A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act. 2.

Scen. 1.

Enter Fear, and Aristotle Junior.
Fear.

HAving orderly perform'd the Injunctions prescrib'd to you according to the Method and Oeconomy of this House, I am order'd, as you have Page  11 heard, by Lady Devotion, to render you to the place where I first receiv'd you. We all hope, that you will retain the scarlet Dye wherewith you are imbued: Besides, It is our order, that as we sing the Introit of him that enters, so we give a Musical Farewel to him agreeably in his dismission. I take my leave, and leave you to your attention.

Exit Fear.
Arist.

I am humbly thankful.

A Song.
Scholar: although you do depart,
One sings.
Carry us with you in your heart
For after practise: Have a care
That you remember who you are,
What you have learn'd, and how you may
Stand ever stedfast in the way,
Which we have taught: Those gradual stairs
Well practis'd, will adorn your hairs
When white with Age, and bring your head
With solace to your earthy Bed.
Then will the joyful Angels
Three sing, one af∣ter another
Then will the joyful Angels
Then will the joyful Angels meet you
They joyn voices
And with their Songs of triumph greet you.
Then will the joyful Angels
Then will the joyful Angels
Then will the joyful Angels say
Welcom t'our endless Holyday.
Snares will be laid on every side:
Be sure that Prudence be your guide
In all your motions. Look before
You place your foot on any shore.
In every place the Net is near:
It will be needful that you fear.
In every place Hypocrisie
Seeming far off, is then most nigh
In real Truth. By a right line
You shall attain to things Divine.
Then will the joyful Angels—
The real Good must first be known,
Then the apparent to disown
Evil compleatly, and assent
To Vertues crown us innocent
In perfect Morals. When you spie
The first approaches of a Lie,
Step back, then flie for Vertues sake,
As if y' had trod upon a Snake.
Go on with Courage: and your youth,
As with a Gemme, enrich with Truth.
Then will the joyful Angels—
Arist.

The blessed Angels constellate here: Yea Heaven it self is translated hi∣ther: Nothing sublunary is more divine: I owe my true life, and all that is conse∣quent to it, to this place: I must now think my self the last, and least, and lowest of all men: Speak in the abstract from the Lists, Lines, and Limits of all Hypocrisie; and act agreeably to the Commutations and Di∣stributions of Aristotelical Justice: It re∣mains, that I wait continually the falling of the Dew: The Shell wherein the Orient Pearl is born, opens it self towards Heaven, begging as it were, one clean drop of proli∣sical and procreating Dew: which having obtained, it presently shuts, keeps the door against all outward things, and secretly transforms and ripens that heavenly drop into a precious Margarite.

May all my Reason owns, hereafter shew
The Orient Pearl born of Celestial Dew.
Exit.

Act 2. Scen. 2.

Enter Lucifer as a Jesuit, Madam Hypocrisie, Pretty, Lucifuga.
Lucifer.

Devotion has been long filing and polishing him: Madam, you must needs intend and bend your utmost skill to reduce him.

Page  12
Hyp.

Sir, I shall walk up close to what your Commands impose upon me: I will not lagg behind them, if my power faints not, and except I be arrested by ne∣cessity.

Lucifer.

Devotion in all her aims drives at this, to bring you and your Art and Power to nothing. A thing will run away through many changes, and put on many strange shapes if the Chymist or Alchymist pursues it, and endeavours the reduction of it to nothing: This way he comes: I will be near in ambush, that if your Plot flagg and hang down the head, I may discharge my strongest Machin upon him. Lucifuga, Wait you invisibly at his Elbow, on his heart-side.

Lucifug.

Sir, I will have him on the left side, the right side, the wrong-side, the in∣side, the out-side, the fore-side, the back∣side, every side.

Exit Lucifer.

Hyp.

Pretty, Let us now sweetly touch all the most Musical strings of Hypocrisie.

Prett.

Madam, Pretty will do all things handsomly.

Enter Aristotle Junior.
Hyp.

Maid, durst I be angry, I would chide you.

Prett.

Madam, durst I be stubborn or proud, I would excuse my fault: yet, prompted from within, I humbly say, that when I omitted my duty towards you, I was otherwise busied.

Hyp.

How mean you busied?

Prett.

I am very loath to answer, lest I should seem vain.

Hyp.

I charge you, answer me.

Prett.

It comes with leaden heels from my own mouth. In the contemplation of heavenly things.

Hyp.

I forgive you. Thou art as vertu∣ous as fair.

Prett.

Now Madam, durst I be angry, I would chide you.

Hyp.

Why, prythee?

Prett.

You call me vertuous: a name which unbecomes you to badge me with, or me to hear assigned to my self without a deluge of tears. O Madam, what have you done?

Hyp.

Amiss, dear Maid: I can mingle an Ocean of Tears with your Deluge, in expiation of my Crime: Forgive me Maid.

Pret.

Forgive me, Madam.

Hyp.

Your ear: Pretty, Dost thou act the Crocodile best now, or I?

Prett.

Both are as like to the Crocodile as the Crocodile is like to himself: All Preambles to the devouring of this Schol∣lar.

Hyp.

Let's change the Humour: Maid, where shall we select and pick forth a Me∣ditation for the present?

Prett.

We have Matter enough every where, Madam. Those two Turtles that stand billing yonder, are an Embleme of chast Love.

Hyp.

A most happy Subject: Let's part a little, and retrait inwardly.

They walk apart.

Arist.

I have discovered their several glances towards me: Prudence, assist me farther. Yonder pretty party-colour'd Ad∣der, watching in the greenest grass, is truly emblematical to me: I like not these af∣fected Pageants of Devotion, these paint∣ed Sepulchers, these Dunghils cover'd with Snow as with a fair sheet. Devotion in the Majesty and Royalty of it, is inward: In the outside, 'tis like a modest face, abus'd if painted: The more sublime the Star is, it appears the lesser: Deep waters are si∣lent: The rich Ears of Corn, and the Boughs heavy-laden with fruit, bow and humble their heads towards the earth that bears them. Chaffe and Straw ride upon Page  13 the Superfice of the waters to be seen, when heavy things sink, hide, and conceal them∣selves: The Silk-worm folds up and houses it self in the little Ball of Silk which it makes, and that from its inwards: Gold is modest in its shining: Jewels, though shining, are small: The Ayr is that by which ut medium diaphanum, all things here are seen, but the Ayr it self is not seen. The Empyreal Heaven, though so shining, that it is able to make a continual day amongst us, is hidden: Nihil in mari eminet praeter saxa: Nothing holds up the head at Sea, but Rocks. The Sun declining, the sha∣dowes encrease: Cernendi vis in albugine sita non est: the white of the Eye sees not. The Seminal and Medicinal Vertues are inward: The Soul is invisible.

Enter a Beggar, leaning upon his Crutches.
Begg.

Good Mistress, assist with your Charity a poor, old, lame man.

Hyp.

A poor man. A meditation of chast Love, is agreeably perfected by the practise of Charity: Old man, I am tender-ear'd: You must not beg of me twice at the same time. Because you are poor, I give you this; because you are old, this; and this, because you are lame.

Prett.

Alass poor man! I have no world∣ly goods to give you: I am a Servant. Yet, because you are poor, I give you readiness of good-will, and compassion; because you are old, and suburb'd near your grave, you shall partake of my best Devotions: and because you are lame, I give you tears, weep over you, cry with you.

Beg.

God bless you both, good Mistresses I thank you.

Exit Beggar.

Arist.

Methinks, this Charity is too full of words, too circumstantial.

Enter a Bagpiper. He playes.
Hyp.

O prophane! This is the Musick of the Bear-Garden, and of the Counttey-Alehouse: not heavenly Musick: Maid, chide him hence.

Prett.

Depart, O thou prophane Per∣son.

Hyp.

Desist: It may be this is his way of begging. Somtimes the poor call at the doors of rich men after this Piping man∣ner: Give him this Alms.

Prett.

Friend: Madam gives you a libe∣ral Almes. He both plaies and dances now. He doubles his Prophaneness.

Hyp.

Let him alone. Having receiv'd a large Almes, the poor man is overjoy'd. We may stop our ears, and look another way.

After a little while exit.

Arist.

In rich-furred beasts their Cases are far better than their Bodies: and in the Cinnamon-Tree the Bark is much dea∣rer than the Bulk: Suavius olet flos, cum folia nihil oleant: The Flower is more sweet∣sented, where the Leaves cannot be sent∣ed, as in the Violet, the Rose; scarlet, pur∣ple, or the fine crimson-Violet, is a royal Cloath, not by reason of the Wool but the Dye: In our actions the Byas wheels the other way. These hypocritical Juggles are execrable in themselves, and adverse to me: I cannot endure the presentation of them longer.

Enter Lucifer.
Lucifer.

Now the grand Genius of our Society be propitious, or I forfeit my much desired Prey. Honoured Sir, what do you here? This Woman is no sutable Con∣sort for you. Madam, I know you, and your fair Fairy Waiting-maid. Quit the Place.

Exeunt Hypocrisie and Pretty.

Sir, This was Madam Hypocrisie, her own Page  14 and very self; and the other was her act∣ing Girl, her play-maid.

Arist.

I divin'd some such thing: Truly Sir, whosoever you are, I have a reserve of Honour for you as you profess against Hy∣pocrisie. But pray Sir, let not my question be unpardonable: who are you?

Lu.

I am forsooth, a Father of the Socie∣ty. You see forsooth, what Swarms of Schis∣maticks we have in these parts; and how forsooth, that in all Meetings scarce two men appear, as the Schools speak, of the same numerical Judgment. Forsooth, the Truth is, the Nation is like a Forrest on the Coasts of Barbary; where every Beast proudly forrageth for himself according to the latitude of his strength, and combates with every living thing he comes near, ei∣ther upon the account of Offence or De∣fence: So that forsooth, this may truly be called, and in civil terms, as the Civilians speak, Religio Deserti, the Religion of the Forrest or Wilderness, or the wild Boar's and Bear's Religion.

Arist.

Sir, I find you are knowing: Hi∣ther I subscribe to your Discourse: And indeed I would steer any Discourse, that I might be set in as much distance from Hy∣pocrisie as the Globe of the earth would permit. But you know how harshly and untuneably change sounds in the ears of all men.

Lu.

Pray forsooth, courteously lend an ear: Then only Change is a Defect, when it is opposite or fals cross to the well-be∣ing or perfection of the thing changed, and is in some kind a degradation of it: This is forsooth, as the Rhetoritians speak, ipsa luce lucidius, clearer than the light or Sun: because the Heavens and heavenly Bodies are incessantly changed in their motions: We are changed for the better in our grow∣ings outward and inward: Every season of the year revels, and causes many changes in the world: which forsooth, cannot be imputed to the things changed as defects, but adhere to them as legitimate perfections of their Natures and Beings.

Arist.

Holy Sir, I do most highly value your Holiness, and your Learning: and humbly require of you more particular In∣formation.

Lucifer.

Child, give me leave, forsooth, to call you so: For now forsooth, you are, and shall be my Ghostly Child: I see for∣sooth, you are ingenious. I will send you first to Flanders; afterwards to Spain; then to Italy; to sublimate and heighten your Learning and Experience; and that you may learn the Arts and Sciences where they are best taught. More of this betwixt us in private.

Exeunt.

Lucifug.

The Field is ours: We have at last wrought him to us: Open Hypocrisie, Strumpet-like, is too palpable. I am now visible to you.

The Stratagem is then exalted high,
When th' Hypocrite reviles Hypocrisie.
Exit.

Act 2. Scene 3.

Enter Agrippa.
Agrip.

I have bound him by Command, and by Promise I my self am bound to se∣cure with my presence the execution. An∣guilla est, elabitur: If we give him his head, he slips. My Presence will keep him fixt.

Enter an Orange-Maid, like those in the Pit.

What seeks this Maid here? Fie on you; so bold? 'Tis a Spirit: and I must lay it.

Maid.

The Affair refers me to you: and you are here.

Agrip.

Be thou Spirit, or Flesh, thou Page  15 hast no part in the Comedy.

Maid.

But I have Sir. No long part you would say; but a necessary part I have.

Agrip.

Your place is the Pit: and your Business is to wait there.

Maid.

And from thence I came.

The Gentlemen there are per∣plex't and troubled: They complain, that your Jesuit sends a chief Actour beyond the Seas; and that either your Scene must be preposterously chang'd, or they shall be deprived of the principal Occurrences which happen to him.

Agrip.

Neither: by vertue of my first and fundamentel Promise, my power shall bring him hither at due times, to act over again the most remarkable Occurrences: and he shall neither know where he is, nor what befals him. Return this Answer, with my devoutest Respects.

She was going forth, and returns.

Maid.

I shall. If you will civilly take your leave of me, I shall present you with a Sevil-Orange.

Agrip.

Is this your custom?

He sa∣lutes her.

Exit Maid.
Maid.

No, Sir: but it was in my desires to teach you manners.

Agrip.
The Matter partly travels: you shall find,
As Friends, all brought before you to your mind.
Exit.

Act 2. Scen. 4.

Enter Lucifer, Lucifuga, Madam Hypocri∣sie, Pretty, Mr. Complement, Mr. De∣mure, Gaffer Highshooe, Galen Ju∣nior, Ignore, Magnifico, See Senior, Signior See, Mr. Kickshaw.
Lucifer.

Well, Madam; I have dispatcht my Scholar to St. Omers, you may now en∣ter your whole Tribe. Every one shall re∣ceive his Charge, and I will discharge you of their persons. Mr. Complement, your charge is, that you stow fire in the Court: Speak every where of Abuses; and of a sin∣gular discerning Spirit, and a Holiness which you have, but others are naked of, as prophane: Turn up the white of your eye, and shew it, as if that were the outside of your Soul, according to the Naturalist, Pro∣fectò in oculis animus inhabitat; truly the Soul dwels in the eyes: Draw every word through your Nose, as if it past through a middle sort of crack't Organ-Pipe: and lift up your hands towards that which scru∣pulous men call Heaven, and close them when they are extended, as if you had fast hold of Heaven. Pretend alwaies like an Apton in the first onset, true things, and such as are in use with holy men: those delude irrefragably: The people regard not the tayl of the Business: The Snake having past his head, draws his body after him into the Faction. Tell the people, that by how much an Element is more near to Heaven, it is by so much the more pure, ctive, noble: that the Water is more pure than the Earth, the Ayr than the Water; and Elementary Fire than the Ayr: That the higher the Ayr is, it is the purer still, and more subtile: That in a Limbeck the things of greatest purity and vertue, are sublimated, that is, hast to the top of the Limbeck; the drossy matter fals. Let there be a new shap't Achates in every pe∣riod. It is not necessary, that one experien∣cing if Sea-water be salt, should drink up: the whole Sea: nor that I should foot it over every particular: your own Genius will direct you forward. There is no more excellent manner of cozening and guling the simple Herd of people, than with the specious Mantle of Religion, because Re∣ligion out-powers, and, overswaies all in Page  16 mankind. Mr. Demure, and Gaffer High-shooe; you for the City, and you for the Countrey, are charged accordingly. Galen junior, when you are call'd to sick persons, and find that their sicknesses lay close siege to their bodies, first prepare them by some eloquent Preamble. Say, if you see the wa∣ter in a calm Ser troubled, and rise high in∣to the Ayr, take heed, ther's a Whale near. Turn it homwards thus; Sickness disturb∣ing so highly the peace and tranquility of the Body, Death is imminent. Then make reverend mention of the Society, and re∣count the numerous Conversions that we have wrought in the world, and press it home to their Consciences, that they leave us honourable Legacies according to their Conditions, yea though they beggar and leave succourless their own dear children: We are not their Heirs at Common Law, but upon a higher account: Tell them, other∣wise they are near to a Gulf, a Precipice: Then while the Iron is hot, and upon the Anvile, send for us. If need urge, we shall use you in Deletories, vulgarly call'd poy∣sons, when we prosecute a pious End. But if any of our holy Society be sick, they pay you not, because they pray for you: The Prayers of the Society are above price, and cannot be valued. Ignora, you must wire∣bind and enchain your self to the common Rabble in the Decisions of Law-cases: af∣fect the names of popular and Patriot: de∣sert noble Interests, though never so just: and though you take Fees on both sides, be sure you herd it with the Rascal Deer; they couch the safest; they are the more numerous, and clamorous. If any case of∣fer it self, wherein the religious profit and emolument of the Society is involv'd, take all shapes, as the Cameleon at Land, the Po∣lypus in the sea; all colours, as the Tar∣rand in the Garden; before you let your Cause fall: Regard not the poor stand∣ing in competition with us; in ballance with us, they are the German Bishops Rats: We are poor, and entangled in debt; though in truth we were never yet acquain∣ted with debt; that's our Pretence, en∣franchised, guided and guarded with a reli∣gious Equivocation; as far as you know to the contrary, we are in debt. Magnifico, Your charge is clear: you know your mach: The Word is enough to a Souldier. My three outlandish Imps, ye must away, each with all expedition to his Country. Your Business wherein ye concenter, is, to de∣base and vilifie the English Nation in all your Discourses, all places: Tell your Coun∣tries, that they are a people of degenerous and ungarrison'd Souls, Adamites in un∣derstanding; and if they have any, have but a surface-knowledge, and that most pa∣radox to Truth: That they live altogether in Forrests and Caves, and in the white Rocks from which England was named Al∣bion; and eat raw flesh, and oftentimes the flesh of Children: That they are a ti∣morous and soft-fac'd people, unapt for wars; yea ready to entertain a conquest with most humble submission. Mr. See Se∣nior, Give your people to understand, that they are the most credulous, and the most noble-soul'd Nation of all others: That if at any time they design another Armado for England, they take a special care they do not provide such an other holy Nun to give a solemn blessing to it; she was after∣wards solemnly prov'd to be a Witch. Pray them, that when they work their false Mi∣racles, they will carry their hands, and their invisible juggling-Hair more covertly and cleverly: The falshood of some these times, hath been Chrystal-clear in the view of Reason: the most learned Laureat's of Spain it self, were confounded in the sight of them; and the Inquisition it self was angry, because they were not acted with Page  17 more nimbleness. Tell them, their most prophane and bawdy Comedies in their Processions on their greatest dayes, are not convenient. I cannot be infinite. Com∣mend my brotherly Respects to Father Es∣cobar at Valladolid: Tell him, his Morals thrive wonderfully: The Mystery of Je∣suitisme is little availeable against them: they have overturn'd all Law, Right, Ho∣nesty, and deified the Jesuit, made him the great God of Nature, all cases of Consci∣ence answering, turning, and returning to him, whenas they should return, turn, and answer to him above. Mr. Signior See, Re∣commend my most humble Vassallage to the grand Signior at Rome: Pray his Holi∣ness, that there be sudden provision by pen∣sion made here, for the poorer and scab'd sort of Priests; they are in the Antecamera to a falling condition: Ascertain to him, that some of the most active and unquiet Spirits amongst them, have taken Pensions here, to discover the Mysterious Intentions and Actions of Rome and Spain, and at the same time, the very very same, have re∣main'd pension'd by his Holiness to betray the Affairs of their own Countrey to him: Insomuch that of late, one of them heated and heighten'd in his Cups at a Tavern, and his Friend desiring to depart, said with Cy∣nick Modesty, Stay, Friend, the Pope and the Rebel in England (he nam'd him) shall pay for all: Fail not to lay this at his Holi∣ness his Feet when you kiss them. We of the Society are glewed by a particular vow of Obedience to his Holiness: It was the Wisdom of our Patron did it, that our ad∣vancements might be joyntly conserved: our Interest is closely twisted and pleaced with his. Signifie to his Holiness, that his wicked Priests get Bastards a pace here; and then, having been overdoers, and over∣done themselves, pretend to be only Over∣seems to the Children: So far forth, that one being demanded why he knav'd it for a Bastard, defended his Act and Monument scholastically with Aristotles Ipse dixit; who saies, that then a living thing is per∣fect, quandò general sibi simile in Naturâ, when it begets a like to it self in Nature. Pray him to keep the Rithm if not the rea∣son, and uphold constantly the Jews and the Stews; that we may have more ho∣nourable Examples of Jewish women turn'd Christians, to the end they may turn whores; which amongst the Jews is highly punishable. Tell him likewise that false Miracles are greatly advantageous to the Cause, if they be done as the Roman School-men speak, et si non castè, tamen cau∣tè; although not chastly and truly, yet wa∣rily to prevent scandal; wherein our own Honour is more consider'd, than the Ho∣nour of him who is most honourable. Mon∣sieur Kickshaw; Load and physick this Na∣tion as far as possibly you can, with the pret∣ty Muld-sack or Don Quickshot, of your new Fashions: And as old Rome did a∣bound with the gods of all the Countreys they conquer'd, introduce the Folsies and Drolleries of all the world hither: That best suits with you, that have the best name in the superlative degree: And still wire∣draw the people here, with forestalling and diverting their Trade. Forgive my length: My Matter, like an Ocean, had I given way, had over-towr'd me. Let's privately rejoyce a while, as Witches have their pri∣vate Revellings, and then wee'l take our Leaves.

Hyp.

Most gladly, Reverend Father.

They Dance.

Reverend Father, they all crave your ho∣ly Benediction, in lieu of a choyce Viari∣cum before they depart.

Lucifer.

O, I give it most willingly. Go, my Children, and may your Foreheads be as wals of Corinthian Brass, and may your Page  18tuus lead all Europe.

Exeunt all the Scholars.

Madam, In certain concurrences of par∣ticulars, to prevent suspition, I shall need a Lady to sustain the person of my Wife: Therefore to palliate my own Person, I retain you and your Maid.

Hyp.

You honour us, Reverend Father.

He whispers to his Page. Exeunt.

Act 2. Scen. 5.

Enter my Lord Liberal, and Mrs. Do∣rothy his Nice.
L. Lib.

Sweet Nice, unhinge your heart from that low-orb'd Religion of Popery, which thus imperils both your Soul and Body.

Dor.

My Lord, I cannot. All which that Religion proposes, goes parallel with the most pure, chast, and refined Truths. If you do not relinquish me to my own liber∣ty, I shall weep, until I have not another little drop to stagnate in my eyes as want∣ing strength to follow the rest.

L. Lib.

What a deep-wrought and root∣ed Delusion is this? If Ignorance hath not uncoyn'd your Soul, and rendred you un∣reasonably renacious of your own Judg∣ment; If your heart be not in a total E∣clipse and Epilepse by the vigorous reverbe∣rations of self-Opinion, you will book it there, that all your noble friends are o∣therwise devoted.

Dor.

My Friends are not competent Presidents to me for the carriage of my own heart. Noble Unkle, If you take me off from this divine foundation, I shall ever be in a rolling condition, ever like a float∣ing Island, or the Sea-weed, and never se∣curely know where to take or keep root.

L. Lib.

They are the Jesuits that have done this: they have out-channel'd their Talents; led them through all the Me∣anders and Labyrinths of Errour, and sta∣ted them incompatible and inconsistent with Truth. Dear Cozen, I pity you; you have taken a wandring Star for the Pole.

Dor.

Noble Sir, you borrow your name from the Nobleness of our Family: I con∣jure you by all the lineal and collateral de∣scents of it, to allow me liberty of Con∣science.

L. Lib.

I may not: My Conscience swaies me the other way. You want no∣thing: No Pleasures are denied to you; of which my House flowes with Variety. you are in the Milky way to peace of mind, if you can bend your heart to walk in it.

Dor.

There is no peace without the qui∣et enjoyment and exercise of Religion.

Enter Lucifuga.
Lucif.

Madam, I belong to a most Re∣verend Father of the Society, to whom your most distressed condition is made known. He will be here quickly, and you may have the benefit of Confession.

Dor.

Dear Boy, that cannot be; I am not permitted to speak with any person in private.

Lucif.

Madam, the Father is wise: hee'l find a way.

L. Lib.

Poor Girl! I bleed inwardly for her: Before she fell into this Trance, her Soul was encaged and engaged like a Bird of Paradise in a pure Body; like the Bird which the Indians call in their Lan∣guage Manuco Diata, Aviculam Dei, the little Bird of God, because it is never seen on the ground, but dead: She was drest modestly, and like one of the Sister-hood: Now her hair is mathematically trim'd, curl'd figure-fashion, and with exquisite Artifice woven into Nets and Snares. Page  19 Howsoever her heart is qualified, she hath more of the world upon her back, than for∣merly. It is a notorious folly, to be proud of a rich Scarf holding up a lame Arm, or of a gay Garment covering our Nakedness. Escobar the Spanish Jesuit hath open'd a broad way to these loose and heathenish Dresses. O the Jesuits! Surgeons are mo∣dest-handed, wary, and soft in their touches, but Murderers care not where they strike, cut, wound. What's he? A little Devil. Cozen, are you a Witch too, Do you deal with the Devil and all? What are you, Sir∣rah? Whence came you? and to whom do you pertain?

Dor.

Good my Lord, Speak not so much beneath your Blood and Education. It is a Blackamore Boy: Do not such obtrude themselves to us every day in the Streets?

L. Lib.

O Cozen: the Jesuits have be∣mir'd your Affections: and the Will be∣ing surpriz'd with a Passion (be it Love, Anger, or any other) the Understanding in a Soul divested of Prudence, easily conde∣scends, and represents all things of the same colour, the same dimensions with the passion. Troubled water renders not the Sun-beams, though most right and pure in themselves, but distorted. The Chrystal∣line humour wherein the visive power is Queen Regent, is ot colour'd. Winnow and sift your heart, to find and single out that which threw you into this Abyss. He that fals into the water by the breaking of the Ice, must rise where he fell, or he is lost beyond recovery.

Dor.

My Lord, I am your Votary, but I am grounded; I stick close to my Root.

L. Lib.

Pray come up to my Proposals: I will send for one who shall free the Ho∣nour of all our Doctrines, which your fan∣cy either from the multiplying or extenua∣ting Glass, mishapes to you.

Dor.

Your Lordship may send for him, but I shall not entertain him: He will be as unwelcom unto me as a Spectre.

L. Lib.

Then let some of your own Learned Acquaintance be call'd, to plain as with a Roller, a Cylinder, the way before you: or, be your own Physitian: Cozen, clean the Gold and keep it: Select the Gold, and throw aside the drossie part: and amongst other things you find, find your Errour: You see, sweet Cozen, that I de∣sire to descend into your heart gently, as the Sun-beams into a Chamber through the window, without opening the Casement, or breaking the Glass.

Dor.

My Lord, you miscenter your hopes. Your Lordship will never be able to pull the Thorn of scruple out of my Conscience. Good my Lord, surrender me to my Medi∣tations. Solitariness is my best Compa∣nion.

L. Lib.

I do, but with some kind of Regret.

Exit L. Liberal.

Dor.

We who are upon the earth, de∣termining and sentencing from the verdict of Sense, fancy, at the least in our first Ap∣prehensions, these things below to be great, and the glorious and shining Bodies above, to be small: If we were advanced to the place where the Stars are, these things would appear to us very small, if seen at all, and those would shew themselves: It sticks in the narrowness of my mouth; I put it over to my thoughts. O the little∣ness and vileness of these inferiour things! In natural things, the higher the Sun mounts, the less shadows it casts: and in artificial things, the Pyramid ascending higher and higher, is lesser still and lesser: So manner'd ought we to be in our out∣ward deportment.

Page  20Enter Lucifuga, and one like an Angel. Musick.
Lucif.

Act it to the life now, and you fasten her. A young Maid believes and loves with equal readiness.

Exit Lucif.

Aug.

Maid: Heaven greets you: I come not to way-lay your Devotions, but so raise and perpetuate them. Let not your Unkle with his out-stretch't perswasions lay or alhy your Zeal. Hereticks are mer∣ciless, Iron-breasted, Rock-hearted, and people of hardned and petrified Bowels: There is no seed, no footstep of Mercy in then; only perhaps now and then certain arreptitious emications and Star-twinck∣lings of natural, moral, and old-Roman ten∣derness. If any of these, walking in the painted Galleries of their Imagination, fancy they do works of mercy, when they do thus and thus because others have done so and so before them, they miscarry; For their Mercy is as their Belief, is beleper'd by it; and the stream cannot be cleaner, clearer, higher than the Fountain, or the Branch purer and more generous than the Root. The Magnetisme of Piery hath wrought upon you; and the Torpedo and Remora, the World and Heresie, the De∣vils Factors, should act no farther by their secret Influx upon your Breast: You have given your Faith to the Firmament, and you must not follow in the train of the Pla∣nets; that is, move on, and retrait in the same Line, and in going forward be som∣times periodical and stationary. You are Heaven-sixt: beware of sublunary Divini∣ty. Relapses are dangerous: because Na∣ture after a sickness is unarm'd, and left un∣able to resist their Assaults. You must pass as a beloved Mirrour of Patience, through all the Topicks and Tacticks of Affliction: which like Galilaeus his Glass, brings most remote things near to you.

Fear not: He that exhorts to what you do,
Joyns two in one, exhorts and praises too.
Exit.
Dor.

I am scarce yet recollected. O now for an eye-cataclysme, till I go to the place where this Angel dwels, by water in mine own Tears.

Religion that calls Angels from above,
Shewes the divinest Intercourse of Love.
Exit Dorothy.

Act 2. Scen. 6.

Enter Agrippa.
Agr.

I present my self now, that I may begin to fall quadrate or into a punctual Cone with my promise. I have brought St. Omers hither; Here you shall see de∣cipher'd and shadow'd what was there act∣ually and substantially done: We will not miss in an Hebrew Point or Tittle of Truth. I should afterwards translate our Scholar hither from Spain, but I cannot: Time out-runs us. Where our Matter is in∣finit, we must circumscribe our selves. How∣soever, as in the turning of an Artificial Globe, new shapes and Figures continually appear, so Changes and Varieties encoun∣ter you continually. The Poet hath enchar∣ged upon us to make hast, or you would see nothing answerable to such a vast Orb of Matter.

Exit.

Aristotle Junior, in a Chair.
Arist.

The Jesuits here have set me un∣der Lock and Key, and curtain'd all the Windows. I have no benefit of Light, but in one corner, where a little Ray peeps in upon a Picture. And the Picture represents the Hollanders as having taken a Ship, wherein were many Jesuits, and thrown Page  21 them overboard into the Sea: but in vain, for the Jesuits lie all upon the Surface of the water, with their faces looking com∣fortably towards Heaven, and cannot sink, but are all sustain'd by Miracle: It is strange that the Jesuits being men so weighty in worth, should now be so light, and not worth their weight either in Gold or ought else. I hear likewise, that they use dark Chambers, and Pictures presenting Homi∣cides, to sad and tragical ends: It is whis∣per'd by their own Pupils here. This my present Employment they call their exer∣cise: And it was impos'd upon me in my entrance, to search my Inwards whether I have a Call to be a Jesuit or no. I do not like these quotidian and ubiquetary Mira∣cles; nor this warping of divine things to self-ends. Hypocrisie haunts me still: The Picture, Image, or the Representation in a Looking-glass, that shews a Face less than it is, may happily be like the Face it shews, and symmetrical with it; but the Repre∣sentation, Image, or Picture that swels up the Face, and allows it greater, except it be wrough so for the suppliance of what is lost by distance, attempts above it self, is monstr ous, and cannot be like its Arche∣type; because Proportion is retain'd in Re∣presentations which are lesser than the life, but in such as are greater, the Composition is discompos'd, and the Proportion seat∣ter'd.

He opens the Lock.

Enter Father Wallis, a Jesuit, in his Habit.
F. Wallis.

I wish forsooth all happiness to you: Child, how fare you forsooth in your heavenly Meditations? I have brought you a Relick here of most high considera∣tion; a, Feather forsooth of the wing of an Arch-Angel. Look not upon it but with due reverence.

Arist.

Father forsooth, my Meditations gain and win much upon me: But when I was a Cantabrigian, as having been matricu∣lated in that University, my Master taught me that Angels were immaterial and incor∣poreal; and that they appear in the shapes of young men, to signifie their strength, virtue, and power, and that they are wing'd in the Picture, to set in view their readi∣ness and quickness in their moving from one place to another.

F. Wallis.

Your Cantabrigians forsooth, are fallen as from Religion, so from Learn∣ing. We of the Society are Antistites, At∣lantes, & Heroes Literarum, the most learn∣ed of all the world.

Arist.

This is a Feather from a West-In∣dian Bird, which the good Father would entitle to Heaven.

F. Wallis.

And Child forsooth, how stand you affected to our Vocation?

Arist.

Father, I have a special observance for your Order (I must speak here after this Dialect) but I desire to be more experi∣ence-proof, before I determine upon a set∣tlement.

F. Wallis,

Child forsooth, you fear want perhaps, because we are vow'd away to po∣verty. We have alwaies a secular Priest at∣tending upon us, that purchases Lands for us in his own namé.

Arist.

And is not this Hypocrisie, which put me upon the wing, and engaged me to flie our of England?

F. Wallis.

Besides, we of the English So∣ciety, have a Ship that trades betwixt Lon∣don and Flanders; in the which we conti∣nually receive and return the best Goods at the best advantage: and we in these parts, receive ten thousand Pounds in ready coyn every year out of England. You stand upon a broad bottom, if you joyn with us: We are above him that wrote, Ego & Rex me∣us; I and my King: Emperours, Kings, Page  22 Princes, Cardinals, Dukes, Generals of Armies by Land and Sea, fear us, and there∣fore court us: We are furnished with se∣cret Engines, able with ease to subdue them and their Families: The Pope him∣self in the traverse of the Business, is our Vassal: he loves us outwardly above all o∣thers, because he inwardly fears us more than he fears all others. If any Cardinal or other person grow into a Favourite, we send from some part of the world, one of our Order that is allied to him, to reside near him in his Orb, and maintain him ours. No Prince in the world feeds fuller and higher than we, if you consider Nature in her ordinary Demands: Be ours Child, and we will hugg thee thus, and thus.

Arist.

Father, I am yours; though not declaratively, yet affectionately: I humbly desire to remain free a while.

F. Wallis.

Be it so. You are ours then, in Affection, not in present manifestation, implicitly, not explicitly, as the Schoolmen speak. Forsooth, I set you free. I forsooth, will call a Council of our Fathers, who shall dispose of you ad melius esse, that you may return to us in the Rebound.

Exeunt.

Finis Actûs Secundi.