/ Representing Sounds in Sign Language

LANGUAGE: American Sign Language

Dr. Susan Mather describes a research study to decipher how teachers sign sounds in ASL.

REFERENCES

  • Boyes Braem, P. (2001). Functions of the mouthing in the signing of Deaf early and late learners of Swiss German Sign Language (DSGS). In The hands are the head of the mouth, P. Boyes Braem & R. L. Sutton-Spence (Eds.), Signum Press.
  • Dingemanse, M. (2009). Ideophones in unexpected places. In Proceedings of Conference on Language Development and Linguistic Theory 2, Peter K. Austin, Oliver Bond, Monik Charette, David Nathan, and Peter Sells (Eds.), (pp.83-97). London: SOAS.
  • Dudis, P. (2004). Body partitioning and real-space blends. Cognitive Linguistics, 15:2, 223-228.
  • Fontana, S. (2008). Mounth actions as gesture in sign language. Gesture, 8(1), 104-123. https://doi.org/10.1075/gest.8.1.08fon
  • Mather, S. (1989). Visually Oriented Teaching Strategies with Deaf Preschool Children. In C. Lucas (ed.). In the Sociolinguistics of the Deaf Community. (pp. 165-187). New York Academic Press.
  • McGovern, A. (1992). Too Much Noise. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • Tannen, D. (1988). Hearing Voices in Conversation, Fiction, and Mixed Genres. Linguistics in Context: Connecting Observation and Understanding, In D. Tannen (Ed.), pp.89-113. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.
  • Tannen, D. (1989). Interpreting Interruption in Conversation. Papers from the 25th Annual Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society. Part two: Parasession on Language in Context. In B. Music, R. Graczyk, and C. Wiltshire (Eds.), pp.266-287. Chicago: Chicago Linguistic society.
  • Woll, B. (2001). The sign that dares to speak its name: Echo phonology in British Sign Language (BSL). In The hands are the head of the mouth, P. Boyes Braem & R. L. Sutton-Spence (Eds.), Signum Press.