Pigs' meat; or, lessons for the swinish multitude: Published in weekly penny numbers, collected by the poor man's advocate (an old veteran in the cause of freedom) in the course of his reading for more than twenty years. Intended to promote among the labouring part of mankind proper ideas of their situation, of their importance, and of their rights. And to convince them that their forlorn condition has not been entirely overlooked and forgotten, nor their just cause unpleaded, neither by their maker not by the best and most enlightened of men in all ages. [pt.1]
Spence, Thomas, 1750-1814.
Page  [unnumbered]

CONTENTS Of VOLUME FIRST.

  • The Fable of the Bee and the Spider — Page 2
  • On Freedom of Speech Cato's Letters Page 3
  • On False Witness Swift. Page 7
  • On the Execution of Louis Capet Frend. Page 11
  • On Political Superstition Barlow. Page 13
  • The Effects of War on the Poor Frend. Page 14
  • A Prognostic of the French Revolution Chesterfield. Page 16
  • A Lesson for Antigallicans Page 17
  • On the Excellency of a Free Government, and its Tendency to exalt the Nature of Man Dr. Price. Page 31
  • A Lamentation for the Oppressed Goldsmith. Page 33
  • On the Responsibility of Kings. Candid Philosopher. Page 36
  • Roman Patriotism founded on Injustice, and the Ruin of Mankind Ditto. Page 38
  • A Description of England Lord Lyttleton. Page 38
  • A Lesson for Gentlemen Volunteers Ditto. Page 40
  • A Lesson for All Men. Locke. Page 41
  • A Song to be sung at the Commencement of the Milenium. From Spence's Rights of Man in Prose, price 4d. Page 42
  • All Monarchies naturally tend to Despotism Chesterfield. Page 44
  • A Modest Plea for an Equal Commonwealth Page 44
  • Every Man is born with an imprescriptible Claim to a Portion of the Elements Barlow. Page 59
  • The glorious prospect of better Times, which are fast approaching Critic Philosopher. Page 63
  • The Advantages of Freedom of Speech Candid Philosopher. Page 66
  • The Marseilles March, or Hymn Page 67
  • Extract from Les Ruines, by M. de Volney. Page 69
  • Of the Ministry or Clergy Page 74
  • Page  [unnumbered]The Desire of Glory naturally generated in Re∣publics Lord Lyttleton. Page 78
  • Examination of James Harrington in the Tower, concerning his Oceana. Page 79
  • A Song on the French Revolution Page 81
  • Extract from Harrington's Works Page 83
  • The free Notions of the English Lord Lyttleton. Page 85
  • An unpleasant Lesson for the Pigs' Betters Swift. Page 86
  • Lessons for Monopolizers of Land Page 88
  • On Equality Puffendorf. Page 89
  • On the Absurdity of unalterable Establish∣ments Priestly Page 92
  • General Political Aphorisms, or Maxims Harrington. Page 96
  • A Song to be sung an Hundred Years hence Page 98
  • A Lesson for Venal Parliaments Cromwell. Page 100
  • Lessons for Statesmen, viz.
    • 1. From the Encyclopedia Britannica Page 101
    • 2. From the Same Page 102
    • 3. From Lady Montague's Letters Page 103
  • The Government of Geneva D'Alembert. Page 105
  • Speeches of Charles Turner, Esq. Page 108
  • The Inhabitants of Hell Rights of the Devil. Page 110
  • Ignorance the Foundation of unequal Govern∣ments, and fostered by them designedly Barlow. Page 112
  • On the Injustice of taking Fees from Persons acquitted in Courts of Justice Page 114
  • Whether the Balance of Dominion in Land be the natural Cause of Empire? Harrington. Page 114
  • * Abridgement of the Roman History Page 118
  • On the shameful Oppression of the Highlanders in the Western Islands of Scotland Page 122
  • A Government of Citizens is invulnerable Harrington. Page 125
  • A Description of Prince Lucifer's Subjects Rights of the Devil. Page 128
  • Candide, a Soldier Voltaire. Page 132
  • On the Progress of Liberty in France Candid Philosopher. Page 134
  • Page  [unnumbered]On a Life of Labour Candid Philosopher. Page 136
  • The personal Virtues of a Monarch are unable to secure him from Contempt, if he will be blindfolded by wicked Ministers Page 137
  • Modern Motives for War Barlow. ibid.
  • On the Government of Hell Rights of the Devil. Page 138
  • The impossibility of commencing Tyrant over an armed Nation convinced of the universal Equality of Mankind Barlow. Page 142
  • On the pompous Titles given to the Dignified Clergy Candid Philosopher. Page 143
  • Defects in the English Constitution, as to Re∣presentation Dyer. Page 145
  • An Apology for Younger Brothers Page 152
  • A Seditious Hand-Bill circulated at Norwich, and Re-published by Authority in the Nor∣folk Chronicle Page 163
  • Five Thousand Pounds offered, in the Morning Chronicle, for a Place of Amusement under Government!!! Page 164
  • National Fasting generally insidious and im∣pious Rev. I. Murray, Page 165
  • † On the Liberty of the Press. By Erskine, in his Speech on the Trial of Thomas Paine Page 168
  • ‡ The New Constitution of France Page 176
  • English Injustice to the French. A Poem Page 180
  • * Roman History (continued) Page 182
  • † Erskine's Speech (continued) Page 189
  • Church Livings to be Sold by Auction!!! Page 193
  • The Distresses of the Poor, exemplified in the Life of a Private Soldier Goldsmith. Page 194
  • § On Kings. From Godwin's Enquiry concerning Political Iustice. Page 200
  • On the Rebellion of Princes Murray. Page 201
  • On the National Sin of suffering Bad Government Page 204
  • On Civil Liberty, and the Principles of Go∣vernment Dr. Price. Page 205
  • ‡ The New Constitution of France (continued) Page 207
  • Popular Assemblies understand only their own Interest Harrington's Oceana. Page 212
  • Page  [unnumbered]On Religion Marning Chronicle. Page 214
  • § On Kings (continued) Godwin. Page 219
  • Kings are Great Blessings. A Poem Page 221
  • On the Horrors of War Dr. Iohnson Page 222
  • † Liberty of the Press (continued) Page 223
  • Patriotic Speech of Sir George Saville Page 226
  • On the Authority of one Country over another Dr. Price. Page 228
  • A Lesson for daring Publishers Page 229
  • The Derby Address Page 230
  • Ode to Human Kind Page 235
  • Orders of the Duke of York Page 238
  • Curious Letter to the Convention Page 238
  • A Panegyric! Cato's Letters. Page 239
  • ‡ The New Constitution of France (concluded) Page 240
  • Cautions against the Natural Encroachments of Power Cato's Letters. Page 246
  • Definition of Loyalty Toplady. Page 249
  • Meaning of the Word Pension, &c. Dr. Iohnson. ibid.
  • Burke's Address to the Swinish Multitude. A Song Page 250
  • * Conclusion of the Roman History Page 252
  • The Marriage Act censured Goldsmith. Page 257
  • The Rights of Man, by Question and Answer Page 261
  • Lessons for Pig Eaters Page 267
  • A Comparison between the African Slaves in the West Indies, and the Celtic Slave, or Scallag, in some of the Hebrides Page 268
  • General Political Aphorisms, or Maxims Harrington. Page 272
  • The baneful Influence of Dependence on the Mind Goldsmith. Page 274
  • On doing Good to our Country Swift Page 276
  • The Year Ninety-Three. A Song Page 279
  • The Progress of Liberty. A Song Page 280
  • A Description of Government, as really or fic∣titiously free Dr. Price. Page 281
  • The Advantages accruing to Mankind from a habitual Consciousness of their being equal Barlow. Page 283
END OF VOL. 1.