The guardian, a comedie acted before Prince Charls, His Highness at Trinity-Colledg in Cambridge, upon the twelfth of March, 1641
Cowley, Abraham, 1618-1667.

Act. 4. Scaen. 5.

Truman pater, Truman filius, Blade.
Tru. p.

I tell you, Captain, he's a stub∣born boy, a self-will'd hair-brain'd boy: he has his know-nots, and his wo'nots, and his may be's, when I speak. I have told him of his manner a hundred ties; nay I may say a thousand.

Bla.

Pray take y counsel for this once: though I be a souldier, yet I love not to do all things by force. Speak fairly to him.

Tru. p.

Speak fairly to my son? I'll see him buried, I'll see his eyes out first.

Bla.

I mean, desire him.

Tru. p.

O, that's another matter. Well, for your perswasion, I'll do it: but if ever I speak fair to him—

Bla.

I know his nature's such, that kind∣ness will sooner win him—Look you, he's here i'faith, as melancholy as an owl i' the day-time.

Tru. p.

O, are you there, Jacksauce—

Bla.

Nay, remember what I told you.

Tru. p.

'Tis true indeed How now, son Dick? you're melancholy still, I see.

Tru. f.

It best becomes my fortune, Sir, now you have cast me off.

Tru p.

I cast thee off? marry God for∣bid, Dick. How dost do, Dick? Thou lookst ill, Dick, in troth thou dost: I must have thee merry.

Bla.

I see all kindness is against this dotards nature, he does so over-act it.

Tru. p.

Wilt thou have a Physitian, Dick? Thou art my onely son, Dick, and I must have a care of thee: thou shouldst ride a∣broad sometimes, Dick, and be merry. We'll ha' a wife too for thee, Dick, a good wife, ha—

Tru. fil.

I thank you, Sir; but I know not—

Tru. p.

I, now he's at his know-nots. I will make you leave those know-nots, boy—

Bla.

Remember, M. Truman, what I told you.

Tru. p.

'Tis true indeed. Your father's old now, Dick, you see, and would fain see a grandchilde: tis out of love to you, Dick, that I perswade you to't; you may be a com∣fort, Dick, to your father now.

Tru. f.

You may commnd me.

Tru. p.

Well said, Dick, I see thou lovest me now, Dick; dost thou want any money, Dick? or cloathes? or horses? You shuld tell me what you want, you shall have any thing —here's the Captain, a hearty friend of yours—where's your Daughter, Captain? there's a wench, Dick! ha you seen her?

Tru. f.

Yes, Sir.

Tru. p.

And how do you like her, Dick? speak freely.

Tu. f.

I know no cause why any should dislike her.

Tru p.

Why well said, Dick; keep thee o' that minde still, and God will bless thee.

Bla.

Your father means, Mr. Truman, I suppose, how you like her for a wife.

Tru. p.

I can tell my own meaning my self I hope, I'm old enough I'm sure.

Tru. f.
You wrong her much, I never shall deserve her.
Alas, I am a man so weak in all things,
Page  [unnumbered]So lost both to the world and to my self;
That if I lov'd a woman heartily,
And woo'd her with all zealous passions,
And valu'd her love 'bove all things else but Heaven;
Yet, when I thought upon my own unwor∣thiness,
I should my self perswade her not to marry me.
Bla.

Well, Sir, if you esteem her worth your choise, she shall be yours.

Tru. p.

Why what should ayre him, Cap∣tain? He esteem her? Must he, forsooth, or I be Master pray? Captain Blade, you make him too saucy with such talk; never tell me, Captain Blade, I say it makes him too saucy, I marry does it, it does i'faith; must he be his own Carver? Come no more words, Ill have you married presently: i'saith law, Captain, you make him too sau∣cy, that you do, you do i'faith, Sir; I can't abide when sons must come to esteem, he esteem her with a vengeance?

Tru. f.

I desire time onely to consider—

Tru. p.

I, why I told you this; 'tis such a another wilful, hair-braind Coxcomb, he's always a considering. Captain Blade, I could never keep him from his considering; but I shall so consider you—go get you in, Sir, I'll have it done when I please; get you in, Sir, I'll keep you from considering here∣after.

Exeunt.