A new play call'd The Pragmatical Jesuit new-leven'd a comedy
Carpenter, Richard, d. 1670?

Act 1. Scen. 3.

Enter Galen Junior, Ignoro a Lawyer, Magnifico a Souldier.
Gal.

Ignoro, Our very knowing (if I may so speak without prejudice to your Name) and long-sleev'd Lawyer by Sta∣tute; and Magnifico, our magnifying and multiplying Souldier, be not so ready∣footed. By Justice, which you ought to Page  5 maintain with your Tongue, & you defend with your Sword, the Precedency belongs to me. It is my part; first to salute the Lady.

Ign. Gal. jun.

I am the right owner though not in possession. My very Vocation gives it me to have and to hold by firm Tenure. I defend man, and his Heire, and his heirs heirs to the worlds end in their just and lawful Rights, secundum aquum & bonum, with respect to all their outward Goods.

Gal.

You deal abroad. I come near to him: I maintain him in his inward health, and soulder up his Body in case of sick∣ness.

Magn.

And I defend and maintain the Common-wealth, and general Good. By how much therefore the General Good is more divine than a Good which is particu∣lar and private, by so much is my Work and Employment more worthy, more no∣ble, and more exceilent than yours or yours. Upon this your Ground I challenge both the Place, and him that claimes it be∣fore me. And my Sword shall uphold my Right founded upon the publick Good. Stand off.

Gal.

The second Place is due to me. I am sure I am the better man of the two. Ignoro, stand thou off. Lawyers of all o¦thers are farthest from Devotion.

Ign. Gal. Jun.

Unhand me. Gentlemen, bear witness: A meer Action of Battery se∣cundum statuta. The next Water is brought to thee to be cast, in my own defence I will break the Urinal about thy head, yea though it contain the Poets Water. For the present, I am a Sufferer.

Magn.

Within there.

Enter Fear.
Fear.

What demand you, Gentlemen?

Magn.

Hither we have march't to visit the Lady Devotion. My name is Magnifico. I am a Souldier. Little Devotion will serve my turn.

Gal.

My name is Galen junior, I am a Physitian; and though most of us be Athe∣ists, a little Devotion is a healthsom In∣gredient in some kind of Medicine.

Ign.

My name is Ignoro, I am a Lawyer, I desire to take all my Fees, lawful, or un∣lawful, a little devoutly.

Fear.

Gentlemen, True Devotion is not little. But as Wheat passes through ma∣ny hands and offices before it comes to the Table in pure Manchet: So before ye can be admitted into the Royal presence of Lady Devotion, ye must here imploy some time in learning and imbibing the directi∣ons and documents, first, of Fear, after∣wards of Innocency, then of Simplicity, then again of Knowledge, and lastly, of Pru∣dence.

Magn.

How? Gentlemen, Heard ye this Lecture? Have we Novitiats and Pu∣pillages to undergo? We must be set back to School again. A Souldier should not fear, neither be innocent, much less simple.

Ign.

Sir, Once more, My name is Ig∣noro. A Lawyer is the Phenix of his age, if he be knowing above the common level of Noverint Ʋniversi and false Latine.

Gal.

Nor should a Physitian be pru∣dent. I must kill unadvisedly, and with∣out justifying what I do with a Probatum est.

Magn.

Adieu Friend; Tell your Lady we return, and go in search of another Mi∣stress.

Exit Fear.

Gentlemen, Let's be Friends, and hew out our way to better Fortunes. Devotion. does not become us: It is not in fashion within our Territories.

Gal.

The first thing I do, shall be this: I'le take a Vomit, and fetch her out of my Stomack, that I may have no more appe∣tite to her.

Ign.

And thou shalt give me a scowring Page  4 Purge, and I'le send her nimbly going 〈…〉∣ther way, that I may take Bribes cleanly, nimbly, and with activity.

Exeunt.