A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act 1.

Scene 1.

Enter Agrippa a Conjurer, and Lucifer the Prince of Devils.
Agripp.

LUcifer, Be not retrograde to my Commands.

Lucifer.

Agrippa, I must be true and constant to my self. Your Commands are de∣structive of Arcana Imperii, the fundamen∣tal Secrets of our Kingdom.

Agripp.

Lucifer, I presume not to re∣fine or advance thy Knowledge; I acknow∣ledge the old Angel in thee. But if thou dost not answer with obsequious and rigorous obedience to these my Sacred Charms, acted on the Spire and Pinnacle of Ma∣gick, thou wilt unhinge the Master-piece of Combination betwixt thee and the learned and high-flown part of the world, besides other evils that are ancillary and dependent.

Lucifer.

Great Sir, Speak your Com∣mands more at large, more circumstantially.

Agripp.

Give attendance. Look about thee. These are persons whom I devoutly reverence, who sit high and enthron'd in my thoughts and estimation. They hear every day from all parts much of thee in the world, and of thy Serpentine and Drago∣nish Cunning; and the reports of thy de∣ceit, lubricity, policies, continually crowd in their ears for entrance. Hither they have retired to receive right, downright, and candid Information. Here stands my charge. Discover here theatrically, the most deep∣bottom'd and profound contrivances, by which thou dost amuse, imperil, ensnare the world, and involve it in thy dragonish tayl. My Charge does not out-walk it to thy quotidian windings; and petty tum∣bling-tricks. These Heroick Spirits are cir∣cled here, to take-a near view of the great Wheel in its motion, upon which the lesser wheels and waights wait and attend.

Lucifer.

This would untwist my great work, unwind and unravel all.

Agripp.

Thou speak'st under thy self. Page  2 Thy Policies have been abundantly dis∣mantled amongst men, and yet thy King∣dom is not unbottom'd, shakes not yet; yea, stands upon a firmer Basis and Pede∣stal than formerly. Howsoever most mens understandings are illustrated, their blind Wils will alwaies be prepossest, obstinate and deaf to goodness. We bandy words. Thou, though the grand Emperour of infer∣nal Spirits, art not exotick and eccentrical from my Commands. Be pliable, be con∣formable, or praestat componere fluctus.

Lucifer.

Mighty Sir, I compose my troubled and tempestuous thoughts: I strike sayl, and submit.

Agripp.

Enough. I go. I have omitted no tittle of observance in the steerige of my Charge, no sacred Character, Word, Ce∣remony. Slignot thou in the least Atome or Punctisio of performance. Exit Agrippa.

Lucifer.

This proud Agrippa fancies he wields and commands me by a Magical power meerly natural, as a Prince his Slave by a Despotical Dominion. There is no such power in Rerum Naturâ. I hold him by the secret Nerves & Ligaments of a traditional and implicit Compact: and therefore must obey, or discharge my Hold, damp and dead my Title. Lucifuga.

Enter Lucifuge, a little Devil, like a Blackamore Boy.
Lucifug.

Your Pleasure, great Prince of Night.

Lucifer.

I am engag'd by some Reasons of State, for a time here at London. Fol∣low me in the dress of a Page, and be ready to be visible or invisible as I shall design.

Lucifug.

I am, high Sir, your both visi∣ble and invisible Servant, to be seen and not heard, heard and not seen, neither heard nor seen, both seen and heard; to be felt and not smelt, smelt and not felt, both felt and smelt, neither smelt nor felt; when, where, how, or in what shape you shall direct.

Exeunt.

Act 1. Scen. 2.

Enter Aristotle junior, a young Scholar.
Arist.

This is the Sacred Grove, this the newest Spring-Garden: Here she dwels. A solitary place, shap't and carv'd by Na∣ture into a fit Receptade for such and so sublime a person. Surely, she understands the language of Birds, the Songs of the Wood-Quiristers, and is promoted in her Knowledge by them. And here the free and open Ayre allowes her a more liberal Prospect towards Heaven, when she looks beyond the Birds, and the Sea-Stargazer the Ʋranoscopus. Who gives Answer here?

Enter Fear, a Man-servant.

I most humbly desire access to the Lady of this Place.

Fear.

How do you call her?

Arist.

She is universally known by the name of Lady Devotion.

Fear.

Here she resides indeed. But ac∣cess to her is not rashly & suddenly grant∣ed. You must begin at me: my name is Fear. When you are initiated by sufficient and inward acquaintance with me, I shall with due Fear give you up into the chast hands of Innocency; Innocency will inno∣cently endear you to Simplicity; Simplicity with an unleven'd Simplicity will resign you to Knowledge; Knowledge will know∣ingly prefer you to Prudence; and Prudence will prudently conduct you to the Lady Devotion, who will devoutly receive you.

Arist.

I most humbly desire admit∣tance.

Fear.

What is your Name?

Arist.

Aristotle Junior. I am a Gradu∣ate in the University, intending by a right Line forward.

Page  3
Fear.

You may enter: But first, with a reverent Fear hear your Welcom.

A Song.
Welcome, Scholar, whose Desire,
One sings in the mu∣sick room.
Kindled with Celestial Fire,
Prompts thee to a Pious Motion
In quest of sublime Devotion.
And points with Pyramidal Love
(Flame-like) to the things above.
Leave thy Body where thou art:
Enter thy Spiritual Part.
Then shalt then be install'd Angelical,
These 4 Ver∣ses are the Burden, and sung by many together.
Above thy mortal self, Se∣raphical.
After, the Vertues here, compos'd into a Ring,
Shall all encircle thee, and to thy Laurels sing.
First, Fear layes thee in the dust,
And presents a Power just:
Which awes, and commands thy Soul
Not to act without controul:
Bends thee to a Law that binds,
And a chiding Conscience finds,
If ought b' indirect: and so
Humbles thee thy self to know.
Then shalt thou be—
After, the Vertues—
Innocency stamps thee good,
Checks the Sallies of thy Blood:
Signes thee moral; and refers
Thee to him that never errs,
Moving him to recommend
Thee to the sublimest End.
And the Meanes in their Degrees,
As he most expedient sees.
Then shalt thou be—
After, the Vertues—
Simplicity states thee pure
From false-dealing, and the lure
Of base Lucre, singles Tongue,
Gesture, Forehead, Hands from wrong.
Tutours thy Life; guards all free
From taint of Hypocrisie:
Renders all thy doings even,
Clean as Flower untouch't of Leven.
Then shalt then be—
After, the Vertues—
Knowledge doth adorn and clear
The Soul in her highest Sphear:
Brings high things near to our sight,
Sees the darkest things in light;
Solves doubts, and removes offences,
Our greatest of Goods commences:
Teaches us what should be done
To end where we first begun.
Then shalt thou be—
After, the Vertues—
Prudence, salt-like, seasons Life,
Parting, as the Surgeons Knife,
Sound and unsound: holds the Reins
Of Vertues: holds Vice in chains.
To Practicks allowance brings,
Prescribes manner, measure, things.
Enter then, as you desire,
Exeunt.
Tow'rds the Queen your Thoughts admire.
Then shalt thou be—
After, the Vertues—

Act 1. Scen. 3.

Enter Galen Junior, Ignoro a Lawyer, Magnifico a Souldier.
Gal.

Ignoro, Our very knowing (if I may so speak without prejudice to your Name) and long-sleev'd Lawyer by Sta∣tute; and Magnifico, our magnifying and multiplying Souldier, be not so ready∣footed. By Justice, which you ought to Page  5 maintain with your Tongue, & you defend with your Sword, the Precedency belongs to me. It is my part; first to salute the Lady.

Ign. Gal. jun.

I am the right owner though not in possession. My very Vocation gives it me to have and to hold by firm Tenure. I defend man, and his Heire, and his heirs heirs to the worlds end in their just and lawful Rights, secundum aquum & bonum, with respect to all their outward Goods.

Gal.

You deal abroad. I come near to him: I maintain him in his inward health, and soulder up his Body in case of sick∣ness.

Magn.

And I defend and maintain the Common-wealth, and general Good. By how much therefore the General Good is more divine than a Good which is particu∣lar and private, by so much is my Work and Employment more worthy, more no∣ble, and more exceilent than yours or yours. Upon this your Ground I challenge both the Place, and him that claimes it be∣fore me. And my Sword shall uphold my Right founded upon the publick Good. Stand off.

Gal.

The second Place is due to me. I am sure I am the better man of the two. Ignoro, stand thou off. Lawyers of all o¦thers are farthest from Devotion.

Ign. Gal. Jun.

Unhand me. Gentlemen, bear witness: A meer Action of Battery se∣cundum statuta. The next Water is brought to thee to be cast, in my own defence I will break the Urinal about thy head, yea though it contain the Poets Water. For the present, I am a Sufferer.

Magn.

Within there.

Enter Fear.
Fear.

What demand you, Gentlemen?

Magn.

Hither we have march't to visit the Lady Devotion. My name is Magnifico. I am a Souldier. Little Devotion will serve my turn.

Gal.

My name is Galen junior, I am a Physitian; and though most of us be Athe∣ists, a little Devotion is a healthsom In∣gredient in some kind of Medicine.

Ign.

My name is Ignoro, I am a Lawyer, I desire to take all my Fees, lawful, or un∣lawful, a little devoutly.

Fear.

Gentlemen, True Devotion is not little. But as Wheat passes through ma∣ny hands and offices before it comes to the Table in pure Manchet: So before ye can be admitted into the Royal presence of Lady Devotion, ye must here imploy some time in learning and imbibing the directi∣ons and documents, first, of Fear, after∣wards of Innocency, then of Simplicity, then again of Knowledge, and lastly, of Pru∣dence.

Magn.

How? Gentlemen, Heard ye this Lecture? Have we Novitiats and Pu∣pillages to undergo? We must be set back to School again. A Souldier should not fear, neither be innocent, much less simple.

Ign.

Sir, Once more, My name is Ig∣noro. A Lawyer is the Phenix of his age, if he be knowing above the common level of Noverint Ʋniversi and false Latine.

Gal.

Nor should a Physitian be pru∣dent. I must kill unadvisedly, and with∣out justifying what I do with a Probatum est.

Magn.

Adieu Friend; Tell your Lady we return, and go in search of another Mi∣stress.

Exit Fear.

Gentlemen, Let's be Friends, and hew out our way to better Fortunes. Devotion. does not become us: It is not in fashion within our Territories.

Gal.

The first thing I do, shall be this: I'le take a Vomit, and fetch her out of my Stomack, that I may have no more appe∣tite to her.

Ign.

And thou shalt give me a scowring Page  4 Purge, and I'le send her nimbly going 〈…〉∣ther way, that I may take Bribes cleanly, nimbly, and with activity.

Exeunt.

Act 1. Scene 4.

Enter Madam Hypocrisie, and Pretty her Maid.
Hyp.

Pretty.

Prett.

Madam.

Hyp.

Well and wittily answer'd: That put together, is Pretty Madam. Thou art Pretty and witty too. I know that I am beautiful, and I know thee to be Pretty.

Prett.

I am your Servant Pretty, Ma∣dam.

Hyp.

Good again. I am pretty outward∣ly, and inwardly pretty. I am pretty and holy too.

Prett.

Madam, you are more than pretty and holy, you are exceedingly holy.

Hyp.

Girl, thou sayest truth: I exceed in my kind of Holiness, or I should not be the Lady I am, Madam Hypocrisie. Well: Call my three English Scholars forth, that I may see what Progress they have made in my kind of Holiness.

Exit Pretty.

Yonder peevish Lady Devotion lives re∣tired, as if she fear'd Mankind, or that a Kiss would blast her. I am hospitable: I reject no man. She prepares all persons by Influence from her inferiour Servants: for her presence; as men are prepar'd in Tur∣ky for the Baths: I receive all at their first entrance, into my near Embraces.

Enter Mr. Complement, a Courtier, Mr. Demure, a Citizen, Gaffer Highshooe.
Prett.

Here they are, Madam.

Hyp.

'Tis well. Mr. Complement my both stately and Coutreous Courtier, Mr. De∣mure my moraliz'd and civil Citizen, and Gaffer Highshooe my bondst Countreyman, or Countreyman of the honest party: I am desirous to behold some fait fruits of your Proficiency in my School. First, Should your Affairs urge you to profess love where ye do not, or cannot love, to countenance your profession, how would ye look in such a case, how behave your selves, with what sweet words would ye accost the person, what would ye say?

Comp.

Our honourable Mistress, I would look thus.

Dem.

And I thus, or thus.

High.

And I thus, and thus, and thus again.

Comp.

My behaviour should be this.

Dem.

And this mine.

High.

And mine as you zee.

Comp.

And I would say, Noble Sir, I do love you beyond the faint apprehension of humane capacity, beyond what all Orators can speak, and beyond what any man can do but my self; and then in an holy man∣ner, I would swear toot, and second my Oath with ar eye towards Heaven.

Dem.

I would say, Dear Brother, I do love you with as much zeal as my poor heart is able to hold without breaking: my love to you, is just weight according to the ballance of sincerity: yea, I profess, and again profess, and profess again, that I love you without the Leven or taint of any kind of Impurity.

High.

And I would zay, Master, indeed and in truth now I do love your Worship: In good sooth I do. I have lov'd you, I do love you, and I will love you now and a∣non too.

Hyp.

This is Scholar-like. If your ne∣cessities should require that ye cheat a man, how then?

Comp.

Then would I look him in the face with a smiling and amiable counte∣nance, with all the Graces dancing on my Forehead and Cheeks: I would joyn eye Page  6 to eye; I would open my cherry lips, and shew him my white and ivory teeth in to∣ken of my innocency: I would salute him with an earthquake of my head: and after∣wards, bow my body to him thus low, and speak all the fairest words that Cicero could have utter'd when his wits were most fresh in a Sun-shiny morning.

Dem.

I would embrace him, and gently pull his body close to my heart-side; I woul musick this action with a groan, after the accent of

He groans.
the Dove when he courts his Mistress: I would stoop, and hold my ear upwards toward his mouth, as if I did ex∣pect Mahomets Pigeon: I would speak whiningly, and be ready to weep, and then wipe-mine eyes very painfully and indu∣striously from the tears which were not. Afterwards, I would conscientiously do my best endeavour, as your Ladyship fables it, to cheat him.

High.

And I would first stand aloof off, and strive to look paleas if I fear'd him, and send half a score of long-Legs before me: then would I move devoutly by little and little, every step should zignifie a man of Worship, towards him: I would no go close, but hold off, as if he were zome fine thing that had wrought false Miracles: I would look very simply and innocently, af∣ter the manner of us honest Countreymen, or like our countrey Lombs: I would scratch my head on this side and on the tother; as if I had a mind to dig up a nest of good words with my nails: And then, acting prettily with my right hand betwixt my mouth and my heart, I would say something which I neither meant nor understood; and cheat him purely.

Hyp.

Your Judgment of this, Pretty.

Pret.

'Tis pretty well, Madam.

Hyp.

Superlatively well: I my self could not soar higher. How would ye walk the streets in a City as this is? Have ye learn'd all your postures of Godliness, all your tra∣verses of Salutation, your pious Gestures of Reprehension, that ye may be thought ir∣reproveably holy, to be perform'd, as ye go, on every side?

Comp.

I would walk, salute, and repre∣hend thus.

Dem.

I after this manner.

High.

And I zo, in City and Coun∣trey.

Hyp.

Excellently! Ye all in your kinds, merit a Garland of Preferment. Pretty; In∣troduce my three Out-landers: If they have thriv'd as throughly, I am rich in Agents and

Exit Pretty.
Emissaries: I shall be able to delude the whole world: The Devil will hardly keep himself out of the Snare.

Enter Pretty, Mr. See Senior, a Spaniard, Mr. Signior See, an Italian; Monsieur Kickshaw, a Erenchman.

Mr. See Senior, my Spanish Scholar; Mr. Signior See, my pure Italy; and Mon∣sieur Kickshaw, my Scholar from France; My thoughts triumph in the Climax, to the top of which my English Scholars have ri∣sen: there wants but the other Wing on your side, and I fly.

See Sen.

Madam, See Senior will not be dropping or dropping on his part. I have learn'd exactly to kneel upon one Knee, and to draw part of my long Rapier in my publick Devotions, to signifie my readi∣ness to defend the truth: to praise the mild∣ness and modesty of the Inquisition, though it be cruel above the Gallies: to pretend fulness from a Bunch of Grapes, and a Clove of Garlick, beyond what all the va∣rieties of England afford. I often pray to the powers in Heaven, but I swear by them oftner. My heart is most zealous towards the She-Saints above; but I am yet more Page  7 servent towards the pretty hearts beneath, and if they fail, the Beast fals even to my desires. I more love the Image in holy things, than the Substance: I can be cruel to the raising of horrour and trembling in the hearers, as I have been in the Indies: and leave the Jesuits to colour and cover it with a godly reason; as somthing may be studied in the favour of all things, though never so barbarous and horrid: I can bring torturing whips for England in a Navy, and delegate the Jesuits to forge that I brought them to whip and discipline my self in the Raptures and Ecstasies of my Devotion: I am a true servant to the Jesuits in the pro∣motnig of their ends; but I falsly forget that the end should be good, and the acti∣on agreeable: I work mischief slowly, but surely: I shall perform incomparably more: Let this suffice to be spoken.

Sign. See.

Madam, you will not find me empty; a man so near the Fountain-head and so wax-like to the Impression of high things: I abound with all the possible garbs of Devotion, and with Bell-concep∣tos to garnish them: My Soul is enticed forth every day at my ears, and I am carri∣ed wholly out of my self, with the Musick of the Churches; but I direct little atten∣tion to the thing signified: I have a Serag∣lio of women in my thoughts: but the for Boy waits there as most delicious: May it please your Madam-ship; the Turk him∣self is not so frolick in this kind of Devoti∣on as I am. I stile my self much an admirer and honourer of the Jesuits: but for the ancient Father of the Society in the casa professa; he is the man in my breast: I dure let him loose to combate with the old De∣vil himself in Matchevelism: I own the holy Monuments of the good men in old time; and those are abundantly sufficient to save me: to the which I add a few dull and scanty Devotions; As, once in a hundred years I convert a Jew, and perhaps a whore when she is rotten, old, and past pleasure: I pass and repass many godly Legerde∣mains in the Inquisition; but I seldom con∣vert any there, except it be into ashes by fire: and if any man prevent me by death, I make a flame-offering of his car case, as I did of Spalato's in Campo di fiori; and that believe me, Madam, was a fat one, I had a godly English Friend, who came from England to Rome, the other day, and there mournfully complain'd with much of your spirit, that he had been horribly persecuted by the wild and savage English: and in the Rant of his Tavern-devotion, came head∣long down the Tavern Stairs, and broke his neck, beyond the skill of the Bone-set∣ter, & so his hypocritical mouth was stopt. It belongs to this Story, Madam, that a devout Spaniard came a while ago into Eng∣land with intention to convert it, as having heard that the people were wild, and liv'd in Woods, and Caves of the earth: but ar∣riving at Canterbury, and by most plain and manifold experience finding it otherwise, he fairly, but not softly, return'd from thence wiser than he came. Truly, Madam; we do hatch & patch together many preci∣ous & godly Stories in Italy, which though they be somwhat near to good ends, are very wide of truth; and yet good Ends must be fought by proportionable means, and Truth wants not the helping hand of Falshood to support it: I am your Vassal at hand to act the rest.

Mr. Kick.

Madam, I do not implunge my self over head and ears into Devotion; because as the Veretians and other high-mo∣ving and Eagle-wing'd Italians, I have a no∣ble part of the Atheist within me: but I can play the devout fool prettily and mo∣dishly at set times: And of all Nations, I do you most humble service, Madam. For, such a monstrous and long-sided: P〈…〉, Page  8 such a changeling and phantastical dress, such a Pedlars-pack of Ribbands, concur∣ring with an outward form of Devotion, is the top and top-gallant of Hypocrisie. Be∣sides, the modes and numberless number of Fashions, that never Flanders-Horse was sick of so many, in benevolous Conjunction with Godliness, pencil forth and give Hy∣pocrisie in her full splendor. Afterwards, the Complements a la mode de France, which multiply words beyond limit, and above Arithmetick, and recount to a Lady her both invisible and impossible Perfecti∣ons, when they meet in the same point with a scarlet Tincture of Piety, degenerate into perfect Hypocrisie. Madam, I pretend to Valour and a generous heart: and in∣deed, when I was a Boy in long coats, I rode upon a Bear, as our honorable custom is in Paris, led by the Bear-hood to my Fa∣thers Door; and thence it came, as the speech of the Vulgar goes, that I could ne∣ver be afraid afterwards of man or beast. And in Paris, the Captains of our Train'd Bands are for the greatest part Taylors, Ma∣dam, as I am, not only because they rode upon Bears when they were in Coats and bare behind, but also because they are nim∣ble at their weapon, and to put them in mind of going through-stitch with their work when they fight: And yet, I confess to you, Madam, that when I am well bea∣ten by a Spaniard or an Englishman, I cry Mon dieu, Mon dieu: and this is Hypocrisie too, though of a lower Orb. We plead all with one mouth against the Inquisition; but par ma Foy, we have a French Inquisiti∣on in Paris, otherwise call'd the Bastille, which is not parallel'd by either Italian or Spanish Inquisition: And is it not exalted and sublimated Hypocrisie, when we bear a superlative name near to him above the world, as if we were most abstracted from the world; and yet we teach the world, and all the Phantasmes and lying Legends of the world to all the world. Madam, I am old excellent in the practise of a singular vertue which the precise part of people call Lying: Indeed I can scarce tune my mouth to speak Truth: And I can swear such Oaths, as would blister an ordinary mans ears: I am very quick and pliable at steal∣ing: and then I can salve it, daub it, and guild it over with a Lye: To tell all, is be∣yond all my power: For the rest, I rest your Tres-humble and restless Serviteur, Monsieur Kickshaw, of Paris, Tay∣lor.

Hyp.

Europe is mine; the other three Parts are within my Verge: My hopes are high as the Firmament. My Servants, hom∣bred and forraign, are men of all hours, weigh all the moments and niceties of Po∣licy, know all the private Overtures and Inclinations of Opportunity, all the knacks of Hypocrisie; and are able to vie cunning with all the simple, lean, and fagg end of the world. Scholars and Friends; howso∣ever we must bear before us a plausible out-side, a fair Forehead of Carriage, a Gloss of Demeanour; yet inwardly, a∣mongst our selves, we may be free and jolly; and as the Brethren in private, turn Wine down by the Tayl into the belly of a fat Capon, at a Merchants Table, to compose good Sauce; in like manner, we may rejoyce at due times, with, in, and over the Creature. Let's have a Dance in the venturous aspirings of our Hopes, and the soarings of our present Joyes.

They Dance. After the Dance.
Prett.

Madam, I hear the motion of some approaching persons.

Hyp.

Let's withdraw.

Exeunt Omnes.

Page  9

Act 1. Scen. 5.

Enter Galen Junior, Ignoro and Mag∣nifico.
Gal.

Still my Stomack is upon a blab∣bing account, it utters all: It disburses faster than it receives: I think my Vomit will never leave giving, till it gives up sto∣mack and all. I mixt it very high, and it works accordingly.

He strains, seems ready to vomit, and goes forth.
Ign.

And my Belly tumbles and tum∣bles without end, after this puissant Chy∣mical Purge: I fear, I shall purge my guts forth. Certainly, I was full of Devotion: I had more matter in me than I was aware of: O, I must go.

Exit.

Magn.

The Lawyer has a motion. This fals right: Now we cannot jarre in con∣test for precedency: the place is peacea∣bly deliver'd up to me: and I will not dis∣band, or give a pass to the present opportu∣nity.

He knockes.

Enter Pretty, with a Book in her hand.
Prett.

Good Sir, speak not except your business be both weighty and godly; I am engag'd in my Devotions.

Magn.

A Maid as fair as may be, as fair as May is, as fair as a Morning in May: I am sorry shee's bookish: yet our most free, blith and buxom Girls here, expose com∣monly a godly Book on the Cupbards head in their Chambers, where they continually sacrifice to Venus. Sweet Maid, are you the Lady of this fair Building? If it were assig∣ned to the fairest of Maids, it would be yours.

Prett.

Sir, I may not dispense with my mouth to answer your vain and imperti∣nent discourse otherwise than thus: You stile me Sweet; this Book is sweeter than all Nature's Wardrobe of sweet things; and for the fair building, this little Book builds fairer. The fairest of Maids is Ver∣tue; here she dwels, and here.

She point's to her Book and her Heart.

Magn.

This Maid transports me. Sweet and fair, beyond compare.

Prett.

I beseech you, Sir, be not grievous to me.

Musick.

Heark:

The Musick invites me: I must sit down, hood mine eyes, and set my thoughts flying upon high things, with my Arms pleated in this devout Knot.

After a while.
Magn.

Having transported me, her self is now transported.

Some while after.

Sans doubt, this holy Creature lives many degrees above mortality.

Yet a while after.

I have met with one in History, that de∣sired, and very much endeavoured to see himself sleep; but could never bring both ends of his desire together. Such a sleep as this in such a Creature, would keep me a∣wake without sleeping.

The Musick ceases.

Enter Galen Junior.
Gal.

O, I am heart-sick still. And no marvel: For the Intention of the Vomit was, to fetch all Devotion out of my heart. But the sight of this pretty Heart somwhat eases my dull heart, and relieves me. Sleeps she?

Magn.

No. She meditates.

Enter Ignoro.
Ign.

I have been so liberal in purging, that I am perswaded I have left my Soul behind me: O my sweet Soul, Have I then lost thee?

Magn.

Your Soul is not so sweet, if you have left it behind you. Look hither, Law∣yer, the sweet Soul's before you.

Page  10
Ign.

She is an Angel.

Magn.

Lawyer, You are without cir∣cumlocutions, a Dunce. Who ever read of a She-Angel? or, of an Angel that put on the shape of a woman? I is enough, that an Angel and a woman concur in some point of similitude.

Ign.

She is such an Angel that I should not refuse for a Fee.

Gal.

She is warm, as we are: and soft as the finest Persian Silk.

She starts up.

Prett.

Be not rude, Gentlemen: Ye have chas't away my purest and divinest thoughts. Now I am bold, with direct lan∣guage to demand your business.

Magn.

Our business, Fair-one, is; we are ambitious to submit our selves to your Tuition, and enter here as Scholars.

Pret.

Say ye so? Then I in the Madams name, pronounce your Welcom: Pray, enter.

Exeunt.

Act 1. Scen. 6.

Enter Lucifer in the dress of the Jesuits here, and Lucifuga as his Page.
Lucifer.

My Charge sits heavy on my heart; but I must amand it to execution: The grand Machin by which the world wheels towards me, is; when the leading Clerks abandon candor, plain-dealing, and simplicity, and evade profoundly hypocri∣tical. For they governing others as the Shrubs of people, by vertue of the reve∣rent opinion which men have traditionally received, concerning their Power, Holi∣ness, Abilities, draw them like inferiour wheels into a combination and subordinate motion, conformably to their Ends. The Habit I wear, is the Dress of an English Je∣suit, as he commonly appears in his Coun∣trey. I will not delegate the acting of the Part, to any: I scarce presume upon my own sufficiency, as equal to the Magisterial height of their Performance: Page, Give notice to Madam Hypocrisie, that I come to take a sensible view of her Scholars, and a∣dopt the ripest of them into my Service. If all things fall pliable, because I greatly cover Honour and Adoration, let me be honour'd before these people with her lou∣dest Musick in my entrance: I follow im∣mediatly.

Exit Lucifuga.

No Power so mighty, where their Lore is Law,
As this of Jesuits. They hold men in awe,
As thought, thoughfalsly, wiser than the rest,
More learned, more Scholastick, and the best
Of mortal men. It followes what what they do
Must have the Plaudit of all others too.
Lowd Musick.
Exit
Finis Actus primi.