A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act 2. Scen. 6.

Enter Agrippa.
Agr.

I present my self now, that I may begin to fall quadrate or into a punctual Cone with my promise. I have brought St. Omers hither; Here you shall see de∣cipher'd and shadow'd what was there act∣ually and substantially done: We will not miss in an Hebrew Point or Tittle of Truth. I should afterwards translate our Scholar hither from Spain, but I cannot: Time out-runs us. Where our Matter is in∣finit, we must circumscribe our selves. How∣soever, as in the turning of an Artificial Globe, new shapes and Figures continually appear, so Changes and Varieties encoun∣ter you continually. The Poet hath enchar∣ged upon us to make hast, or you would see nothing answerable to such a vast Orb of Matter.

Exit.

Aristotle Junior, in a Chair.
Arist.

The Jesuits here have set me un∣der Lock and Key, and curtain'd all the Windows. I have no benefit of Light, but in one corner, where a little Ray peeps in upon a Picture. And the Picture represents the Hollanders as having taken a Ship, wherein were many Jesuits, and thrown Page  21 them overboard into the Sea: but in vain, for the Jesuits lie all upon the Surface of the water, with their faces looking com∣fortably towards Heaven, and cannot sink, but are all sustain'd by Miracle: It is strange that the Jesuits being men so weighty in worth, should now be so light, and not worth their weight either in Gold or ought else. I hear likewise, that they use dark Chambers, and Pictures presenting Homi∣cides, to sad and tragical ends: It is whis∣per'd by their own Pupils here. This my present Employment they call their exer∣cise: And it was impos'd upon me in my entrance, to search my Inwards whether I have a Call to be a Jesuit or no. I do not like these quotidian and ubiquetary Mira∣cles; nor this warping of divine things to self-ends. Hypocrisie haunts me still: The Picture, Image, or the Representation in a Looking-glass, that shews a Face less than it is, may happily be like the Face it shews, and symmetrical with it; but the Repre∣sentation, Image, or Picture that swels up the Face, and allows it greater, except it be wrough so for the suppliance of what is lost by distance, attempts above it self, is monstr ous, and cannot be like its Arche∣type; because Proportion is retain'd in Re∣presentations which are lesser than the life, but in such as are greater, the Composition is discompos'd, and the Proportion seat∣ter'd.

He opens the Lock.

Enter Father Wallis, a Jesuit, in his Habit.
F. Wallis.

I wish forsooth all happiness to you: Child, how fare you forsooth in your heavenly Meditations? I have brought you a Relick here of most high considera∣tion; a, Feather forsooth of the wing of an Arch-Angel. Look not upon it but with due reverence.

Arist.

Father forsooth, my Meditations gain and win much upon me: But when I was a Cantabrigian, as having been matricu∣lated in that University, my Master taught me that Angels were immaterial and incor∣poreal; and that they appear in the shapes of young men, to signifie their strength, virtue, and power, and that they are wing'd in the Picture, to set in view their readi∣ness and quickness in their moving from one place to another.

F. Wallis.

Your Cantabrigians forsooth, are fallen as from Religion, so from Learn∣ing. We of the Society are Antistites, At∣lantes, & Heroes Literarum, the most learn∣ed of all the world.

Arist.

This is a Feather from a West-In∣dian Bird, which the good Father would entitle to Heaven.

F. Wallis.

And Child forsooth, how stand you affected to our Vocation?

Arist.

Father, I have a special observance for your Order (I must speak here after this Dialect) but I desire to be more experi∣ence-proof, before I determine upon a set∣tlement.

F. Wallis,

Child forsooth, you fear want perhaps, because we are vow'd away to po∣verty. We have alwaies a secular Priest at∣tending upon us, that purchases Lands for us in his own namé.

Arist.

And is not this Hypocrisie, which put me upon the wing, and engaged me to flie our of England?

F. Wallis.

Besides, we of the English So∣ciety, have a Ship that trades betwixt Lon∣don and Flanders; in the which we conti∣nually receive and return the best Goods at the best advantage: and we in these parts, receive ten thousand Pounds in ready coyn every year out of England. You stand upon a broad bottom, if you joyn with us: We are above him that wrote, Ego & Rex me∣us; I and my King: Emperours, Kings, Page  22 Princes, Cardinals, Dukes, Generals of Armies by Land and Sea, fear us, and there∣fore court us: We are furnished with se∣cret Engines, able with ease to subdue them and their Families: The Pope him∣self in the traverse of the Business, is our Vassal: he loves us outwardly above all o∣thers, because he inwardly fears us more than he fears all others. If any Cardinal or other person grow into a Favourite, we send from some part of the world, one of our Order that is allied to him, to reside near him in his Orb, and maintain him ours. No Prince in the world feeds fuller and higher than we, if you consider Nature in her ordinary Demands: Be ours Child, and we will hugg thee thus, and thus.

Arist.

Father, I am yours; though not declaratively, yet affectionately: I humbly desire to remain free a while.

F. Wallis.

Be it so. You are ours then, in Affection, not in present manifestation, implicitly, not explicitly, as the Schoolmen speak. Forsooth, I set you free. I forsooth, will call a Council of our Fathers, who shall dispose of you ad melius esse, that you may return to us in the Rebound.

Exeunt.

Finis Actûs Secundi.