A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?
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Act 3. Scen. 2.

Enter Lord Liberal, Sr. John Wit-little, Mrs. Dorothy.
L. Lib.

Come, Sr. John Wit-little; This is alwaies the merriest day of the week with us; though indeed mirth cannot well at∣temper it self to these new-born Troubles: but we hope the storm will not long rage, it is so violent. The Transision in Musick from a Discord to a Concord, is very swee: from a Concord to a Discord, harsh and unpleasant.

S. John.

My Lord: I could wish you would conclude a final and happy Concord betwixt me and Mrs. Dorothy.

Dor.

That will never be concluded, Sir John Wit-little.

Sr. John.

And pray, why, fair Mrs. Dorothy?

Dor.

Because you are Sir John Wit-little.

Sr. John.

I am sure, there is not only Wit-little, but also little Wit in that An∣swer.

L. Lib.

Let her be as free as Ayr in her Speeches: you shall have her in the Exit of the Business.

Dor.

But he shall never hold her.

S. John.

Mrs. Dorothy, it will be your securest way to take me. I'le be a Papist or Atheist or any thing to please you.

Dor.

You have not understanding e∣nough to be a Papist, nor sufficient Wit to be an Atheist.

S. John.

I have understanding enough, to adore you as my Saint, wit enough to worship you as my Image.

Dor.

Fie, fie, Sr. John; You are pro∣phane.

S. John.

I will not be prophane to please you: and to please you, I will be prophane again; if you please, that I will.

L. Lib.

Sr. John, Let her abound in her own sense.

S. John.

Sense! I am almost in a mind, she's deprived of all her Senses, that can∣not see, nor hear, nor smell, nor tast nor touch enough in me to make her love me: Madam, Speak punctually, and to the Needle's point, Will you have me?

Dor.

I shall then speak sharply: No.

S. John.

Why then, I'le marry thy Wir.

Dor.

Sr. John, you must first find another Wit to match it.

Sr. John.

Must I, whether I can or no?

Enter Lucifer, Madam Hypocrisie, Pretty, Lucifuga.
Lucifer.

Wher's this Noble Lord, whose nature so perfectly consorts with his name? and who is so large-handed and boundless in his Entertainments, the Lord Libe∣ral?

L. Lib.

Sir, I am the Master of this Place.

Lucifer.

In a good and auspicious hour you speak it: My Lord, we understood, that this was your weekly day of Jollity, and I was bold to bring my wife in my hand with me; that we might ive up the rich experience of your Noble Entertain∣ment.

L. Lib.

Ye are welcom. This can be no Priest or Jesuit, he has a Wife. We stand out of the Gun-shot of danger. Sir, our Manner and Oeconomy is, first to dance, and then to banquet. We excuse no Gen∣tile Person that enters.

Lucifer.

My Lord, I run all honourable hazards among Friends.

Vaing.

Madam, This is a good man, as they are call'd, a Priest, and Father of the Society: now time, and opportunity invite you to Confession.

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Dor.

But I want the coveniency of pri∣vacy.

Vaing.

Madam, you may do it in the Dance: It hath been practised by the Learned Society, in case of Necessity.

Dor.

I thank you: I shall not fail to im∣brace the present occasion.

L. Lib.

Come, Gentlemen, and Ladies, sort your selves.

In the Dance she meets him often, often turns with him, and laies, her mouth to his ear. In the end of the dance she gives him Gold.
Lucifer.

This is a Child worth Gold: Her hand was double-pav'd with twenty Shilling Pieces: This Golden Girl must not be neglected: Give her notice, that I will visit her often: the manner thus.

L. Lib.

Friends, and Strangers, the Banquet attends you within.

Exeunt.