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Title: Papermaking. Plate I b
Original Title: PAPETERIE. PLANCHE Iere. bis.
Volume and Page: Plates vol. 5 (1767)
Author: Unknown
Translator: Abigail Wendler Bainbridge [West Dean College, bainbridge.abigail@gmail.com]
Original Version (ARTFL): Link
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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License. To use this work in a way not covered by the license, please see http://quod.lib.umich.edu/d/did/terms.html .

URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0001.508
Citation (MLA): "Papermaking. Plate I b." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Abigail Wendler Bainbridge. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2013. Web. [fill in today's date in the form 18 Apr. 2009 and remove square brackets]. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0001.508>. Trans. of "PAPETERIE. PLANCHE Iere. bis.," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 5 (plates). Paris, 1767.
Citation (Chicago): "Papermaking. Plate I b." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Abigail Wendler Bainbridge. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2013. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0001.508 (accessed [fill in today's date in the form April 18, 2009 and remove square brackets]). Originally published as "PAPETERIE. PLANCHE Iere. bis.," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 5 (plates) (Paris, 1767).

The plate captions have been translated but not the legends. To volunteer to translate the legends, please contact diderot-info@umich.edu.

Containing Fourteen Plates, Including One Double One.]

Plate I: Paper Manufacturing, View of the Buildings of the Anglée Manufacture, near Montargis. View of the Wheel of One of the Mills of this Manufacture


Plate I bis: Paper Manufacturing, Cutting


The picture represents the sorting [1] workshop.

Fig. 1 and 2. Sorters. A, B, C, crates.

The bottom of the Plate represents the general layout of the Langlée factory [2]. A, channel that furnishes water from the Montargis canal to the basin. B G, basin. B D, G H, couriers. E F, mill for fraying [the rags]. K L, mill for refining [the rags]. M M M M retting [3] and cutting room. N N N, place where one sizes the paper. P R, spiral staircases to go up to the two higher floors which serve as the drying lofts. The large building is 64 fathoms long and 8 wide. S X, wings 25 fathoms long and 8 wide, in which lies the rag store and the workshop for the sorters. T V, another wing of which the ground floor forms a room. The attics [4] of these wings serve as a supplement to the drying lofts which occupy the entire length of the two floors of the large building. X V, pavilions where there are various lodgings.

Plate II: Paper Manufacturing, Fermentation


Plate III: Paper Manufacturing, Beater Roll


Plate IV: Paper Manufacturing, Hammer Mill


Plate V: Paper Manufacturing, Plan of the Hammer Mill


Plate VI: Paper Manufacturing, Elevation of the Hammer Mill


Plate VII: Paper Manufacturing, Profile View of the Hammer Mill


Plate VIII: Paper Manufacturing, Details of one of the Cylinder Machines


Plate IX: Paper Manufacturing, Maker of the Forms


Plate X: Paper Manufacturing, Details of a Vat of a Mould Machine


Plate XI: Paper Manufacturing, Sizing


Plate XII: Paper Manufacturing, Drying


Plate XIII: Paper Manufacturing, Workshop


Note

1. Délisser –more generally to untangle, but often used specifically for sorting rags for papermaking

2. The Langlée papermill was run by Léorier Delisle by 1770, who is known as the first to use bark, grasses, and other plant fibers rather than making paper from rags–-although clearly this text precedes those experiments. See Dard Hunter, Papermaking : the History and Technique of an Ancient Craft (New York: Dover Publications, 1978), 327–328. The contemporary director of the mill, M. Prevost de Langlée, assisted L. J. Goussier in the writing of the main papermaking article.

3. Pourissoir –see the article under this name

4. Mansards– mansard roofs, style named after the architect François Mansart; they allow for another floor in the building.