A treatise of original sin ... proving that it is, by pregnant texts of Scripture vindicated from false glosses
Burgess, Anthony, d. 1664.
Page  [unnumbered]Page  [unnumbered]

AN ALPHABETICAL TABLE.

A

    Actions.
  • MEns best Actions carnal, pag. 139
  • Bad Actions are not ju∣stified by good intentions, 280
  • The will hath not power over all its Acti∣ons. 323
    Adam.
  • Adam had full power over himself. 20
  • Made upright. 23
  • Yet free and changeable. ib. 114
  • He sinned not after the same manner, that we sinne, against Socinians, ib.
  • A common head. 25
  • His sin was disobedience. 27
  • His sin imputed to all. ib.
  • His disobedience makes us sinners by propagation, not by imitation. 28
  • He had power to stand. 114
  • And to repent and believe, while in in∣nocency, transcendently. ib.
  • Deprived by his fall of more, then was meerly supernatural. 118
  • And of supernaturals also. ib.
  • Had free-will to good before his fall, not after. 119
  • Had faith. 120, 128
  • Loved God above all, before his fall. ib.
  • And delighted in him. 121
  • Not made in a neutral indifferent state. 123
  • How original righteousnesse was natu∣ral to him. 125
  • What was supernatural to Adam, 127
  • Had all graces, either actually, or habitually. 128, 129
  • Had his affections subject to his mind. 134
  • A comparison between the first and second Adam. 181
    Affections.
  • The pollution of them. 325
  • The nature of them. 327
  • How variously they may be considered. 328
  • Their tyranny over the understanding and will. 329
  • Sinfull in their first motions. 330
  • And in their progress and degrees. 331
  • Page  [unnumbered] And in their duration, and in respect of their objects. 332
  • And in respect of their end and use. 333
  • And in their motion to lawfull objects. 334
  • And in respect of their opposition to one another. 336
  • Affections polluted in respect of the con∣flict between them and natural con∣science. 336
  • And in their distracting us in duties. 338
  • And in their contrariety to the exam∣ple of God. ib.
  • How they are in God. 339
  • Their dulness toward good. 340
  • Drawn to holy duties from corrupt motives. 341
  • Zealously drawn out to false wayes. 342
  • Inlets to all sin. 343
  • The privacy of the Affections. 345
  • The hurtfull effects on our own bodies. 346
  • And others. 347
  • They readily receive temptations. ib.
    All.
  • All sinfull that come of Adam, sinfull by nature, though the children of the most godly. 394
  • And how absurd to exempt any. 400
  • God justified for shutting up All under sin for the sin of Adam. 421
    Amyraldus.
  • Amyraldus and other sense, upon the conflict in Rom. 7. examined. 483
    Angels.
  • Angels not generated. 196
    Appetite.
  • Of the three-fold Appetite in man. 158

B

    Beleeve.
  • NO man can Beleeve by the power of nature. 315
    Blasphemies.
  • What devilish Blasphemies have been re∣ceived. 219
    Body.
  • Body of man defiled with sin. 372
  • Is not serviceable to the soul in holy approaches, but a clog. 376
  • Doth positively affect and defile the soul. 377
  • Man acts more according to the inclina∣tions of the Body then the dictates of the mind. ib.
  • Its a tempter and seducer. 378
  • Doth objectively occasion much sin to the soul. 381
  • Its indisposition to serve God. 392
  • Easily moved by its passions. 384
  • When sanctified it is the temple of God. 385

C

    Children.
  • CHildren suffer for parents sinnes 46
  • Arminians make the Children of Hea∣thens and believers alike. 67
  • How soon a Child may commit actual sin. 416
    Christ.
  • Whether upon Christ's death there be a universal removal of the guilt of ori∣ginal sinne. 539
    Combate.
  • Combate between the flesh and the spirit. 474
    Conflict.
  • No spiritual Conflict in the state of integrity. 479
  • Page  [unnumbered] Nor is there sense or feeling of any such Conflict in a natural man. 480
  • It's in all that are sanctified. 81
  • Conflict, the several kinds. 500
    Conscience.
  • What Conscience is. 223
  • Whence quietness of Conscience in un∣regenerate men. 90
  • And whence troubles of Conscience in the regenerate. ib.
  • Erroneous Conscience ought to be obeyed 224
  • Conscience horribly blind and erroneous by nature. 225
  • And senslesse. 226
  • The defect of Conscience in its offices and actings. 228
  • The corruption of Conscience in accusing and excusing. 230
  • Of a counterfeit Conscience. 233
  • Sinfull lust, fancy and imagination, cu∣stome and education, mistaken for Conscience. ib.
  • Conscience severe against other mens sins, blind about its own. 236
  • Security of Conscience. 237
  • The defilement of Conscience when troubled and awakened. 238
  • The difference between a troubled and a regenerate Conscience. 243
  • Causes of trouble of Conscience without regeneration. ib.
  • False cure of a wounded Conscience. 245
    Consent.
  • A two-fold Consent of the will, expresse and formal; or interpretative and virtual. 287
    Creation.
  • Christ had his soul by Creation, and so we have ours. 195
    Creature.
  • Mans bondage to the Creature. 317

D

    Damnation.
  • DAmnation due to all for original sinne. 528
    Death.
  • Death not natural to Adam before sin. 31, 115
  • Death and all other miseries come from sin. 173
    Devil.
  • The Devil cannot compell us to sinne. 15, 114
    Difference.
  • Difference between original and actual sins. 477
    Difficulty.
  • Difficulty of turning to God, whence. 478
    Doubtings.
  • Doubtings, whence. 241
    Duties.
  • Imperfection in the best Duties. 11
  • Of doing Duties for conscience sake. 234

E

    Exorcisms.
  • EXorcisms used anciently at the Ba∣ptism of Infants. 54

F

    Faculties.
  • SOme Faculties and imbred principles left in the soul after the fall. 224
  • Mans best Faculties corrupted by sinne. 139
    Flesh.
  • Flesh and spirit in every godly man. 11
  • Page  [unnumbered] How the word Flesh is used in Scripture. 139
  • Flesh and spirit contrary. ib.
    Forgetfulness.
  • Forgetfulness natural and moral. 257
  • Forgetfulness of sin. 260
  • Of usefull examples, and former work∣ings of Gods Spirit. 261
  • Of our later end, the day and death, and judgement, and the calamities of the Church. 262
    Freedom.
  • Several kinds of Freedom. 306
  • Freedom from the dominion of sin, whe∣ther it be by suppression or abolishing part of it. 503

G

    Grace.
  • WHat sanctifying Grace is. 20
  • Given not so much to curb actual sin, as to cure the nature. ib.
  • Free Grace exalted by the Apostles. 308
  • The Doctrine of free Grace unpleasing to flesh and bloud. 310
  • The necessity of special Grace to help against temptations. 314

H

    Habits.
  • THe Habits of sin forbidden, and the Habits of grace required by the Law. 45
    Heathens.
  • Heathens, how far ignorant of original sin. 168
  • Condemn the lustings of the heart. 169
    Heresies. Hereticks.
  • The Heresies of the Gnosticks, Carpocra∣tians, Montanists and Donatists. 225
  • The guilt and craft of Heretiques. 303

I

    Jesus Christ.
  • JEsus Christ his conception miraculous. 388
  • But framed of the substance of the Virgin. 389
  • Why called the Son of God. ib.
  • Had a real body. ib.
  • Born holy and without sin. 390
  • How he could be true man, and yet free from sin. 392
    Ignorance.
  • A universal Ignorance upon a mans understanding. 178, 210
    Image.
  • Gods Image in Adam not an infused habit or habits, but a natural recti∣tude, or connatural perfection to his nature. 19
  • Why called Gods Image. 21
    The Image of God in man.
  • Reason and understanding one part of it. 113
  • Holinesse and righteousnesse another part. ib.
  • Power to persevere in holinesse another part. ib.
  • A regular subordination of the affecti∣ons to the rule of righteousnes, ano∣ther part. 114
  • Primitive glory, honour and immorta∣lity, another part. 115
  • Dominion and superiority another part, yet not the only Image of God, as the Socinians falsly. ib.
  • How man made in it. 131
    Imagination.
  • Imagination, its nature. 351
  • Its sinfulnesse in making Idols and conceits to please it self. 352
  • And in its defect from the end of its Page  [unnumbered] being. 353
  • By its restlesnesse. 355
  • By their universality, multitude, disorder, their roving and wan∣dring, their impertinency and unsea∣sonablenesse. 356, 357
  • It eclipseth and keeps out the under∣standing. 358
  • Conceiveth for the most part all actual transgressions. 359
  • Acts sin with delight when there are no external actings. 360
  • Its propensity to all evil. 361
  • Is continually inventing new sins, or occasions of sin. 362
  • Vents its sinfulnesse in reference to the Word, and the preaching of it. 364
  • Mind more affected with appearances than realities. 365
  • And in respect of fear and the work∣ings of conscience. 366
  • And its acting in dreams. 367
  • Is not in subordination to the rational part of man. 368
  • The instrument in Austins judgment of conveying sin to the child. 368
  • Prone to receive the Devils temptati∣ons. 369
    Immortal.
  • How many wayes a thing may be said to be Immortal. 509
  • Of Adams Immortality in the state of innocency. 513
    Impossibility.
  • Impossibility of mans loosing himself from the creature, and return to God, 371
    Infants.
  • Infants deserve hell. 7
  • Sinners. 29
  • Cannot be saved without Christ. 35, 55
  • Infant-holinesse, what it is. 56
  • Infants defiled with original sin before born. 62
    Judgment.
  • Whence diversities of Judgment in the things of God. 219
    Justification.
  • Justification by imputed not inherent righteousnesse. 29

K

    Knowing. Known.
  • CVriosity and affection in all of Knowing what is not to be Known 184
  • Which comes from original sin. 212

L

    Law.
  • THe Law impossible to be kept. 10
  • A Law what. 85
  • The Law requireth habitual holinesse. 130
  • Forbids lust in the heart. 156
    Liberty.
  • Liberty of will nothing but voluntari∣nesse or complacency. 132
    Lust.
  • What Lust is. 155
  • How distinguished. 157
  • Lust considered according to the four-fold estate of man. 160
  • Sinfull Lust utterly extirpated in heaven 161

M

    Man.
  • MAn by nature out of Gods favour. 117
  • Man made to enjoy and glorifie God. 132, 133
  • How sin dissolved the harmony of Mans nature. ib.
  • Man unable to help himself out of his lost condition. 153
  • Through sin it is worse with Man than other creatures. 174
  • Page  [unnumbered] The nobler part of Man inslaved to the inferiour. 175
  • Man utterly impotent to any spiritual good. 177
  • By his fall became like the devil. 183
    Memory.
  • The pollution of it. 247
  • What it is. 250
  • A two-fold weaknesse of Memory, na∣tural and sinfull. ib.
  • The use and dignity of it. 251
  • The nature of it. 253
  • Discoveries of its pollution. 253
  • Wherein it is polluted. 257
  • Wherein it fails in respect of the objects ib.
  • Hath much inward vitiosity adhering to it. 263
  • Subservient to our corrupt hearts. 265
    Mind.
  • Whence the vanity and instability of the Mind. 217
    Ministry.
  • One end of the Ministry. 255

N

    Natural.
  • EVery Natural man is carnal, in the mysteries of Religion, in religious worship, in religious ordinances, in religious performances. 140, 141
  • In spiritual transactions and reli∣gious deportment. 142, 143
    Necessity.
  • What Necessity is consistent with freedom 312

O

    Original Sinne.
  • THe necessity of knowing it. 1
  • The term ambiguously used; and how taken in this Treatise. ib.
  • That there is such a natural con∣contagion on all. 2
  • Why called Original sin. 5
  • Denial of it, the mother of many errors 6
  • The cause of all miseries. 7
  • Worse than actual. 8
  • Ignorance thereof the cause why men understand not the work of conver∣sion. 9
  • Inseparably adheres to the best. 11
  • A natural evil, and how; with the several names it hath had. 13
  • The difilement of our specifical being. 14
  • The inward principle of all sinfull motions. ib.
  • Flacius his opinion concerning it. ib.
  • Is alwayes putting it self forth. 16
  • Neerer to us than actual or habitual sin. 18
  • What it is. 19, 20
  • Why compared to death. 21
  • Objections answered. 22
  • Pelagians and Socinians opinion of it. 28
  • Propagated. ib.
  • Is an internal and natural depravati∣on of the whole man. 32
  • Adams sin imputed to us, is not all our Original sin. ib.
  • Of that opinion, that Original sinne is vitium, but not peccatum. 33
  • Truly and properly a sin. 34
  • Against the Law. 35
  • How voluntary. 39
  • Arminius and the Remonstrants disa∣gree about Original sin. 40
  • Arminius, Remorstrants, Zuinglius, Papists, Scotists, and Socinians opinions of it. 40
  • A sin, a punishment, and a cause of sin. 41
  • Original inherent sin, and Adams imputed sin are two distinct sins. 43
  • Against the Law, and how. 44 45
  • Acknowledged in Old Testament times 48
  • Remonstrants confess it may be proved by two or three places of Scripture. ib.
  • Page  [unnumbered] Compared to a leprosie. 51
  • Makes us leathsom to God as soon as born. 52
  • Why called uncleanness. ib.
  • Should make us vile in our own eyes. ib.
  • Put a man by nature into worse con∣dition than beasts. 53
  • Makes us like the Devils. ib.
  • Pollutes our duties, and makes us unfit and unworthy to draw nigh to God in duties. 54
  • Makes us to be in the most imme∣diate contrariety to God that can be. ib.
  • The denial of it charged upon Calvin∣ists by the Lutherans. 56
  • Acknowledged by the Rabbins and Fathers. 62
  • Meditation thereon, wherein advanta∣gious. 64
  • Not one universal thing of general influence, but a particular thing in particular men. 65
  • To be bewailed, even by those that are regenerate. ib.
  • A two-fold Original sin. 66
  • The different opinions of men about humiliation for it. 67
  • In what sense it is to be repented of. 68
  • Papists against sorrow for it. 69
  • Several opinions concerning the pardon of it. 67, 68, 69
  • Wherein repentance and the pardon of Original and actual sin do differ. 70
  • It is an universal defilement. 71
  • And an universal guilt. ib.
  • And the fountain and root of all actual sin. ib.
  • And the greatest sin. 72
  • Inseparable from our natures, while we live. 73
  • Of the Scripture names of it. 79
  • Not the essence or substance of the soul ib.
  • Why called the old man. 80
  • Improperly called a Law. 83
  • Why called a Law. 84
  • Instructs a man in all evil ib.
  • Inclineth and provoketh to all evil. ib.
  • Compelleth to all evil. 85
  • Why called the inherent or in-dwelling sin. 90
  • How it dwels in the regenerate. ib.
  • Active, and ever stirring. 94
  • Is of an insinuating and contamina∣ting nature. 95
  • Depriveth both of power and will to do good. 97, 98
  • Inclines the heart to the creature. 98
  • Resisteth all profers of grace. 99
  • Weakens the principles of grace. 100
  • Why called a treasure. 102
  • An inexhausted stock. 103
  • The cause of all pleasure in sin. 104
  • Called a body and why. 105 107
  • Shews it self outwardly in all our actions. 107
  • Cannot be mortified without pain. ib.
  • A reality, yet not a substance. 108
  • Not a single sin, but a lump of all evil. ib.
  • Inclineth only to carnal, earthly, and bodily things. 109
  • Seth born in Original sinne. 110, 111
  • Deprives of more than external hap∣piness and immortality, against So∣cinians. 117
  • Many Papists deny the positive part of it. 136
  • Hath infected all men. 137
  • Positive as well as privative. 144
  • And the reasons thereof. 145
  • Produceth positive sinfull actions. 146
  • Sticks closer then vicious habits. ib.
  • Not a pestilential quality in the body. 149
  • Is properly concupiscence or lust. 157
  • And in what sense. 159
  • And why so called. 162
  • It is ignorant also. ib.
  • Defined. 164
  • The whole man, and the whole of man the subject thereof. ib.
  • Propagated and communicated to all Adams posterity. 165
  • Page  [unnumbered] Truly known only by Scripture-light. 167
  • How farre Heathens were ignorant thereof. 168
  • The propagation thereof by the souls creation. 199
  • Hath fill'd us with errour. 211
  • And with curiosity. 212
  • And vanity. 213
  • And folly. 214
  • Polluting the conscience, how, and wherein. 221
  • Polluteth the memory. 249
  • Polluteth the will. 268
  • The affections. 325
  • The imagination. 348
  • The body of a man 392
  • And every one of mankind. 387
  • Not the children of the most godly, or the Virgin Mary excepted, but only Christ, 387. to 401
  • Original sin imputed, the aggrava∣tions of it. 405
  • Inherent; the aggravation of it. 407
  • It defiles all the parts of the soul, is the root and cause of all actual sin, is incurable, taketh away all spiri∣tual sense and feeling, is habitual, radicated in the soul. 407. to 410
  • Objections against the hainousnesse of this sin: Every one hath his proper Original sin. 412
  • Vents it self betimes. 415
  • Is alike in all. 419
  • The immediate effects of Original sinne are mans propensity to sin. 437. to 455
  • Is the cause of all other sine. 455
  • Evil motions not consented unto, and lusts consented unto. 464
  • The combat between the flesh and spirit 474
  • Death. 505
  • Eternal damnation. 526

P

    Pray.
  • A Natural man cannot Pray. 314
    Pride.
  • Pride the cause of most heresies. 218
    Propagation.
  • Propagation of sin. 397
    Punishment.
  • The same thing may be a Punishment and a sin. 41

R

    Redeemer.
  • THe necessity of a Redeemer demon∣strates our thraldom to sin. 319
    Reformation.
  • A carnal mans Reformation is but the avoiding of one sin by another. 318
    Regenerate.
  • A sure difference between a Regenerate and unregenerate man. 9
    Regeneration.
  • Three sorts of mistaken Regeneration. 10
    Reliques.
  • Reliques of sin. 474
    Remember.
  • Whence is it that we Remember things when we would not. 266
    Righteousness.
  • Original Righteousness not given to Adam as a curb to the inferiour facul∣ties. 25
  • The difficulty of Rom. 5. 26
  • Original Righteousness, the privation of it a sin. 130
  • We were deprived of it by Adam. 131
  • Page  [unnumbered] Vniversally lost. 135
  • The losse of it the cause of all temporal losses. ib.
  • The privation of it doth necessarily inferre the presence of all sin in a subject susceptible. 202

S

    Sacraments.
  • ONe end of the Sacraments. 255
    Sanctification.
  • Sanctification two fold. 391
    Satan.
  • All by nature in bondage to Satan. 370
    Scripture.
  • Scripture discovers us to our selves better then light of nature or Philosophy. 161, 168
  • The end of its being written. 253
    Self-knowing.
  • Self knowing a great duty, and the hinderance of it. 8
    Sensless.
  • We are altogether Sensless as to any spi∣ritual concernment. 176
    Sin.
  • A man naturally can do nothing but sin. 15, 16
  • The reason why all men do not commit all Sins, though inclinable thereto. 17
  • Men lie under a necessity of sinning, yet this necessity is consistent with voluntarinesse. 18
  • Sin delightfull to men. 21
  • How Sin is natural to us. 24
  • Christ only born without Sin, and how. 37. 390
  • Sin, is what sense voluntary. 38
  • When a punishment, how from God. 42
  • One Sin may suddenly and formally de∣prive the subject of all grace, yet it doth not so alwayes. 58
  • Three sorts of Sin, original, habitual and actual. 89
  • The first motions of the heart, though never so involuntary and indeliberate, are sinfull. 94
  • All Sin is potentially and seminally in every mans heart. 103
  • Every man would commit all Sin, if not restrained. 147
  • Sin rightly divided into original and actual. 164
  • Whence it comes to passe that men commit known Sins. 227
  • Why men chuse Sin rather than affliction. 283
  • Every man lieth under a necessity of sinning. 311
    Sinners.
  • To be made a Sinner by Adam is more than to be made subject to death as a curse. 31
  • And more than to be obnoxious to eternal wrath. ib.
  • All mad: truly and properly Sinners by Adam. 31, 34
  • Every man, Christ excepted. 387, 393
    Socinians.
  • Wherein Socinians do make God the au∣thor of sin. 66
  • Socinians and Papists blasphemy 114
  • Socinians deny both original sin, and original righteousnesse 121
  • The rocks they stumble at. ib. & 122
    Soul.
  • The arguments of those that hold the Souls traduction. 197
  • Souls not by eduction or traduction, but creation and introduction. 191
  • Soul not generated. 189
  • Souls created. 194
  • Origen and Plato's opinion of the Soul. 186
  • Confuted. 187
  • The Soul cannot be neutral. 130
  • Page  [unnumbered] Inclined to earthly objects. 175
  • Souls not created before the bodies. 187
  • Souls come not into the world pure and holy. ib.
  • Souls not perfect substances. 200
  • The Soul infused by creating, and crea∣ted by infusing. 21
  • How it comes to be infected. 393

T

    Taylor.
  • A Character of Doctor J. Taylor. 30
  • He is answered in these places. 62, 398, 407, 409, 422, 430, 449, 450, 452, 461, 476, 485, 518 520, 521, 522, 523, 524, 525, 527, 528, 534, 535

V

    Vanity.
  • OF the natural Vanity of our minds 213
    Virgin.
  • Virgin Mary born in original sin. 398
    Uncleanness.
  • A three-fold Uncleanness, corporal, ceremonial and moral. 50
    Understanding.
  • Our Understandings very weak in respect of natural things. 179, 219
  • And uncapable of holy and spi∣ritual things. 212
    Voluntariness.
  • Voluntariness not requisite to every sin. 39

W

    Wickedness.
  • OF the extream Wickedness of the world. 172
    Will. Willeth.
  • No man Willeth sin, and damnation, as such. 38
  • Adams Will, how ours. 39
  • The Nature of the Will. 270
  • The difference between the Will and un∣derstanding. 271
  • Will, taken ambiguonsly. 272
  • The Will the seat of obedience and disobe∣dience. 273
  • Good, is the proper object of the Will. ib.
  • The several operations of the Will. 274
  • The difference between a wicked mans, and a good mans doing what he al∣lows not. 88
  • Free Will, how far we are deprived of it. 116
  • The corruption of the Will in volition. 275
  • And in efficacious Willing a thing. 276
  • And in fruition. 277
  • And in its act of intention. 279
  • And in election. 282
  • Whence it is that the Will is backward to to follow the understanding. 284
  • The pollution of the Will in its act of consent. 286
  • The first motions of the Will are evil. ib.
  • The pollution of the Will in its affections and properties. 289
  • The degeneracy of the Will. 293
  • The Will wholly perverted about the ul∣timate end. ib.
  • The Will naturally inclineth to be inde∣pendent on God. 295
  • The contumacy and refractoriness of the Will. 297
  • The enmity and contrariety of the Will to Gods will. 298
  • Page  [unnumbered] The rebellion of the Will against the light of the mind, and the slavery of it to the sensitive part. 299
  • The mutability and inconstancy of the Will. 300
  • The bondage of the Will, and of free will. 302
  • No man before grace hath free will to good. 305
  • The Will impotent to spiritual things. 313
  • Free will, how call'd in Scripture. 307
  • Exalted by erroneous persons. 308
  • The different effects of free will and free grace in mens lives. 310
  • The difficulty of the question. 311
  • Demonstrations against it. ib.
  • The definitions and descriptions of it. 320
  • Doth not consist in an active indiffe∣rency to good or evil. 321
FINIS.