Ioannis Palsgraui Londoniensis, ecphrasis Anglica in comoediam Acolasti The comedye of Acolastus translated into oure englysshe tongue, after suche maner as chylderne are taught in the grammer schole, fyrst worde for worde, as the latyne lyeth, and afterwarde accordynge to the sence and meanyng of the latin sentences ... with admonitions set forth in the margyn ... and afore the second sceane of the fyrst acte, is a brefe introductory to haue some general knowledge of the duyers sortes of meters vsed of our auctour in this comedy. And afore Acolastus balade is shewed of what kyndes of meters his balade is made of. And afore the syxte sceane of the fourthe acte, is a monition of the rhetorycall composytion vsed in that sceane ... Interpreted by Iohn Palsgraue.
Gnaphaeus, Gulielmus, 1493-1568., Palsgrave, John, d. 1554.

¶ Of the thyrde Acte, the thyrde Sceane.
  • EVBVLVS,
  • PELARGVS.
Versus Iambici Octonarij.

EVB.

I will go for to se what of thinges Pelargus may beare. i. what thing Pelargus is a doing, by * what couenant. i. in what wise or vnder what maner he may bere. i. he takith the absēce of his sonne, whom he loueth tenderlye, and paraduenture he bewayleth him now forsaken. i. he taketh it heuyly, that he hath put him away from him. For why he brought him vp or fostred by his moste great labour: and afterwarde he cared hym onely. i. he had an eye or regarde to him chiefly or principally hoping the plesure to be in time to come stedy. i. trustyng that the pleasure shulde in tyme to come be stedfast, whiche he shulde take of his presence. i. of his beinge with him in companye, or in his company, I beleue (wel inough) as it is the witte * of the father. i. as it is the fathers condicion, or as a fathers hart serueth him (towardes his sonne) him now to be carefull. i. that he is nowe full of care vpon 〈◊〉. for the helthe or welthe of his childe. I go (now) to se that. i. this thing, whether he moder or measure his cares to to moche carefull. i. whether he take his pas∣synge great heuynes wysely, and temper or gouerne his affections, which thing dothe become a very wyse Page  [unnumbered] man (to do.)

PE.

I lerne by my selfe how moch the care of the father is toward his sonne, being absent, or be∣ing away from hym, bycause my sonne is now lately put away from me, my mind can not abide or suffer to * be in rest or quiet, but that he diligētly hanteth before myn eies, & before my mynde. i. but that he cōtinually or styl is present or hanteth or walketh to & fro, before myn eies, & in my mynd (by reason of my moche thyn∣kyng vpō hym) I take care or thought for hym being absent, not otherwyse. i. none otherwyse, or no lesse than I cared for hym, or tendered hym lately beinge present. Howe fayne wolde I Eubulus, to be gyuen (to me). i. howe fayue wolde I (nowe) mete with Eu∣bulus? with whome it is a pleasure (to me) to make mention, or to speake of my sonne being absent, but lo hym (here) he commeth to me in the selfe tyme. i. in the best tyme that can be. Eubulus, all hayle moche. i. god sende the well to fare.

EVBVLVS.

O my Pe∣largus, I sawe not or spied not the before, yf thou be well at ease, or in good helthe, it is well, or all is well, for I went. i. I was commynge to the warde, for this grace. i. for this intent, by whiche. i. to the intent that I myght lerne howe thy mynde myghte fare. i. howe thou arte quieted in thy mynde.

PELAR.

All cares com togyther to me. i. I am wrapped in care on euery syde.

EV.

In whom?. i. towardes whom, or to whom warde?

PEL.

Towardes whome myghtest thou sup∣pose, but towardes my sonne?

EVB.

Haste thou hard of hym. i. haste thou herde any tydynges of hym that * to vs so sone. i. that thou comeit towardes vs so short¦ly?

PEL.

Nothynge at all, but I meruayle me howe he may fare.

EVB.

Surely, well I hope.

PEL.

Wold Page  [unnumbered] to god (he dyd so.)

EVB.

What thynge is it that trou∣bleth * the thus. i. bringeth the into care?

PE.

My sonne.

EVB.

Minishe truly this wicked care. i. lesson or make lesse hardely, or a goddis name, this obstinate or selfe wylled care of thyne.

PEL.

I can not Eubulus, he is my sonne.

EVB.

That he be. i. put case he be so, or sup∣pose he be, or what though he be so, wherto belongeth it to torment the. i. to what intente or effecte auayleth it to take on with thy self (thus?)

PEL.

To me so is vse. i. suche is my custome, or it is nedefull or expediente for me to do thus.

EVB.

If this thyng be certayn vn∣to the so to do, I wyl go my way. i. if thou be fully de∣termined, or if it be fully decreed with the thus to do, I will departe hens.

PEL.

Rather than I wold want the. i. rather than I wolde wante thy presence or com∣pany, what so euer thou shalt or wylt commande me, * I wyll do it.

EVB.

Fyrst and formost, whiche thynge I wote (well) shall be sene. i. shal seme to the harde (to be doone) beware thou be not to moche carefull, syns that by this meanes, thou shalt make the estate of thy sonne by nothynge the better. i. seinge that thy sonne shall be in neuer the better condicion therfore, but ra∣ther * leaue hym holely to the destenies to be cared for, a. let god alone with him, or leaue him holly vnto the ordinaunce or disposition of god, to be cured. From the care or tuition of which destenies. i. disposition of god, he hath in no maner of wyse fallen awaye. i. he is in no maner condicion expelled or put abacke or a∣way from. nor here not the Epicures. i. nor gyue noo credence to those sort of philosophers, whyche stryue the goddes nothynge to care mortall thynges. i. whi∣che by great contention of wordes defende, that the Page  [unnumbered] goddes do nothynge care or haue no regarde to mor∣tall mens matters. Better Homere. i. Homeres sen∣tence * is better, which sens he knoweth not, or hath no knowledge of fortune, a wanderer. i. syns he can not skyll, or is not acquayuted with fortune, seynge that she is but a wandrer, that strayeth from place to place lyke a vacabunde. i. dothe nothyng stedyly or certain∣ly, putteth all thynges in truste, to the onely decree of the wyl of god, to be gouerned. i. cōmitteth al thingis to the gouernāce or dispositiō of goddis plesure. thou hast intreted or handled thy sonne, while the tyme dyd beare. i. whyle the tyme serued or required, or was con¦uenit, as it did becom a father, now he is sent away. i. now thou hast sent him away or put him away (from the) beare it (paciētly) or be cōtent therwith, thou shalt do ynough for thine office. i. thou shalte acquyte thy selfe sufficiently for thy part, if thy mynde stande styll equalle to thy sonne warde. i. yf thy mynde contynue styll after one, towardes thy sonne, of whom what so euer is sene to the godlye power. i. of whome what so euer shall seme to goddis pleasure, to decree or deter∣myne, it shuld mowe be to be praysed, or it were to be * cōmended with eche thombe, or with bothe the thom∣bes. i. it ought to be accepted, and to be most thanke∣fully, or with most hygh fauor receyued. This adage taketh his begynnynge vpon a common maner vsed * of the Romayns, which whan they fauored a matter or a persone, they vsed to declare it by thrustynge of their thombe downe within their fyst, and whan they liked not, they closed theyr fingars togither, and held vp theyr thombe: but whan they wolde declare that they dyd moste hyghly fauour a matter or a persone, Page  [unnumbered] they wold close both their thōbes within theyr fystes, * lyke as ye citysens of Lōdon in token of fauor, lyft vp both their handes at the chosyng of theyr hed officers at their yeld hall. Who euer hath foughtē with ye god∣dis * deuoutly, or luckily. i. who did euer striue or take {per}tie agaynst the goddis, but he came to a mischief (re∣corde the Tyranes gyauntes) whiche made warre a∣gaynst Jupiter, and he destroyd them with his lyght∣nyng: or what deuout man, or well fortuned dyd euer yet stryue ageynst the pleasure of god, other in weale * or in woo, surely thou shalt not be voyde of the crime of the hatred or dispisyng of god. i. surely thou shalt not be vtterly or quite clere of the offence of hatred to god warde, if thou extende thy carefulnes aboue that * whiche is lefull before god. i. if thou be fuller of care than is leful for the before god, or in the syght of god, * syns that god hath the issue of the thynge, that is to come in his of one hande. i. sens that god hath the fy∣nalle ende or conclusyon of the thynges, that be to come, in his onely hande (to dyspose them at his ple∣sure.) Why here fearest thou so moch wretche. i. wher∣to arte thou so moche afrayde in this case (sory man that thou arte) woldest thou through thy mystrusting make god giltie or faultie of a lye. i. make god a lyar? whiche sayth hym to take the care of vs. i. which she∣weth, that he taketh the cure of vs (vpon hym) whi∣che also holdeth in a noumbred. i. in a somme, all the * heares of our heed. i. whiche hath noumbred (as the thinge that he dothe regarde, and hath taken the tui∣tion of) all the heares of our heed. Loke nowe whom thou makest thy selfe, loke in to what inconuenience * thou bringest thy self, that thou mayst on the contra∣rye Page  [unnumbered] syde make or shape an aunswere vnto god. doeste * thou enuy to him the monarchye of the thing mortal?. i. enuiest thou at him that he hathe the soole or onely gouernaunce of the thinges transytory? I beseche the goddis that they may gyue the mynde to the. i. I be∣seche god to sette the, or put the in thy ryghte mynde.

PEL.

Surely thou dost constrayne me to go in to thy sentence. i. to be of the mynde thou arte, or to thynke thy reson good, or to thynke as thou thinkest: I shal do. i. so demene me, that herafter I may be more quiet (of mynde) in the meane whyle or season, the callyng to remembrance of my sonne shall be swete (to me.) I * am a man Eubulus, nothyng of mannyshe thyng is straunge vnto me. i. there is nothynge that belongeth to man, whiche (I thynke strange to me) for (my part is in it.)

EVBVL.

I beseche the loke, that from hens forthe thou pursewe not thy sonne, with a foolysshe affection. i. mynde or fantasye thou bearest towardes hym, whiche (thy pursuyng by continuall thinkynge vppon hym) thou mayste thinke to be a zeale. i. a ten∣der loue dewe vnto him. i. whiche thou doest owe vn∣to hym, syns (I wylle not, that thou erre or go besy∣des * the ryght way) euyll affections. i. inclinations of the mynd (beyng errours out of the way) be (oftenty∣mes commended). i. approued or allowed (in mennes fantasyes) vnder the spice. i. similytude or lykenes of * ryght. i. of the thynge that is good in dede, of whens. i. of which mysiudgyng thou canst loke for nothing but for noysome or hurtfull deceyte or beguyling, but what sayd thy sonne last of all?

PEL.

With two wor∣des * he commaunded me the longe farewell. i. in fewe wordes, he badde me farewell a great whyle. i. for a Page  [unnumbered] great whyle.

EVB.

What more?

PEL.

Nothynge.

EVB.

Went he not away heuye. i. was he not sorye or heuy, whan he went his way?

PEL.

Nay mary glad. 〈◊〉. * nay mary he was gladde Eubulus, from hens. i. vp∣pon this occasion, he whiche was so colde towardes his father, did shake out teares to me. i. made the tea∣resstande in myne eyes, or made the teares rounne downe by my chekes, or made me wepe (for sorowe.)

EVB.

It is thus ordeyned by nature, that we do lesse regarde vertue being present. i. when vertue or good∣nes is present (byfore our eyes) we do litel regarde it, but whan it is taken away or remoued from our eies, than anone, or shortely after, we enuious. i. desyrous therof do seke (therfore) whiche thyng thy sonne lesse seeth. i. consydereth but a littell by youth. i. by rayson of his youthe or yong age, and he counselleth lytell. i. he lyttell regardeth, or pondereth it but smally by due consyderation, age shall amende that thynge. i. rype age shall amende or correcte (that faulte) whan he a foole shall sauour yll beinge taken. i. after that he be∣inge but yet a foole, shall afterwardes waxe wyser, whan he shal haue felt or suffred aduersite or trouble. What helthe maye gyue of commoditie to the sycke man, he afterwarde shall perceyue or vnderstande, (whan he hath recouered his helth ageyne) nowe him repenteth of him selfe. i. he is now penitent or repent∣full of him self, or for his misdedes, he coueted to sore or to to very moch to be free. i. to be set at his lybertie, but what he may erre herein. i. but what errour or in∣conuenence he may fall into (by reason of his settyng at large) hereafter he shall fele. i. perceyue it, whan he whose shyppe is gone to wracke, shall lce for succour Page  [unnumbered] to the, as it were into a sure hauen, that which to com hereafter I gesse. i. the whiche thynge I gesse or pro∣phecye shall betyde hereafter.

PELARGVS.

Hawe * my Eubulus, I feare frome thy sothesayenge. i. I feare me of thy sothesayenges, (that it shall not come to good passe) or I feare me, that thy sothesayinge meaneth no good lucke.

EVB.

There is nothing that thou mayst feare. i. thou hast no cause at all to feare, if this thyng do happen or chance, or in case this thynge * come thus to passe, let there be a place of mercy. i. loke thou be mercyfull, or loke thou haue or take mercye with the, whan the tyme shal come.

PELAR.

The vse shall not come. i. it shall not come so to passe I hope, or I hope, I shal haue none experience or profe here∣of.

EVB.

And I also by the god Hercules hope the same, nor I say it not to that intente, or bycause that I haue felte hym to haue gyuen any thynge of ylle, 〈◊〉. bycause I haue perceyued that he hath doone any maner harme or hurt (to any body) but if any thynge * or not any thyng. i. but whether he haue or not, or whi ther it be so or not so, or be as be maye (for I take not vpon me to iudge, or to saye the thynge I knowe not) * what his age is thou perfitly or throughly seest in the warst thyng it is a folower. i. his age is gyuen or en∣clyned to folowe or imitate the worste thyng (that can be) and he hangeth forwarde. i. he hath an aptenes or is inclyued to yll with his hole breaste. i. with all his hart and mynde (and that nowe) most chiefly or most of all while he is lefte to his owne counsels. i. whyle he is suffered to ronne on the brydell, or to do what he liste, withoute any restraynt: for why what is worthe in him that whiche is best. i. how moch is the best na∣turall Page  [unnumbered] gyft worth that is in him (as who say nothing) * that hurtful or noysom yll which dyd leese. i. dyd cast away our first formed or shaped fathers. i. parētes, A∣dam & Eue (which by their disobedience had lost their former perfections) hath also defiled or corrupted the mynde of this (yonge man) wherby he can not, not to be prouoked or entyced. i. he canne not chose, but be styrred vnto ylle lustes or desyres, whiche also for the counsayle of Philautus. i. accordynge to the aduyse of Philautus, he muste nedes studye to execute. i. go about to put them in execution, onelesse that a cor∣rectour or an amender by good aduyse or counsaylle gyuynge, be by present, or redy at hande, which may calle. i. prouoke or styre this (yonge man) vnto better (dedes or doinges.) But if thou knowe not (who that correctour or redresser may be) that same moste beste redresser or reformer 〈◊〉 God, whose hande gouerneth or ruleth all thynges, and in whome, that I may say it summarilye. i. that I maye say or conclude the hole * matter in fewe wordes, we all lyue, we all moue, & we be. i. & haue our being, syns he alone is the disposer or orderer of al thynges, at his wyl and pleasure. PEL. I beleue Eubulus all these thynges to be spoken (of * the) after the oratours facion, as well truly as ernest∣ly. i. I beleue that thou haste spoken al these thynges here in this open audience very eloquently, and that as well accordyng to the truth, as after an ernest ma∣ner. * whiche thyng men beare. i. men reporte or tell of Pericles. i. which gyft men say was gyuen to the ora∣tour Pericles, for (perswasion sytteth in thy lyppes) * i. what so euer oration passeth throughe thy lyppes, it is able to perswade the audience. i. to cause them to Page  [unnumbered] gyue cr〈…〉ence therevnto, or to thy sayenges. i. the gospell is in thy mouthe. And howe excellent an ora∣tour * this Pericles was, may appere by Archidamas the Lacedemonien capitayne, which beyng demaun∣ded, whether he was more valyant than Pericles, he made answere, Though Pericles be ouercome by me in batayle, yet is he of so great eloquence, that whā he reasoneth with me of the affayres betwene vs, he se∣meth not to be ouercome, but that he hath got the vic∣tory, * and ouer come me. Surely, I wolde coueyte. i. I wolde fayne put away in the hole. i. vtterly or holly the care of my sonne beinge in exyle or banysshed. i. so it lay in my power, or so I myght.

EVB.

To hym that trusteth, the thynges hoped succede. i. to hym that ho∣pethe (welle) the thinges, whiche he hopeth for, take theyr effecte, or come to passe. i. hope welle, and haue well. But wylt thou me nothyng other. i. wilte thou * nothynge elles with me, or wilt thou commaunde me no more seruice?

PELAR.

That thou mayst torne in * to vs. i. I will that thou turne in to my howse.

EVB.

Syns thou wylte this thyng, be it. i. syns this is thy wyll, I am content, I wyll not any commoditie to be shutte to the in me. i. I wolde be lothe, that thou shul∣dest want any pleasure or seruyce, that may lye in me to do for the.