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Author: Gascoigne, George, 1542?-1577.
Title: A hundreth sundrie flowres bounde vp in one small poesie Gathered partely (by translation) in the fyne outlandish gardins of Euripides, Ouid, Petrarke, Ariosto, and others: and partly by inuention, out of our owne fruitefull orchardes in Englande: yelding sundrie svveete sauours of tragical, comical, and morall discourses ...
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Print source: A hundreth sundrie flowres bounde vp in one small poesie Gathered partely (by translation) in the fyne outlandish gardins of Euripides, Ouid, Petrarke, Ariosto, and others: and partly by inuention, out of our owne fruitefull orchardes in Englande: yelding sundrie svveete sauours of tragical, comical, and morall discourses ...
Gascoigne, George, 1542?-1577.

At London: Imprinted [by Henrie Bynneman [and Henry Middleton]] for Richarde Smith, [1573]
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A01513.0001.001
How to cite: For suggestions on citing this text, please see Citing the TCP on the Text Creation Partnership website.

Contents
poems
Gascoignes deuise of a maske for the right honorable Viscount Mountacute, written (as I haue heard Master Gascoigne himselfe declare) vpon this occasion, when the sayde L. had prepaed to solemnise two mariages be∣twene his sonne and heire and the daughter of sir William Domer knighte, and betwene the sonne and heire of sir William Dormer, and the daughter of the saide L. Mountacute: there were eighte gentlemen (all of bloud or ai∣ance to the saide L. Mountacute) which had determined to present a maske at the day appoynted for the sayd mariages, and so farre they had proceeded ther∣in, that they had alredy bought furniture of silks. &c. and had caused their gar∣ments to be cut of the Venetian fashion. Newe then they began to imagin that (without some speciall demonstraciō) it would seeme somewhat obscure to haue Venetians presented rather than other countrey men. Wherevpon hey entreated Master Gascoigne to deuie some verses to be vttered by an Actor wherein mighte be some discourse conuenient to render a good cause of the Veetians presence. Master Gascoigne calling to minde that there is a noble house of the Mountactes in Italie, and therewithall that the L. Mountacute here doth quarter the cote of an anciēt english gentlemā called Mounthrme, and ath the inheritance of the sayde house, did therevppon deuise to bring in Boy of the age of twelue or xiiij. yeres, who shoulde fayne that he was a Mounthermer by the fathers side, and a Moutacute by the mothers side, and that his father being slayne at the last warres against the Tuke, and he there taken, he was recoueed by the Venetians to their last victorie, and with them sayling towardes Venice, they were driuen by tempest vppon these coasts, and so came to the mariage vppon report as followeth, and the said Boy pronoun∣ced the deuise in this orte.