her.
Hip.

I find already I love, because she is another Woman.

Ferd.

You cannot love two women, both at once.

Hip.
Sure 'tis my duty to love all who do resemble
Her whom I've already seen. I'le have as many as I can,
That are so good, and Angel-like, as she I love.
And will have yours.
Ferd.

Pretty youth, you cannot.

Hip.

I can do any thing for that I love.

Ferd.

I may, perhaps, by force restrain you from it.

Hip.
Why do so if you can. But either promise me
To love no Woman, or you must try your force.
Ferd.

I cannot help it, I must love.

Hip.

Well you may love, for Prospero taught me friendship too: you shall love me and other men if you can find 'em, but all the Angel-women shall be mine.

Ferd.
I must break off this conference, or he will
Urge me else beyond what I can bear.
Sweet youth! some other time we will speak
Further concerning both our loves; at present
I am indispos'd with weariness and grief,
And would, if you are pleas'd, retire a while.
Hip.
Some other time be it; but, Sir, remember
That I both seek and much intreat your friendship,
For next to Women, I find I can love you.
Ferd.

I thank you, Sir, I will consider of it.

[Exit Ferdinand.
Hip.
This Stranger does insult and comes into my
World to take those heavenly beauties from me,
Page  51 Which I believe I am inspir'd to love,
And yet he said he did desire but one.
He would be poor in love, but I'le be rich:
I now perceive that Prospero was cunning;
For when he frighted me from woman-kind,
Those precious things he for himself design'd.
[Exit.