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Title: Egg white
Original Title: Blanc d'oeuf
Volume and Page: Vol. 2 (1752), p. 272
Author: Urbain de Vandenesse (biography)
Translator: Abigail Wendler Bainbridge [West Dean College, bainbridge.abigail@gmail.com]
Subject terms:
Natural history
Original Version (ARTFL): Link
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. To use this work in a way not covered by the license, please see http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/terms.html .

URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0002.627
Citation (MLA): Vandenesse, Urbain de. "Egg white." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Abigail Wendler Bainbridge. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2011. Web. [fill in today's date in the form 18 Apr. 2009 and remove square brackets]. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0002.627>. Trans. of "Blanc d'oeuf," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 2. Paris, 1752.
Citation (Chicago): Vandenesse, Urbain de. "Egg white." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Abigail Wendler Bainbridge. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2011. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0002.627 (accessed [fill in today's date in the form April 18, 2009 and remove square brackets]). Originally published as "Blanc d'oeuf," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, 2:272 (Paris, 1752).

Egg white. It the viscous and whitish part which surrounds the yellow, when the yolk is raw, and which is consistent and white when it is cooked: one uses it, in Medicine, for its glutinous and astringent qualities. In this case one often mixes it with Armenic bole, etc., to prevent swelling in areas which suffered some violence, and to restore to the fibers their resilience and elasticity; that which one calls a preventative. It also enters in some mixes to heal recent wounds and prevent hemorrhaging.

Bookbinder-gilders use egg white to glaire the spine and other places two or three times with a very fine sponge, before applying the gold there once the egg white is dry. One says to glaire [1] . One uses the egg white again to give the covers a shine. When the book is entirely finished one lightly wipes the entire covering with a fine sponge dipped in the egg white, and when it is dry one goes over it with the polishing iron. See Polishing Iron and Polish.

Translator's Note

1. See Glaire.