A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act 2. Scene 3.

Enter Agrippa.
Agrip.

I have bound him by Command, and by Promise I my self am bound to se∣cure with my presence the execution. An∣guilla est, elabitur: If we give him his head, he slips. My Presence will keep him fixt.

Enter an Orange-Maid, like those in the Pit.

What seeks this Maid here? Fie on you; so bold? 'Tis a Spirit: and I must lay it.

Maid.

The Affair refers me to you: and you are here.

Agrip.

Be thou Spirit, or Flesh, thou Page  15 hast no part in the Comedy.

Maid.

But I have Sir. No long part you would say; but a necessary part I have.

Agrip.

Your place is the Pit: and your Business is to wait there.

Maid.

And from thence I came.

The Gentlemen there are per∣plex't and troubled: They complain, that your Jesuit sends a chief Actour beyond the Seas; and that either your Scene must be preposterously chang'd, or they shall be deprived of the principal Occurrences which happen to him.

Agrip.

Neither: by vertue of my first and fundamentel Promise, my power shall bring him hither at due times, to act over again the most remarkable Occurrences: and he shall neither know where he is, nor what befals him. Return this Answer, with my devoutest Respects.

She was going forth, and returns.

Maid.

I shall. If you will civilly take your leave of me, I shall present you with a Sevil-Orange.

Agrip.

Is this your custom?

He sa∣lutes her.

Exit Maid.
Maid.

No, Sir: but it was in my desires to teach you manners.

Agrip.
The Matter partly travels: you shall find,
As Friends, all brought before you to your mind.
Exit.