The guardian, a comedie acted before Prince Charls, His Highness at Trinity-Colledg in Cambridge, upon the twelfth of March, 1641
Cowley, Abraham, 1618-1667.

Scaen. 1.

Dogrel, Aurelia.
Dog.

Not poysoned you say?

Au.

No, hes as well as we.

Dog.

It may be he has more lives then one, or used himself to poyson, as we now, that are Scholars, and Poets read, of one Mithidrates.

Au.

He was never sick.

Dog.

Yes, very hot.

Au.

I, as a painted fire, his fancy made him so; I smell a plot in't. Lucia, you say, urged him then for Truman. 'Twas a meer plot, I doubt, to put him in fear of death.

Dog.

I shall be taken for a kind of Rogue then, for bearing false witness

Au.

You shall not be mistaken, Sir, at all.

Dog.

Pillory'd, and whipt, with my godly brother Cutter.

Au.

Abus'd by the Prentices as you walk in the streets, and have rotten apples slung at you.

Dog.

Have a hundred blustring oaths o' mine no more beleeved, then when I swear to my Creditors, I'll pay all.

Au

Be abandon'd by all men above a Tapster; and not dare to looke a gentleman i'the face; unless perhaps you sneak into a Play-house, at the fifth Act.

Dog.

If ever I have to do with women a∣gain, but i'the way of all flesh, may I dye an Eunuch. I'll never lye or swear hereafter, but for my self. Were not you the vertu∣ous gentlewoman, with the brown paper-face, that perswaded me to it?

Au.

The very same, Sir; and I ha' just such another exploit here to imploy thee in: therefore be secret, close as a cokle, my good Rymer.

Dog.

To imploy me in!

Au.

Nay, you must do't i'faith; I ha' sworn first, Dogrel.

Dog.

By this good light, I will do nothing at thy intreaty: not if thou shouldst intreat me to lye with thee. Must Poet Dogrel?

Au.

I, must, if he intend e're to drink Sack again; or to make more use of his little-poc∣ket, then to carry Tavern-bills in't; must do't, unless he intend to die without a shirt, and be buried without a winding-sheet.

Dog

I like thy wit yet wench, what is't?

Au

I would marry Puny; he's rich you know, and a bravery, and a wit.

Dg.

He says himself he is so; but few are of his faith.

Au.

He dances too, and courteth the Ladies.

Dog.

Yes in more postures then a dozen of Bowlers.

Au.

But he's rich, Dogrel, and will be wise enough; when I have got'um knighted, then I shall be a Lady, Dogrel; have a dozen of French-Taylors, Doctrs, Jewellers, Perfumers, Tyre-women, to sit in consultati∣on every morning, how I shall be drest up to play at Gleek, or dance, or see a Comedy, or go to the Exchange i'the afternoon; send every day my Gentleman, to know how such a Lady slept, and dream'd; or whe∣ther her dog be yet in perfect health: Then have the young smelling braveries; all adore me, and cut their arms, if I be pleased to be angry: Then keep my close and open Coaches, my yellow sattin Pages, Mon∣kies, and women, or (as they call 'um) crea∣tures.

Dog.

Be then a politick, Lady; keep none but ugly ones, you'll ne'er be handsome else. But suppose all this, what's this to Dogrel?

Au.

Dogrel shall be maintain'd by me, he shall ha' fine new Serge; and every day more wine then's drunk at a Corona∣tion.

Dog.

This qualifies. And when the good Knight's dicing, or at bowls, or ga∣thering notes in private out o' Romances; might not Dogrel have a bit?

Au.

Yes, like enough your Poetry might tempt some of my under-women to't. But are you prepar'd to cheat, in your own be∣half, Page  [unnumbered] and mine?

Dog.

I, but how must this be done?

Au.

Why thus briefly. First read this Letter.

Dog.

(reads)

Dearest Truman,

We haue long desired to be contracted to∣gether, that nothing might be wanting to our Loves, but Ceremony: To night about nine a clock, I shall finde opportunity to meet you at the garden door, and let you in; silence and the help of veiles, will save the violating of your oath. Farewel.

Yours, Luc. Blade.

I'faith, was this her writing?

Au.

No▪ but the hand's s like hers as the left is to the right. This you shall shew to Puny; and tell him that you found or stole it from Truman: I need not I suppose in∣struct you, to polish over a lye; he knows their love, and cannot suspect any thing; perswade him to make use of the occasion, and come himself.

Dog.

And youll meet him vail'd.

Au.

Hast thou found it out? thou hast shrewd reaches Dogrel.

Dog.

I'll do't. Thou shalt be blest. I'll do't i'faith.

Au.

About it then; I'll leave you: and fail not, Dogrel; remember wine and serge. But first, I have another way t' undoe thee, Lucia: And that Ill try too.

Exit.

Dog.

Go thy ways girl for one, and that's for Puny I hope; I see thou'lt ne'er turn Semstress, nor teach girls; thou'dst be a rare wife for me, I should beget on thee Donnes, and Iohnsons: but thou art too wit∣ty. We men that are witty know how to rule our selves, can cheat with a safe consci∣ence; 'tis charity to help thee, Aurelia, and I will do't, and merit.

Exit.