The Lancashire-witches and Tegue O Divelly, the Irish-priest a comedy acted at the Duke's Theater
Shadwell, Thomas, 1642?-1692.
Page  27 Page  28 Page  29

ACT. III.

Enter Sir Edward Harfort, Bellfort and Doubty.
Doubt.

YOu have extreamly delighted us this morning, by your House, Gardens, your Accommodation, and your way of Living, you put me in mind of the renowned Sidneys Admirable description of Kalandar.

Sir Edw.

Sir you Complement me too much.

Bell.

Methinks you represent to us the Golden days of Queen Elizabeth, such sure were our Gentry then; now they are grown Servile Apes to Forreign customes, they leave off Hospitality, for which we were famous all over Europe, and turn Servants to Board-wages.

Sir Edw.

For my part, I love to have my Servants part of my Family, the other were to hire day Labourers to wait on me, I had rather my Friends, Kindred, Ten∣nants and Servants should live well out of me, than Coach-makers, Taylors, Em∣broiderers, and Lacemen should: To be pointed at in the Streets, and have Fools stare at my Equipage, is a vanity I have always scorn'd.

Doubt.

You speak like one descended from those Noble Ancestors that made France tremble, and all the rest of Europe Honour 'em.

Sir Edw.

I reverence the Memory of 'em: But our New-fashion'd Gentry love the French too well to fight against 'em; they are bred abroad without knowing any thing of our Constitution, and come home tainted with Foppery, slavish Principles, and Popish Religion.

Bell.

They bring home Arts of Building from hot Countries to serve for our cold one; and F••gality from those places where they have little Meat and small Stomacks, to suffice us who have great plenty and lusty Appetites.

Doubt.

They build Houses with Halls in 'em, not so big as former Porches; Beg∣gars were better entertained by their Ancestors, than their Tennants by them.

Sir Edw.

For my part, I think 'twas never good days, but when great Tables were kept in large Halls; the Buttery-hatch always open, Black Jacks, and a good smell of Meat and March-beer, with Dogs-turds, and Mary-bones as Ornaments in the Hall: These were signs of good House keeping, I hate to see Italian fine Buildings with no Meat or Drink in 'em▪

Bell.

I like not their little Plates, methinks there's Vertue in an English Sur-loyn.

Doubt.

Our Sparks bring nothing but Forreign Vices and Follies home; 'tis redicu∣lous to be bred in one Country to learn to live in another.

Sir Edw.

While we lived thus (to borrow a Coxcombly word) we made a better Figure in the World.

Bell.

You have a mind that suits your Fortune, and can make your own hap∣piness.

Sir Edw.

The greatest is the Enjoyment of my Friends, and such Worthy etlemen Page  30s your Selves, and when I cannot have enough of that; I have a Library, good Hor∣ss and good Musick.

Doubt.

Princes may envy such an English Gentleman.

Sir Edw.

You are too kind, I am a true English man, I love the Princes Rights and Pples liberties, and will defend 'em both with th last penny in my purse, and the last drop n my veins, and dare defy the witless Plots of Papists.

Bell.

Spoken like a Noble Patriot.

Sir Edw.

Pardon me, you talk like English-men, and you have warm'd me; I hope to see the Prince and People flourish yet; old as I am, inspite of Jesuits, I am sure our Constitution is the Noblest in the World.

Doub.

Would there were enough such English Gentlemen.

Bell.

Twere to be wisht; but our Gentry are so much poysoned with Forreign Vnities, that methinks the Genius of England seems sunk into the Yeoma••y.

Sir Edw.

We have indeed too many rotten Members▪ You speak like Gentlemen, Worthy of such Noble Fathers, as you both had; but Gentlemen I spoke of Musick, I see two of my Artists, come into the Garden, they shall entertain you with a Song this Morning.

Bell.
Sir you oblige us every way.
An Italian Song.
Finely compos'd, and excellently perform'd.
Doubt.

I see Sir you are well serv'd in every thing.

Enter Isabella and Theodosia.
Sir Edw.

My sweet Cousin good Morrow to thee, I hope to call thee shortly by another Name, my dear Child, Heaven's bless thee▪

Isab. Kneels.
Bell.

Ladies your most humble Servant; you are early up to take the pleasure of the Morning in these Gardens.

Doubt.

'Tis a Paradice you are in; every object within this place is ravishing.

Theo.

This place affords variety of Pleasures; nothing here is wanting.

Bell.

Where such fine Ladies are.

Enter Servant with Tegue O Devilly an Irish-Priest.
Serv.

A Gentleman, To speak with you.

Sir Edw.

With me! Daughter pray shew those Gentlemen the Statues, Grottoes and the Water-works, Ile wait on you immediately.

Bell.

This is an opportunity beyond our hopes.

Ex. ell. Doubt. Isab. Theo.
Sir Edw.

Would you speak with me?

Priest.

Arrah, and please ty Oorship, I am come here to displaash to maake a 〈◊〉 unto thee, dest dou not know me Joy?

Sir Edw.

Oh! You live at Mr. Redletters my Catholick Neighbours.

Priest.

Ah by my Shoul, I.

Sir Edw.

How came you to venture hither? you are a Popish-Priest.

Priest.

Ay, but 'tis no matter for all daat oy: by my Shoul, but I vill taak de Page  31 Oades, and I think I vill be excus'd, but hark 〈◊〉 you a while, by my trott I shall be a Papist too for all daat, indeed, yes.

Sir Edw.

Excellent Principles.

Priest.

I do come for de nonest to see dee, and yet I do not come on purpose gra: But it is no matter, I will talk vid you about daat, I do come upon occaasion and Mr. Redletter did shend me unto de.

Sir Edw.

For What?

Priest.

What will I say unto dee now, but Mr. Redletter did shend me, and yet I did come of my self too for all daat upon occaasion, daat I did heare, concerning of dee, dat dy House and de Plaash is all over-run with Witches and Spirits, do you see now?

Sir Edw.

I had best let this Fool stay to laugh at him, he may be out of the damn'd Plot, if any Priest was? Sure they would never trust this Fool.

Aside.
Priest.

What shaall you shay unto me upon all dis, I will exorcize doze Vitches, and I will plague dose Devils now by my Shoul, vid Holy-Water, and vid Reliques, and I will reet 'em out of his Plaash, God shaave the King.

Sir Edw.

I have forgot your Name.

Priest.

They do put the Name of Kelly upon me, Joy, but by my fait I am call'd by my own right Name, Tegue O Devilly.

Sir Edw.

Tegue O Devilly?

Priest.

Yes, a very oold Naam in Eereland by my Shalvaation, well gra, I have brought upon my Cloke-bagg shome Holy-water, and I will put it upon the Devils and de Vitches Faashes, and I will make you shome more Holy-water, and you will vaash all de Roomes vid it and bee—

Sir Edw.

Well, Father Tegue O Devilly, You're welcom; but how are you venture publickly in these times?

Priest.

Why, I have great consideraation upon dy Prudence; for if dou woudst be∣tray me, now phare will be de soleedity of dat Joy.

Sir Edw.

I speak not for my self, but others.

Priest.

The Devil aak me now, I do think, I will suffer for my Religion, I am affraid I will be slain at lasht at the plaash they call Saint Ty-burn, but I do not caare by my Shalvaation; for if I will be hang'd, I will be a Saint presently, and all my Country shall pray unto Saint Tegue, besides, shome great people will be naamless too, I tell you I shay noe more, but I will be prayed unto Joy.

Sir Edw.

Prayed too! Very well.

Priest.

Yes by my Shoule will I, and I will have Reliques maade of me too.

Enter Servant.
Serv.

Sir Ieffery Shacklehead and my Lady have some business with you, and desire your company within.

Sir Edw.

Come Father Tegue, come along with me, do you hear, find the Gentle∣men that are walking with my Daughter and her Couzen, and tell 'em I will wait on 'em presently.

Ex. Sir Edw. and Priest.
Serv.

I will. They are here, Gentlemen, my Master is called away upon business Page  22〈◊〉 begs your excuse, and will wait on you presently.

Ex. Serv.
Bell.

Heaven gives us yet a longer Opportunity, and certainly intends we should make use of it; I have my own Parson that comes to hunt with me at Whally, Madam, an excellent School Divine, that will end all differences betwixt us.

Isab.

He is like to begin 'em betwixt us▪ the Name of a Parson is a dreadful Name upon these occasions, he I bring us into a Condition we can never get out of but by Death.

Bll.

If the absolute command of me and my Fortune can please you, you shall never desire to get out of it.

Doubt.

I should at more distance and with more reverence approach you, Madam, did not the shortness of the time, and the great danger of losing you, force me to be free; Throw not away this pretious time, a Minute now is Inestimable.

Theo.

Yet I must consider on that Minute on which the happiness or Misery of all my Life may depend.

Isab.

How can imagine that you who have rambled up and down the Southern World, should at last ix on a Horne-bred Mistress in the North? how can you be in earnest?

Bell.

Consult your Understanding and your Looking-Glass, one will tell you how Witty, Wise, and Good you are, the other, how Beautiful, how Sweet, how Charm∣ing.

Isab.

Men before they are Married turn the great end of their Perspective; but the little end after it.

Bell.

They are Men of ill Eyes, and worse Understanding; but for your Perfections there needs no Perspective.

Theo.

If I were inclin'd to Marriage, methinks we are not well enough acquainted yet to think of that.

Doubt.

To my Reputation I suppose you are no Stranger, nor to my Estate, which lis all in the next County; and for my Love, I will convince you of it, by setling what ever you please, or all that Estate upon you before I expect any Favour from you.

Theo.

You are so Generous beyond my Deserts, that I know not how to Credit you.

Doubt.

Your Modesty is too Great, and your Faith too Little.

Enter Sir Tymothy.
Sir Tim.

Death, Who are these whith my Mistress and my Sister? Oh! they are the silly Fellows that we saw at the Spaw, that came hither last night, do you know Sir, that this is my Mistress Sir?

Bell.

I know Sir that no man is worthy of that Honour.

Sir Tim.

Ye Sir, I will make you know that I am Sir, and She has the Honour to be my Mitress.

Bell.

Very well Sir.

Sir Tim.

Very well Sir, No 'tis very ill Sir, that you should have the boldness to take my Mistress by the Hand Sir, and if you do Sir, I must tell▪ you Sir—What do you Smile Sir?

Page  33
Bell.

A man may do what he will with his own Face. I may Smile Sir—

Sir Tim.

If you do Sir, I will fight Sir, I tell you that Sir. hah,

Isab.

Sir Timothy, you are a Bloody-minded man.

Sir Tim.

'Tis for my Honour, my Honour, he is plaguely afraid; look you Sir, if you Smile Sir, at me Sir, I will Kick Sir, that's more Sir.

Bell.

If you do, you will be the fifteenth man I have run through the Body Sir.

Sir Tim.

Hah! What does he say, through the Body, oh.

Theo.

Yonders my Brother, we must not be so perticular, lets joyn.

Sir Tim.

How, the Body Sir?

Bell.

Yes Sir, and my custom is (if it be a great affront, I kill them, for) I rip out their Hearts, dry 'em to Powder, and make Snuff on 'em.

Sir Tim.

Oh Lord! Snuff!

Bell.

I have a box full in my pocket Sir, will you please to take some.

Sir Tim.

No Sir, I thank you Sir: Snuff quoth a, I will have nothing to do with such a cruel man, I say no more Sir.

Doubt.

Your Servant Sir—

Sir Tim.

Your Servant Sir: does he take such Snuff too?

Bell.

The same—do you hear Sir, if you value your own life, which I will save for the Families sakes, not a word of this to any man.

Sir Tim.

No Sir, Not I Sir? Your humble servant.

Enter Sir Edward.
Sir Edw.

I ask your pardon Gentlemen, I was stay'd by what, if you please to walk in, will divert you well enough.

Doubt.

Wee will wait on you Sir.

Sir Edw.

Daughter, Sir Ieffery and my Ladys have made complaints of you for a∣busing Sir Timothy; let me hear no more on't, we have resolv'd the Marriage shall be to Morrow, it will become you to be upon a little better Tearms to day.

Sir Tim.

Do you here that Gentlewoman—

Sir Edw.

Gentlemen, I have sent to Whally for all your Servants, and Horses, and Doggs, you Must do me the honour to Make some stay with me.

Bell.

We cannot enough acknowledg your great Civility.

Sir Edw.

No Complements, I obliege my self; Sir Ieffery Shacklehead and I have just now agreed, that to morrow shall be the Day of Marriage between our Sons and Daughters.

Theo.

Very short warning.

Sir Edw.

Hee I not delay it longer.

Theo.

I'le in and see what the reason of this sudden resolution.

Bell.

Sir we wait on you.

Sir Edw.

Stay you there a while with Sir Timothy.

Ex. all but Sir Tim. and Isab.
Sir Tim.

Dear Cousin, prethee be kinder to me, I protest and vow, as I am a Christian, I love the better then both my Eyes, for all this.

Isab.

Why how now Dogs face, hast thou the Impudence to make love again, Page  34 with that hideous Countenance? that very insipid silly Physnomy of thine? with that most piteous mein? why thou lookst like an Operatr for Teeth.

Sir Tim.

This is all sham, I wont beleive it; I can see my self in the great glass, and to my mind no man looks more like a Gentleman than my self.

Isab.

A Gentleman! with that silly wadling shuffling gate? thou hast not mien good enough for a chief Constable, every change of thy Countenance, and every motion of thy Body proclaims thee an Ass.

Sir Tim.

Ay, Ay, come Madam, I shall please you better when I am Marry'd, with a 〈◊〉 that I have; I tell yee.

Isab.

Out of my sight, thou makest me sick to see thee.

Sir Tim.

I shall be more Familiar with you to Morrow-night, oh my dear rogue—well I say no more, faith I shall, well, no more to be said.

Isab.

Be gone thou Basilisk, here, I vow if thou wert the only man on Earth, the Kinde should cease rather than I would Marry thee.

Sir Tim.

You'l be in a better humour to Morrow-night, though you are such a 〈◊〉 now.

Isab.

This place, where some Materials are to mend the Wall, will furnish me with some Ammunition: be gone I say.

Sir Tim.

I shant dot, I know when I am in good Company, come prethee Cousin, do not let us Fool any longer, to Morrow we shall be one flesh—de ye see:

Isab.

I had rather be inoculated into a Tree, than be made one Flesh with thee; can that Westphlia hide of thine ever become one Flesh with me? when, I can become one Ass with thee it may, you shall never change my mind.

Sir Tim.

Well, well, I shall have your Body to Morrow-night, and I warrant you your mind shall soon follow it.

Isab.

Be gone, thou infinite Coxcomb, Ile set thee farther.

She throws Stones at him.
Sir Tim.

What, what, what a pox! hold, what a Devil, are you mad? Flesh, heart, hold, what a plague, uds bud, I could find in my heart to turn again.

Isab.

Do ilthy Face, do if thou darst.

Sir Tim.

Oh help, murder, murder.

Ex. Sir Timothy.
Isab.

I have no patience with this Fool, no Racks, or Tortures shall force me to marry him.

Ex. Isab.
Enter Young Harford and Theodosia.
Theo.

I am very indifferent about this Matrimony, and for ought I see, you are so too.

Yo. Har.

I must confess you are as fine a Gentlewoman as ever I saw, and I am not worthy of you; but my Father says he will disinherit me, if I will not marry you to Morrow; therefore I desire you would please to think on't.

Theo.

I will think on't.

Yo Har.

You shall command all my Estate, and do what you will; for my part, I rsolve all my Life, to give up my self wholly to my Sports, and my Horses, and Page  35 my Dogs, and to drink now and then a cup of Ale with my Neighbours, I hate Wine.

Theo.

You will do very well.

Yo. Har.

He says we must be Married to Morrow at Ten, I can be going a Hawking by six and come home time enough, I would be loath to neglect my Hawking at Pows in the height of the Season.

Theo.

By no means, you'd do very ill if you should.

Yo. Har.

Ay so I should, but shall I tell my Father that you will have me to Mor∣row? you know the Writings are Sealed, and Wedding-Cloaths bought of all sides.

Theo.

Well, I shall do as becomes me.

Yo. Har.

Well, Cousin there's no more to be said betwixt you and I then, Pace Verba, a word to the Wise, I say, is enough, so I rest your humble Servant to com∣mand; e tell my Father what you say presently, your Servant to, tell you truly I had never so much mind to be Married as now; for I have been so woundedly frightned with Witches, that I am affraid to lye alone, dee see; well, I am glad this business is over: a pox upon all mking of Love for me.

Ex. Yo. Har.
Theo.

I thought I saw my Cousin in yo Walk, 'tis time for us to consult what to do, my Father and Mother are resolved upon to Morrow for the fatal day.

Ex. Theo.
Enter Smerk, and Priest, and Mrs. Susan.
Priest.

By my shoule, Ioy, I thank you for my Fast-break, for it does give refreshment unto me, and Consolaation too gra.

Smerk.

Thank you Mistress Susan, my Caudle was admirable; I am much strengthened by these good Creatures.

Sus.

Yours was admirable—if Mother Demdike has any Skill, I shall find the opperati•• before night, and I will be reveng'd for his scorn to me.

Aside.
Priest.

Though thou dosht know me, yet thou dosht shay thou wilt tell nothing concerning of me.

Smerk.

No, for my part though I differ in some things, yet I honour the Church of Rome as a true Church.

Priest.

By my Shalvaation yee did all come out of us indeed, and I have expectaation daa you will come in agen, and I think I will live to shee it; perhaps I will tell you now, you had your Ordination too with us.

Smerk.

For my part, I think the Papists are honest, loyal men, and the Iesuits dyed in∣nocent.

Priest.

Phaat dou dosht not believe de Plot de Devil taak me.

Smerk.

No, no, no Papist Plot, but a Presbyterian one.

Priest.

Aboo, boo, boo, By my Shalvaation I will embraash dy Fathers Child, and I will put a great kish upon dy cheeke, now for dat, ay dear ish a damnd Presbyterian Plot to put out de Paapists, and de Priests, and de good Men, and if I would have my minde, de Devil taak me I would shee 'em all broyle and fry in de 〈◊〉 they call Smithfild,〈◊〉.

Page  36
Smerk.

I wou'd have S••plices cram'd down their Throats, or would have 'em hang'd in 〈…〉.

Priest.

〈…〉.

Enter〈◊〉and Doubty.
〈◊〉

〈…〉 with these Priests, see they are come from their Breakfast, and 〈◊〉

Priest.

〈…〉 not believe de Paapist Pot my Ioy.

〈◊〉

〈…〉 Presbyterian Plot I do: I would be a Turk before I would be a 〈…〉

〈◊〉

〈…〉 I vill give Satisfction unto dee, and aak dee of my Church, we have 〈…〉 of dy Church, and dou art almost as good a Friend as he in de West, I have 〈…〉 take it did begin vid a T.

Doubt.

How now! Do nt you believe a Ppish Plot?

Smerk.

No, but a 〈◊〉 I do.

Bell.

This is great Impudence, ater the King has affirm'd it in so many Prclamations, and three Parliaments have 〈◊〉 it, Nemine 〈◊〉.

Smerk.

Parliaments, tell me of Parliaments, with my Bible in my hand, le dispute with the whole 〈◊〉 of Commons; Sir, I hate Parliaments, nne but Phanaticks, Hobbists, and Athiests, believe the 〈◊〉.

Priest.

By my 〈…〉, dou dsh't maak me weep indeed, by my Shoul, Ioy, dou wilt be a good Cathlick, if I will instruct dee, I will weep on dee indeed.

Bell.

Why the true and wise Church of England-men believes it, and are a great Rock a∣gainst the Church of Rome.

Doubt.

And Preach and Write learnedly against it; but such Fellows as you are scandals to the Church, a Company of Tantivy Fools.

Bell.

All the Eminent men of the Church of England believe the Plot, and detest it with horror, and abominate the Religion that contriv'd it.

Smerk.

Not all the Eminent men, for I am of another opinion.

Doubt.

By my shoul, by my Shoud, Ioy, dey are our Enemies, and I would have no fait put upon de••, but dis is my dear Friend.

Doubt.

This is a Rascal conceal'd in the Church, and is none of it; sure his Patron know him not.

Bell.

No certainly!

Smerk.

You are Hobbists and Athiests.

Priest.

It is noe mater for all daat Ioy, what dey doe shay unto dee for by Chreest, and by Saint Paatrick dey be Heretick Doggs, by my Shalvaation dou dosht maake me weep upon de agen; by de Lady Mary, I think I will be after reconciling deet o de Catholick Church in∣deed.

Enter Sir Ieffery, Lady, Sir Edw. and Isab. and Theodosia.
Sir Ieff.

Your Servant Gentlemen.

La. Sha.

Your most humble Servant.

Page  37
Bell. Doubt.

Your most humble Servant.

Sir Edw.

Is not my Irish man a pleasant fellow?

Dubt.

A great Father of the Church.

Bell.

And perhaps may come to be hang'd for't.

Sir Edw.

Sir 〈…〉 to take some informations about Witches, perhaps that may divert you not ill, 'Tis against my opinion, but I give him way.

La. Sha.

I hope you are pleas'd to pardon my incivillity, in rushing unawares into your Chamber last night; but I know you are so much a Gentleman, so well-bred▪ and so a•••mplist, I know you do—

Doubt.

adam.

La. Sha.

And for that reason I will make you my Confident in a business, that perhaps, I do not know, but I think it may not be t your disadvantage, I will commu∣nicate it to you in ••ivate. Nw, Sir Ieffery and I are to take some Examinations. I assist him very 〈…〉 business, or he could never do it.

He sits down and La Sha.
Sir Ieff.

Call in these Fellows, 〈◊〉 hear what they'l say about these Witches; come on, Did you serve my Warrant on Mother Demdike?

They call the Constable in and a Country fellow.
Const.

Sir, I went to her House (and please your Worship) and lookt in at her Window, and she was feeding three great Toads, and they daunc'd and leapt about her, and she suckled a great black Cat well nigh as big as a Spaniel; I went into the House, and she vanisht, and there was nothing but the Cat in the middle, who spit and star'd at me, and I was frighted away.

Sir Ieff.

An arch Witch I warrant her.

Const.

I went out at the back-dore, and by the Threshold sat a great Hare, I struck at it, and it run away, and ever since I have had a great pain in my back, and cannot make Water, saving your presence.

Sir Edw.

A fit of the Gravel.

Priest.

No, by my shoule, she is a great Witch, and I vil cure you upon aat.

Sir Ieff.

No: I tell you, Sir Edward, I am sure she is a Witch, and between you and I, last night, when I would have been kind to my Wife, she bewitht me, I found it so.

Sir Edw.

Those things will happen about ive and fifty.

Priest.

I will tell you now, Joy, I will cure you too. * Taak one of de Tooths of a dead man, and bee, and burn it, and taak dee smoke into both your Noses, as you taak Snush, and anoint your self vid dee Gaal of a Crow, taak Quicksilver, as dey do call it, and put upon a Quill, and plaash it under de shoft Pillow you do shit upon, den maake shome waa∣ter through de Ring of a Wedding, by St. Patrick, and I will shay shome Ave Maaries for dee, and dou wilt be ound agen: gra.

Sir. Ieff.

Who is this pretends to skill in Witchcraft?

Sir Edw.

A very lea••ed man in these matters, that comes hither on purpose.

Sir Ieff.

I shall be gla of your better acquaintance.

Priest.

I vil be very vel pleash'd to b after being acquainted vid dee Joy.

Page  38
La. Sha.

Have you any more to say? Fellow speak to me.

Const.

Why, an't please your Worship forsooth, Mother Demdike said she would be revengd on me for not giving her some Butturmilk; and the next night coming from Rachdale, I saw a great Black Hog, and my Horse threw me, and I lost a Hog that night, he dy'd, that was as well when he went to bed, as ever he was since he was born.

La. Sha.

'Tis enough, a plain, a manifest Witch, make a Warrant for her.

Sir Ieff.

Ay, do.

La. Sha.

Take some of the Thatch of her House, and burn it at your House, and you shall see she will come streight.

Sir Ieff.

Or to morrow about dawn, piss in a Pot, and cover it with your right, neither Stocking, and the Witch will be tormented in her Bladder, and come to you roaring before night.

These two Remedies are in Scott.
Doubt.

A most profound Science.

Bell.

And poor old Ignorant wretches must be hang'd for this.

Const.

A Cow of mine is bewitcht too, and runs about the Close as if she were mad; and that, I believe, Mother Hargrave bewitcht, because I deny'd her some 〈◊〉.—good.

Sir Ieff.

〈◊〉 into the Warrant too: 'Tis enough, a little thing will serve for evi∣dence against Witch.

Sir Edw.

A very little one.

Priest.

* Put a pair of Breeches or Irish Trowsers upon your Cows head, Fellow, upon a Fryday Morning, and wid a great Stick maak beat upon her, till she do depart out of de Close, and she vill repair unto de Witches dore, and she vill knock up∣on it vid her Horns indeed.

Const.

Thank you good Sir.

Sir Ieff.

Sir, I see you are a Learned man in this business, and I honour you.

Priest.

Your Servant Sir, I will put shome holy waater into your Cows mout, and I vill maak Cure upon her for all daat indeed.

La. Sha.

Come, has any one else any thing to inform?

Const.

Yes ant please your Worship, here is a Neighbour, Thomas o Georges.

Tho. o G.

Why, an't please your Worships, I was at Mal. Spencers House where he wons 〈◊〉 Lone, and whoo had a meeghty great Cat, a black one by'r Lady, and whoo kist and who clipt Cat, and ay set me dwn a bit (meet a bit) and believe Cat went under her Coats, Quo ay what don yeo doo with that fow Cat? why, says Whoo, who soukes me. Soukes tee! Marry that's whaint quo ay, by'r Lady what an Cat do besides? Why, says whoo, whoost carry me to Rachdale believe. Whaw, quo ay, that's prtty! Why, sayes whoo, yest ha one an yeow win to carry yeow; by'r lady, quo ay, with aw my heart, and thank ow too, marry 'twill save my Tit a pow'r of labour; so whoo cawd a Cat to me, a huge Cat, and we ridden both to Rachdale strieght along.

B••l.

Well said, this was home; I love a Fellow that will go through stitch.

Sir Ieff.

This is a Witch, indeed, put her name in.

Priest.

This is nw thing by my Shoule, I will tell you now it is naw thing for all dat, a Vih, if she be a good Vitch, will ride upon a Graashopper, I tell you, very well, Page  39 and yet a Graashopper is but a weak beast neither; you do maak wonder upon dis but by my Shoule it is naw thing.

Sir Ieff.

Where did you take Cat, say you, together?

Tho. o. Geor.

Why, we took Catith Lone meet a mile off.

Sir Ieff.

So you rid eight mile upon Cats: are there any more informations?

Const.

No more ant please your Worship, but when I have once taken 'em, enough will come in.

La. Sha.

Go then about taking 'em, and bring 'em before Sir Ieffery, and my self, Ple warrant you wee'l order 'em.

Priest.

I will tell you now Fellow, taak de shoe of a Horse, and nayle it upon your Threshold, de plaash dou dosht goe into dy dore upon.

Sir Ieff.

And put a Clove of Garlick into the Roof of thy Hose.

La. Sha.

Femel is very good in your House against Spirits and Witches, and Alicium, and the Herb Mullein, and Long-wort, and Moly too is very good.

Priest.

* Burne shome Brimstone, and maak a sweet fume of de Gall of a Black Dogg, Joy, and be∣smeare dy Pots, and dy Walls, and bee, and Cross dy Self, and I will touch dee vid Reliques, and dee to gra.

Const.

Thank you good Sir.

Tho. o Geor.

Thank a.

Sir Edw.

Is not this an excellent Art?

Bell.

'Tis so extravagant, that a man would think they were all in Dreams that ever writ of it.

Doubt.

I see no manner of Evidences against these poor Creatures.

Bell.

I could laugh at thee Fools sufficiently, but that all the while our Mistresses are in danger.

Doubt.

Our time is very short, prethee let's consider what is to be done.

Isab.

Well, my Dear, I must open my heart to thee; I am so much in Love with this Bellfort, that I shall dye if I lose him.

Theo.

Poor Isabella, dying is something an inconvenient business; and yet I should live very uncomfortable without my Spark.

Isab.

Our time's very short, therefore preethee let's play the fool no longer, but come to the point when we meet 'em.

Theo.

Agreed: But when shall we meet 'em?

Isab.

I warrant thee before Midnight.

Sir Edw.

Come, let us take one turn in the Garden, and by that time my Dinner will be ready.

Bell.

Madam, For Heaven's sake consider on what a short time my Happiness or Ruin depends.

Isab.

Have a care, Sir Ieffery and his Lady will be Jealous.

Bell.

This is a good sign.

To himself.
Theo.

Not a word, we shall be suspected, at night we will design a cenferrence.

Page  40Enter Mal Spencer and Clod.
M. Spen.

Why so unkind Cld? You frown and wonnot kiss me.

〈◊〉.

No marry, ••e be none of thy Imp, I wott.

M. Spen.

What dot thou mean my Love? prethee kiss me.

〈◊〉.

Stand off by'r Lady an I lit kibbo once, 〈◊〉 raddle thy bones: 〈…〉 that, thou art a fow Witch.

M. Spen.

〈◊〉 Witch a poor Innocent young Lass, that's whaint, I am not awd 〈◊〉 for that Mon.

〈◊〉.

And I believe my yne, by the Mass I saw you in Sir Yedards Cellar last neeght with your 〈◊〉, thou art a rank Witch, uds flesh I'le not come nere thee.

M. Spn.

Did you see me? Why, if I be a Witch, I am the better Fortune for you, 〈…〉 of the best and be rich.

〈◊〉.

〈◊〉 marry le fare none with thee, Ile not be hang'd, nor go to the Deel 〈…〉 mass, but I will hang thee on I con by'r Lady.

M. Spen.

Say you so Rogue, Ile plague you for that.

She goes out.
Cld.

What is whoo gone? Tis for no good marry, I ha scap'd a fine waife, a fow 〈◊〉 by'r Lady, Ile hang the Whean and there be no more Witches in Loncashire.〈◊〉 whats tiss?

Mal. Enters with a Bridle, and puts it on ere he is aware.
Mal.
S.a Horse, Horse, be thou to me,
And carry me where I shall flee.
She gets upon him, and flies away.
Enter Demdike, Dickenson, Hargrave, &c. with their Imps, and Madg, who is to be the new Witch.
Demd
b Within this Shattrd Abby Walls,
This Pit or grown with Brakes and Briers,
Is fit for our dark Works, and here
Our Mastr dear, will soon appear,
And make the Mother Madge a Witch,
〈…〉 be Happy, long-liv'd, Rich,
Thou wi•• be Powrful and Wise,
And be reveng'd of thy Enemies.
Madg.
'Tis that I'd have, I thank you Dame,
Demd.
c Hr take this Imp, and let him suck,
Hl do what e're thou bidst him, call
Him 〈…〉,
Madg.

Come hither Puck-Hairy.

En. an Imp in shape of a black shock, comes to her.
Demd.

Where is thy Contract written in Blood?

Madg.

'Tis here.

Demd.
So t' firm and good.
Wheres my Mamilion come my Rogue,
Page  41 And take thy Dinner.
Dicken.
Where•• my Puggy?
Come to me and take thy Duggy.
Harg.

Come my Rouney, where art thou?

Enter Mal. Spencer, Leading Clod in a Bridle.
Mal.
Come Sirrah, I have switcht you well
She ties him up, and joyns with the other Witches.
I'le tye you up now to the Rack.
Well met Sisters, wheres my Pucklin?
Come away my pretty Sucklin.
Clod.

Waunds and Flesh, what con Ay do naw, I am turn'd into a Horse, a Capo, a meer Titt; Flesh Ayst ne're be a Mon agen, I marle I con speak, I conno pray, I wot a pox o'th' Deel Mun, Ay live of Oates, and Beans, and Hay aw my life, instead of Beef and Pudding: uds Flesh I neigh too,

He neighs.

Oh who has switcht and spurd me plaguely, I am raw all over me, whoo has ridden a wounded way about too.

Demd.
Oyntment for Flying here I have,
d Of Childrens Fat stoln from the Grave.
e The juice of Smallage, and Night-shade,
Of Poplar Leaves, and Aconite made
With these.
The Aromattic Reed I boyl,
With Water-parsnip, and Cinquesoil;
With store of Soot, and add to that,
The reeking Blood of many a Bat.
Dick.
f From the Seas 〈◊〉 owse a Weed,
I fetchd to open Locks at need.
g With Coats uckt up, and with my Hair,
All flowing losly in the Air,
With naked Feet I went among
h The poysnous Plants, there Addersi Tongue,
With Aomt and Martagon,
Henbane, Hemlock, Moon-wort too,
k Wild Fig-Tree, that o're Tombs do's grow,
The deadly Night-shade, Cypress, Yew,
And Libbards Bane, and venemous Dew,
I gathered for my Charms. Harg.l And I
Dug up a Mandrake which did cry,
Three Circles I made, and the Wind was good,
And looking to the West I stood.
M. Spen.
m The Bones of Frogs I got, and the Blood,
With Screetch-Owls Eggs, and Feathers too.
n Here's a Wall-Toad, and Wings of Bats,o
The Eyes of Owls, and Brains of Cats.
Page  42 The Devil appears in Humane Shape with four Attendants
Demd.
Peace, here's our Master him Salute,
And kiss the Toe of his Cloven Foot,
They kiss the Devils Foot.
Now our new Sister we present,
The Contract too, sign it with Blood.
Madge signs it with her Blood.
Dev.
First, Heaven you must renounce.
Madg.
I do.
Dev.
Your Baptism, thus I wash out too.
The new Name Maudlin you must take,
And all your Gossips must forsake,
And I these new ones for you make.
Demd.
A piece of your Garment now present.
Madg.
Here, take it Master, I'm content.
Gives it him.
Demd.
Within this Circle I make here,
Truth to our Master you must swear.
Madg.
I do.
Dev.
You must each month some murdered Children pay,
Besides your yearly tribute at your day.
Madg.
I will.
Dev.
Some Secret part I with my mark must sign.
A lasting token, that you are wholy mine.
Madg.
Oh!
The Devil takes her hands between his.
Demd.
Now do your Homage.
Dev.
Curse Heaven, Plague Mankind, go forth and be a Witch.
The Musick sounds in the Air.

Song.

Chor. of 3 parts.
WElcome, welcome, happy be,
In this blest Society.
1.
Men and Beasts are in thy Power,
Thou canst Save, and canst Devour,
Thou canst Bless, and Curse the Earth,
And cause Plenty, or a Dearth.
Chor.
Welcome, &c.
2.
O're Natures Powers thou canst prevail,
Raise Winds, bring Snow, or Rain, or Hail;
Without their Causes, and canst make
The steady Course of Nature shake.
Page  43 Chor.
Welcome, &c.
3.
Thou canst mount upon the Clouds,
And skim o're the ruggid Floods;
Thou canst dive to the Sands below,
And through the sollid earth canst go.
Chor.
Welcome, &c.
4.
Thou'lt open Looks, or through a Chink
Shalt creep for daintiest Meat and Drink.
Thou maist sleep on tops of Trees,
And lye in Flowers like Humble Bees.
Chor.
Welcome, &c.
5.
Revenge, revenge, the sweetest part
Of all thou hast by thy black Art.
O Heaven thou ne're shalt fx thy mind,
For here 'tis Heav'n to plague mankind.
They Dance with fantastick unusual postures
Devil.
p At your command all Natures course shall cease,
And all the Elements make war or peace:
The Sky no more shall its known Laws obey,
Night shall retreat whilst you prolong the day.
q Thy Charms shall make the Moon and Stars come down,
And in thick darkness, hide the Sun at Noon.
r Winds thou shalt raise, and streight their rage controul.
s The Orbs upon their Axes shall not rowl;
Hearing thy mighty Charms, the troubled Sky
Shall crack with Thunder, Heav'n not knowing why.
t Without one puff the Waves shall foam and rage,
Then though all Winds together should ingage,
The silent Sea shall not the Tempest feel.
u Vallies shall roar, and trembling Mountains reel.
x At thy command Woods from their seats shall rove,
Stones from their Quarries, and fixt Oaks remove.
y Vast standing lakes shall flow, and, at thy will,
The most impetuous Torrents shall stand still:
Swift Rivers shall (while wond'ring Banks admire)
Back to their Springs, with violent hast, retire.
z Thy Charms shall blast full Fruits, and ripen'd Ears.
a Ease anxious minds, and thn afflict with cares.
b Give Love, where Nature cannot, by thy skill,
And any living creature save or kill:
c Raise Ghosts, transform your self and whom you will.
Page  44 Enter Tom. Shacklehead, with a Gun on his shoulder.
Demd.
Who's here? who's here?
Tom. Sha.
Waunds whats here? The Witches By'r Lady,
I'le shoot amongst 'em: have at ye.
They all vanish, and Clod Neigh
Hey, Dive-dappers, Dive-dappers:
What a Devils here! Clod tied by a Bridle and Neighing! What a Pox ail'st thou?
Const a tell?
Tom. Shac. takes off the Bridle.
Cld.
Uds flesh, I am a Mon agen naw!
Why, I was a Horse, a meer Tit, I had lost aw
My speech, and coul'd do naught but neigh;
Flesh I am a Mon agen.
Tom. Sha.
What a dickens is the fellee wood?
Clod.
Ise ta the Bridle with me, fly from the Dee'l, and the Witches, and I'le tell you
aw at the Ale-house.
Tom. Sha.
What a murrain ails the Hobbell?
I mun follow, and see what's the matter.
Act Ends.