Irenicum, to the lovers of truth and peace heart-divisions opened in the causes and evils of them : with cautions that we may not be hurt by them, and endeavours to heal them / by Jeremiah Burroughes.

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Title
Irenicum, to the lovers of truth and peace heart-divisions opened in the causes and evils of them : with cautions that we may not be hurt by them, and endeavours to heal them / by Jeremiah Burroughes.
Author
Burroughs, Jeremiah, 1599-1646.
Publication
London :: Printed for Robert Dawlman,
MDCLIII [1653]
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Subject terms
Christian union.
Theology, Doctrinal.
Link to this Item
http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A30587.0001.001
Cite this Item
"Irenicum, to the lovers of truth and peace heart-divisions opened in the causes and evils of them : with cautions that we may not be hurt by them, and endeavours to heal them / by Jeremiah Burroughes." In the digital collection Early English Books Online. https://name.umdl.umich.edu/A30587.0001.001. University of Michigan Library Digital Collections. Accessed July 23, 2024.

Pages

Page 275

The fourth joyning Consideration.
What we get by contention will never quit cost.

A Merchant thinks it an ill venture, if when he casts up his ac∣counts he finds the charge of his voyage rises to more then his incomes. If thou hast so much command of thy spirit, if thou canst so farre overcome thy passions as to get a time in coole bloud to cast up thy accounts truly, what good thou hast done, or what thou hast got by such and such contentions; and on the other side cast up what the hurt thou hast done, what sin hath been committed, what evill hath got into thy spirit, I fear you will have little cause to boast of,* 1.1 or rejoyce in your gains. To be freed from that expence that comes in by strife, is not a little gain, says Ambrose. In strife you will finde there is a very great ex∣pence of time, of gifts, and parts. Many men in regard of the good gifts God hath given them, might have proved shining Lights in the Church, but by reason of their contentious spirits, they prove no other then smoaking firebrands. It may be by all the stirre you keep you shall never get your minde; if you do, it will not quit cost; the charge you have been at for it, comes to much more then it is worth. God deliver me from having my minde at such a dear rate.

Notes

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