The first set of English madrigals to foure voices: newly composed by Iohn Farmer, practicioner in the art of musicque.
Farmer, John, fl. 1591-1601.
Page  [unnumbered]Page  [unnumbered]

CANTVS. THE FIRST SET OF ENGLISH MADRIGALS: TO Foure Voices: Newly composed by IOHN FAR∣MER, practicioner in the art of Musicque.

Printed at London in Little Saint Helens by William Barley, the Assigne of Thomas Morley, and are to be solde at his shoppe in Gratious-streete, Anno Dom. 1599.

Cum Priuilegio ad imprimendum solum.

Page  [unnumbered]

[illustration]
VERO NIHIL VERIVS

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To the right Honorable my very good Lord and Ma∣ster, EDWARD DEVERE Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbeck, Lord of Escales and Badlesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of Eng∣land, IOHN FARMER wisheth long life, health and happinesse with encrease of honour.

MOst Honorable Lord, it commeth not within the compasse of my power to expresse all the duty I owe, nor to pay the least part: so farre haue your Honorable fauours outstripped all meanes to manifest my humble affection, that there is nothinge left but praying and wondering. There is a canker worme that breedeth in manie mindes, feeding onelie vppon forgetfulnes, and bringing forth no birth but ingratitude: to shew that I haue not beene bitten with that monster, for wormes prooue monsters in this age, which yet neuer any Painter could counterfait to expresse the vglines, nor any Poet describe to decipher the highth of their ilnes: I haue presumed to tender these Madrigales onlie as remembrances of my seruice and witnesses of your Lordships liberall hand, by which I haue so long liued, and from your Honorable minde that so much haue loued all liberall Sciences: in this I shall be most encouraged, if your Lordship vouchsafe the protection of my first fruites, for that both for your greatnes you best can, and for your iudgement in Mu∣sicke best may: for without flattrie be it spokē, those that know your Lordship know this, that vsing this science as a recreation, your Lordship haue ouergone most of them that make it a profession. Right Honorable Lord, I hope it shall not be distastfull to number you heere a∣mongst the fauourers of Musicke, and the practisers, no more then Kings and Em∣perours that haue beene desirous to be in the roll of Astronomers, that being but a starre faire, the other an Angels Quire. Thus most humbly sub∣mitting my selfe, my labours, and what euer is or may bee in me, to your Lordships censure & protection: I humbly end wishing your Lordship as continuall an increasing of health and honor, as there is a daylie en∣crease of vertue, to come to happines.

Your Honors most dutifull seruant to command IOHN FARMER.

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To the Reader.

THe present age beeing so bewtified with excellent Poets and adorned with rare Musitions, amongst whome some by publike writings make an eliphant of a mouse: other by strange Paradoxes striue to attaine preheminence: I haue thought good amongst the rest, being as vertuously am∣bitious as any, to expose my selfe to the world, cloathing my infant in humility, not ostentation, striuing so farre to auoyde a peremptory opinion of mine owne witte, as I take it▪ n honor for mee to ascribe the little I deserue rather to the master that taught mee, then mine owne diligence that formed and fashioned my Muses: onely this I protest for my selfe, that I haue studied so much as in me lieth to obserue a true decorum, which protestation I shall suppose for an indecorum also before it be ra∣tified by your allowance and fauors. Yet in these my Madrigales I beseech you esteeme this, that I haue not enforced the one to the other, but so fitly haue I linkt my Musicke to number, as each giue to other their true effect, which is to mooue delight, which delight, as Socrates witnesseth in Platoes Philebo, is the daughter of Harmony. This vertue beeing so singular in the Italians, as onely vnder that ensigne they hazard their honor: I could aduise the studious in Mu∣sicke so to imploy themselues, that they might seeme to be rightly borne vnder the sweete aspect of Venus, which, as the Astronomers witnesse, is the Domi∣natrix in Musitians natiuities: it is the onely grace in a Musitian to follow this course, so to fitte both note and number as if like Twinnes of one mother, they may seeme to be all one which yeeldeth great abundance of variety. To con∣clude, I so much loue perfect harmony, as I earnestly entreate all the professed in Musicke to fly discord amongst themselues: though in composing of songes, it may be well taken, beseeching them so farre to fly selfe-opinion also, that ay∣ming all of them at their Countries honor, not their owne glory, they may by this meanes and in this manner outstrip any straunger, and make England as fa∣mous in Musitions, as it is and hath beene for soldiers: so leauing my labors to your fauourable iudgement, to keepe secret what may be amisse. I take heartie leaue.

A friend to all louers and Professors of Musicke Iohn Farmer.

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I.

〈♫〉 YOu prety flowers that smile for sōmers sake, pul in your 〈♫〉 heads before my watry eies doe turne doe turne the medowes to a standing 〈♫〉 lake, by whose vntimely floods your glo- ry dies, for loe my heart re- 〈♫〉 solude to moistning aire feeding mine eies ij which doubles 〈♫〉 teare for teare, which ij which doubles teare for teare, for lo my hart re- 〈♫〉 solude to moistning aire, feeding mine eies ij w̄ doubles tear for teare 〈♫〉 which ij which doubles teare for teare.

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II.

〈♫〉 NOw each creature ioyes the other, now ij each creature 〈♫〉 ioyes the other: passing happy daies and howers: one bird reports vnto an- 〈♫〉 o- ther re- ij reports vnto another, re- ij 〈♫〉 by the fall of sil- uer showers, whilst the earth our common mother, 〈♫〉 hath her bosome deckt with flowers: one bird reports vn- to an- o- ther re- 〈♫〉 ij reports vnto another re- ij by the fall of sil- uer 〈♫〉 shewers, whilst the earth our common mother, hath her bosome deckt with 〈♫〉 flowers.

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III.

〈♫〉 YOu'le neuer leaue still tossing to and fro still ij you'le 〈♫〉 neuer leaue still tossing to & fro, still ij til at the last you catch a 〈♫〉 fal: for waue- ring minds, for waue- ring 〈♫〉 minds doth alwaies harbor woe, doth ij loosing true frendship, loo- 〈♫〉 sing true friēdship, loue & all: be constant then and thou shalt find it best, to 〈♫〉 scorne the world, in hope to liue at rest, to ij to liue at 〈♫〉 rest, to scorne the world in hope to liue at rest. 〈♫〉

Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 LAdy my flame still burning, Lady ij and my con- 〈♫〉 suming anguish doth grow so great, doth ij that life I feele to lan- guish, oh 〈♫〉 let your hart be moued, oh ij to end your grief, to end your grief & 〈♫〉 mine so long time proued, and quencht the heate that my chiefe part so fireth 〈♫〉 and ij that my chiefe part so fireth, yeelding the fruite that 〈♫〉 faithfull loue requi- reth, yeelding the fruite that faithful loue requi- 〈♫〉 reth and quench the heate that my chiefe part so fireth, and ij 〈♫〉 that my chiefe part so fireth, yeelding the fruite that Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 faithfull loue requi- reth, yeelding the fruite that faithfull loue re- qui- 〈♫〉 reth.

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V.

The second part.

〈♫〉 Swete Lord your flame, your flame stil bur- 〈♫〉 ning, & your cōtinuall anguish, cā not be more thē mine in w̄ I lan- guish 〈♫〉 cannot be more thē mine in w̄ I languish, nor more your hart is mou- 〈♫〉 ed, to end my griefe my griefe and yours so long time proued: but if I 〈♫〉 yeeld, & so your flame decreaseth, but ij I thē 〈♫〉 lose my life, I ij I thē lose my life, I ij & so our loue cea- 〈♫〉 eth: but if I yeld & so your flā decreseth, but ij I thē 〈♫〉 lose my life, I ij I ij I ij and so our loue ceas- eth.

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VI.

〈♫〉 SOone as the hungry Li- on seekes his pray, soone ij 〈♫〉 in so- li-ta-ry rāg, in ij of pathles moūtains 〈♫〉 of ij soon as the passinger sets on his way, sets ij so 〈♫〉 soon as beasts resort, so soone as beasts resort, so soone as beasts re- 〈♫〉 sort vn- to the fountaines, so soone, so soone mine eies their of- fice are dis- 〈♫〉 charging, & I my griefs my griefs, my griefs with greater griefs inlarging, so soon 〈♫〉 so soone mine eies their of- fice are dis- charging, and I my griefes my 〈♫〉 griefes my griefes with greater griefes inlarg- ing.

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VII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 O Stay swete loue, O ij O ij O stay swet loue see 〈♫〉 here the place of sporting, see ij of sporting of ij of sporting of 〈♫〉 ij of ij these gen- tle flowers smiles swete- ly to in- uite vs, and 〈♫〉 chirping chirping birds, ij are hitherwards resorting, warbling swete 〈♫〉 notes, war-bling ij only to delight vs, then stay deare loue, then ij then 〈♫〉 ij then stay deare loue, for though thou run from me, from me, for ij 〈♫〉 for though thou runne from me, for ij run neere so fast ij 〈♫〉 run neere so fast, yet I will follow thee, yet ij yet I will follow Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 thee yet ij then stay deere loue, then ij then ij then ij 〈♫〉 for though thou run from me, from me, for ij for ij 〈♫〉 for though thou run from me, run nere so fast ij run nere so fast, 〈♫〉 yet I will fol-low thee yet ij yet I will follow thee yet I will follow thee.

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VIII.

The second part.

〈♫〉 I Thought my loue that I should ouertake you, sweete hart sit downe sit 〈♫〉 downe vnder this shadowed tree, and I will promise ne-uer to forsake you, 〈♫〉 so you will graunt to me a lo- uers fee, whereat shee smild, whereat shee 〈♫〉 smild, and kindly to me saied, I ne-uer meant to liue and dye a maide, 〈♫〉 whereat shee smild, whereat shee smild, and kindly to me saide, I ne-uer meant 〈♫〉 to liue and dye a maide.

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IX.

〈♫〉 COm-paire me to the child that playes with fire with fire ij 〈♫〉 ij with fire, or to the flye the flye that di- eth in the 〈♫〉 flame, or to the foolish boy the foo- lish boy that did aspire that ij 〈♫〉 aspire to touch the glorie of high heauens frame, no man to these me 〈♫〉 fit- ly can compare, these liue to dye these ij these liue to dye I dye 〈♫〉 ij I dye ij I dye to liue in care, no man to these me 〈♫〉 fit-ly can compare, these liue to dye, these ij these liue to dye, I dye 〈♫〉 ij I dye ij I dye to liue in care.

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X.

〈♫〉 WHo would haue thought that face of thine had beene so 〈♫〉 full ij of doublenes, ij or that within those christall 〈♫〉 eyne ij had been so much ij ij vnstable- 〈♫〉 nes: thy face so faire ij thy looke so strāg ij thy look so strāg, thy 〈♫〉 look so strange, who would haue thought of such a change? ij 〈♫〉 who would haue thought of such a change?

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XI. For the loue of his most deare friend EDMVND KEATE.

〈♫〉 Sweete friend thy absence greeues my bleeding hart, thy ij 〈♫〉 yet doe I ioye yet ij yet doe I ioye I ioye I ioye yet doe I 〈♫〉 ioye I ioye I ioye to heare of thy good health: ah Woe is me ah ij that 〈♫〉 now I shall depart from thee, more deere to me then Cressus wealth, but if on 〈♫〉 earth I may not see thy face, but ij Ile fly to heauen, 〈♫〉 Ile ij Ile fly Ile fly to heauen to heauen, Ile fly Ile fly to heauen, 〈♫〉 Ile fly to heauen, to seeke thee in that place, to seeke thee in that place.

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XII.

〈♫〉 THe flattring words, sharpe glosses that men vse, ij 〈♫〉 to trap poor sil- ly womē in their snares, to trap poore sil- ly womē in their 〈♫〉 snares: with fai- ned lookes their gen- tle sex abuse, their ij 〈♫〉 which yeelds nought else but griefe and endlesse cares, and end- lesse 〈♫〉 cares: sometimes they smile and sometimes frowne, but ne- uer pleasde in 〈♫〉 deede, till time till time and place till time and place, where they may watch 〈♫〉 their sorrowes their sorrows their sorrows for to breed, sometimes they smile 〈♫〉 and sometimes frowne, but ne- uer pleasde indeede, till time till time and Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 place, till time and place, where they may watch their sorrowes, their sor- 〈♫〉 rowes their sorrowes for to breede.

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XIII.

〈♫〉 CEase now thy mourning & thy sad lamēting, ij for 〈♫〉 faire Auroraes louely face doth light thee: thy mistresse heart is now vp- 〈♫〉 pon relenting: vowing henceforth ne- uer more to spight thee: then 〈♫〉 harbour not those thoughts ij that stil may grieue thee, ij 〈♫〉 since that thy mistresse sweares she wil releeue thee ij since 〈♫〉 that thy mistresse sweares shee will releeue thee.

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XIIII.

〈♫〉 A Lit- tle prety bony lasse was walking in midst of May, be- 〈♫〉 fore the Sū gā rise: a little prety bony las was walking in midst of May before the 〈♫〉 Sun gan rise: I tooke her by the hand, I ij and fell to talking 〈♫〉 of this and that of ij of ij as best I could de- uise, 〈♫〉 I swore I would, yet still shee saide I should not, yet ij doe what I 〈♫〉 would ij & yet for all I could not, ij I swore I wold 〈♫〉 yet still shee saide I shoud not yet ij doe what I would, ij 〈♫〉 and yet for all I could not, and yet for all I could not.

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XV.

〈♫〉 FAire Phyllis I saw sitting all alone feeding her flocke neere to the 〈♫〉 mountaine side, faire Phyllis I saw sit- ting all alone feeding her flocke neere 〈♫〉 to the mountaine side: the shepheards knewe not they knewe not 〈♫〉 whither shee was gone, but after her lo-uer, her louer, but after her louer 〈♫〉 Amyn- tas hied vp and downe hee wandred vp ij vp ij 〈♫〉 vp and down hee wandred, vp and down hee wandred, whilst 〈♫〉 shee was missing, whē he found her, oh thē they fell a kissing a kissing, oh 〈♫〉 then they fell a kissing, vp & down he wandred, vp ij Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 vp ij vp ij vp and downe hee wan- dred 〈♫〉 whilst she was missing, when he found her, oh then they fell a kissing a 〈♫〉 kissing, oh then they fell a kissing.

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XVI.

〈♫〉 TAke time while time doth last take 〈♫〉 time while time doth last take time while time doth last, marke 〈♫〉 how faire fa- deth fast, marke how faire fa- deth fast: beware 〈♫〉 beware if en - uy raigne, beware ij take heede of proude dis- 〈♫〉 daine take heede of proud of proud disdaine hold fast now 〈♫〉 in thy youth now in thy youth, hold fast now in thy youth, 〈♫〉 hold fast hold fast hold fast now in thy youth ij now ij 〈♫〉 now ij re- gard re- Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 gard regard thy vow- ed truth, least when thou wax- 〈♫〉 eth old least when thou wax-eth old thou ij least when thou 〈♫〉 wax-eth old friends fayle friends faile and loue growe 〈♫〉 cold, and loue growe cold, and loue grow cold.

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XVII.

Of 8. voyces. SECVNDVS BASSVS.

〈♫〉 YOw blessed &c. shaddow the sunne-shine from my mistresse 〈♫〉 face, and you sweete roses on-ly for her bedding, when weary shee doth 〈♫〉 take her resting place, when wea-ry shee doth take her rest- ing place, you 〈♫〉 faire white lil-lies, and pretty pretty flowers all, giue your attendaunce at 〈♫〉 my mistresse call, giue your attendaunce at my mi- stris call my misttesse 〈♫〉 call, giue your attendaunce at my mi-stresse call, you faire white lil-lies, & 〈♫〉 pretty pretty flowers all giue your attendaunce giue ij at my mistresse call 〈♫〉 giue ij giue ij giue your attēdāce at my mistresse call.

Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 YOu bles- sed bowers whose greene leaues now are sprea-ding 〈♫〉 sha- dow the sunne-shine from my mistresse face, and you sweete ro-ses only 〈♫〉 for her bedding- for her bedding, when wea-ry shee doth take her resting 〈♫〉 place, giue your attendance at my mistris call, giue your attendance 〈♫〉 giue your attendance at my mistresse call giue your attendance ij 〈♫〉 at my mistresse call, giue your attendance giue your attendance 〈♫〉 at my mistresse call.

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THE TABLE.

  • YOu pretie Flowers I
  • Now each creature. II
  • You'le neuer leaue. III
  • Lady my flame. The first part. IIII
  • Swete Lord your flame. The second part. V
  • Soone as the hungrie Lion. VI
  • O stay swete loue. The first part. VII
  • I thought my loue The second part. VIII
  • Compare me to the Flie. IX
  • Who would haue thought. X
  • Swete friend thy absence. XI
  • The flattring words. XII
  • Cease now thy mourning. XIII
  • A little prety bony lasse. XIIII
  • Faire Phyllis. XV
  • Take time. XVI
  • You blessed bowres, A song of eight voyces. XVII
FINIS.
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ALTVS. THE FIRST SET OF ENGLISH MADRIGALS: TO Foure Voices: Newly composed by IOHN FAR∣MER, practicioner in the art of Musicque.

Printed at London in Little Saint Helens by William Barley, the Assigne of Thomas Morley, and are to be solde at his shoppe in Gratious-streete, Anno Dom. 1599.

Cum Priuilegio ad imprimendum solum.

Page  [unnumbered]

[illustration]
VERO NIHIL VERIVS

Page  [unnumbered]

To the right Honorable my very good Lord and Ma∣ster, EDWARD DEVERE Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbeck, Lord of Escales and Badlesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of Eng∣land, IOHN FARMER wisheth long life, health and happinesse with encrease of honour.

MOst Honorable Lord, it commeth not within the compasse of my power to expresse all the duty I owe, nor to pay the least part: so farre haue your Honorable fauours outstripped all meanes to manifest my humble affection, that there is nothinge left but praying and wondering. There is a canker worme that breedeth in manie mindes, feeding onelie vppon forgetfulnes, and bringing forth no birth but ingratitude: to shew that I haue not beene bitten with that monster, for wormes prooue monsters in this age, which yet neuer any Painter could counterfait to expresse the vglines, nor any Poet describe to decipher the highth of their ilnes: I haue presumed to tender these Madrigales onlie as remembrances of my seruice and witnesses of your Lordships liberall hand, by which I haue so long liued, and from your Honorable minde that so much haue loued all liberall Sciences: in this I shall be most encouraged, if your Lordship vouchsafe the protection of my first fruites, for that both for your greatnes you best can, and for your iudgement in Mu∣sicke best may: for without flattrie be it spokē, those that know your Lordship know this, that vsing this science as a recreation, your Lordship haue ouergone most of them that make it a profession. Right Honorable Lord, I hope it shall not be distastfull to number you heere a∣mongst the fauourers of Musicke, and the practisers, no more then Kings and Em∣perours that haue beene desirous to be in the roll of Astronomers, that being but a starre faire, the other an Angels Quire. Thus most humbly sub∣mitting my selfe, my labours, and what euer is or may bee in me, to your Lordships censure & protection: I humbly end wishing your Lordship as continuall an increasing of health and honor, as there is a daylie en∣crease of vertue, to come to happines.

Your Honors most dutifull seruant to command IOHN FARMER.

Page  [unnumbered]

To the Reader.

THe present age beeing so bewtified with excellent Poets and adorned with rare Musitions, amongst whome some by publike writings make an eliphant of a mouse: other by strange Paradoxes striue to attaine preheminence: I haue thought good amongst the rest, being as vertuously am∣bitious as any, to expose my selfe to the world, cloathing my infant in humility, not ostentation, striuing so farre to auoyde a peremptory opinion of mine owne witte, as I take it an honor for mee to ascribe the little I deserue rather to the master that taught mee, then mine owne diligence that formed and fashioned my Muses: onely this I protest for my selfe, that I haue studied so much as in me lieth to obserue a true decorum, which protestation I shall suppose for an indecorum also before it be ra∣tified by your allowance and fauors. Yet in these my Madrigales I beseech you esteeme this, that I haue not enforced the one to the other, but so fitly haue I linkt my Musicke to number, as each giue to other their true effect, which is to mooue delight, which delight, as Socrates witnesseth in Platoes Philebo, is the daughter of Harmony. This vertue beeing so singular in the Italians, as onely vnder that ensigne they hazard their honor: I could aduise the studious in Mu∣sicke so to imploy themselues, that they might seeme to be rightly borne vnder the sweete aspect of Venus, which, as the Astronomers witnesse, is the Domi∣natrix in Musitians natiuities: it is the onely grace in a Musitian to follow this course, so to fitte both note and number as if like Twinnes of one mother, they may seeme to be all one which yeeldeth great abundance of variety. To con∣clude, I so much loue perfect harmony, as I earnestly entreate all the professed in Musicke to fly discord amongst themselues: though in composing of songes, it may be well taken, beseeching them so farre to fly selfe-opinion also, that ay∣ming all of them at their Countries honor, not their owne glory, they may by this meanes and in this manner outstrip any straunger, and make England as fa∣mous in Musitions, as it is and hath beene for soldiers: so leauing my labors to your fauourable iudgement, to keepe secret what may be amisse. I take heartie leaue.

A friend to all louers and Professors of Musicke Iohn Farmer.

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I.

〈♫〉 YOu pre- ty flowers that smile for sommers sake: pull in your 〈♫〉 heads before my watry eies doe turn the medows, to a stāding lake, a ij 〈♫〉 by whose vntimely flouds your glo- ry dies: for lo my hart resolude 〈♫〉 to moistning aire feeding mine eies, feed-ij feeding mine eies which doubles 〈♫〉 teare for teare, teare ij which ij which ij 〈♫〉 for loe my heart resolude to moistning aire feeding mine eies, feed-ij 〈♫〉 feeding mine eies which doubles teare for teare, teare for teare, ij 〈♫〉 which doubles teare for teare.

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II.

The second part.

〈♫〉 NOw each creature ioyes the other, now ij now ij 〈♫〉 ioyes the othet, pas-sing happy dayes and howers, one bird reports vnto an 〈♫〉 other vn-to an o-ther, on ij reports vn-to an other by the 〈♫〉 fall re ij by the fall of siluer showers: whilst the earth our cōmon 〈♫〉 mother hath her bo-some deckt with flowers: one bird re-ports vn-to an 〈♫〉 other vn-to an other one ij reports vn-to an other by▪ the 〈♫〉 fall re ij by the fall of sil-uer showers whilst the earth our cōmon 〈♫〉 mo-ther hath her bosome deckt with flowers.

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III.

〈♫〉 Yyou'le ne-uer leaue still tossing to and fro still ij you'le 〈♫〉 neuer leaue still tossing to and fro still ij till at the last you 〈♫〉 catch a fall for waue- ring mindes doth alwayes 〈♫〉 harbour woe, ij doth ij lo-sing true friendship ij 〈♫〉 loue and all: be constant then and thou shalt finde it best 〈♫〉 to scorne the world in hope to liue at rest, in hope to liue at rest, to 〈♫〉 scorne ij to scorne the world in hope to liue at rest.

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IIII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 LAdy my flame still burning, ij still burning, and 〈♫〉 my consuming an- guish doth grow so great, doth ij that life I feele to 〈♫〉 lan-guish, oh let your hart be moued, oh ij to end your grief and 〈♫〉 mine so long time proo- ued, and quench the heate, and ij that 〈♫〉 my chiefe part so fi-reth, and quench the heat that my chiefe part, that ij 〈♫〉 part so fireth, yeelding the fruite that faithfull loue requi- reth, re- qui- 〈♫〉 reth, yeelding the fruite that faithful loue re- qui- reth, and quench the 〈♫〉 heate, and quench the heate, that my chiefe part so fireth, and ij Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 that my chiefe part so fireth, yeelding the fruit that faithfull 〈♫〉 loue requi- reth, requireth, yeelding the fruite that faithfull loue requireth.

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V.

The second part.

〈♫〉 Swete Lord your flame, your flame still burning, and your cō- 〈♫〉 tinuall anguish, cā not be more thē mine in wc I languish, can ij 〈♫〉 nor more your hart is mou- ed to end my grief, to ij 〈♫〉 to end my griefe ij and yours so long time proued: but if I yeelde, and 〈♫〉 so your flame decreas- eth, but ij deccreseth, I thē lose my 〈♫〉 life, lose ij I thē lose my life, ij and so our loue ceaseth: but if I yeeld and 〈♫〉 so your flame decreas- eth, but if I yeeld & so your flame decreseth, I thē 〈♫〉 lose my life, lose my life, I then lose my life, ij and so our loue ceaseth.

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VI.

〈♫〉 SOone as the hungry Li- on seeks his pray, soon ij 〈♫〉 in so- li- ta- ry rang, in ij of pathlesse moūtains 〈♫〉 soone as the passinger, soone ij sets on his way, so soon as beasts 〈♫〉 resorts, so soon as beasts resort, re- sort vnto the fountaines, so soone, so 〈♫〉 soone mine eies their office are discharging, and I my griefes, my griefs with 〈♫〉 greater griefs inlarg- ing: so soone, ij mine eies their of- fice are dis- 〈♫〉 charging, and I my griefes my griefes with greater griefes inlarg- ing.

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VII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 O Stay sweete loue, ij O stay O stay sweete loue, see 〈♫〉 heere the place of sporting, see ij of spor-ting, of 〈♫〉 spor-ting ij of sporting ij these gen- tle flowers smiles 〈♫〉 sweet-ly to in-uite vs, and chir-ing chir-ping birds, and ij ij are 〈♫〉 hitherwards resorting, warbling swete notes ij on-ly to de- 〈♫〉 light vs, then stay deere loue, then ij then stay deere loue, for though thou 〈♫〉 run from me, for ij from me, for though thou run from me, for 〈♫〉 ij run nere so fast run ij yet I will follow thee follow▪ Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 thee yet ij yet ij yet I will fol-low thee, then 〈♫〉 staye deere loue ij then staye dere loue for though thou run from me ij 〈♫〉 from me for though thou run from me, for ij 〈♫〉 run nere so fast run ij yet I will fol-low thee follow thee yet ij 〈♫〉 yet I will fol-low thee, yet I will follow thee.

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VIII.

The second part.

〈♫〉 I thought my loue that I should o-uertake you: sweete hart sit downe, 〈♫〉 sit downe vn-der this shadowed tree, and I will pro-mise neuer to forsake you, 〈♫〉 so you will graunt to me ij▪ a lo- uers fee, whereat shee smilde ij 〈♫〉 ij shee smilde and kindly to me said, I neuer meant to liue, 〈♫〉 to liue and dye a mayd, wherat shee smilde ij whereat shee smild shee 〈♫〉 smild and kindly to mee said, I neuer meant to. liue to. liue, and dye a mayd.

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IX.

〈♫〉 COm-paire me to the child that playes with fire that plays with 〈♫〉 fire that plays with fire with fire ij ij with fire, or 〈♫〉 to the flye, or to the flye that dieth in the flame, ij or to the 〈♫〉 foo-lish boy ij that did as-pire ij to touch the glorie of high 〈♫〉 heauens frame, no man to these me fit-ly can com-pare, no ij 〈♫〉 these liue to dye ij ij I dye ij ij ij I dye 〈♫〉 to liue in care, no mā to these me fit-ly cā cō-pare, ij these 〈♫〉 liue to dye ij ij I dye ij ij ij I dye to liue in care.

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X.

〈♫〉 WHo would haue thought who would haue thought that face of 〈♫〉 thine, who would haue thought that face of thine had been so full, had ij 〈♫〉 so full of double- nes, ij or that within those christall eyne ij 〈♫〉 had bin so much so much ij vnstablenes: thy face so faire ij 〈♫〉 thy looke so strang ij thy look so strāg, thy looke so strang, 〈♫〉 who would haue thoght of such a change? ij who would haue thoght of 〈♫〉 such a change, of such a change?

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XI. For the loue of his most deare friend EDMVND KEATE.

〈♫〉 Sweete friend thy absence greeues my bleeding hart thy ij 〈♫〉 yet doe I ioye yet ij yet ij yet doe I ioye ij I ioye I 〈♫〉 ioye, yet doe I ioye to heare of thy good health, ah ah woe is me, ah ij 〈♫〉 that now I shall depart from thee more deere to me then Cressus wealth: but 〈♫〉 if on earth I may not see thy face, ij Ile fly to heauen 〈♫〉 Ile ij Ile fly to heauen Ile ij Ile fly to heauen, ij 〈♫〉 Ile fly to heauen ij, to seeke thee in that place to seeke thee in that place.

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XII.

〈♫〉 THe flattring wordes, sharpe glosses, that men vse to 〈♫〉 trap poore sil- ly women in their snares, to trap poore sil- ly women 〈♫〉 in their snares: with fained lookes, with fained lookes their gen- tle 〈♫〉 sex abuse, which yeelds nought else but griefe and endlesse cares: but ij 〈♫〉 sometimes they smile & sometimes frown, but ne-uer pleasde in 〈♫〉 deede, till time and place, till time and place, where they may watch their 〈♫〉 sorrowes, their sorrowes, their sorrowes for to breede: sometimes they 〈♫〉 smile and sometimes frowne, but ne- uer pleasde in- deede, till Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 time and place till time and place where they may watche their sorrowes, 〈♫〉 their sorrowes their sorrowes for to breede.

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XIII.

〈♫〉 CEase now thy mourning & thy sad la- men- ting, ij 〈♫〉 for faire Au- ro- raes loue- ly face doth light thee: thy 〈♫〉 mistresse heart is now vp- pon re- len- ting, thy ij 〈♫〉 vowing henceforth ne- uer more to spight thee: then harbour not those 〈♫〉 thoughts ij that still may grieue thee, ij that still may grieue 〈♫〉 thee, since that thy mistresse sweares she will re- leeue thee, she ij 〈♫〉 since that thy mistresse sweares shee will releeue thee.

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XIIII.

〈♫〉 A Lit-tle pre-ty bony lasse was walking was walking in midst 〈♫〉 of May before the sunne gan rise, a lit-tle prety bony lasse was walking 〈♫〉 was walking in midst of May before the sun gan rise, I took her by the 〈♫〉 hand, I ij & fel to talking ij of this & that of ij 〈♫〉 of ij as best I could de- uise, I swor I would, yet stil she said I 〈♫〉 shuld not ij do what I would ij & yet for al I could not, & 〈♫〉 ij I swor I would, yet stil she said I shuld not ij 〈♫〉 do what I would, do ij & yet for all I could not and ij

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XV.

〈♫〉 FAire Phyllis &c. Feeding her flocke neere to the moūtain side, feeding 〈♫〉 her flock neere to the moūtain side: the shepheards knew not whither she was 〈♫〉 gone, but after her lo-uer, her louer, but after her louer Amyn-tas hied 〈♫〉 vp and downe vp and downe hee wandred vp and downe hee wan- 〈♫〉 dred, vp and downe he wandred, vp and downe he wan- dred, he wandred, 〈♫〉 whilst shee was missing, when hee found her, oh thē they fell a kissing oh 〈♫〉 then they fell a kissing, a kissing oh ij vp and downe 〈♫〉 vp and down he wandred, vp and down he wan- dred, vp and downe hee Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 wādred, vp and down hee wan- dred, hee wandred, whilst she was missing, 〈♫〉 when he found her, oh thē they fel a kissing, oh thē they fel a kis-sing, a 〈♫〉 kis- sing, oh then they fell a kissing.

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XVI.

〈♫〉 TAke time while time doth last while time doth last, take 〈♫〉 time while time doth last, marke how faire fa- deth fast, marke ij 〈♫〉 beware beware beware beware if en- uie raigne, if ij take 〈♫〉 heede of proud disdaine, take heede of proud dis-daine of 〈♫〉 proud dis-daine holde fast, now in thy youth hold fast, 〈♫〉 hold fast now in thy youth, in hold fast now in thy 〈♫〉 youth now in thy youth, now ij in thy youth re- 〈♫〉 gard regard thy vow-ed truth re- gard thy Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 vow-ed truth, thy ij least whē thou wax- eth 〈♫〉 old, least when thou waxeth old, thou ij least when thou 〈♫〉 friends faile, & loue grow cold & loue grow cold, and 〈♫〉 loue grow cold.

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XVII.

Of 8. voyces.

〈♫〉 YOu blessed bowers whose green leaues now are spread- 〈♫〉 ing, shadow the sun-shine from my mistresse face, and you sweete ro- ses 〈♫〉 sweete roses only for her bedding, when weary shee doth take her resting place 〈♫〉 doth ij she doth take her rest-ing place, you faire white lillies & 〈♫〉 prety prety flowers all, giue your attendāce ij giue your at- 〈♫〉 tēdāce at my mistresse call, giue ij you faire white 〈♫〉 lillies & pretty pretty flowers all giue your attendance, ij 〈♫〉 giue your attendance at my mistresse call, giue your attēdāce at my mistresse call▪

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XVII.

Of 8. voyces. SECVNDVS TENOR.

〈♫〉 YOu blessed bowers. &c. shadow the sun- shine from my mis- 〈♫〉 tresse face, & you sweete Roses & you sweete ro- ses on- ly for her bedding, 〈♫〉 when wea-ry shee doth take her resting place, when ij her 〈♫〉 resting place, you faire white lillies & pretty pretty flowers all giue your at- 〈♫〉 tēdance ij at my mistresse call, giue your attēdāce giue your at- 〈♫〉 tendance at my mistresse call, giue ij giue your at 〈♫〉 tendāce at my mistresse call, giue your attendance at my mistresse call,

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THE TABLE.

  • YOu pretie Flowers I
  • Now each creature. II
  • You'le neuer leaue. III
  • Lady my flame. The first part. IIII
  • Swete Lord your flame. The second part. V
  • Soone as the hungrie Lion. VI
  • O stay swete loue. The first part. VII
  • I thought my loue The second part. VIII
  • Compare me to the Flie. IX
  • Who would haue thought. X
  • Swete friend thy absence. XI
  • The flattring words. XII
  • Cease now thy mourning. XIII
  • A little prety bony lasse. XIIII
  • Faire Phyllis. XV
  • Take time. XVI
  • You blessed bowres, A song of eight voyces. XVII
FINIS.
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TENOR. THE FIRST SET OF ENGLISH MADRIGALS: TO Foure Voices: Newly composed by IOHN FAR∣MER, practicioner in the art of Musicque.

Printed at London in Little Saint Helens by William Barley, the Assigne of Thomas Morley, and are to be solde at his shoppe in Gratious-streete, Anno Dom. 1599.

Cum Priuilegio ad imprimendum solum.

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[illustration]
VERO NIHIL VERIVS

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To the right Honorable my very good Lord and Ma∣ster, EDWARD DEVERE Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbeck, Lord of Escales and Badlesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of Eng∣land, IOHN FARMER wisheth long life, health and happinesse with encrease of honour.

MOst Honorable Lord, it commeth not within the compasse of my power to expresse all the duty I owe, nor to pay the least part: so farre haue your Honorable fauours outstripped all meanes to manifest my humble affection, that there is nothinge left but praying and wondering. There is a canker worme that breedeth in manie mindes, feeding onelie vppon forgetfulnes, and bringing forth no birth but ingratitude: to shew that I haue not beene bitten with that monster, for wormes prooue monsters in this age, which yet neuer any Painter could counterfait to expresse the vglines, nor any Poet describe to decipher the highth of their ilnes: I haue presumed to tender these Madrigales onlie as remembrances of my seruice and witnesses of your Lordships liberall hand, by which I haue so long liued, and from your Honorable minde that so much haue loued all liberall Sciences: in this I shall be most encouraged, if your Lordship vouchsafe the protection of my first fruites, for that both for your greatnes you best can, and for your iudgement in Mu∣sicke best may: for without flattrie be it spokē, those that know your Lordship know this, that vsing this science as a recreation, your Lordship haue ouergone most of them that make it a profession. Right Honorable Lord, I hope it shall not be distastfull to number you heere a∣mongst the fauourers of Musicke, and the practisers, no more then Kings and Em∣perours that haue beene desirous to be in the roll of Astronomers, that being but a starre faire, the other an Angels Quire. Thus most humbly sub∣mitting my selfe, my labours, and what euer is or may bee in me, to your Lordships censure & protection: I humbly end wishing your Lordship as continuall an increasing of health and honor, as there is a daylie en∣crease of vertue, to come to happines.

Your Honors most dutifull seruant to command IOHN FARMER.

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To the Reader.

THe present age beeing so bewtified with excellent Poets and adorned with rare Musitions, amongst whome some by publike writings make an eliphant of a mouse: other by strange Paradoxes striue to attaine preheminence: I haue thought good amongst the rest, being as vertuously am∣bitious as any, to expose my selfe to the world, cloathing my infant in humility, not ostentation, striuing so farre to auoyde a peremptory opinion of mine owne witte, as I take it an honor for mee to ascribe the little I deserue rather to the master that taught mee, then mine owne diligence that formed and fashioned my Muses: onely this I protest for my selfe, that I haue studied so much as in me lieth to obserue a true decorum, which protestation I shall suppose for an indecorum also before it be ra∣tified by your allowance and fauors. Yet in these my Madrigales I beseech you esteeme this, that I haue not enforced the one to the other, but so fitly haue I linkt my Musicke to number, as each giue to other their true effect, which is to mooue delight, which delight, as Socrates witnesseth in Platoes Philebo, is the daughter of Harmony. This vertue beeing so singular in the Italians, as onely vnder that ensigne they hazard their honor: I could aduise the studious in Mu∣sicke so to imploy themselues, that they might seeme to be rightly borne vnder the sweete aspect of Venus, which, as the Astronomers witnesse, is the Domi∣natrix in Musitians natiuities: it is the onely grace in a Musitian to follow this course, so to fitte both note and number as if like Twinnes of one mother, they may seeme to be all one which yeeldeth great abundance of variety. To con∣clude, I so much loue perfect harmony, as I earnestly entreate all the professed in Musicke to fly discord amongst themselues: though in composing of songes, it may be well taken, beseeching them so farre to fly selfe-opinion also, that ay∣ming all of them at their Countries honor, not their owne glory, they may by this meanes and in this manner outstrip any straunger, and make England as fa∣mous in Musitions, as it is and hath beene for soldiers: so leauing my labors to your fauourable iudgement, to keepe secret what may be amisse. I take heartie leaue.

A friend to all louers and Professors of Musicke Iohn Farmer.

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I.

〈♫〉 YOu pretty flowers that smile for sommers sake pull in your 〈♫〉 heads before my wa-trie eies doe turne the meadowes to a 〈♫〉 standing lake, by whose vntimely floods your glo- rie dyes▪ 〈♫〉 for loe my hart re-solud to moystning aire, fee-ding mine eies ij 〈♫〉 ij which doubles teare for teare which ij which 〈♫〉 doubles teare for teare, for loe my hart re- solud to moystning aire feeding mine 〈♫〉 eies ij feeding mine eies which doubles teare for teare 〈♫〉 which ij which doubles teare for teare.

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II.

〈♫〉 NOw each creature ioyes the o- ther, now ij 〈♫〉 now each creature ioyes the o- ther passing happy daies and howers: happy 〈♫〉 ij one bird reports vnto another, vn- ij reports vnto another re- 〈♫〉 ij by the fall of sil-uer showers, whilst the earth our cōmō mother, 〈♫〉 hath her bosome deckt with flowers: one bird reports vnto another, vnto ij 〈♫〉 reports vnto an- o- ther re- ij by the fall of sil- uer 〈♫〉 shewers, whilst the earth our commō mother, hath her bo-some deckt with flowers.

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III.

〈♫〉 YOu'le neuer leaue still tossing to and fro still ij you'le 〈♫〉 neuer leaue still tossing to & fro, still ij till at the last till ij 〈♫〉 you catch a fall: for waue- ring minds, for waue- 〈♫〉 ring minds doth alwaies harbor woe, doth ij doth alwaies harbor wo, 〈♫〉 losing true friēdship, losing true friēdship, loue and all: be constāt then and 〈♫〉 thou shalt find it best, to scorne the world, in hope to liue at rest, to ij 〈♫〉 to liue at rest, to scorne the world in hope to liue at rest.

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IIII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 LAdy my flame still bur- ning, stil bur- ning ij 〈♫〉 & my cōsu- ming an- guish, doth grow so great, that life I feele to lā- 〈♫〉 guish, oh let your hart be moued, oh ij to end your greefe and 〈♫〉 mine & mine so long time proued, and quēch the heat, and ij that 〈♫〉 my chiefe part so fireth, and ij yeelding 〈♫〉 the fruite that faithfull loue requireth requi- reth, ij the fruite that 〈♫〉 faithfull loue requi- reth, and quench the heat ij that my chief part so 〈♫〉 fi- reth and ij yeeld- ing the fruite that faithfull Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 loue re- quireth re- qui reth, yeelding the fruite ij that faithfull loue re- 〈♫〉 qui- reth.

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V.

The second part.

〈♫〉 SWeete Lord, your flame still burning, and your con-tinuall an- guish 〈♫〉 cannot be more then mine, in which I languish, cannot be more then mine, in 〈♫〉 which I languish, nor more your hart is moo - ued, to end my griefe, 〈♫〉 to ende my greefe and yours so long time proued but if I yeld and so your 〈♫〉 flame decreaseth but if I yeeld and so your flame de- creseth I then lose my life 〈♫〉 my life I then lose my life, and so our loue ceas- eth: but if I 〈♫〉 yeeld and so your flame decreaseth but if I yeeld and so your flame de- crea- 〈♫〉 seth I then lose my life ij I then lose my life and so our loue ceaseth.

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VI.

〈♫〉 SOone as the hungry ly-on seekes his pray, ji 〈♫〉 in so-ly-ta-rie rang ij of pathles mountayns of 〈♫〉 ij▪ soone as the pas-sin-ger soone as the passinger soone ij sets 〈♫〉 on his way so soone as beastes resort so ij as beasts resort vn-to the 〈♫〉 fountaines so soone so soone so soone mine eies their of- fice are dis- 〈♫〉 charging, and I my greefs ij my greefs with grea- ter greefs inlar-ging 〈♫〉 so soone so soone so soone mine eies their of- fice are dis- charg-ing and 〈♫〉 I my greefe my greefe my greefs, with grea- ter greefs in - larg - ing.

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VII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 O Stay swete loue, O stay O ij O stay swete loue see 〈♫〉 here the place of sporting see here the place of sporting of sporting ij 〈♫〉 ij ij ij ij these gentle flowers smiles sweetly to in- 〈♫〉 uite vs, and chirping chirping birds and ij ij are hether wards re- 〈♫〉 sorting, warbling sweete notes ij onely to delight vs thē stay deare 〈♫〉 loue, then ij then stay deare loue: for though thou run frō me, ij 〈♫〉 for ij from me, from me, for though thou run frō me, rū nere so 〈♫〉 fast so fast ij run nere so fast so fast yet I will fol-low thee Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 yet ij yet I wil follow thee then stay deere loue then ij then 〈♫〉 ij for though thou runne from me runne from me, for ij from 〈♫〉 me from me for though thou runne from me runne nere so fast, so 〈♫〉 fast, runne ij runne ij so fast, yet I will follow thee yet ij 〈♫〉 yet I will follow thee.

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VIII.

The second part.

〈♫〉 I Thought my loue that I should ouertake you, swete heart sit downe 〈♫〉 vnder this shadowed tree, and I will promise neuer to forsake you, so you wil grāt 〈♫〉 so you will grant to me a lo- uers fee, whereat shee smilde, whereat shee smilde, 〈♫〉 whereat shee smilde shee smilde and kindly to me saide, I ne- uer meant to 〈♫〉 liue to liue and dy a maide, whereat shee smild, ij ij shee 〈♫〉 smild, and kindly to mee said, I ne- uer meant to liue to liue and die a maide.

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IX.

〈♫〉 COmpare me to the childe that playes with fire, playes with 〈♫〉 fire, playes with fire ij ij ij or to the fly, ij 〈♫〉 or ij that dyeth, ij in the flame, or to the foolish boy the foolish 〈♫〉 boy that did aspire aspire to touch the glorie of high heauens frame: no man 〈♫〉 to these me fit- ly can compare, no ij these liue to die, 〈♫〉 these ij these ij to die, I die ij ij ij I die to liue in 〈♫〉 care: no man to these me fit- ly cā compare, no ij these liue to 〈♫〉 die: ij ij to die, I die ij ij ij I die to liue in care

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X.

〈♫〉 WHo would haue thought that face of thine had been so ful of 〈♫〉 doublenes, so full of doublenes, of doublenes, or that within those christall 〈♫〉 eyne had been so much so much had been so much vnstablenes? thy 〈♫〉 face so faire, ij thy looke so strang, thy looke so strang, ij thy 〈♫〉 looke so strange, who woulde haue thought of such a change a 〈♫〉 chāge, who would haue thought ij who would haue thoght, of such a change?

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XI. For the loue of his most deare friend EDMVND KEATE.

〈♫〉 Sweete friend thy absence greeues my bleeding hart, thy ij 〈♫〉 yet doe I ioye yet ij yet doe I ioye yet ij yet ij 〈♫〉 I ioye yet doe I ioye to heare of thy good health: ah ah woe is me ah ij that 〈♫〉 now I shall depart from thee, more deere to me then Cressus wealth, but if on 〈♫〉 earth I may not see thy face, but ij Ile fly to heauen, 〈♫〉 Ile ij Ile fly Ile fly Ile fly to heauen, Ile fly to heauen, to heauen 〈♫〉 to seeke thee in that place, to seeke thee in that place.

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XII.

〈♫〉 THe flatring words, sharp glosses that men vse, the flatring words 〈♫〉 sharpe glosses that men vse, to trap poor sil- ly women in their snares 〈♫〉 to trap poore sil- ly women in their snares: with fai- ned lookes with 〈♫〉 fainned looks their gen- tle sex abuse, which yeelds nought else but griefe and 〈♫〉 endlesse cares, but greefe and end-lesse cares: some times they smile and 〈♫〉 sometimes frowne, but ne- uer pleasde in deede, till time and place where 〈♫〉 they may watch wehre they may watch their sorrows their sorrows their 〈♫〉 sorrows for to breed, sometimes they smile and sometimes frowne but neuer Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 pleasde in deede, till time and place where they may watch where they may 〈♫〉 watch there sorrows their sorrows there sorrows for to breede.

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XIII.

〈♫〉 CEase now thy mourning and thy sad lamen- ting, and ij 〈♫〉 for faire Auroraes louely face doth light thee: thy mistres hart is now vp- 〈♫〉 on relenting, thy mistresse heart is now vpon relen- ting, vowing hēce- 〈♫〉 forth neuer more to spight thee: then harbour not those thoughts, then ij 〈♫〉 that still may grieue thee, that ij that still may grieue thee, since 〈♫〉 that thy mistresse sweares shee will releeue thee, she ij since that thy 〈♫〉 mistresse sweares, since ij she will releeue thee.

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XIIII.

〈♫〉 A Lit-tle prety bony lasse was walking in midst of May, be- 〈♫〉 fore the Sū gan rise: a little prety bony lass was walking in midst of May be 〈♫〉 fore the Sun gan rise: I tooke her by the hand, I ij and fell to 〈♫〉 talking to talking and ij of this and that of ij of ij 〈♫〉 as best I could de-uise, I ij I swore I would I ij yet stil shee said I 〈♫〉 should not, doe what I would doe ij & yet for all I could not & ij 〈♫〉 I swore I would I ij yet still shee saide I shoud not doe what I 〈♫〉 would doe ij & yet for all I could not & yet for all I could not.

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XV.

〈♫〉 FAire Phyllis &c. fee-ding her flocke neere to the mountaynes side, 〈♫〉 feeding her flock neere to the moūtains side the shepheards knewe not they 〈♫〉 knewe not whither shee was gon, but af-ter her lo-uer her louer but af-ter her 〈♫〉 lo-uer Amintas hied, vp & downe he wandred vp & downe vp & downe he 〈♫〉 wandred vp ij vp ij vp & downe he wan-dred vp ij 〈♫〉 wilst shee was missing, when he found her, oh? then they fell a kissing 〈♫〉 oh? ij a kis-sing oh? then they fell a kissing, vp & downe he 〈♫〉 wandred vp & downe vp & downe he wandred vp ij vp ii Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 vp and downe he wandred vp and downe he wandred whilst shee was 〈♫〉 missing, when he found her oh? then they fell a kissing, oh ij 〈♫〉 a kissing, oh then they fell a kissng.

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XVI.

〈♫〉 TAke time while time doth last marke how faire fa- deth 〈♫〉 fast: be- ware if en- uy raigne, take heede of proude disdaine, 〈♫〉 holde fast nowe in thy youth, re- gard thy vow- ed truth, least 〈♫〉 when thou waxeth olde friends faile and loue grow cold.

Page  [unnumbered]Verte folium.

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XVII.

SECVNDVS CANTVS.

〈♫〉 NOn blessed bowers whose green leaues now are spread- 〈♫〉 ing, shadow the sun-shine frō my mistresse face, and you sweet roses on- ly 〈♫〉 for her bedding, whē weary she doth take her resting place, whē ij 〈♫〉 her resting place, you faire white lil- lies and pre- ty pre- ty flowers, all giue 〈♫〉 your attēdāce ij at my mistresse call, giue your attēdāce, giue ij 〈♫〉 at my mistris call, giue ij you faire white lil- lies, and 〈♫〉 prety ij flowers all, giue your attēdāce at my mistresse call, giue ij 〈♫〉 my mistresse call, giue your attendaunce at my mistresse call.

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XVII.

〈♫〉 YOu bles-sed &c. shadow the sunne-shine from my mistresse face 〈♫〉 you sweete ro-ses ij on- ly for her bedding when wea- ry 〈♫〉 shee doth take shee doth take her rest-ing place, doth ij when weary 〈♫〉 shee doth take her rest- ing place, you faire white lil-lies & pretty pretty 〈♫〉 flowers all giue your attendance ij giue your at- 〈♫〉 tendance at my mistresse call, ij you faire white 〈♫〉 lil-lies & pretty pretty flowers all giue your attendance ij 〈♫〉 ij giue your attēdāce at my mistresse call. ij

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THE TABLE.

  • YOu pretie Flowers. I
  • Now each creature. II
  • You'le neuer leaue. III
  • Lady my flame. The first part. IIII
  • Swete Lord your flame. The second part. V
  • Soone as the hungrie Lion. VI
  • O stay swete loue. The first part. VII
  • I thought my loue The second part. VIII
  • Compare me to the Flie IX
  • Who would haue thought▪ X
  • Swete friend thy absence. XI
  • The flattring words. XII
  • Cease now thy mourning. XIII
  • A little prety bony lasse. XIIII
  • Faire Phyllis. XV
  • Take time. XVI
  • You blessed bowres, A song of eight voyces. XVII
FINIS.
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BASSVS. THE FIRST SET OF ENGLISH MADRIGALS: TO Foure Voices: Newly composed by IOHN FAR∣MER, practicioner in the art of Musicque.

Printed at London in Little Saint Helens by William Barley, the Assigne of Thomas Morley, and are to be solde at his shoppe in Gratious-streete, Anno Dom. 1599.

Cum Priuilegio ad imprimendum solum.

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[illustration]
VERO NIHIL VERIVS

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To the right Honorable my very good Lord and Ma∣ster, EDWARD DEVERE Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbeck, Lord of Escales and Badlesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of Eng∣land, IOHN FARMER wisheth long life, health and happinesse with encrease of honour.

MOst Honorable Lord, it commeth not within the compasse of my power to expresse all the duty I owe, nor to pay the least part: so farre haue your Honorable fauours outstripped all meanes to manifest my humble affection, that there is nothinge left but praying and wondering. There is a canker worme that breedeth in manie mindes, feeding onelie vppon forgetfulnes, and bringing forth no birth but ingratitude: to shew that I haue not beene bitten with that monster, for wormes prooue monsters in this age, which yet neuer any Painter could counterfait to expresse the vglines, nor any Poet describe to decipher the highth of their ilnes: I haue presumed to tender these Madrigales onlie as remembrances of my seruice and witnesses of your Lordships liberall hand, by which I haue so long liued, and from your Honorable minde that so much haue loued all liberall Sciences: in this I shall be most encouraged, if your Lordship vouchsafe the protection of my first fruites, for that both for your greatnes you best can, and for your iudgement in Mu∣sicke best may: for without flattrie be it spokē, those that know your Lordship know this, that vsing this science as a recreation, your Lordship haue ouergone most of them that make it a profession. Right Honorable Lord, I hope it shall not be distastfull to number you heere a∣mongst the fauourers of Musicke, and the practisers, no more then Kings and Em∣perours that haue beene desirous to be in the roll of Astronomers, that being but a starre faire, the other an Angels Quire. Thus most humbly sub∣mitting my selfe, my labours, and what euer is or may bee in me, to your Lordships censure & protection: I humbly end wishing your Lordship as continuall an increasing of health and honor, as there is a daylie en∣crease of vertue, to come to happines.

Your Honors most dutifull seruant to command IOHN FARMER.

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To the Reader.

THe present age beeing so bewtified with excellent Poets and adorned with rare Musitions, amongst whome some by publike writings make an eliphant of a mouse: other by strange Paradoxes striue to attaine preheminence: I haue thought good amongst the rest, being as vertuously am∣bitious as any, to expose my selfe to the world, cloathing my infant in humility, not ostentation, striuing so farre to auoyde a peremptory opinion of mine owne witte, as I take it an honor for mee to ascribe the little I deserue rather to the master that taught mee, then mine owne diligence that formed and fashioned my Muses: onely this I protest for my selfe, that I haue studied so much as in me lieth to obserue a true decorum, which protestation I shall suppose for an indecorum also before it be ra∣tified by your allowance and fauors. Yet in these my Madrigales I beseech you esteeme this, that I haue not enforced the one to the other, but so fitly haue I linkt my Musicke to number, as each giue to other their true effect, which is to mooue delight, which delight, as Socrates witnesseth in Platoes Philebo, is the daughter of Harmony. This vertue beeing so singular in the Italians, as onely vnder that ensigne they hazard their honor: I could aduise the studious in Mu∣sicke so to imploy themselues, that they might seeme to be rightly borne vnder the sweete aspect of Venus, which, as the Astronomers witnesse, is the Domi∣natrix in Musitians natiuities: it is the onely grace in a Musitian to follow this course, so to fitte both note and number as if like Twinnes of one mother, they may seeme to be all one which yeeldeth great abundance of variety. To con∣clude, I so much loue perfect harmony, as I earnestly entreate all the professed in Musicke to fly discord amongst themselues: though in composing of songes, it may be well taken, beseeching them so farre to fly selfe-opinion also, that ay∣ming all of them at their Countries honor, not their owne glory, they may by this meanes and in this manner outstrip any straunger, and make England as fa∣mous in Musitions, as it is and hath beene for soldiers: so leauing my labors to your fauourable iudgement, to keepe secret what may be amisse. I take heartie leaue.

A friend to all louers and Professors of Musicke Iohn Farmer.

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I.

〈♫〉 YOu pretty &c. pull in your heads before my watrie eies doe 〈♫〉 turne doe turne the medowes to a standing lake by whose vntimely floods 〈♫〉 your glo- rie dyes, for loe my hart resolud to moystning 〈♫〉 aire fee-ding mine eies ij which dubles teare for teare which ij 〈♫〉 which doubles teare for teare for loe my hart re- 〈♫〉 solud to moystning aire feeding mine eies ij which doubles teare for 〈♫〉 teare which ij which doubles teare for teare.

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II.

〈♫〉 NOw each creature ioyes the other, now ij 〈♫〉 passing happy dayes and howers, passing happy dayes and howers, one 〈♫〉 bird reports vn-to an other one ij reports vn- 〈♫〉 to an o-ther, reports vn-to an other, by the fall of sil - uer showers 〈♫〉 whilst the earth our cōmon mother hath her bosome deckt with flowers one 〈♫〉 bird reports vnto an other one ij reports vnto an other 〈♫〉 reports vn-to an other by the fall of sil - uer showers whilst the earth our 〈♫〉 cōmon mo-ther harh her bosome deckt with flowers.

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III.

〈♫〉 YOu'le ne-uer leaue still tos-sing to and fro, still ij 〈♫〉 till at the last till at the last you catch a fall for waue- 〈♫〉 ring mindes doth allwayes harbour woe doth ij, doth 〈♫〉 allwayes harbour woe, lo-sing true frindship loue and all be constant then & 〈♫〉 thou shal finde it best to scorne the world in hope to liue at rest to liue at 〈♫〉 rest, to scorne ij to liue at rest to scorne the world in 〈♫〉 hope to liue at rest.

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IIII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 La dy my flame still burning, ij 〈♫〉 & my con-suming anguish, doth grow so great, doth ij that life 〈♫〉 I feele to languish, oh let your hart bee mo-ued, to end your 〈♫〉 greefe and myne to ij so long time proued, 〈♫〉 and quench the heat that my cheefe parte so fi-reth, yeelding the 〈♫〉 frute that faithfull loue re- qui- reth re-qui - reth yeel-ding the 〈♫〉 frute that faith - full loue re- qui - reth and quench the 〈♫〉 heat that my cheefe part so fi - reth yeel- ding the frute that Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 faith - full loue re- qui - reth re qui - reth yeel - ding the 〈♫〉 frute that faith-full loue requireth.

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V.

The second part.

〈♫〉 SWeet Lord, and your cōti-nu- all anguish, can not be more then 〈♫〉 mine, in which I languish, can not be more then mine, in which I languish, not 〈♫〉 more your hart is mooued, to end my griefe, to end my griefe, and yours so 〈♫〉 long time proued but if I yeelde and so your flame decreaseth I 〈♫〉 then lose my life, I then lose my life, and so our loue ceaseth: but if I 〈♫〉 yeeld and so your flame decreaseth I then lose my life I ij and 〈♫〉 so our loue ceaseth

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VI.

〈♫〉 SOone as the hungry lyon seekes his pray in so- ly-ta-rie 〈♫〉 rang in so-li-ta-rie rang of pathles mountayns soone as the 〈♫〉 passinger sets on his way soone as the passinger sets one his way so 〈♫〉 soone as beastes resorte so ij so soone as beastes re 〈♫〉 sorte vn-to the fountaines so soone so soone so soone mine eies their 〈♫〉 office are dis-charg-ing and I my greefs my greefs with grea-ter greefs 〈♫〉 in-larg- ing so soone so soone so soone mine eies their of-fice are dis- 〈♫〉 charg-ing and I my greefe my greefe with grea-ter greefs in - lar - ging

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VII.

The first part.

〈♫〉 O Stay swete loue O stay ij O ij O stay swete loue see 〈♫〉 here the place of sporting see ij of sporting of ij of ij of 〈♫〉 ij of ij these gentle flowers smiles sweetly to inuite vs, and 〈♫〉 chirping chirping birds and chirping chirping birds are hetherwards re- 〈♫〉 sorting, warbling sweete notes ij onely to delight vs 〈♫〉 then stay deere loue then ij then ij for though thou 〈♫〉 runne from me, for ij for ij for though thou runne from 〈♫〉 me runne nere so fast, runne nere so fast, runne nere so fast so fast, Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 yet I wil follow thee yet ij yet ij yet I will follow thee, 〈♫〉 then stay deere loue then ij then ij for though thou 〈♫〉 runne from me, for ij for ij for though thou runne from 〈♫〉 me runne nere so fast, runne nere so fast, runne nere so fast so fast, 〈♫〉 yet I will follow thee yet ij yet ij yet ij

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VIII.

The second part.

〈♫〉 I thought my loue that I should ouertake you: sweete hart sit downe, sit 〈♫〉 downe vn- der this shadowed tree, and I will pro-mise neuer to forsake you, 〈♫〉 so you will graunt to me a louers fee, whereat shee smilde ij whereat 〈♫〉 shee smilde and kindly to me said, I neuer meant to liue, to liue and dye a 〈♫〉 mayd, wherat shee smilde ij whereat shee smilde and kind-ly to mee said 〈♫〉 I ne- uer meant to liue to liue, and dye a mayd.

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IX.

〈♫〉 COmpare me &c. with fire or to the fly, or ij that 〈♫〉 dy-eth in the flame, or to the fool-lish boye that did aspire as-pire to 〈♫〉 touch the glo-rie of high hea-uens frame, no man to these me fitt- ly 〈♫〉 can compare, no ij these liue, to die these ij ij 〈♫〉 I die ij I die I die to liue in care no man to these me 〈♫〉 fitly can compare, no ij these liue to die: these ij 〈♫〉 these liue to die I die. ij I die I die to liue in care.

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X.

〈♫〉 WHo would haue thought, who ij that face of thine 〈♫〉 had beene so full of dou- blenes, of doublenes, or that within those christal 〈♫〉 eyne had been so much so much had been so much, had been so 〈♫〉 much vnstablenes? thy face so faire, thy looke so strang, thy ij thy 〈♫〉 looke so strang, thy looke so strang, who would haue thought of such a change?

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XI. For the loue of his most deare friend EDMVND KEATE.

〈♫〉 Sweete friend thy absence greeues my bleeding hart thy ij 〈♫〉 yet doe I ioye yet ij yet ij yet doe I ioye I ioye I ioye, yet doe I 〈♫〉 ioye to heare of thy good health, ah woe is me, ah ij that now I 〈♫〉 shall depart from thee more deere to me then Cressus wealth: but if on 〈♫〉 earth I may not see thy face, Ile fly to heauen Ile fly to heauen Ile 〈♫〉 fly Ile fly to heauen, to heauen Ile fly Ile fly to heauen to seeke thee▪ 〈♫〉 in that place, to seeke thee in that place.

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XII.

〈♫〉 THe flattring words, sharpe glosses, the ij 〈♫〉 that men vse to trap poore sil- ly women in their snares, to trap poore 〈♫〉 sil- ly women in their snares: with fained lookes their gentle sex abuse 〈♫〉 which yeelds nought else but griefe and endlesse cares: and ij some 〈♫〉 times they smile & sometimes frown, but ne- uer pleasde in- deed, till time and 〈♫〉 place where they may watch where they may watch, their sorrowes ij 〈♫〉 their sorrowes for to breede: sometimes they smile and sometimes frown 〈♫〉 but ne- uer pleasde in deede, till time and place wher they may watch, wher Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 they may watch, their sor- rowes their sorrowes their sor- rowes 〈♫〉 for to breede.

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XIII.

〈♫〉 CEase now thy mourning and thy sad la-mēting, for faire Auroraes 〈♫〉 louely face doth light thee: thy mistresse heart is now vp- pon re- len- 〈♫〉 ting, vowing henceforth ne- uer more to spight thee: then harbour not those 〈♫〉 thoughts, thē harbor not those thoughts, that still may grieue thee, that still may 〈♫〉 grieue thee, since that my mistresse sweares shee will releeue thee, since that thy 〈♫〉 mistresse sweares shee will releeue thee.

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XIIII.

〈♫〉 A Lit-tle pre-ty bony lasse was walking in midst of may be- 〈♫〉 fore the sunne gan rise, a lit-tle prety bony lasse was walking in midst of may be- 〈♫〉 fore the sunne gan rise I tooke her by the hand and fell to talking of 〈♫〉 this & that of ij of ij as best I could de- uise I swore I 〈♫〉 would I ij yet still shee saide I should not doe what I would 〈♫〉 doe ij and yet for all I could not and ij I swore I would, I 〈♫〉 ij yet still shee saide I should not doe what I would do ij 〈♫〉 and yet for all I could not, and yet for all I could not.

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XV.

〈♫〉 FAire Phyllis &c. fee-ding her flocke neere to the mountaynes side, 〈♫〉 feeding her flocke neere to the mountaynes side the shepheards knewe not 〈♫〉 whither shee was gon, but af-ter her lo- uer but af-ter her louer Amintas 〈♫〉 hied, vp and downe he wandred he wandred vp and downe he wan- 〈♫〉 dred wilst shee was missing, when he found her, oh? then they fell a 〈♫〉 kissing, oh? then they fell a kis-sing a kis-sing, oh? then they fell a 〈♫〉 kissing, vp and downe he wan-dred he wandred vp and downe he wan- 〈♫〉 dred whilst shee was missing, when he found her oh? then they fell a Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 kis- sing, oh? then they fell a kis- sing a kis- sing, oh? then they 〈♫〉 fell a kis- sing.

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XVI.

〈♫〉 TAke time while time doth last doth last take time while 〈♫〉 time doth last, marke howe faire fa- deth fast, marke howe faire 〈♫〉 fa-deth fast, beware beware beware beware if en-uie raigne be-ware ij 〈♫〉 take heede of proud disdaine, take heede of proud dis-daine take heede of 〈♫〉 proud dis-daine holde fast hold fast, now in thy youth hold 〈♫〉 fast hold fast now in thy youth, hold fast ij hold fast now in thy 〈♫〉 youth thy youth, now in thy youth now in thy youth now ij re- 〈♫〉 gard re- gard re- gard thy vow- ed Page  [unnumbered]〈♫〉 truth, thy vowed truth, least whē thou wax- eth old, least whē thou 〈♫〉 least when thou waxeth old, thou waxeth old, least when thou waxeth 〈♫〉 old friends faile, and loue grow cold friends faile and loue grow 〈♫〉 cold, and loue grow cold, and loue grow cold.

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XVII.

Of 8. voyces. PRIMVS TENOR.

〈♫〉 YOu bles- sed bowers whose greene leaues now are spreading, 〈♫〉 now are spread- ing, shadow the sun-shine frō my mistresse face, ij 〈♫〉 and you swete roses ij only for her ij bedding, when weary 〈♫〉 she doth take her resting place, ij when weary shee doth 〈♫〉 take her resting place: giue your attēdance at my mistresse call, giue your at- 〈♫〉 tēdāce at my mistresse call, giue ij you faire white lillies 〈♫〉 and prety prety flowers all, giue your attendāce ij at my mistresse 〈♫〉 call, giue your attendance, giue your attendance at my mistresse call.

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XVII.

Of 8. voyces. PRIMVS BASSVS.

〈♫〉 YOu blessed bowers. &c. shadow the sun- shine from my 〈♫〉 mistresse face, and you swete Roses on- ly for her bedding, when weary shee 〈♫〉 doth take her resting place, giue your attēdance giue your attēdāce at my 〈♫〉 mistresse call, giue ij giue your at- tendance at my mistresse call, 〈♫〉 giue your attendance at my mistresse call, giue your attendāce giue 〈♫〉 your attendance at my mistresse call.

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THE TABLE.

  • YOu pretie Flowers I
  • Now each creature. II
  • You'le neuer leaue. III
  • Lady my flame. The first part. IIII
  • Swete Lord your flame. The second part. V
  • Soone as the hungrie Lion. VI
  • O stay swete loue. The first part. VII
  • I thought my loue The second part. VIII
  • Compare me to the Flie. IX
  • Who would haue thought. X
  • Swete friend thy absence. XI
  • The flattring words. XII
  • Cease now thy mourning. XIII
  • A little prety bony lasse. XIIII
  • Faire Phyllis. XV
  • Take time. XVI
  • You blessed bowres, A song of eight voyces. XVII
FINIS.
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