A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act. 5. Scen. 3.

Enter L. Liberal.
L. Lib.

My Cozen is uncag'd, and I fear flown beyond catch, beyond reco∣very. Had she been within my Wals, and but as big as a new-born child, or a childe's Baby, I had found her; but she cannot here be found, who is not here. What shall I do? No, that will be to Inn at the Labour in vain: Something I have brought forth; under what Star I know not: I will send to all the Port-Towns that are near, chance may be so gracious to me, that I may take her in one of them at the rebound, at the second run. If I catch her, I shall cage her compani∣ons.

Enter Page.
Page.

My Lord, A poor Sea-man at the door, is very earnest to speak with your Lordship. He talks of businesse, and that of no small importance; and he sayes, he must not, as being a poor man, send his businesse by an Interpreter.

L. Lib.

A Sea-man? and with im∣portant businesse? send him to me.

Exit Page.

Most certainly, my Cozen cannot reach the Sea so soon: she is not wing'd at her feet like Mercury. He may be a poor man, that has had great losses at Sea, and comes a begging; if so, he will be a fit Subject of charity, and libe∣rality: indeed the winds have chid and bellow'd loud alate.

Enter F. Robert, like a Sea-man.

Seaman, What wind blew you hither?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, an angry wind, may it please your Lord∣ship; a roaring and raging wind, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

I thought so, I did imagine it was a begging businesse: it pleases not me, that you were molested with an an∣gry Page  57 wind, endamag'd by a roaring and raging wind. But what's your present condition?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, I did belong, may it please your Lordship, to a Vessel call'd the Virgin, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

The Virgin? 'Twas not the Virgin Martyr, her name was not Doro∣thy, was it?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, no, not so, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

O, on with your Story. The fellow's distracted with his losses, or ve∣ry sick of the Simples.

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, In this weak Vessel call'd the Virgin, may it please your Lordship, we made notwith∣standing a Voyage to the West-Indies, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship; and after some length of time, may it please your Lordship, we return'd in due time, may it please your Lordship, rich-laden, may it please your Lordship. We were bound, may it please your Lordship, I say, may it please your Lordship, we were bound in our return for London, may it please your Lordship, and at the River's mouth, may it please your Lordship, our weak Vessel known by the name of Virgin, may it please your Lordship, by reason of that angry, roaring, and raging wind, may it please your Lordship, I cannot tell it without weeping, may it please your Lordship, foundred like a tyred Mare, like old Hob∣son's Mare, may it please your Lordship, and we all that were in the Vessel named the Virgin, were cast away and lost, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship. I my self was quite cast away with the rest, may it please your Lordship, as far as I can remember, may it please your Lordship, but here I am again, I think, may it please your Lord∣ship, or, I am sure, my Ghost, may it 〈◊〉 your Lordship, to beg your be∣〈…〉, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

But how cam'st thou to shore?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, I know not whether I am at shore yet or no, may it please your Lordship, but if I am at shore, may it please your Lord∣ship, I came to shore, like Bacchus astride upon a Hogshead, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

Were none sav'd but thee?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, again I say as I said before, I do not as yet well know whether I am sav'd or no, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

Alas poor simple fellow, the fright his dazled his understanding. There are twenty shillings for thee, to recruit and refresh thee after thy sorrows and losses.

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, I thank your Lordship, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship, may it please—

L. Lib.

No more of that, may it please your Lordship.

Rob.

Pardon me, my Lord, my pur∣pose was to say it twenty times over, be∣cause your Lordship gave me twenty shillings, and I desire to be hired so, may it please or not please your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

Sea-man, you have your alms.

Rob.

May it, or may it not please your Lordship, if you are pleas'd, I am pleas'd, pleas'd I am not if you are not Page  58 pleas'd, may it please or not please your Lordship, twenty-score thanks for your twenty shillings, may it please or not please your most liberal Lordship.

He returns.

I had forgot half my Arrant, may it please your Lordship. I lost my memo∣ry when I was cast away, may it please your Lordship. We having lost one Virgin at the Rivers mouth, may it please your Lordship, I found another at the tail of the salt water, may it please your Lordship. Now I come to Mistresse Do∣rothy, may—

L. Lib.

My Cozen Dorothy, what of her?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

No, no, she does not please my Lordship. Once more I tell you, lop that off.

Rob.

Then I shall speak no more of her, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

Again? yes, yes, on with Mi∣stresse Dorothy.

Rob.

Why then, may it please your Lordship.

L. Lib.

Yet again?

Rob.

My Lord, in good earnest, my Lord, I am but a simple Idiot: I cannot tell you the Story, except you suffer me to tell it after my manner: I must go in my beaten road, steer my own course, my Lord.

L. Lib.

Tell it then after thy manner.

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, Mrs Dorothy took shipping at Gravesend, yesterday morning at five of the Clock, may it please your Lordship. The Sea∣men, my Brethren that belong'd to the vessel, presently weigh'd Anchor; the wind was fair for her, as fair as she, may it please your Lordship; and so it has held; and by this time she must needs be in Holland, or in France, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

But how camest thou to know she was my Nice Dorothy, and to be di∣rected hither?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, I begg'd of her, as I now do of your Lord∣ship, and told her I was going beyond London a great way to my Friends in the Countrey, may it please your Lordship; and presently she put her white hand into her pocket, and pull'd forth two half crowns, and gave them to me, may it please your Lordship, and made me pro∣mise her, that I would bring hither her Duty to your Lordship, and this news with it, may it please your Lordship, may it please your Lordship. Moreover, she gave me a Token for your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

A Token? thou gav'st me no Token: where's the Token?

Rob.

May it please your Lordship: a Token, by the which your Lordship should know, that it was she, concern∣ing a strange man and an Ape, but that I have almost forgot, because the best part of my memory was cast away when I was drown'd, may it please your Worship, Lordship I should have said. Now you have both ends of my Story, there is all, if it like your Lordship, if it like your Lord∣ship.

L. Lib.

None of it likes me. By all signs and tokens this must be she. Then all farther enquiry will be vain, and run upon a false Bias. Seaman, here, I give thee a Crown more for thy fidelity.

Rob.

May it please your Lordship, I came with Fidelity, and I shall depart with Fidelity, and perhaps that will deserve a Crown more, may it please your Lordship, and it like your Lordship. My Lord frowns. I must be gone.

Exit Seaman.

Page  59
L. Lib.
My Cozens last from me, found by a Sect:
Ile live hereafter my own Recollect.
Fxit. L. Lib