The workes of that famous chirurgion Ambrose Parey translated out of Latine and compared with the French. by Th: Johnson
Paré, Ambroise, 1510?-1590., Johnson, Thomas, d. 1644., Cecil, Thomas, fl. 1630, engraver., Baker, George, 1540-1600.
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CHAP. IIII. What things are to be observed, as necessary unto generation in the time of copulation.

WHen the husband commeth into his wives chamber hee must en∣tertaine her with all kinde of dalliance, wanton behaviour, and al∣lurements * to venery: but if he perceive her to be slow, and more cold, he must cherish, embrace, and tickle her, and shall not abrupt∣ly, the nerves being suddenly distended, breake into the field of nature, but rather shall creepe in by little and little, intermixing more wanton kisses with wanton words and speeches, handling her secret parts and dugs, that she may take fire and bee enflamed to venery, for so at length the wombe will strive and waxe fervent with a desire of casting forth its owne seed, and recei∣ving the mans seed to bee mixed together therewith. But if all these things will not suffice to enflame the woman, for women for the most part are more slow and slack unto the expulsion or yeelding forth of their seed, it shall be necessary first to foment her secret parts with the decoction of hot herbes made with Muscadine, or boiled in any other good wine, and to put a little muske or civet into the neck or mouth of the wombe: and when shee shall perceive the efflux of her seed to approach, by reason * of the tickling pleasure, shee must advertise her husband thereof, that at the very in∣stant time or moment, hee may also yeeld forth his seed, that by the concourse or meeting of the seeds, conception may be made, and so at length a child formed and borne. And that it may have the better successe, the husband must not presently se∣parate himselfe from his wives embraces, lest the aire strike into the open wombe, Page  890 and so corrupt the seeds before they are perfectly mixed together. When the man departs, let the woman lye still in quiet, lying her legges or her thighes acrosse, one upon another, and raising them up a little, lest that by motion or downeward situa∣tion, the seed should be shed or spilt: which is the cause why she ought at that time not to talk, especially chiding, nor to cough, nor sneese, but give herselfe to rest and quietnesse, if it be possible.

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