A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act 3. Scen. 5.

Enter Lord Liberal, and Sir John Wit-little.
S. John.

My Lord, the Gentleman's Wife that yesterday was your Guest, pro∣mist me the sight of a Quaker this day: I have a great mind to see a Quaker. Their outward appearance is highly com∣mended.

L. Lib.

Sr. John: Toads and Serpents have been found in the midst and heart of the fairest-colour'd Stone or Marble being hollow. I love to be like the Pearl, which is united in it self, and called Ʋnio. If I should put my heart upon the Wheel, to run round, the sequel would be dangerous, Page  30 and perhaps like the famous, or infamous rather, motion of the Wheel, which was first set on going, and then carried about and about, round and round, with Bags of Sand tyde to the Wheel, and falling still as the wheel mov'd more and more forcibly, until the violent motion kindled fire in it, and burnt it out of all Motion, but what the sporting wind bestowed upon the cold ashes.

Enter Vain-glory, Pretty, Lucifer like a Quaker, Lucifuga.
S. John.

Madam: You are welcome to my Father-in-Law's house: by that name I commonly stile him: I see you stand close to your word.

Mad.

Else I were not enstated in that Honesty which I pretend to.

S. John.

Is this your Quaker?

Mad.

Yes, Sr. John: This is the Mufty and Head of the Sect.

S. John.

My Lord, pray speak to him: I am not wife enough.

L. Lib.

Friend: What is your Judg∣ment concerning Religion!

Lucifer.

Thou man, who gave thee Au∣thority, thus to question me, thy Fellow-Creature? I am free, and unquestionable in the matter of Religion.

S. John.

Quaker, You should uncover your head: This is a Lord.

Lucifer.

Man, thou art deceiv'd: I will not put off my Hat, though he be a Lord: He is but a man as I am, and my Fellow by Birth.

L. Lib.

What is your Profession?

Lucifer.

I am a poor ingerant Coun∣treyman, a Cobler by Trade, that profess the knowledge of Truth in a larger size, than ordinary.

L. Lib.

How attain'd you to this Know∣ledge of so large a Circumference, if you be ignorant of Learning?

Lucifer.

By Inspiration.

Vaing.

My Lord, he is inspirited of en∣times, and speaks beyond a man.

L. Lib.

The Comet is perfectly circular, except where it blazes: yet wants the Perfection and perfect Influence of a star: though because it is neerer, it seems fairer: Besides, it is an Upstare, and risen out of gross Matter. Our Quaker blazes only in the business of Religion.

Vaing.

Now his Fit enters upon him. Maid, give him a Chair.

He trembles.

S. John.

This is fine sport.

L. Lib.

The Ague shakes him.

Vaing.

He returns to himself.

Exit

Lucifuga.
Lucifer.

The Nightingale growing fat, cannot sing: I have long fasted. Accord∣ing to the multitude of Operations (be they of the same or a different nature) in which the Soul doth busie her self, she per∣formeth each particular Operation with less obsequiousness and ability, and there∣fore less perfectly. Because the Soul being finite and limited, her active virtue is also limited and finite; and so fitting and ap∣plying her activity to divers operations, she gives the cause that each participateth a less portion thereof. It is not within the Sphere of humane power, that one should at the same very time, observingly contem∣plate the Feature of a mans face, beheld with his eyes, and judiciously bend his Thoughts to the curious and bewitching Strains of Musick intruding upon his Ears; nor in the same instant attentively discern the Differences and several Garbs of Co∣lour and Figure. Had I a hundred Under∣standings, and as many Tongues, I have Matter wherewith to lade and load them. Man, there is yet Terra Incognita, a Land unknown to thee, with respect unto know∣ledge and Religion. The truly knowing Page  31 people, wheresoever they are, are infalli∣ble. He that thinks such a People can fall, fears the ruine of the Firmament, and is more than somwhat like him, who-being Galens Patient, and very sick, told him de∣manding in the morning how he did; that he had been restless and without sleep all the nigh; heaving himself from side to side, and heavily groaning; and had been grievously troubled in seriously thinking, what should become of him (sick man) if Atlas, weary now at last, should steal away his out-worn shoulder, and Heaven, with all the Larks in the Ayr, fall upon him ly∣ing weak in his Bed. Without Infallibility, there is no certainty, no security. And what are all Professors, compar'd to us? They are deckt like heathenish Indians, with fine Feathers; filch't from Birds, that when they were alive, flew near Heaven; while these, because their feathers are ascititious, cannot fly, can scarcely creep. If they raise an old Truth, like the shape of a fair plant or flower in a Glass, they suddenly draw the flame or Candle away, and let it fall to dull Ashes again. Other men are petty Chapmen, and Pedlers of Divinity: Man, if thou wilt know, know that I am the knowing man: And man, thou maiest know it by this: of a simple and ignorant man, I am suddenly exalted above my self by Rapture. Persons ill-affected in their eyes, many times see two things, when but one presents it self: every man in their seeing, hath two heads, four eyes, two Mouths, two Bodies, four hands, as many feet; and is twice himself, and a double man. Man, thou maiest think me double and deceitful, but the fault is in thy Eyes, not in me.

He trembles again.

Vaing.

Now he goes back to the simple man he was.

L. Lib.

This begets wonder. But he that is red through blushing, cannot be said to have a red face: He that is pale through fear, cannot be said to have a pale Countenance. As one good or evil Act ren∣ders not a man morally and throughly good or evil: we being truly nam'd good or evil, just or unjust, from the Habits and the multiplication of Acts issuing from them: so a Fit of Knowledge, fits not a man for the Name of a knowing man.

Enter Mrs. Dorothy, and Lucifuga.
S. John.

O Sweet-heart, Had you been here, you had seen a Quaker in his Fit: He quakes and shakes like the Leaves of a tree in a fresh wind.

Dor.

Such sights are not pleasant to me, Sr. John Little-Wit.

Sr. John.

My Lord, she speaks with the Quaker.

L. Lib.

It matters not: I had rather she were a Quaker than a Papist. Tender In∣fants are most subject to fascination; she has Age.

Lucifer.

Madam, Your Portion being in your own hands; bagg it; and I will find waies to fetch it: Afterwards, I shall con∣vey you to a Nunnery.

Dor.

You will make me happy.

L. Lib.

Come, loving Guests, receive the Civility of the House.

Sr. John.

Madam: You have sign'd us yours by this Favour: How does your hus∣band?

Vaing.

Well, I hope, Sr. John.

Sr. John.

Come Quaker, go with us.

Lucifer.

Man, I follow thee.

Exeunt.