Gallathea As it was playde before the Queenes Maiestie at Greene-wiche, on Newyeeres day at night. By the Chyldren of Paules.
Lyly, John, 1554?-1606.
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Actus primus. Scaena quarta.

Mariner, Raffe, Robin, and Dicke.
Rob.

Now Mariner, what callest thou this sport on the Sea?

Mar.

It is called a wracke.

Raffe.

I take no pleasure in it. Of all deathes I wold not be drownd, ones clothes will be so wet when hee is taken vp.

Dicke

What calst thou the thing wee were bounde to?

Mar.

A raughter.

Raffe.

I wyll rather hang my selfe on a raughter in the house, then be so haled in the Sea, there one may haue a leape for his lyfe; but I maruaile howe our Ma∣ster speedes.

Dicke

Ile warrant by this time he is wetshod. Dyd you euer see water buble as the Sea did? But what shall we doe?

Mar.

You are now in Lyncolnshire, where you can want no foule, if you can deuise meanes to catch them, there be woods hard by, and at euery myles ende hou∣ses: so that if you seeke on the Lande, you shall speede better then on the Sea.

Rob.

Sea, nay I will neuer saile more, I brooke not their diet: their bread is so hard, that one must carrie a whetstone in his mouth to grinde his teeth: the meate so salt, that one woulde thinke after dinner his tongue had beene powdred ten daies.

Raffe

O thou hast a sweet life Mariner to be pinde in a few boordes, and to be within an inche of a thing bottomlesse. I pray thee howe often hast thou beene drowned?

Mar.

Foole thou seest I am yet aliue.

Rob.

Why be they deade that be drownd, I had Page  [unnumbered] thought they had beene with the fish, and so by chance beene caught vp with them in a Nette againe. It were a shame a little cold water should kill a man of reason, when you shall see a poore Mynow lie in it, that hath no vnderstanding.

Mar.

Thou art wise from the crowne of thy heade vpwards; seeke you new fortunes nowe, I will followe mine olde. I can shift the Moone and the Sunne, and know by one Carde, what all you cannot do by a whole payre. The Lode-stone that alwaies holdeth his nose to the North, the two and thirty poynts for the winde, the wonders I see woulde make all you blinde: you be but boyes, I feare the Sea no more then a dish of water. Why fooles it is but a liquid element, farewell.

Rob.

It were good wee learned his cunning at the Cardes, for we must liue by cosenage, we haue neyther Lands nor wit, nor Maisters, nor honestie.

Rafe

Nay I would faine haue his thirty two, that is, his three dozen lacking foure points, for you see be∣twixt vs three there is not two good points.

Dicke

Let vs call him a little backe that wee may learne those points. Sirra a word, I pray thee shewe vs thy points.

Mar.

Will you learne?

Dicke.

I.

Mar.

Then as you like this I will instruct you in all our secretes: for there is not a clowte nor carde, nor boord, nor post, that hath not a speciall name, or singu∣ler nature.

Dicke

Well begin with your points, for I lacke on∣lie points in this world.

Mar.

North. North & by East. North North East. North-east and by North, North-east. North-east and by East. East North-east, East and by North. East.

Dicke

Ile say it, North, north-east, North-east, Nore → Page  [unnumbered]nore → and by Nore-east. I shall neuer doe it.

Mar.

Thys is but one quarter.

Rob.

I shall neuer learne a quarter of it. I will try. North, North-east, is by the West side, North and by North.

Dicke

Passing ill.

Mar.

Hast thou no memorie. Try thou.

Rafe

North North and by North. I can goe no fur∣ther.

Mar.

O dullerde, is thy head lighter then the wind, and thy tongue so heauie it will not wagge. I will once againe say it.

Rafe

I will neuer learne this language, it wil get but small liuing, when it will scarce be learned till one bee olde.

Mar.

Nay then farewell, and if your fortunes ex∣ceede not your wits, you shall starue before ye sleepe.

Rafe

Was there euer such cosening? Come let vs to the woods, and see what fortune we may haue be∣fore they be made shippes: as for our Maister hee is drownd.

Dicke

I will this way.

Robin

I this.

Rafe

I this, & this day twelue-month let vs all meete heere againe: it may be we shall eyther beg together, or hang together.

Dicke

It skils not so we be together. But let vs sing now, though we cry heereafter.

Exeunt.

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