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Title: Cut a suit, to
Original Title: Tailler un habit
Volume and Page: Vol. 15 (1765), p. 858
Author: Unknown
Translator: Bob Trump
Subject terms:
Tailor
Original Version (ARTFL): Link
Availability:

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URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.124
Citation (MLA): "Cut a suit, to." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Bob Trump. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2003. Web. [fill in today's date in the form 18 Apr. 2009 and remove square brackets]. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.124>. Trans. of "Tailler un habit," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 15. Paris, 1765.
Citation (Chicago): "Cut a suit, to." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by Bob Trump. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2003. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.124 (accessed [fill in today's date in the form April 18, 2009 and remove square brackets]). Originally published as "Tailler un habit," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, 15:858 (Paris, 1765).

To cut a suit, tailor's term ; which means to cut in the fabric the necessary pieces for making a suit, and giving them the width and the length required [in order] to provide adequately for the person who is having it made.

In order to cut a suit, the worker spreads out on his table or workbench the fabric to be made up as well as all the pieces or parts of a suit and the lining, if the pieces need to be lined, in the order they are to be used, one for the right side and the other for the left side. He ordinarily lays the fabric [out] doubled in order to cut the two pieces at the same time. Then he puts on this fabric a pattern or model of the piece he wants to cut; and with the large shears made expressly for the men of this profession, he cuts the fabric all around the pattern, observing while doing so to give the pieces that he is cutting in order to form out of all the pieces [when] stitched and joined together, all the lengths and widths that one has prescribed for them.