The Spanish wives a farce, as it was acted by His Majesty's servants at the theatre in Dorset-Garden.
Pix, Mary, 1666-1720., Brémond, Gabriel de. Pelerin.
Page  22

SCENE, a Palace.

Enter the Marquess, Orada following him.
Ora.

— My Lord, I have a Thousand things of greater consequence to say. — Pray return.

Marq.

Dear Orada, by and by; I must see where my Devil of a Wife is.

Ora.

You know she cannot pass the Lodgings, perhaps she's at her Devotions.

Marq.

No, she's too foul to Pray.

Ora.

(Taking him by the Arm)
— But, my Lord, — as I was saying, —

Marq.

(Flinging from her)
I'll return immediately. —

Ora.

There's no keeping this mad Fool out of his Wife's sight; — They must e'en to Bed, whilst I parle with the Lover.

Enter Marquess, pulling in Elenora.
Marq.

— So, Gentlewoman! I have caught ye! — How? With your Head out at Window, making your amorous Com∣plaints!

Elen.

I was almost stifled for want of her. — Sure you are not Jealous of the Trees and Stars, — They were my only Objects.

Marq.

Oh Impudence! did I not hear you say, When will he come; my Light, my Life, break thro' this Veil of Dark∣ness, and shoot with Rays of Comfort on me?

Ora.

(aside)
A duce of these thinking Minds! so brimfull of Cogitations, they must run over.

Elen.

I knew you behind me, and therefore did it to tor∣ment ye.

Marq.

It may be so; but I sha'n't trust ye — Come, into the Bedchamber. — Orada, do you School her, — I'll wath for your Light and Life my self.

Page  23
Or.

My Lord, you had better go to Bed with her, and then you'll be secure.

Marq.

No, no; in, in.

(Shuts 'em in and locks the Door)
— Now for my Pistols —that I may give this Midnight-Guest the Welcome he deserves.
Exit.