The academy of armory, or, A storehouse of armory and blazon containing the several variety of created beings, and how born in coats of arms, both foreign and domestick : with the instruments used in all trades and sciences, together with their their terms of art : also the etymologies, definitions, and historical observations on the same, explicated and explained according to our modern language : very usefel [sic] for all gentlemen, scholars, divines, and all such as desire any knowledge in arts and sciences
Holme, Randle, 1627-1699.

Canting Terms used by Beggars, Va∣gabonds, Cheaters, Cripples and Bedlams.

  • Avile, a Town.
  • Autem, a Church.
  • Autem Mort, a Married Woman.
  • Abram Cove, a lusty Rogue.
  • Bien, brave.
  • Page  168Boung, a Purse.
  • Borde, a shilling.
  • Half a Borde, six pence.
  • Bugher, a Cur Dog.
  • Bleating Cheat, a Sheep.
  • Ben Fakers, counterfeiters of Passes and Seals. Good makers.
  • Belly Cheat, an Apron.
  • Bowse, Drink.
  • Bowsing Ken, an Ale-house.
  • Bene, good.
  • Benar, better.
  • Beneship, very good fellowship.
  • Bufe, a Dog.
  • Buffar, Dog-like.
  • Bing a wast, get you hence.
  • Bing, go or come.
  • Crash, eat.
  • Crashing cheat, Teeth.
  • Cuffin Quier, a Justice of Peace.
  • Cackling cheat, a Cock, Hen, or Capon.
  • Cheat, a stollen thing; but the word Cheat joined to others, hath then a variable signification, a Nab cheat, a Hat, or Cap, &c.
  • Canke, a Dumb Man.
  • Crackmans, Hedges.
  • Clapperdogion, a Beggar born.
  • Cloyers, Thieves, Purloyners.
  • Cannikin, the Plague.
  • Cleymes, sores on the body.
  • Cassan, Cheese.
  • Cove, or Cofe, Coffin or Cuffin, a Man, a Fellow.
  • Coves, Fellows, Rogues.
  • Caster, a Cloak.
  • A Commission, a Shirt.
  • Chates, the Gallows.
  • To cly the Ierk, to be Whipt.
  • To Cut, to speak.
  • To Cut bene, to speak gently.
  • To Cut bene Whiddes, to speak good words.
  • To Cut quier Whiddes, to give evil Language.
  • To Cant, to speak.
  • To Couch a Hogshead, to lye down asleep.
  • Cly, Haunt, Molest.
  • Cramp-ring, Shackles, Bolts.
  • Confeck, Counterfeit.
  • Cackling, Prating, Talking.
  • Dimber Damber, a pretty Rascal.
  • Dommere, a Madman, a Bedlam.
  • Drawers, Hosen.
  • Dudes, Cloaths.
  • Darkmans, the Night.
  • Deusea-vile, the Country.
  • Dub the Giger, open the Door.
  • Dell, a Trull, a Drab.
  • Dine, Spite, Malice.
  • Doxie, Sweet-heart, Chuck, Whore.
  • Dock agen, do it again.
  • Fambles, Hands.
  • Fambling cheat, a Ring.
  • Ferme, Hole, Cave, or hiding place.
  • Flagg, a Groat.
  • Filch, Steal or Rob. a Staff.
  • Filchers, Stealers.
  • Faker, maker.
  • Glasiers, Eyes.
  • Gan, a Mouth.
  • Gage, a Quart Pot.
  • Grannam, Corn.
  • Gybe, a Writing.
  • Glimmer, Fire.
  • Gigger, a Door.
  • Gentry Mort, a Gentlewoman.
  • Gentry Cofes Ken, a Noble Mans House.
  • Grunting cheat, a Pig.
  • Grunters, Pigs.
  • Harman-Beck, a Constable.
  • Harmans, the Stocks.
  • Heave a Bough, rob a Booth.
  • Hearing cheats, the Ears.
  • Ierke, a Seal.
  • Ierk't, Sealed.
  • Iybe, a License.
  • Iague, a Ditch.
  • Iocky, a Mans Yard.
  • Ken, a House.
  • Kinchin, little, or Kitchin-coes, little Rogues.
  • Lage of Duds, a Buck of Cloaths.
  • Libberdge, a Bed.
  • Lowre, Money.
  • Lap, Butter-Milk or Whay.
  • Libkin, a House to ly in. Lodging.
  • Lage, Water.
  • Light-mans, the day.
  • Long lib, long lying, last end.
  • Lib, ly, lye down.
  • Mynt, Gold.
  • A Make, an half-penny.
  • Margery Prater, a Hen.
  • Mawnding, Asking.
  • Mawnd, Beg.
  • To Mill, to Steal.
  • Mill a Ken, Rob a House.
  • Mort, a Woman, a Punk.
  • Mawnders, Rogues, Beggars.
  • Muffeling Cheat, a Napkin.
  • Nosegent, a Nun.
  • Niggling, accompanying with a Woman.
  • Nip, cut.
  • Nab, head.
  • Nab cheat, a Hat.
  • Nase Nabs, Red Noses, Drunkards.
  • Prat, a Buttock, Thighs.
  • Peck, Meat.
  • Poplar, Pottage.
  • Prancer, an Horse.
  • Prig, to Ride.
  • prigging, riding.
  • Patrico, a Priest.
  • Priggers, Robbers, Stealers, High-way Men.
  • Pad, a way.
  • Pannam, Bread.
  • Pallyards, Beggars.
  • Pratling cheat, the Tongue.
  • Quaromes, a body.
  • Quarrons.
  • Quier cuffing, a Justice of Peace, a naughty Fellow, a Churl.
  • Ruyer Ken, the Jayl, a Naughty House.
  • Quier, cruel, naught.
  • Quacking cheat, a Duck, a Calf, or Sheep.
  • Red-shanks, Mallards, Drakes.
  • Ruff-peck, Bacon.
  • Roger, or Tib of the Buttry, a Goose.
  • Page  169Rome-vile, London.
  • Rome bowse, Wine.
  • Rome Mort, the Queen.
  • Ruffe-Mans, the Woods or Bushes.
  • Ruffian, or Ruffin, the Devil.
  • Rome-coves.
  • Rome-pad, High way.
  • Rum Maunder, a Beggar Fool, slavering Fool.
  • Ruffeler, a brave strong Rogue.
  • Scowre, wear, put on.
  • Shove the Flogging Tumbler, to be whipt at the Carts Arse.
  • Stamps, Leggs.
  • Stampers, Shooes.
  • Slate, a Sheet.
  • Skew, a Cup or Dish.
  • Scue.
  • Solomon, the Mass.
  • Staling Ken, a House to receive Goods stollen, or to Buy them.
  • Skipper, a Barn.
  • Strommell, Straw.
  • Smelling Cheat, an Orchard, or a Garden, a Nose.
  • To scour the Cramp Ring, to wear Bolts.
  • Stalling, making or ordaining.
  • Stow you, hold your peace.
  • Strawling, Brokers, Buyers of Goods.
  • Tatterdemallion, a Ragged Rogue.
  • Trine, Hang.
  • Trining, Hanging.
  • Trin'd, Hanged.
  • To Towre, to see.
  • Tib a th' Buttery, a Goose.
  • Togmans, a Gown or Cloak.
  • Upright, highest.
  • Wyn, a Penny.
  • Whiddes, Words, Language.
  • Wap well, Kiss well.
  • Woune, stolne.
  • Yarrume, Milk.

LXIX. He beareth Argent, two Morice Dancers in their Leaping, Dancing, or Fantastiek postures, variously cloathed, with Handkerchers in their hands, and Bells at their Caps, Shoulders, Knees Elbows, Or. Now some hold that to name Morrice-Dancers, is as much as to name all that I have before said, because they are ever drawn and set forth in such antick Dresses and Postures.

In the Base of this quarter is another kind of Fools head, cloathed, Gules; the Cap with a scapular, or shoulder cover, Argent. Such a Monkish Fools head to the Sinister, is the crest of Schopper of Brunswick. This may fitly be termed so, because the Cap resembles the Monks Coul, see numb. 53.

The Art of Dancing, (though here set forth in its rustick and antick postures) yet oppertunely and civilly used, is a commendable and rare quality, fit for young Gentlemen and Gentlewomen; and hath formerly been honoured in the Courts of Princes, and it is much com∣mended to be excellent for recreation after much Study, making the Body active and strong, graceful in deport∣ment, and is a quality very much beseeming a Gentle∣man.