The guardian, a comedie acted before Prince Charls, His Highness at Trinity-Colledg in Cambridge, upon the twelfth of March, 1641
Cowley, Abraham, 1618-1667.

Act. 3. Scaen. 6.

Blade, Truman Pater, Widow, Dogrel.
Tru.

O Sir, my Son has poyson'd you, I see; there's no Law yet, is there?

Bla.

Mr. Trumn

Tru.

True me no more then I true you. Come, Captain Blade, I know what you are, and so shall others too.

Bla.

You'll hear me, Sir, I hope —

Tru.

And so shall you hear me, Sir; I can be heard, I would you should know, in as good a place as this is; and before as good as you are, Captain Blade.

Bla.

First leave your raging, Sir: for though you should roar like Tamerlin at the Bull, 'twould do no good with me.

Tru.

I Tamerlin? I scorn him, as mch as you do, for your ears. I'll have an acti∣on of slander against you, Captain; you shall not miscal me at your pleasure: remember you call'd me Iethro once before.

Wid.

O the Father! little did I think, I wuss, to see you ever with these eyes a∣gain.

Bla.

Pray, Sir, hear me; The wrong I did you, when you were last here, came from distraction onely, and not my will; and therefore deserves pardon. The business, if you please, I'll relate truly to you; and by what special providence I escap'd the danger.

they whisper.

Tru.

Well, Sir, I'm not angry; but Page  [unnumbered] I'll not be call'd Tamerlin by any man.

Bla.

Upon my faith, Sir, it was an Anti∣dote; I vomited up more then any whale could have done; things of more colours then twenty Rhetoricians were ever able to invent.

Tru.

I shall teach my son—

Bla.

No good Sir, I forgive him with all my heart: but for my Neece—You remem∣ber, Sir, the Will my brother left; you were witness to it. For this her disobedience, the means are faln to me. Now if you please to marry M. Richard to my daughter, Lucia's portion shall all be hers.

Tru.

Thank you good Captain Blade; I thank you for your love heartily: pray send for 'um; he shall do't presently. I thank you heartily for your love, good Captain: he shall do't, he shall do't.

Calls his servant, and sends for 'um.
(What good luck was this, that I spoke not to the widow for her daughter!) How do you, widow? you're melancholy methinks; you're melancholy i'faith, that you are.

Wid.

Well, I praise God, Sir, in better health then I deserve, vile wretch. I'm glad to see our neighbour so recovered.

Tru.

I, good man, he has had a dangerous time of it, that he has, a very dangerous time: his neece is a naughty wench, a scurvie girl, to repay him thus for all his care and trou∣ble: he has been a father to her, Widow, that he has; to my knowledge he has: Her father was an honest man, I'm sure on't.

Wid.

Was he? I, as ever trod upon Gods ground, peace be with him; I, and as loving a neighbour too—

Tru.

We have drunk our half pintes of Muscadel together many a morning, that we have.

Wid.

My husband too was all in all with him. Hei-ho! I shall never forget how merry we were when we went with him to Mortlake in the Easter-holy-days: and we carried a shoulder of Mutton with us, and a fat Pig, and he carried his bottle of wine down with him: I warrant you he he lov'd a cup of wine as well as his brother; in a fair sort, I mean.

Tru.

Ah widow! those days are gone: we shall never see those days again. I was a merry grig too then, and would ha'danc'd and cut capers: ha—who but I? I was as merry as the maids.

Wid.

My daughter Tabytha was just four yeer old then, come Lamas-tide.

Dog.

Captain, I thought thou hadst been at Ereus by this time: but 'tis no matter; 'tis but an Epitaph lost: hang't, 'twas made ex tempore and so let it pass.

Bla.

Hadst thou made one i'faith?

Dog.

Yes, by thi, light.

Bla.

I'm glad I did not die then. O here they come. She's a good handsome wench; 'tis pity to cozen her. But who can help it? Every one for himself, and God for us all.