A free enquiry into the vulgarly receiv'd notion of nature made in an essay address'd to a friend
Boyle, Robert, 1627-1691.
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ADVERTISEMENT.

THE Reader is here to be adver∣tis'd of a great Oversight that happen'd to be made by several Trans∣positions of the loose Sheets, wherein (and not in a Book,) the Copy was sent to the Press. For the Discourse begin∣ning at the sole Break that is to be met with in the Hundred and Fiftieth Page, and ending with another Break at the second Line of the Hundred Fifty and Sixth Page, ought to have been plac'd at the sole Break that is to be met with in the Hundred Sixty and Second Page. And the Discourse that reaches from the beginning of the Hundred Se∣venty and Eighth Page, to the Close of the V. Section, which ends in the Hun∣dred Eighty and Second Page, ought to have been Printed among the Argu∣ments that may be alledg'd by the Natu∣rists, among which it should, if I mis∣remember Page  [unnumbered] not, have been brought in at the Close of the Two Hundred Forty and Eighth Page, and thence have reach'd to the end of the Sixth Section. These Transpositions are thought neces∣sary to have notice given of Them, to avoid Confusion, since the Printed Sheets did not come to Hand, 'till too much of the Book was wrought off be∣fore the Transpositions could be dis∣cern'd; which makes it fit to give No∣tice of what 'tis too late to remedy. And though also some Connections and Transitions, relating to the Transpos'd Papers, be not such as they should be, yet 'tis not judg'd fit, that the Reader be troubled with long Advertisements about them; because his Discretion may easily correct them, and the Incon∣gruities are not of Moment enough to spoil the Discourses they relate to.

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