An evening's love, or, The mock-astrologer acted at the Theatre-Royal, by His Majesties servants
Dryden, John, 1631-1700., Corneille, Thomas, 1625-1709. Feint astrologue., Molière, 1622-1673. Dépit amoureux., Calderón de la Barca, Pedro, 1600-1681. Astrologo fingido.
Page  8

SCENE II. A Chappel.

Enter Alonzo, Theodosia, Jacinta, Beatrix, other Ladies and Cavaliers as at their Devotion.
Alon.

By that time you have told your Beads I'll be agen with you.

Exit.
Jac.
Do you think the English Men will come after us?
Beat.
Do you think they can stay from you?
Jac.

For my part I feel a certain qualm upon my heart, which makes me believe I am breeding Love to one of'em.

Theo.

How, Love, Jacinta, in so short a time? Cupids Arrow was well feather'd to reach you so suddenly.

Jac.

Faith as good at first as at last Sister, 'tis a thing that must be done, and therefore 'tis best dispatching it out o'th' way.

Theo.

But you do not mean to tell him so whom you love?

Jac.

Why should I keep my self and Servant in pain for that which may be cur'd at a dayes warning?

Beat.

My Lady tells you true, Madam, long tedious Court∣ship may be proper for cold Countries, where their Frosts are long a thawing; but Heaven be prais'd we live in a warm Climate.

Theo.

The truth is, in other Countries they have opportu∣nities for Courtship, which we have not, they are not mew'd up with double Locks and Grated Windows; but may receive Addresses at their leisure.

Jac.

But our Love here is like our Grass; if it be not mow'd quickly 'tis burnt up.

Enter Bellamy, Wildblood, Maskall: they look about 'em.
Theo.

Yonder are your Gallants, send you comfort of 'em: I am for my Devotions.

Jac.

Now for my heart can I think of no other Prayer, but Page  9 only that they may not mistake us—Why Sister, Sister,—will you Pray? What injury have I ever done you, that you should Pray in my company? If your servant Don Melchor were here, we should have you mind Heaven as little as the best on's.

Beat.

They are at a loss, Madam, shall I put up my Vail that they may take aime?

Jac.

No, let 'em take their Fortune in the dark: we shall see what Archers these English are.

Bell.
Which are they think'st thou?
Wild.

There's no knowing them, they are all Children of darkness.

Bell.

I'll besworn they have one sign of Godliness among 'em, there's no distinction of persons here.

Wild.

Pox o'this blind-mans-buffe; they may be asham'd to provoke a man thus by their keeping themselves so close.

Bell.

You are for the youngest you say; 'tis the eldest has smitten me. And here I fix, if I am right—happy man be his dole.————By Theodosia.

Wild.

I'll take my fortune here.—By Jacinta. Madam, I hope a stranger may take the libertie without of∣fence to offer his devotions by you.

Jac.

That, Sir, would interrupt mine, without being any advantage to your own.

Wild.

My advantage, Madam, is very evident; for the kind Saint to whom you pray, may by the neighbourhood mistake my devotions for yours.

Jac.

O Sir! our Saints can better distinguish between the prayers of a Catholick and a Lutheran.

Wild.

I beseech you, Madam, trouble not your self for my Religion; for though I am a Heretick to the men of your Country, to your Ladies I am a very zealous Catholick: and for fornication and adulterie, I assure you I hold with both Churches.

Theo. to Bell.

Sir, if you will not be more devout, be at least more civil, you see you are observ'd.

Bell.

And pray, Madam, what do you think the lookers on imagine I am imploy'd about?

Page  10 Theo.
I will not trouble my self to guess.
Bell.

Why, by all circumstances, they must conclude that I am making love to you: and methinks it were scarce civil to give the opinion of so much good company the lye.

Theo.

If this were true, you would have little reason to thank 'em for their Divination.

Bell.
Meaning I should not be lov'd again.
Theo.

You have interpreted my riddle, and may take it for your pains.

Enter Alonso, (and goes apart to his devotion)
Beat.
Madam, your Father is return'd.
Bell.
She has nettled me, would I could be reveng'd on her.
Wild.

Do you see their Father? let us make as though we talk'd to one another, that we may not be suspected.

Beat.
You have lost your Englishmen.
Jac.

No, no, 'tis but design I warrant you: you shall see these Island Cocks wheel about immediately.

Beat.

Perhaps they thought they were observ'd.

The English gather up close to them.
Wild. to Bell.

Talk not of our Countrie Ladies: I declare my self for the Spanish Beauties.

Bell.

Prethee tell me what thou canst find to doat on in these Castilians.

Wild.
Their wit and beauty.
Theo.
Now for our Champion St. Jago for Spain there.
Bell.

Faith I can speak no such miracles of either; for their beautie 'tis much as the Moores left it; not altogether so deep a black as the true Aethiopian: A kind of beautie that is too civil to the lookers on to do them any mischief.

Jac.
This was your frowardness that provok'd him, Sister.
Theo.
But they shall not carry it off so.
Bell.

As for their wit, you may judge it by their breeding, which is commonly in a Nunnerie; where the want of man∣kind while they are there, makes them value the blessing ever after.

Theo.

Prethee dear Jacinta tell me, what kind of creatures Page  11 were those we saw yesterday at the Audience? Those I mean that look'd so like Frenchmen in their habits, but only became their Apishness so much worse.

Jac.
Englishmen I think they call'd 'em.
Theo.

Crie you mercy; they were of your wild English in∣deed, that is a kind of Northern Beast, that is taught its feats of activity in Monsieurland, and for doing 'em too lubberly, is laugh'd at all the world over.

Bell.

Wildblood, I perceive the women understand little of discourse; their Gallants do not use 'em to't: they get upon their Gennits, and prance before their Ladies windows; there the Palfray curvets and bounds, and in short entertains 'em for his Master.

Wild.
And this horse-play they call making love.
Beat.
Your Father Madam.—
Alon.

Daughters! what Cavaliers are those which were talking by you?

Jac.

Englishmen, I believe Sir, at their devotions: Cavalier, would you would try to pray a little better then you have railly'd.

aside to Wildblood.
Wild.

Hang me if I put all my devotions out of order for you: I remember I pray'd but on Tuesday last, and my time comes not till Tuesday next.

Mask.

You had as good pray, Sir; she will not stir till you have: Say any thing.

Wild.

Fair Lady, though I am not worthy of the least of your favours, yet give me the happiness this Evening to see you at your fathers door, that I may acquaint you with part of my sufferings.

aside to Jacinta.
Alon.
Come Daughters, have you done?
Jac.

Immediately Sir.—Cavalier, I will not fail to be there at the time appointed, if it be but to teach you more wit, henceforward, then to en∣gage your heart so lightly.

aside to Wildblood.
Wild.

I have engag'd my heart with so much zeal and true devotion to your divine beauty, that—

Alon.
What means this Cavalier?
Jac.
Some zealous ejaculation.
Page  12 Alon.
May the Saint-hear him.
Jac.
I'll answer for her.—
Ex. Father and Daughters.
Wild.
Now Bellamy, what success?
Bell.

I pray'd to a more Marble Saint than that was in the Shrine; but you, it seems, have been successful.

Wild.
And so shalt thou; let me alone for both.
Bell.

If you'll undertake it, I will make bold to indulge my love; and within this two hours be a desperate Inamorado. I feel I am coming apace to it.

Wild.

Faith I can love at any time with a wish at my rate: I give my heart according to the old law of pawns, to be return'd me before sun-set.

Bell.

I love only that I may keep my heart warm; for a man's a pool if love stir him not; and to bring it to that pass, I first resolve whom to love, and presently after imagine I am in love; for a strong imagination is requir'd in a Lover as much as in a Witch.

Wild.
And is this all your Receipt?
Bell.

These are my principal ingredients; as for Piques, Jea∣lousies, Duels, Daggers, and Halters, I let 'em alone to the vulgar.

Wild.

Prethee let's round the street a little; till Maskall watches for their Woman.

Bell.

That's well thought on: he shall about it immediately. We will attempt the Mistress by the Maid: Women by women still are best betray'd.

Exeunt.