The guardian, a comedie acted before Prince Charls, His Highness at Trinity-Colledg in Cambridge, upon the twelfth of March, 1641
Cowley, Abraham, 1618-1667.
Page  [unnumbered]

Act 4. Scaen. 7.

Aurelia, Blade.
Bla.

How now? all alone, Aurelia? you're eating soap and ashes here, I warrant you, without so much as saying grace for 'um.

Aur.

I'd rather repent in ashes, Sir, then eat 'um

Bla.

What would you think if I should marry now this very day?

Aur.

I should think, Sir, you'd repent to morrow fort.

Bla.

And the widow too.

Aur

The widow? then you'll repent to night, Sir, I believe.

Bla.

I woo'd her long ago, and now she sees there's an estate faln to me, faith she's content; and, to save charges, is willing to be married to day privately.

Aur.

But I hope you are not so, Sir: why we shall have all the silenc'd Ministers hum∣ming and hawing thrice a week here; not a dish o' meat but will be longer a blessing then a rosting. I shall never hear my Virgi∣nals when I play upon 'um, for her daughter Tabytha's singing of Psalms. The first pious deed will be, to banish Shakespear and Ben. Iohnson out of the parlour, and to bring in their rooms Mar-prelate, and Pryns works. You'll ne'er endure 't, Sir You were wont to have a Sermon once a quarter at a good time; you shall have ten a day now.

Bla.

Let me alone to deal with 'um. If any of her eating talking tribe shew their ears here, I will so use her tribe, that they shall free the Pope, and call me Antichrist here∣after: and the widow, Ill warrant you, I'll convert: I'll carry her to Plays, in stead of Lectures: she shall see them, as well as the dancing o' the ropes, and the Puppet-play of Nineve. But this is not my business, girl: I have an husband too for you.

Aur.

I could wish you would keep him, Sir, if you have him; I know not what to do with him my self.

Bla.

Come, 'tis a man you'll like, I'm sure; I have heard you often commend him for his parts. 'Tis young M. Truman.

Au.

Truman, Sir? the melancholy cross-arm'd Gentleman that talks to trees and ri∣vers as he goes by 'um? We should sit all day together like pictures of man and wife, with our faces towards one another, and never speak I'll undertake, upon our Marriage-night he'll onely sigh a little, cry Cruel Fate, and then go sleep.

Bla.

Never fear't. Come, thou shalt have him, girl: go quickly and dress your self; we'll both be married on a day. The humor is good, and it saves charges: there's the wi∣dows humour too.

Aur.

You'll give me leave, Sir—

Bla.

No, no, no; prithee go dress thy self: by heaven it must be as I say: the fates have ordain'd it.

Aur.

Be pleas'd to hear me, Sir.

Bla.

I would not hear thee, though thou wert an Angel. I'm as resolute as he that writ the Resolves. Come away, and adorn thy self.

Exeunt.