A treatise of original sin ... proving that it is, by pregnant texts of Scripture vindicated from false glosses
Burgess, Anthony, d. 1664.
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THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOOK.

PART I.

PRoving the total and universal Pollution of all Mankind inherently through Sinne.

    CHAP. I.
  • The first Text to prove Original Sinne, improved and vindicated, viz.
  • Ephes. 2. 3. And were by nature the children of wrath, as well as others.
    CHAP. II.
  • Of the Name Original Sinne, and of the Utility and Necessity of be∣ing clearly and powerfully informed about this Subject.
    CHAP. III.
  • Demonstrations of the Naturality of this sinne, that we have it by Natural Propagation.
    CHAP. IV.
  • Objections against the Naturality of Original Sinne, answered.
    Page  [unnumbered] CHAP. V.
  • A second Text to prove Original Sinne, opened and vindicated, viz.
  • Rom. 5. 19. For as by one mans disobedience many were made sin∣ners, &c.
    CHAP. VI.
  • Whether we are sinners by Natural Propagation, or by Imitation.
    CHAP. VII.
  • Of the Souls inward filth, and defilement by Original Sinne.
    CHAP. VIII.
  • That the inward Contagion that we have from Adam's Disobedience, is truly and properly a sinne.
    CHAP. IX.
  • Objections Answered.
    CHAP. X.
  • A third Text to make good this Fundamental Point, improved and vindicated, viz.
  • Job 14. 4. Who can bring a clean thing out of an unclean? Not one.
    SECT. II.
  • A three-fold Uncleanness.
    SECT. III.
  • A Comparison between mans moral Uncleanness, and Levitical Un∣cleanness.
    SECT. IV.
  • What is comprehended in this expression Uncleanness.
    SECT. V.
  • Objections against mans Natural Uncleanness, answered.
    Page  [unnumbered] CHAP. XI.
  • A fourth Text to prove Original Sinne, opened and vindicated, viz.
  • Psal. 51. 5. Behold I was shapen in iniquity, and in sinne did my mo∣ther conceive me.
    SECT. II.
  • Objections answered.
    SECT. III.
  • More Advantages accruing from the Belief and Meditation of this Truth.
    SECT. IV.
  • That we are to bewail this Original Sinne all our dayes.
    SECT. V.
  • Which needed not to have been, if Adam had stood.
    SECT. VI.
  • We must be humbled for a two-fold Original Sinne, and seek from Christ a two-fold Righteousnesse.
    SECT. VII.
  • The different opinions of men about humiliation for Original Sinne.
    SECT. VIII.
  • Repentance may be taken either largely or strictly.
    SECT. IX.
  • The Difference between godly Sorrow for Original Sinne, and for Actual.
    SECT. X.
  • Reasons why we must be humbled for Original Sinne.
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The Contents of the Second Part.

SHewing that Original Sinne is, and how it is communicated.

    CHAP. I.
  • Of the Name Old-man, [given to Original Sin.]
  • Rom. 6. 6. Knowing this, that if our old-man be crucified with Christ, &c.
    SECT. IV.
  • Why it is called [Man.]
    SECT. V.
  • Why it is called [Old-Man.]
    CHAP. II.
  • Of the Name [Law of Sin,] given to Original Sinne.
  • Rom. 7. 25. But with the flesh the Law of sinne.
    SECT. III.
  • Original Sinne compared to a Law in five Respects.
    CHAP. III.
  • Of the Name, [The Sinne that dwelleth in us,] given to Original Sinne.
  • Rom. 7. 17. It is no more I, but sinne that dwelleth in me.
    CHAP. IV.
  • Of the Epithete, [Evil is present with us,] given to Original Sinne.
  • Rom. 7. 21. That when I would do good, evil is present with me.
    Page  [unnumbered] CHAP. V.
  • Of that Name, [The Sin that doth so easily beset us,] given to Origi∣nal Sinne.
  • Hebr. 12. 1. And the sinne that doth so easily beset us.
    SECT. II.
  • What is implied in that expression.
    SECT. III.
  • How many wayes Original Sinne is a Burden, and an Hinderance un∣to us.
    CHAP. VI.
  • Of the Name, [Evil Treasure of the Heart,] given to Original Sinne.
  • Matth. 12. 35. And an evil man out of the evil treasure of his heart, bringeth forth evil things.
    SECT. II.
  • How Original Sinne resembles a Treasure.
    CHAP. VII.
  • Of the Name [Body,] given to Original Sin.
  • Rom. 8. 13. But if you through the Spirit do mortifie the deeds of the body, ye shall live.
    SECT. II.
  • What is implied by the word Mortifie.
    SECT. V.
  • Why Original Sinne is called a Body.
    CHAP. VIII.
  • Of the Privative Part of Original Sinne.
    SECT. I.
  • Of Adam's begetting Seth in his own likeness.
  • Page  [unnumbered]Gen. 5. 3. And Adam—begat a son in his own likeness after his Image, and called his name Seth.
    SECT. II.
  • What Original Sin is as to the Privative Part of it.
    CHAP. IX.
  • Wherein the making man after Gods Image did consist.
    CHAP. X.
  • Corollaries informing us of the Nature and Aggravations of our loss by sinne; and shewing what were the most excellent and choice parts of that Original Righteousness that we are deprived of.
    CHAP. XI.
  • A further Consideration, of Original Righteousness, proving the thing, and answering Objections against it.
    CHAP. XII.
  • More Propositions about the Nature of the Image of God, which man was created in; Shewing what particular graces Adam's soul was adorned with.
    CHAP. XIII.
  • Reasons to prove, That the Privation of Original Righteousness is truly and properly a sin in us.
    CHAP. XIV.
  • The Aggravations of the losse of Gods Image.
    SECT. II.
  • By the losse of Original Righteousness Gods end in making man was lost.
    SECT. III.
  • The Harmony and Subordination in mans Nature dissolved.
    SECT. IV.
  • The Properties of this loss.
    Page  [unnumbered] CHAP. XV.
  • Of the Positive Part of original Corruption.
  • John 3. 6. That which is born of the flesh is flesh.
    SECT. II.
  • Of the use of the word Flesh in Scripture, and why original Corruption is called by that Name.
    SECT. III.
  • How carnal the Soul is in its actings about spiritual objects.
    CHAP. XVI.
  • Reasons demonstrating the Positive Part of Original Sinne, and why Divines make Original Sinne to have 〈◊〉Positive as well as Privative Part.
    CHAP. XVII.
  • Objections against the Positive Part of O•••al Sinne, answered.
    CHAP. XVIII.
  • A Second Text to prove Original Sinne to be Positive, opened and vindicated.
  • Rom. 7. 7. For I had not known lust, except the Law had said, Thou shalt not covet.
    SECT. II.
  • The word Lust expounded.
    SECT. VI.
  • A Three-fold Appetite in man.
    SECT. VIII.
  • A Consideration of this Concupiscence in reference to the four-fold estate of man.
    SECT. X.
  • Why Original Sinne is called Concupiscence or Lust.
    CHAP. XX.
  • A clear and full knowledge of Original Sinne can be obtained onely by Scripture-light.
    SECT. II.
  • Whether the wisest Heathens had any knowledge of this Pollution.
    CHAP. XXI.
  • That Reason, when once enlightned by the Scriptures, may be very powerfull to convince us of this Natural Pollution.
    CHAP. XXII.
  • A Comparison and Opposition between the first and second Adam, as introductory to this Question, How this corruption is propagated.
  • 1 Cor. 15. 49. As we have borne the Image of the earthly, we shall also bear the Image of the heavenly.
    CHAP. XXIII.
  • The various Opinions, Objections and Doubts about the manner how the Soul comes to be polluted.
    CHAP. XXIV.
  • That the Soul is neither by Eduction or Traduction, but by Introduction or Immediate Infusion, proved by Texts of Scripture, and Argu∣ments from Scripture.
    SECT. V.
  • The Authors Apology for handling this great Question.
    SECT. VI.
  • Propositions to clear the Doctrine of the Propagation of Original Sin, notwithstanding the Souls Creation.
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The Contents of the Third Part.

HAndling the Subject of Inhesion.

    CHAP. I.
  • Of the Pollution of the Mind with Original Sinne.
  • Ephes. 4. 23. And be ye renewed in the Spirit of your Mind.
    CHAP. II.
  • Of Original Sinne polluting the Conscience: Setting forth the De∣filement of Conscience, as it is Quiet, Stupid and Senslesse; and also when it is troublea and awakened.
  • Tit. 1. 15. But even their mind and Conscience is defiled.
    CHAP. III.
  • Of the Pollution of the Memory.
  • 2 Pet. 1. 12. I will not be negligent to put you alwayes in Remem∣brance of these things, &c.
    SECT. II.
  • What we mean by Memory.
    SECT. III.
  • A Two-fold weaknesse of the Memory.
    SECT. V.
  • Its great Usefulnesse.
    SECT. VI.
  • Of the Nature of it.
    SECT. VIII.
  • Instances of the Pollution of the Memory.
  • 1. In forgetting the Objects that we should have in our Memory, both Superiour and Inferiour.
    SECT. X.
  • 2. In respect of its inward vitiosity adhering to it.
  • 3. In not attaining its End.
  • 4. In that it is made subservient to the corrupt frame and inclina∣tion of our hearts.
  • 5. It is not subject to our will and power. Hence
  • 6. We remember things that we would not.
    CHAP. IV.
  • Of the Pollution of the Will of Man by Original Sinne.
  • John 1. 13. Which were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.
    SECT. II.
  • Propositions concerning the Nature of the Will.
    SECT. III.
  • ¶. 1. The Corruption of the Will in all its several operations.
  • ¶. 2. Its Corruption in its General Act, which is called Volition.
  • ¶. 3. In its absolute and efficacious willing of a thing.
  • ¶. 4. In its Act of Fruition.
  • ¶. 5. In its Act of Intention.
  • ¶. 6. In its Act of Election or Chusing.
  • ¶. 7. In its losse of that Aptitude and readinesse it should have to follow the Deliberation and Advice of the Understanding.
  • ¶. 8. In its Act of Consent.
    SECT. IV.
  • The Desilement of the Will, in its Affections and Properties, or the sinfull Adjuncts inseparably cleaving unto it.
  • Page  [unnumbered]Rom. 9. 16. So then it is not of him that willeth, or of him that run∣neth, but of God that sheweth mercy.
  • ¶. 1. This Scripture opened, vindicated and improved.
  • ¶. 2. The Will is so fallen from its primitive honour, that its not worthy to be called Will but Lust.
  • ¶. 3. Its wholly perverted about the Ultimate End.
  • ¶. 4. Its Privacy and Propriety.
  • ¶. 5. Its Pride and Haughtiness.
  • ¶. 6. Its Contumacy and Refractoriness.
  • ¶. 7. Its Enmity and Contrariety to Gods will.
  • ¶. 8. Its Rebellion against the light of the Mind, and slavery to the sensitive part in a man.
  • ¶. 9. Its Mutability and Inconstancy.
    SECT. V.
  • Of the Natural Servitude and Bondage of the Will, with a brief Dis∣cussion of the Point of Free-will.
  • John 8. 35. If the Sonne therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed.
  • ¶. 2. The Text opened.
  • ¶. 3. Of the several kinds of Freedom which the Scripture speak∣eth of.
  • ¶. 4. The Names the Scripture expresseth that by, which we call Free-will.
  • ¶. 5. Some observations concerning the Promoters of the Doctrine of Free-will; How unpleasing the contrary Doctrine is to flesh and blood, with some advice about it.
  • ¶. 6. The first Demonstration of the slavery of the Will, is from the Necessity of sinning, that every man is plunged into.
  • ¶. 7. That a Necessary Determination may arise several wayes, some whereof are very consistent with liberty, yea the more necessary the more free.
  • ¶. 8. The second Argument of its Bondage is, Its being carried out unto sinne voluntarily, and with delight.
  • ¶. 9. Thirdly, It is evident by its utter impotency to any thing that is spiritual.
  • Here is shewed, wherein that inability consists.
  • ¶. 10. That man naturally loves his thraldom to sin, and contradicts the means of Deliverance.
  • ¶. 11. Its Bondage is seen in its Concupiscential Affection to some creature or other, never being able to lift it self up to God.
  • Page  [unnumbered] ¶. 12. That when it doth endeavour to overcome any sinne, it is by falling into another.
  • ¶. 13. The more means of grace to free us, the more our slavery ap∣pears.
  • ¶. 14. The Necessity of a Redeemer demonstrates our thraldome to sinne.
  • ¶. 15. An Examination of the Descriptions and Definitions of Free∣dom or Liberty of Will, which many Writers give it: Shewing, That none of them are any wayes agreeing to the Will un∣sanctified.
    CHAP. V.
  • Of the Pollution of the Affections.
  • Col. 3. 2. Set your Affections upon things above, not on things on the earth.
    SECT. I.
  • The Text opened.
    SECT. II.
  • Of the Nature of the Affections.
    SECT. III.
  • How the Affections are treated of severally, by the Philosopher, the Physician, the Oratour, and the Divine.
    SECT. IV.
  • The Natural Pollution of the Affections is manifested,
  • 1. In the Dominion and Tyranny they have over the Under∣standing and Will.
  • ¶. 2. Secondly, In regard of the first motions and risings of them.
  • ¶. 3. Thirdly, In respect of their Progress and Degrees.
  • ¶. 4. Fourthly, In respect of the Continuance or Duration of them.
    SECT. V.
  • They are wholly displaced from their right Object.
    SECT. VI.
  • Their sinfulness is discovered in respect of the End and Use for which God ingraffed them in our Natures.
    SECT. VIII.
  • In respect of the Contrariety and Opposition of them, one to ano∣ther.
    SECT. IX.
  • The Pollution of the Affections in respect of the Conflict between the natu∣ral Conscience and them.
    SECT. X.
  • In respect of the great Distractions they fill us with in holy Duties.
    SECT. XI.
  • Their Deformity and Contrariety to the Rule and Exemplary Patern.
    SECT. XII.
  • Their Dulness and senslesness, though the Understanding declare the good to be imbraced.
    SECT. XIII.
  • The Affections being drawn out in holy Duties from corrupt Motive, shews the Pollution of them.
    SECT. XIV.
  • That they are more zealously carried out to any false way than to the Truths of God.
    SECT. XV.
  • They are for the most part in-lets to all sinne in the Soul.
    SECT. XVI.
  • The Privacy of them.
    SECT. XVII.
  • Their hurtfull Effects upon a mans Body.
    SECT. XVIII.
  • The sad Effects they have upon others.
    CHAP. VI.
  • The Sinfulness of the Imaginative Power of the Soul.
  • Gen. 6. 5. And God saw that every Imagination of the thoughts of mans heart was only evil, and that continually.
    SECT. 1.
  • The Text explained and vindicated against D. J. Taylor, Grotius, the Papists and Socinians.
    SECT. II.
  • Of the Nature of the Imagination in a man.
    SECT. III.
  • 1. The Natural Sinfulnesse of the Imagination appears, in its making Idols, Supports and vain Conceits, whereby it pleaseth it self.
    SECT. IV.
  • 2. In respect of its Defect from that end and use which God did intend in the Creation of man with such a power.
    SECT. V.
  • 3. Restlesnesse.
    SECT. VI.
  • 4. Universality, Multitude, and Disorder of the Imaginations.
    SECT. VII.
  • 5. Their Roving and Wandring up and down without any fixed way.
    SECT. VIII.
  • 6. Their Impertinency and Unreasonableness.
    SECT. IX.
  • 7. The Imagination eclypseth, and for the most part keeps out the Under∣standing.
    Page  [unnumbered] SECT. IX.
  • In the Imaginations for the most part are conceived all actual im∣pieties.
    SECT. X.
  • That many times Sinne is acted by the Imagination with Delight and Content, without any relation at all to the external actings of Sinne.
    SECT. XI.
  • Its Propensity to all evil, both towards God and man.
    SECT. XII.
  • It continually invents new sins, or occasions of sins.
    SECT. XIII.
  • The Sinfulness of the Imagination manifesteth it self in reference to the Word of God, and the ministerial preaching thereof.
    SECT. XIV.
  • It is more affected with Appearances then Realities.
    SECT. XV.
  • Its Sinfulness in respect of fear, and the workings of Conscience.
    SECT. XVI.
  • Of the Actings of the Imagination in Dreams.
    SECT. XVII.
  • The Imagination is not in that orderly Subordination to the rational part of man, as it was in the Primitive Condition.
    SECT. XVIII.
  • It is according to Austin's Judgement the great instrument of conveying Original Sinne to the Child.
    SECT. XIX.
  • How prone it is to receive the Devils Impressions and Suggestions.
    CHAP. VII.
  • Of the last Subject of Inhesion, or seat of Original Sinne, viz. the Body of a man.
  • 1 Thess. 5. 23. And the very God of peace sanctifie you wholly, and I pray God your whole spirit, and soul, and Body be preserved blameless, unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.
    SECT. II.
  • The Text explained.
    SECT. III.
  • Scripture-proofs of the sinfull Pollution of the Body.
    SECT. IV.
  • The sinfulness of the Body discovered in particulars.
  • ¶. 1. It is not now instrumental and serviceable to the Soul in holy Ap∣proaches to God, but on the contrary a clog and burden.
  • ¶. 2. It doth positively affect and defile the Soul.
  • ¶. 3. A man acts more according to the Body, and the Inclinations thereof, then the mind, with the Dictates thereof.
  • ¶. 4. The Body by Original Sinne is made a Tempter and a Seducer.
  • ¶. 5. It doth objectively occasion much sinne to the Soul.
  • ¶. 6. Its indisposition to any service of God.
  • ¶. 7. How easily the Body is moved and stirred by the passions and affe∣ctions thereof.
  • ¶. 8. The Body when sanctified is become no lesse glorious then the Temple of the holy Ghost.
    CHAP. VIII.
  • Of the Subject of Predication; Shewing that every one of mankind (Christ only excepted) is involved in this sinne and misery.
  • Luk. 1. 35, Therefore also that holy thing, which shall be born of thee, shall be called the Son of God.
    SECT. II.
  • The Aggravations of Original Sinne.
  • ¶. 1. The Aggravation of Adam's Actual Transgression.
  • ¶. 2. The Aggravation of Original Sinne inherent.
  • ¶. 3. An Objection Answered.
    SECT. III.
  • That every one by Nature hath his peculiar Original Sinne.
    SECT. IV.
  • That Original Sinne in every one doth vent it self betimes▪
    SECT. V.
  • How soon a Child may commit Actual Sinne.
    SECT. VI.
  • Whether Original Sinne be alike in all.
    CHAP. X.
  • A Justification of Gods shutting up all under Sinne for the Sinne of Adam, in the sense of the Reformed Churches, against the Excepti∣ons of D. J. Taylor, and others.
  • Gal. 3. 24. But the Scripture hath concluded all under sinne, that the promise by faith of Jesus Christ might be given to them that believe.
    SECT. I.
  • The Text explained.
    SECT. II.
  • Prpositions to direct us in this great Point of Gods Proceedings, as to the matter of Original Sinne.
    SECT. III.
  • Objections Answered.
Page  [unnumbered]

The Contents of the Fourth Part.

TReating of the Effects of Original Sinne.

    CHAP. I.
  • Of that Propensity that is in every one by Nature to sinne.
  • Job 15. 16. How much more abominable and filthy is man, which drink∣eth iniquity like water?
    SECT. I.
  • The Text explained and vindicated from Socinian Exceptions.
    SECT. II.
  • How much is implied in this Metaphor, Man drinketh iniquity like water.
    SECT. III.
  • Some Demonstrations to prove, that there is such an impetuous Inclina∣tion in man to sinne.
    SECT. IV.
  • The true Causes of this Proneness, and the false ones assigned by the Ad∣versaries, examined.
    CHAP. II.
  • The second immediate Effect of Original Sinne is, the Causality which it hath in respect of all other sins.
  • Jam. 1. 14. But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed.
    SECT. I.
  • The Text explained, setting forth the generation of Sinne.
    Page  [unnumbered] SECT. II.
  • That Original Sinne is the Cause of all Actual Evil, cleared by se∣veral Propositions, which may serve for Antidotes against many Errours.
  • ¶. 2. Of the Motions of the heart to sinne not consented unto, as an immediate Effect of Original Sinne.
  • ¶. 3. How many wayes the Soul may become guilty of sinne, in respect of the Thoughts and motions of the heart.
    CHAP. III.
  • Of the Combate between the Flesh and the Spirit, as the Effect of Original Sinne, so that the Godliest man cannot do any holy Duty perfectly in this life.
  • Gal. 5. 17. For the Flesh lusteth against the Spirit, and the Spirit against the Flesh, and these are contrary one to the other; so that ye cannot do the things that ye would.
    SECT. I.
  • The Text explained and vindicated from corrupt Interpretations.
    SECT. II.
  • Several Propositions clearing the truth about the Combate between the Flesh and Spirit in a Godly man.
    SECT. III.
  • A Consideration of that part of the seventh Chapter to the Romans, which treats of the Conflict within a man; Shewing (against Amyraldus and others) that it must be a regenerate person only, of whom those things are spoken.
  • ¶. 4. The several wayes whereby Original Sinne doth hinder the Godly in their Religious Progress, whereby they are sinfull and imperfect.
  • ¶. 5. Objections against the Reliques of Sin in a regenerate man, an∣swered.
  • ¶. 8. The several Conflicts that may be in a man.
  • ¶. 10. How the Combate in a Godly man between the Flesh and Spi∣rit, may be discerned from other Conflicts.
  • Page  [unnumbered] ¶. 10. Of the Regenerates freedome from the Dominion of sinne; and whether it be by the Suppression of it, or by the Abo∣lishing part of it.
    CHAP. IV.
  • Of Death coming upon all men, as another Effect of Original Sinne.
  • 1 Cor. 15. 22. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.
    SECT. II.
  • Death an Effect of Original Sinne, explained in divers Propo∣sitions.
  • ¶. 2. How many wayes a thing may be said to be Immortal, and in which of them man is so.
  • ¶. 4. Distinctions about Mortality, and that in several respects Adam may be said to be created Mortal and Immortal.
  • ¶. 7. The several Grounds assigned by Schoolmen of Adam's Immortality rejected; and some Causes held forth by the Orthodox.
    SECT. III.
  • Arguments to prove, That through Adam's sinne we are made sinners, and so Mortal.
    SECT. IV.
  • Arguments brought to prove, That Adam was made Mortal, answered.
    SECT. V.
  • Whether Adam's sinne was onely an occasion of Gods punishing all man∣kind, resolved against D. J. Taylor.
    SECT. VI.
  • Whether Death may be attributed to mans constitution, considered in his meer Naturals, against D. J. Taylor, and the Socinians.
    Page  [unnumbered] CHAP. V.
  • Eternal Damnation another Effect of Original Sinne.
  • Ephes. 2. 3. And were by nature the children of wrath, as well as others.
    SECT. I.
  • What is meant by Wrath in this Text.
    SECT. II.
  • What is meant by Nature.
    SECT. III.
  • That by nature through the original sinne we are born in, all are heirs of Gods wrath, all are obnoxious to eternal damnation.
    SECT. IV.
  • What is comprehended in this Expression, Children of wrath.
    SECT. V.
  • Some Propositions in order to the proving, That the wrath of God is due to all mankind because of Original Sinne.
    SECT. VI.
  • Arguments to prove it.
    SECT. VII.
  • Some Conclusions deduceable from the Doctrine of the damnableness of Original Sinne.
    SECT. VIII.
  • A Consideration of their Opinion that hold, an Universal Removal of the Guilt of Original Sinne from all mankind by Christs Death: Answering their Arguments; among which, that from the Antithesis or Opposition which the Apostle maketh Rom. 5. between the first Adam and the second Adam.
    Page  [unnumbered] SECT. IX.
  • Of the state of Infants that die in their Infancy, before they are ca∣pable of any Actual Transgressions, and that die before Bap∣tisme.