Two treatises of Mr. Jeremiah Burroughs. The first of earthly-mindedness, wherein is shewed, 1. What earthly-mindedness is. ... 6. Directions how to get our hearts free from earthly-mindedness. The second treatise. Of conversing in heaven, and walking with God. Wherein is shewed, 1. How the Saints have their conversation in heaven. ... 9. Rules for our walking with God. The fourth volumn [sic] published by Thomas Goodwyn. William Greenhil. Sydrach Simpson. Philip Nye. William Bridge. John Yates. William Adderley.
Burroughs, Jeremiah, 1599-1646., Goodwin, Thomas, 1600-1680.
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CHAP. VII. Five Directions how to get our hearts freed from Earthly∣mindedness.

FIrst, To that end be watchful over your thoughts, do not take liberty to let your hearts run too far in the things of the earth, what time you have for me∣ditation let it be as much as can be reserved for spi∣ritual things; most men and women think they may take liberty in their thoughts; why the thing in its self is not unlawful, I but your thoughts will steal upon you and af∣fect your hearts very much: therefore watch narrowly o∣ver your thoughts, keep them within Scripture bounds.

The Second Direction

Be much humbled for sin, That will take off the heart much from earthly-mindedness. Your earthly-minded men, who have earthly and drossie hearts, they have not known what the weight and burden of sin hath meant, let God but lay the weight and burden of sin upon the soul, it will take off the soul from earthly things quickly; Oh! those men that have gone on in the world in a secure condi∣tion, and never knew what trouble of conscience meant for sin, they grow seer'd in those earthly Contentments; but now those men that have had but the weight of sin lie upon them, know what it is to have to deal with an infinite God, in the bearing of the burden of the wrath of an incensed Deity, such know, that they have other things to look after than the things of the earth: If God did but humble your hearts, the humiliation of your spirits would quicken you, and take off the dulness and deadness of your spirits, and stir you up to look after other things than the things of this life.

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The Third Direction.

Further, Set the example of the Saints before you, that have been the most precious servants of God, in former times; how they accounted themselves as Pilgrims and strangers here in the earth: read at your leisure that Scrip∣ture in the 11 of the Heb. at the 13. verse, These all died in faith, not having received the promises, but having seen them a∣far off, and were perswaded of them, and imbraced them, and confessed that they were strangers and pilgrims on the earth: and mark therefore how it follows in the 37. verse, They were stoned, they were sawn asunder were tempted, were slain with the sword, they wandred about in sheeps-skins and goats-skins, be∣ing destitute, afflicted, tormented. Who were these? They were they of whom the world was no tworthy, They wan∣dered in deserts, and in Mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth: and yet such precious Saints of God as the world was not worthy of. Now when we set before us how joyfully these servants of the most high went through all their wil∣dernesse condition, this should make us ashamed of our earthly-mindedness, and would be a mighty help to us.

The Fourth Direction.

And then if we consider the great accompt that we are to give for all earthly things; you only look upon the comfort of them, but consider the account you must give for them: this would be a means to take off the heart from earthly-mindednesse: And consider, what if you were now to die, and to go the way of all flesh, what good would it be to me to remember what contentments and pleasures I had in the earth?

The fifth Direction.

But above all, the setting Jesus Christ before you, and Page  88 the meditating of the death of Jesus Christ: (I say) that's the great thing that wil take off the heart from the things of the earth: The looking upon Christ Crucified; how he that was the Lord of Heaven and Earth, yet what a low condition he put Himself into, meerly for the redeeming of us! The conversing much with the death of Jesus Christ deads the heart much to the world. In the 3. to the Philip∣pians we have a notable text for that, in the example of Paul, he accounted all things as dung and drosse for Jesus Christ: at the 8. verse, I account all things but loss for the ex∣cellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord, for whom I have suffered the liss of all things, and do count them but DƲNG that I may win Christ. And then in the 19. verse, That I may know Him, and the power of his Resnrrection, and the fellowship of His Sufferings being made conformable unto his Death. Paul desired to be so conformable to the very Death of Christ, that he accounted all things in the world but as dung and drosse in comparison of that; Paul had the death of Christ before his eyes, and meditated much on the death of Christ, and that meditation had a great impression upon his spirit, that made him account all these things as drosse, as dogs meat in comparison, and that he might have fellowship with the death of Christ, Perhaps some of you may think of the glory of Christ in Heaven, and that may for the present make you lesse worldly; but let me intreat you to meditate on the death of Christ, and know that there is an excellen∣cie in Conformity even to the death of Christ, such an Ex∣cellency that may take off your hearts from the things of the world. It's said of the King of France, that he asking one once about an Eclypse, saith he, I have so much busi∣nesse in the earth, that I take little notice of the things of Heaven.

Oh my Brethren! for the close of all, I beseech you let not this be said concerning any of you, that you have such and such worldly imployments, that you cannot enquire after Jesus Christ. Plead not that you have such great bu∣sinesse, that you have so much to do in this earth that you Page  89 take little notice of the things of Heaven; no, surely, the Saints of God have their businesse in Heaven, (as we shall see God willing hereafter:) Their City Business, their Tra∣ding, their Aims, their Bent, it is higher than the things of this earth. There are things that a man may let out his thoughts and affections too as much as he wil: This shews the vanity of the things af this world, that a man had need be very wary how much he minds them, he cannot enjoy the comforts of this earth without some fear: but now, when he comes to converse with Heaven, there he may let out himself to the uttermost; that shews the excellency of these things. And you that are but poor and mean in the things of this earth, be not discomforted, because there is a charg from God that men should not mind these things; surely there is no great matter in them, as God charges that we should not mind them: Oh the excellency it lies in things above which are heavenly and spiritual, where the Saints have their conversation. But of this more at large in this following Treatise of Heavenly Conversation.