The guardian, a comedie acted before Prince Charls, His Highness at Trinity-Colledg in Cambridge, upon the twelfth of March, 1641
Cowley, Abraham, 1618-1667.

Scaen. 1.

Widow, Tabytha, Colonel Cutter, Dogrel.
Cutter.

PRithee widow be not in∣cens'd, we'll shew our selves like yong Lords shortly; and you know, I Hope, they use to pay their debts.

Wid.

I, you talk of great matters, I wis, but I'm sure I could never see a groat yet of your money.

Dog.
Alas, we carry no silver about us,
That were mechanical and base;
Gold we about us bring:
Gold, thou art mighty in each place,
Of Metals Prince and King.

Why I tell you my pockets have not been guilty of any small money in my remem∣brance.

Wid.

I know not, but all things are grown dear of late; our Beef costs three shillings a stone, and the price of corn is rais'd too.

Taby.

Nay, mother, coals are rais'd too, they say. These things you think cost no∣thing.

Dog.

Nay, Tabytha, Mistress Tabytha! ifaithlaw now I'll make a Psalm for you, and be but peaceable.

Contain thy tongue, and keep it in
Within thy mouths large prison.
Both jars, and also many a sin
From out the mouth has risen.

I'm onely for Odes, by the Muses, and the quickest for them, I think, in the Christian world, take in Turks, Infidels, Jews and all.

Cutt.

Have but a little patience, widow; well I'll say this for thee, thou art the ho∣nestest Landlady upon the face of the earth, which makes me desire to live in your house; and you shall not lose by't: do but mark the end.

Wid.

I stand not so much upon that; but I use to ha' Lawyers in my house, such civil compleat gentlemen in their Sattin doublets (I warrant you) and broad ruffs, as passes; and Courtiers, all to be lac'd and slasht, and fine fellows as you shall see in a summers day; they would not say Why do ye this? to a wo∣man: and then Knights.

Tab.

I, and Gentlemen too, mother.

Wid.

But you, forsooth, come in drunk every night, and fall a swearig as if you would rend the house in two, and then mum∣ble and tumble my daughters cloathes, she says.

Page  [unnumbered]
Tab.

I, and would have—

Cutt.

What would we have done?

Tab.

Nay no good, I warrant you.

Wid.

And then you drink up a kilderkin of small beer next morning.

Dog.

All this shall be corrected and amended, Landlady: yes faith, Cutter, thou must repent, thou hast been to blame some∣times.

Wid.

Besides, you are always so full of your fripperies, and are always a grinning and sneering at every thing: I was wont to have sober boorders in my house, and not such hee-hee-heeing fellows.

Tab.

Nay, they mock'd and fleer'd at us as we sung the Psalm the last Sunday-night.

Cutt.

That was that mungrel Rhymer; by this light, he envies his brother Poet ho∣nest Iohn Sternhold, because he cannot reach his heights.

Wid.

O the father! the Colonel's as full of waggery as an egge's full of meat: I warrant, M. Dogrel, what you get by him you may e'en put i' your eye, and ne'er see the worse for't.

Cutt.

Well, and how dost ifaith now, ho∣nest Landlady? when shall we walk again into Moor-fields, and rejoyce at the Queens Cake-house?

Dog.

I'll bespeak Cakes and Ale o'th' purpose there; and thou shalt eat stew'd Prunes, little Tabytha, till thy smock drop again. A word i' you ear, Landlady: Can you accommodate us with two shillings?

To morrow ere the rosie finger'd morn
Starts from Tithonus bed, as Authors write;
Ere Phoebus cry Gee-hoe unto his team,

We will restore again, and thank you for your pain.

Cutt.

I'll tell you a secret, Landlady: Captain Blade and I shall be call'd shortly to the Court; the King has taken notice of our deserts: I say no more: though yet thou scorn'st me, Tabytha, I'll make thee a Lady one day. Will you lend, widow? Great af∣fairs bid me make haste.

Wid.

I care not much if I trust you for once: Come in and take it.

Dog.
Then Mistress let me lead you thus,
And as we go let's buss.
Tab.

Buss me no bussings. O lord, how you tumble my gorget!

Exeunt.