Promptorium parvulorum sive clericorum, dictionarius anglo-latinus princeps, auctore fratre Galfrido grammatico dicto, ex ordine fratrum Predicatorum, northfolciensi, circa A. D. M.CCCC.XL. Olim ex officina Pynsoniana editum, nunc ab integro, commentariolis subjectis, ad Fidem codicum recensuit Albertus Way, A. M.
Galfridus, Anglicus, active 1440., Way, Albert, 1805-1874, ed., British Library. Manuscript. Harley 221.
Page  319

PROMPTORIUM PARVULORUM.

  • MACARE. Factor, plasmator.
  • MACARE of noghte, as God only. Creator.
  • MACE of a seriawnt. S(c)eptrum, clava.
  • MACER, or he þat berythe mace. Scept(r)iger.
  • MACYS, spyce. Macie, in plur. C. F.
  • MADDE, or wood. Amens, demens, furiosus.
  • (MADDE, or wroth be crafte or cunnyng, S. Factus.)
  • MADYR, herbe. Sandix, DICC. rubia major, et minor dicitur hayryf.
  • MADDYN̄, or dotyn̄. Desipio.
  • MADDYN̄, or waxyn̄ woode. In∣sanio, furio, CATH.
  • MADDENESSE. Amencia, demencia.
  • MAFEY, othe (maffeyth, S.) Me∣dius fidius.
  • MAGERAM,1. [This word should possibly be read MAGERAN, as the power of the contraction placed over the penultimate letter in the MS. is uncertain. The other readings are maiorū, K. mageron, S. magerym, P. W. margeryn, J.] herbe. Majorona.
  • MAGESTE. Magestas.
  • MAGRY, vn-thanke,

    2. This word is used both as a substantive, from the French "malgré; blâme, re∣proche, mauvais gré; malas grates;" ROQUEF. and as an adverb, maugré, in spite of opposition.

    "Ma manasinges ȝit have thai maked,
    Mawgre mot thai have to mede!"

    Minot, p. 3.

    Chaucer uses the word "maugre" in the same manner, Rom. of R. 4399. Compare Vision of P. P. 4280. See also the Prologue to Book ii. of the version of Vegecius, attributed to Trevisa. "Had ye, Sir Emperour, commaundede me to haue written your soueraigne dedes of armes—then had I been siker to haue deseruede thanke, there now I drede me to deserue magre." ROY. MS. 18 A. XII. Horman says, "I am not able to bere thy maugrefe, impar invidiae tuae;" and Palsgrave gives, as a substantive, "Maugry, malgré, maltalent." See Jamieson, v. Mawgré. For instances of the use of the word adverbially see Sir F. Madden's Glossary to Gawayn; R. Glouc. p. 94; R. Brunne, p. 58; and Chaucer. "Maulgre my heed. Maulgre fortune. Maulgre his tethe, maulgré ses dens," &c. PALSG. "Maulgré eux, mauger their teeth, in spight of their hearts," &c. COTG.

    Vituperium, reprobacio (malas grates, K. demeritum, P.)
  • MAY, monethe. Maius.
  • MAYDEKYN', or lytylle mayde (maydyn kyn, H. P.) Puella, puerula, juvencula.
  • MAYDE WEDE, herbe, or maythys Page  320 (maydewode, S. maydenwede, P.)1. [See MAYTHYS. Anthemis cotula, Linn. Ang.-Sax. maȝeðe, chamaemelum.]Melissa, amarusca.
  • MAYDYN (or maydon, S.) yn clennesse of lyyf.2. [The old writers occasionally use the term maiden in reference to either sex. In the Vision of P. P. 5525, Wit, discoursing of ill-assorted matrimony, commends al∣liances between "maidenes and maydenes." In the Liber Festivalis it is said that St. Luke "went to our Lady, and she taught him the gospell that he wrothe, and for he was a clene mayden, our Ladi cherished him the more." Ed. Rouen, 1491, f. cliij. "Mayde of the mankind, puceau. Maide of the woman kynde, pucelle." PALSG.]Virgo.
  • MAYDĒN (or maydon, S.) ser∣uaunt. Ancilla.
  • MAYDYN, or seruaunt folowynge a woman of worschyppe. Pe∣dissequa, assecla, CATH.
  • MAYDYNHOOD. Virginitas.
  • (MAYFAY, supra in MAFAY, S.)
  • MAYLE of a haburione. Squama C. F. hamus, CATH. macula, C. F. CATH. et UG. in macero.
  • MAYNE, or hurte (mayme, H. P.) Mutilacio.
  • MAYNYD (or mankyd, infra, maymyd, H. P.) Mutilatus.
  • MAYNYN̄ (or mankkyn̄, infra, maymyn, K.)3. ["To mayne, mutulare. Maynde, mutulatus. A maynynge, mutulacio." CATH. ANG. "I mayne, or I mayne one, I take the vse of one of his lymmes from hym, I'affolle, and Ie mehaigne, but mehaigner is Normante." PALSG. The participle "mayned" occurs in the Golden Legend, f. 121, b. Compare mahennare, mahemiare, DUC.; and the old French mehenier, mehaingner.]Mutilo.
  • MAYNPRYSYD, or menprisyd (maynsprisid, K. maymprysyd, or memprisyd, S.)4. [The second word is here contracted in the MS. and should possibly be read mem∣prisyd. By a writ of main-prize the sheriff is commanded to take sureties for the appear∣ance of a prisoner, called mainperners, or mainprisours, and to set him at large. This is done either when bail has been refused, or when the cause of commitment is not properly bailable. Of the distinction between manucapere and balliare, see further in Spelman.]Manucaptus, fidejussus, C. F. (mancipatus, P.)
  • MĀ(Y)NPRISYN̄' (maynpresonte, S.) Manucapio, CATH. man∣cipo, CATH. fidejubeo, CATH.
  • MAYNPRISYNGE. Manucap(t)io, manumissio, C. F.
  • MAYNPRISOWRE. Mancipator, fidejussor, C. F. (manucaptor, P.)
  • MAYNE, or strengthe. Vigor, robur.
  • MAYNTENAUNCE. Manutencio, supportacio, defencio.
  • MAYNTENYD. Manutentus, sup∣portatus, defensus.
  • MAYNTENOWRE. Manutentor, defensor, supportator, fautor.
  • MAYNTYN̄ (sic, S. maynteyne, K. P.) Manuteneo, supporto. (defendo, protego, P.)
  • MAYSTYR. Magister, didascolus, petagogus (monitor, auctor, preceptor, P.)
  • MAYSTERLY. Magistraliter.
  • MAYSTRESSE. Magistra.
  • MAYSTRYE, or souerente, and heyare honde y(n) stryfe or werre (maistri, or worchip, or the heyer hond, K. maystrys, S.) Dextre, pl. victoria, triumphus.
  • (MAISTRI, K. Magisterium.)
  • MAYTHYS, supra in MAYDE WEDE.)

    5. This plant is thus mentioned by G. de Bibelesworth; Arund. MS. 220, f. 301.

    "Si vous trouet en toun verger
    Amerokes (maþen) e gletoner (and cloten,)
    Les aracez de vn besagu (twybel.)"

    In the Vocabulary of names of plants, Sloane MS. 5, is given "Amarusca calida, Gall. ameroche, Ang. maithe;" in another list, Sloane MS. 56, "cheleye, i. mathe." The camomile is still known by the appellation Mayweed; Anthemis cotula, Linn. Gerarde describes the "May weed, wild cammomill, stinking mathes, or mauthen," Cotula faetida, and observes that the red kind grows in the west parts of England amongst the corn, as Mayweed does elsewhere, and is called "red maythes, our London women do call it Rose-a-rubie." Ang.-Sax. maȝeðe, maȝða, chamaemelum.

  • Page  321(MAKARE, supra in MACARE, S.)
  • MAKE, or fyt, and mete (mak, fyt, or esy, K.) Aptus, conveniens.
  • MAKE, mathe, wyrm yn þe flesħe (or maye, infra, make, or magot, H. P. magat, may, or math, S.)1. [Maak in the Craven Dailect still means a maggot. Dan. mak, madike, vermis.]Tarmus, CATH. cimex, C. F. COMM.
  • MAKE, or metche.2. ["Collega, a make, or a yomanne." MED. In the edition of the Ortus in Mr. Wilbraham's library collega is rendered "a make, or a felowe." This term, as used by Chaucer and other writers, has the signification of a mate, or fellow, a spouse, either husband or wife. It is said of the turtle dove in the Golden Legend, "When she hath lost her make, she wyll neuer haue other make." See Jamieson. A.-S. maca, consors.]Compar.
  • MAKEREL, fysche. Megarus.
  • MAKYN̄, or make. Facio, plasmo, compono.
  • MAKE ABLE. Habilito.
  • MAKE A-CEETHE (makyn sethe, K. a sythe, P.)3. [The substantive a-cethe has occurred previously, p. 5, where the word has been printed A-CETHEN, a contraction appearing in the Harl. MS. over the final Ē. which, however, is probably erroneous. The word is thus used in the earlier Wicliffite version: "Now than ryse, and go forth, and spekynge do aseethe to thi seruauntis;" in the later, "make satisfaccioun (satisfac servis tuis," Vulg.) ii. Kings, xix. 7. In the later version it occurs in i. Kings, iii. 14: "Therfore y swore to the hows of Heli that the wickidnes of hys hows shal not be doon a-seeth before with slayn sacrifices and ȝiftis;" in the earlier, "schal not be clensid (expietur," Vulg.) See also Mark xv. 15. "Asethe, satisfaccio. To make asethe, satisfacere." CATH. ANG. "Satisfactio, (sic) to make a-sethe." ORTUS. Chaucer, in the Rom. of Rose, 5600, rendered "assez—asseth;" and in the passage previously cited from the Vis. of P. P. the line is printed by Mr. Wright, "if it suffise noght for assetz," where he explains the word as syno∣nymous with the common law term, assets. Compare FULFYLLYN, or make a-cethe in thynge þat wantythe; p. 182.]Satisfacio.
  • MAKE BETTYR. Melioro.
  • MAKE BYTTYR. Exacerbo, ama∣rico.
  • MAKE BLAK. Denigro.
  • MAKE BLUNTE. Obtundo, CATH.
  • MAKE CLENE. Mundo, purgo, purifico.
  • MAKE COMUENAUNT, or com∣naunt (cōmavnt, K. cumnawnte, S. couenaunt, P.)4. [Some doubt may here arise as to the power of the contractions in the MS. cōue∣naunt, or cōnaunt. Compare BREKE cōuenant, p. 50, and see the note on cūnawnte, p. 108.]Pango.
  • MAKE DEEF. Surdo, CATH.
  • MAKE DRUNKYN̄. Inebrio.
  • MAKE DUL. Hebeto, obtundo, etc. ut supra.
  • MAKE EVYN̄. Equo.
  • Page  322MAKE FET, or fat. Impinguo, sagino.
  • MAKE FOWLE. Deturpo, sordido.
  • MAKE GAY. Orno.
  • MAKE FREE. Manumitto.
  • MAKE HARD. Induro (duro, P.)
  • MAKE HEVY in herte, or sory. Contristo, molesto, mestico, CATH. (mestifico, P.)
  • MAKE HEVY yn wyghte. Gravo.
  • MAKE IOY, idem quod IOYN̄, supra in I. (maken ioyze, supra in ioyze, P.)
  • MAKE KNOWYN̄' (makyng open, HARL. MS. 2274.) Manifesto, notifico.
  • MAKE LARGE. Amplio.
  • MAKE LAWFULLE. Legitimo.
  • MAKE LENE. Macero.
  • MAKE LESSE. Minoro.
  • MAKE MEENDE (make mynde, or brynge to mynde, K. P.) Com∣memoro.
  • MAKE MERVELYOWS, or wonder∣fulle. Mirifico.
  • MAKE MERY, and gladyn̄ oþer menn. Letifico; (nota, P.) supra in GLADYN̄, G.
  • MAKE MERY, or be mery yn herte or chere. Letor, jocor, jocundor.
  • MAKE MORE. Majoro.
  • MAKE NESCHE (or make softe, infra.) Mollifico, molleo, CATH.
  • MAKE PERFYTTE. Perficio.
  • MAKE PLEYNE. Plano, complano.
  • MAKE PLAYNTE (make pleyne, S.) Conqueror.
  • MAKE PLENTYVOWS (plentows, HARL. MS. 2274.) Fecundo.
  • MAKE QWEYNT, or wonderfulle (make qveynte, or wonder, S.) Mirifico.
  • MAKE REDY. Paro.
  • MAKE RYCHE. Dito.
  • MAKE PASTE. Intero.
  • MAKE SACRIFYCE. Sacrifico.
  • MAKE SEKYR in grawnte. Rati∣fico, confirmo.
  • MAKE SYGH̄TY (sythty, K. sythy, S.) Elucido.
  • MAKE SOFTE, idem quod MAKE NESCHE, supra.
  • MAKE SOLEMPNYTE (solempte, K.) Solempnizo.
  • MAKE TOKYN̄ to a-nodyr, or bekyn̄' (beknynge, HARL. MS. 2274.) Nuo, annuo.
  • MAKE WERY. Fatigo, lasso.
  • MAKE WYTHE CHYLDE. Im∣pregno.
  • MAKYNGE. Faccio, factura.
  • MAKLY, or esyly.1. [The adjective MAKE has occurred already, and the reading of the King's Coll. MS. gives easy, as synonymous therewith. Jamieson cites Douglas, who uses the word in the sense of evenly, or equally. Compare Ang.-Sax. macalic, opportunus; Belg. maklyk, easy. Sir Thomas Brown gives matchly as a Norfolk word; it is likewise given by Forby, and signifies exactly alike, fitting nicely; the modern pronunciation being, as stated by the latter, mackly. Ang.-Sax. maka, par.]Faciliter (apte, P.)
  • MALENCOLYE, complexiōn' (male∣coly, K.) Malencolia, vel ma∣lancolia, secundum C. F. (et malincolica, UG. in cirus, S.)
  • MALENCOLYOWS (malecoliowus, K.) Malencolicus.
  • MALAPERT (or presumptuowse, infra.) Effrons.
  • Page  323MALARDE, bryde (or mavelarde, infra.) Anas (anatinus, P.)
  • MALAWNDER, sekeness.1. [This term denotes most commonly the disease in the legs of horses, as causing them mal andare, to go ill, according to Skinner's observation. Malandria, however, in medieval Latin, as in French malandrie, denoted generally an ulcer, a disease diffi∣cult of cure, as leprosy. See Ducange. "Malandrie, sickenesse, malandre. Malandre, malandre, serot." PALSG. In a veterinary treatise, Julius, D. VIII. f. 114, the following remedy is given "for the Malaundres. Tac parroures of chese, and tac hony, and tempre hem to-gedre, and ley hit on þe sore as hot as þou may."]Morbus.
  • MALE of trussynge, and caryage.2. ["A male, mantica, involucrum." CATH. ANG. "Male, or wallet to putte geare or stuffe in, malle." PALSG. Horman says, "Undo my male, or boudget (bulga, hip∣popera, bulgula.)" The horse by which it was carried was termed a somer, or sompter horse, sommier. See SOMER HORS, hereafter. In Norfolk the cushion to carry lug∣gage upon, behind a servant attending his master on a journey, is still called a male-pillion.]Mantica.
  • MALE HORSE. Gerulus, CATH. somarius, CATH. in gerulus.
  • MALE, best or fowle, no femel. Masculus, CATH. mas.
  • MALYCE. Malicia.
  • MALYCYOWSE. Maliciosus.
  • MALYET, betyl (malle or malyet, H. P. malys, S.) Malleolus, CATH. marculus, CATH.
  • MALKYNE, or Mawt, propyr name (Molt, K. Mawde, W.) Matildis (Matilda, P.)
  • MALKYNE, mappyl, or oven swe∣pare (malpyle, S. ouen swepe, H. P.)3. ["Fornaculum, Fornacale, instrumentum ad opus fornacis, a malkyne, or a malott." MED. MS. CANT. "A malyne (sic), tersorium." CATH. ANG. "Malkyn for an ouyn, frovgon." PALSG. Holliband renders "Waudrée, the clout wherewith they clense, or sweepe the ouen, called a maukin. Escouillon, an ouen sweeper, a daflin." "A malkin, vide Scoven (sic). A Scovel or maulken, ligaculum, scopula. Penicillum, a bull's tail, a wisp, a shoo-clout, a mawkin, or drag to sweep an oven." GOULDM. This term is still used in Somersetshire. It would appear from the Medulla that this word was also used as an opprobrious appellation: "Gallinacius; i. homo debilis, a malkyn, and a capoun." Forby gives maukin, as signifying either a dirty wench, or a scarecrow of shreds and patches.]Dossorium, tersorium (DICC. S.)
  • MALT. Braseum.
  • MALTE BOWDE (or wevyl, infra.)4. [Compare BOWDE, malte-worme; p. 46, and BUDDE, flye; p. 54. In the Eastern counties weevils that breed in malt are termed bowds, according to Ray, Forby and Moore; the word is repeatedly used by Tusser. R. Holme says that "the Wievell eateth and devoureth corn in the garners: they are of some people called bowds." Acad. of Arm. B. ii. p. 467. The appellation is applied to other coleopterous insects. Gower compares the envious to the "sharnbudes kynde," which, flying in the hot sun of May, has no liking for fair flowers, but loves to alight on the filth of any beast, wherein alone is its delight. "Crabro, quedam musca, a gnat, or a sharnebode. Scarabeus, a sharne budde." MED. R. Holme mentions the "Blatta, or shorn bud, or painted beetle." Ang.-Sax. scearn, stercus. In Arund. MS. 42, f. 64, an insect is described which devours the young shoots of trees. "Bruk is a maner of flye, short and brodissh, and in a sad husc, blak hed, in shap mykel toward a golde bowde, and mykhede of twyis and þryis atte moste of a gold bowde, a chouere, oþer vulgal can y non þerfore." The name gold bowde probably denotes a species of Chrysomela, Linn.]Gurgulio, KYLW.
  • Page  324(MALTE COMYS, supra in COMYS.)1. ["Germinatus, commyn as malte." ORTUS. Harrison, in his Description of Eng∣land, speaking of the making of malt, says that the grain is steeped, and the water drained form it; it is then laid on the floor in a heap, "untill it be readie to shoote at the root end, which maltsters call commyng. When it beginneth therefore to shoot in this maner, they saie it is come, and then fortwith they spread it abroad, first thicke, and afterward thinner and thinner vpon the said floore (as it commeth), and there it lieth by the space of one and twentie dayes at the least." B. ii. c. 6. Holinsh, i. 169. R. Holme, among terms used by malt-makers, says that "the comeing of barley, or malt, is the spritting of it, as if it cast out a root." Acad. of Arm. B. iii. p. 105. The little sprouts and roots of malted barley, when dry, and separated by the screen, are still called in Norfolk malt-cumbs, according to Forby. Bp. Kennett gives "Malt comes, or malt comings, the little beards or shoots, when malt begins to run, or come; Yorkshire." Lansd. MS. 1033. See Craven Glossary and Jamieson. Compare Isl. keima, Germ. keimen, germinare.]
  • MALTYN̄', or make malt. Brasio.
  • MALTYNGE. Brasiatura (bras∣iacio, P.)
  • MALSTERE, or maltestere (maltar, H. P.) Brasiatrix, brasiator.
  • MALWE, herbe. Malva.
  • MANNE. Homo, vir, mas.
  • MANASSE, or thretynge. Mine.
  • MANASSYD, or thret. Minatus.
  • MANASSYNGE. Minatus, commi∣nacio.
  • MANDRAGGE, herbe (mandrake, K. H. P.)2. [The strange and superstitious notions that obtained in olden times regarding the mandrake, its virtues, and the precautions requisite in removing it from the soil, are recorded by numerous writers. In an Anglo-Saxon Herbal of the Xth cent. Vitell. C. III. f. 53, vo, a representation will be found of the plant, at the side of which ap∣pears the dog, whose services were used in dragging it up. The account there given of the herb has been printed by Mr. Thorpe in his Analecta. Alex. Neccham, who died 1227, mentions it as if it had been commonly cultivated in gardens, which should be decked, as he observes in his treatise de naturis rerum, "rosis et liliis, solsequiis, molis et mandra∣goris." Roy. MS. 12 G. XI. f. 77. The author, however, of the treatise on the qualities of herbs, written early in XVth cent., who appears to have cultivated in his herber at Stepney many botanical rarities, speaks of the "mandrage" as a plant that he had see once only. He admits that as to any sexual distinction in the roots, "kynde neuere ȝaf to erbe þe forme and þe kynde of man: some takyn seere rootys, and keruyn swuche formys, as we han leryd of vpelonders;" Arund. MS. 42, f. 31, vo. The curious relation that he gives of his detection of an aged man, who kept in a strong chest a mandrake root, which brought him daily "a fayre peny," is a remarkable illustration of the credulity of the age. See further on this subject Roy. MS. 18 A. VI. f. 83, vo; Trevisa's version of Barthol. de Propr. B. xvij. c. 104; Bulleine's Bulwarke of Defence, p. 41; Browne's Vulgar Errors, and Philip's Flora Historica, i. 324. Singular re∣presentations of the "mandragolo" and "mandragola," executed by an Italian de∣signer in the earlier part of the XVIth cent., are preserved in the Add. MS. 5281, f. 125 and 129, vo. The dog drags up the monstrous root by a chain attached to its ancles, whilst his master stops his ears, to escape the maddening effects of the mandrake's screams.]Mandrogara.
  • MANE of an horse. Juba, CATH.
  • MANER, dwellynge place (or lord∣ship, K.) Manerium, predium, munium, COMM.
  • MANER, vse or custōm. Modus, consuetudo (maneries, P.)
  • MANER of theve (maner, or thewe, K. H. S. P.) Mos.
  • MANNFULLE. Humanus, mag∣nanimus.
  • Page  325(MANFULLI, K. H. S. P. Viriliter, humane, magnanimiter.)
  • MAGNETE, precyowse stone. Magnes.
  • MAGNYFYEN, or make mykyl of thynge yn preysynge (make moche preysynge of a thinge, P.) Magnifico.
  • MANNHOOD. Humanitas, viri∣litas.
  • MANY. Multus.
  • MANYCLE. Manica, C. F. cathena, secundum sacram scripturam.
  • MANYMANERYS, or manyfold. Multiformis, multipharius, mul∣liplex.
  • MANYFOLDE WYSE. Multipharie, multipliciter.
  • MANY MANER WYSE, idem est.
  • MANIURE (maniowre, S. P.) Man∣sorium, presepium, C. F. pre∣sepe.
  • MANKYD, or maymyd.1. [This word seems to be derived from mancus, or the old French manche, mutilated, deprived of the use of a hand, or a limb. The participle "mankit," maimed, occurs in Golagros and Gawane, 1013. See also the passages cited by Jamieson. Compare Teut. mancken, Belg. minken, mutilare.]Muti∣latus.
  • MANKKYN̄', or maynyn̄'. Mutilo.
  • MANKYNGE, or maymynge. Mu∣tilacio.
  • MANNE OF LAW. Jurisperitus, scriba (legisperitus, P.)
  • MANNE QWELLARE. Homicida, cedes, sanguinarius, CATH. (plagiarius, P.)
  • MANN QWELLYNGE, or man slaw∣tur (manslawt, K. S.) Homi∣cidium, cedes, C. F.
  • MANUELE, booke of minster wythe the sacramentys.2. [The manuale occurs among the service books which, at the synod of Exeter, in 1287, it was ordained that every parish should provide; Wilk. Conc. ii. 139. The Constitutions of Abp. Winchelsey, in 1305, comprise a similar requisition. Lyndwood defines it as containing "omnia quae—spectant ad sacramentorum et sacramentalium ministrationem." It comprises also the various forms of benediction; and in the printed editions of the Manuale ad usum Sarum are added the curious instructions for the seclusion of lepers. "Manuels" are included amongst the books which, by the Stat. 3 and 4 Edw. VI. were "cleerelie and utterlie abolished, and forbidden for euer to be used or kept in this realme."]Manuale, KYLW.
  • MAPPEL, idem quod MALKYN, supra.3. [Mappel seems to be a diminutive of the old French mappe, a clout to wipe anything withal.]
  • MAPULLE, tree. Acer.
  • MARBUL, stone. Marmor.
  • MARBUL, whyghte stone. Parium C. F.
  • MARSCHALE. Marescallus.
  • MARCHAUNTE. Mercator, ne∣gociator, institor, CATH.
  • MARCHAUNDYSE. Mercimonium, commercium, merca(n)cia.
  • MARCHAUNTSYN̄', or chafferyn̄', Mercor, negocior.
  • MARCHE, myddys be-twyx ij. cun∣trees (a-twixyn, K. be-twyn, S.)4. ["A marche, marchia, maritima." CATH. ANG. "Marches bytwene two landes, frontiéres." PALSG. The frontiers of a country were termed in medieval Latin marchia, in French, marches; and in Britain the terms "marches of Wales—the Northern marches," were still in use at no very remote period. Ang.-Sax. mearce, fines. See Kilian and Wachter. The verb to march, to border upon, is used by Gower; Sir John Maundevile also describes one course for the pilgrim to the Holy Land "thorghe Almanye, and thorghe the kyngdom of Hungarye, that marchethe to the lond of Polayne (quod conterminum est.)" See Voiage, pp. 8, 50.]Marchia, confinium, C.F.
  • Page  326MARCHE, monythe. Marcius.
  • MARE, or nyȝhte mare.1. [It has been affirmed that the Mara was reverenced as a deity by the Northern tribes; in Britain it appears only to have been regarded as a supernatural being, the visits of which were to be averted by physical charms, such as the hag-stone, called in the North the mare-stane. Of the popular belief respecting the Ephialtes see the curious passages printed by Mr. Wright in the Introduction to the Trial of Alice Kyteler; and Keysler, Ant. Sept. p. 497. Chaucer gives in the Miller's Tale, v. 3481, a singular night spell, to preserve the house from the approach of spirits, and "the nightes mare." "Night mare, goublin." PALSG. It was termed in French godemare, according to Cotgrave. Ang.-Sax. mara, incubus.]Epialtes.
  • MARE, or wyche. Magus, maga, sagana, UG. in sagio.
  • MARGERY, propyr name. Mar∣geria.
  • (MARGARET, proper name, P. Margareta.)
  • MARGERY, perle.2. ["A margaryte stone, margarita." CATH. ANG. "Margery perle, nacle." PALSG. In Trevisa's version of Higden's Polych. B. i. c. 41, amongst the productions of Britain, are mentioned "muscles, that haue within hem margery perles of alle maner of colour and hewe, of rody, and reed purpure, and of blewe, and specially and moost of white." Chaucer speaks of the precious "margarite perle," formed in a blue muscle shell on the sea coast of "the More Britaine;" Test. of Love, B. iii. In Arund. MS. 42, f. 12, vo, allusion is made to the supposed cause of the formation of "margery perle—produced in muscle, or cokle, from dew of heaven." In the Wicliffite version pearls are called "margaritis," Matt. vii. 6; xiii. 46. Horman observes that "margaritis be called pearles, of a mountayne in the see of Ynde, called Permula, where is plentye of them."]Margarita.
  • MARGYNE, or brynke. Margo.
  • MARY, propyr name. Maria.
  • MARY, or marow of a boōn (marwhe, K. H. marughe, P.) Medulla.
  • MARYABLE, abylle to be maryed. Nubilis, C. F.
  • MARYAGE. Mar(i)tagium, con∣jugium.
  • MARYCE of a fen (or myre, or moore, infra.) Mariscus, la∣bina, UG. V. in L. et COMM.
  • MARYYN̄' (marytyn, K.) Marito.
  • MARKE, propyr name. Marcus.
  • MARK, of money. Marcha.
  • MARKET, of byynge and syllynge. Mercatus, C. F.
  • MARKET PLACE. Forum, C. F. mercatorium, UG. in merco, et KYLW. emptorium, mercatus, C. F.
  • MARKET DASCHARE.3. [This term is synonymous with that used by Chaucer in reference to the Miller of Trumpington, described as being proud as a peacock, and whom none dared to touch or aggrieve; "He was a market-beter at the full." Reve's T. 3934. The old Glossarist explained this as denoting one who made quarrels at the market, but it seems rather to imply one who swaggers about, and elbows his way through the crowd. "A merket∣beter, circumforanus." CATH. ANG. "Circumforanus, a goere aboute þe market." MED. "Batre les rues, to revell, jet, or swagger up and down the streets a nights. Bateur de pavez, an idle, or continuall walk-street; a jetter abroad in the streets," rendered also under the word Pavé "a pavement beater, a rakehell," &c. COTG.]Circum∣foranus, UG. in circum.
  • Page  327MARL, or chalke. Creta, C. F.
  • MARLPYTTE, or chalke pytte. Cretarium.
  • MARLYD, or snarlyd. Illaque∣atus, innodatus.
  • (MARLYD, as lond, K. Cretatus.)
  • MARLYN', or snarlyn̄'.1. [To marl is retained as a sea term, signifying, according to Ash, to fasten the sails with writhes of untwisted hemp dipped in pitch, and called marlines. Compare Dutch, marrelen, to intangle one in another; Dan. merling, pack-thread.]Illaqueo.
  • MARMESET, beeste. Zinziphalus, cenozephalus, KYLW. mammo∣netus, C. F. marmonetus, COMM.
  • MARTLOGE.2. [The martyrologium was, in the earlier times, the register of names of saints and martyrs, which served to bring each successively to the memory of the faithful, on the anniversary of his Passion. At a later period the term denoted, in monastic establish∣ments especially, the register more properly called necrologium, or obituary, wherein were inscribed the obits and benefactions of those who had been received into the fra∣ternity of the congregation, and whose names were thus in due course brought to mind, being recited day by day in the chapter, and suitable prayers said. The martyrology was termed also liber vitae, and the memorial inscribed annotatio Regulae, because it was generally annexed to the Rule, and connected therewith was the obituary, wherein the deaths of abbots, priors, and members of the congregation in general, were recorded. The martyrologium occurs next to the regula canonicorum, among the gifts of Bp. Leofric to Exeter, in 1050. The nature of the entries made may be seen by Leland's "thingges excerptid out of the martyrologe booke at Saresbyri," and at Hereford. Itin. iii. f. 64; viii. f. 79. A remarkable specimen of such a register is supplied by the Liber Vitae of Durham, commencing from Xth century; COTT. MS. DOM. A. VII. See Kennett's Glossary to Par. Ant. In the version of Vegecius attributed to Trevisa, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. it is said that the Roman legions, "with her chosen horsemen i-rolled in the constables martiloge (matriculae), were euer-more myghty i-nowe to kepe her wardes," without auxiliaries. B. ii. c. 2. It is here put for the muster-roll, termed album, or pittacium.]Martilogium, KYLW.
  • MARTNET, byrd (martenet, K. H. P.)3. [The martinet or martlet is the Hirundo urbica, Linn. and both appellations appear to have been taken from the French. Skinner considers it to be a diminutive of the proper name, comparing the usage of calling a parrot or a starling Richard, or a ram Robert, and rejects as fanciful the conjecture of Minsheu that the name martinet was given in allusion to its arrival at the end of March, and migration before St. Martin's day. "Martynet, a byrde, martinet." PALSG.]Turdus, padellus, pandellus.
  • MARTER. Martir.
  • MARWE, or felawe yn trauayle (or mate, infra; marowe, P.)4. [The term marrow is used in this sense by Tusser, but appears to be no longer known in East Anglia. It is retained in the Northern, Shropshire, and Exmoor dialects; see the quotations given in the Craven Glossary, and Jamieson. It occurs in the Townl. Myst. p. 110. "A marrow, or fellow, socius." GOULDM. Minsheu would derive it from the Hebrew.]Socius, compar (sodalis, P.)
  • MAROWE, idem quod MARY.
  • MASSAGE. Nuncium, legatum, legacio.
  • Page  328MASSANGERE (massager, K.) Num∣cius, legatus, veredarius, CATH.
  • MASCHEL, or rothyr, or masch∣scherel.1. [This term evidently implies the implement used for mashing or mixing the malt, to which, from resemblance in form, the name rudder is also given. In Withal's little Dictionary, enlarged by W. Clerk, among the instruments of the Brew-house, is given "a rudder, or instrument to stir the meash-fatte with, motaculum."]Remulus, palmula, mixtorium.
  • MASCHYN̄, yn brewynge. Misceo. (pandoxo, S.)
  • MASCHYNGE. Mixtura, mixtio.
  • MASSE, or gobet of mete, or other lyke. Massa.
  • MASERE.

    2. "A maser, cantarus, murra, murreus: hec murpis arbor est." CATH. ANG. "Masar of woode, masière, hanap." PALSG. There can be little doubt that the maser, the favourite drinking vessel used by every class of society in former times, was called murrus, from a supposed resemblance to the famed Myrrhene vases of antiquity. The maser was, however, formed of wood, especially the knotty-grained maple, and esteemed in proportion to the quality of the veined and mottled material, but especially the value of the bands and rings of precious metals, enamelled, chased, or graven, with which the wood was mounted. In Latin this kind of vessel was called mazerinus, maderinus, madelinus, masdrinum, &c. in French madre, maselin, or ma∣zerin; and it seems probable that the name mether, applied to the ancient cups of wood preserved in Ireland, may be of cognate derivation. Amongst innumerable instances where mention occurs of the cyphus murreus, of maser, in wills and other documents, may be cited the Inventories taken at St. Paul's, 1295, printed by Dugdale, and at Canterbury, 1328, given by Dart from Cott. MS. Galba, E. IV. f. 185. In the Register of benefactors of St. Albans, Nero, D. VIII. f. 87, Thos. de Hatfelde, Bp. of Durham, 1345, is represented holding his gift in his hands, namely, a covered mazer, "cyphum suum murreum, quem Wesheyl nostris temporibus appellamus." A maser very similar in form, but without a cover, was in the possession of the late John Gage Rokewode, Esq. It is of knotty, dark-coloured wood, mounted with metal: on the small plate, termed crusta, attached to the bottom, is graven the monogram IHC. and around the brim the following couplet:

    "✚ Hold ȝowre tunge, and sey þe best,
    and let ȝowre neyȝbore sitte in rest:
    Hoe so lustyþe god to plese,
    let hys neyȝbore lyue in ese."

    Similar instances of masers bearing inscriptions may be found in Testam. Ebor. i. 209, and Richard's Hist. of Lynn, i. 479. Doublet, in his Hist. of St. Denis, describes the richly-ornamented "hanap de bois de mardre," which had been used by St. Louis, and presented to that church. "Vermiculatus variatus ad modum vermis, distinctus, rubeus, maderde." MED. "Madré, of wood whose grain is full of crooked and speckled streakes, or veins." COTG. Plantin, in the Flemish Dict. 1573, gives "Maser, un noeud ou bosse à un arbre nommée erable. Maseren hout, acernum lignum." In Syre Gawene and the Carle a lady's harp is described, formed "of masere fyne," v. 433, which Sir F. Madden explains to be the wood of the maple. See on the manufacture of "hanas de madre" the Reglements sur les métiers de Paris au XIII. siècle; Documents inédits sur l'histoire de France, p. 112 edited by Depping. Compare RONNYN, as masere, or other lyke, hereafter.

    Murrus, DICC. murra, UG. in amarus.
  • MASSY, noȝt hole. Solidus.
  • MASYL, or mazil, sekenesse.3. ["Lepra, quedam infirmitas, meselrye. Leprosus, mesell, or full of lepre." ORTUS. It appears that, though this term was frequently used as synonymous with leprosy, they were sometimes considered as distinct. See Roquefort, v. Mesel. R. Brunne calls the leprous Baldwin, King of Jerusalem, "þe meselle," and states that for "foule meselrie he comond with no man." Langt. Chron. p. 140. In the earlier Wicliffite version the Syrian Naaman, iv. Kings, c. 5, and the four lepers in Samaria, c. 7, are called "mesels." See also Sir Tristrem, p. 181; Vis. of Piers P. v. 1624, 4689, and 11,024; Chaucer, Persones T. &c. "A meselle, serpedo." CATH. ANG. "Mesyll, a sicke man, meseav. Mesyll, the sickenesse, mesellerie." PALSG. "Meseau, a meselled, scurvy, leaporous, lazarous person." COTG. See Weber's notes on Amis and Amiloun, and Jamieson.]Page  329Serpedo, variola, volatica, se∣cundum phisicos.
  • MASELYD. Serpiginosus, vel ser∣pigionatus, volaticiosus.
  • MASKE of a nette. Macula CATH. et C. F.
  • MASONE, werkemann. Lathomus.
  • MASON̄RYE. Lathomia.
  • MASONYS EX. Lathomega, COMM. asciolus, UG. in acuo.
  • MASONYS LOGGE. Lapidicina, UG. in laos.
  • (MASSE, or messe, infra. Missa.)
  • MAST of a schyppe. Malus, CATH.
  • MAST HOG (or, H. P.) swyne (mastid swyne, K. maste, S.)

    1. Masty signifies swine glutted with acorns or berries. A.-S. maeste, esca, baccae.

    "Ye mastie swine, ye idle wretches,
    Full of rotten slow tetches."

    Chaucer III. B. of Fame.

    "Masty, fatte, as swyne be, gras. Maste for hogges, novriture à povrceaux. Acorne, mast for swyne, gland. Many of falowe dere dyeth in the wynter for faulte of maste (mast), and that they haue no yonge springes to brouse vpon." PALSG. Compare MESTYF, hogge, or swyne; and FAT FOWLE, or beste, mestyde to be slayne, p. 151.

    Maialis, CATH.
  • MASTYF, hownde (or mestyf, infra.) Spartanus, COMM.
  • MASTYK, spyce. Mastix.
  • MASTYN̄ beestys. Sagino, im∣pinguo.
  • MATE, idem quod FELAW, supra in F. (or marwe, K.)
  • MATTE, or natte. Matta, C. F. storium, C. F. et UG. in stasis, mattula, C. F.
  • MATEYNYS. Matutine.
  • MATERE. Materia.
  • MATTERAS, vndyr clothe of a bed (matrace, K.) Lodix, CATH. matracia.
  • MATFELŌN, herbe.2. ["Mattefelone, Jacea, herba est." CATH. ANG. It is said in a Treatise on the virtues of herbs, Roy. MS. 18 A. VI. f. 78, vo. that "Jasia nigra ys an herbe þat me clepyþ maudefelune, or bolwed, or yrychard, oþer knoppewede: þys herbe haþ leuys ylyke to scabyose, and þys herbe haþ a flour of purpul colour." In the Synonymia of herbs, Sloane MS. 5, is given "Jacea nigra, Gall. madfeloun, Ang. snapwort." Gerard mentions the English names knap-weed, bull-weed, and matfelon; also materfillon, or matrefillen. It is the Centaurea nigra, Linn. Parkinson affirms that this plant is called "matrefillon very corruptly from Aphylanthes," because the flowers are leafless; and Skinner suggests that from its scabrous nature it is suited to scourge felons withal. Belg. matten, fatigare. Cow-wede is again mentioned hereafter, under the word OCULUS CHRISTI.]Jacia nigra; et alba dicitur scabyowse, vel covwede (cowewed, K. cobbed, P.)
  • MATYN at the chesse (mattyn, S. P.) Mato, ij. libro de tribus Dietis, capitulo ij.
  • MATYNGE at the chesse. Matacio; in libro iij. de dominis, ca. ij.
  • Page  330(MATTED at the ches, P.)
  • MATTOK, instrument (or pykeys, or twybyl, infra.) Ligo, DICC. marra, DICC.
  • MATRONE, eld woman. Matrona.
  • MAW, Jecur.
  • MAVELARDE, idem quod MALARD.
  • MAVYCE, byrde.

    1. In Norfolk, according to Forby, the smaller thrush only, Turdus musicus, Linn. is called mavis. The name is used by Chaucer, R. of Rose, 619; and Spenser,

    "The Thrush replyes, the Mavis descant playes."

    Epithal. 81.

    "Maviscus, ficedula, mawysse." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. "Mauys, a byrde, mavuis." PALSG. "Mauvis, a Mavis, a Throstle, of Thrush." COTG. See Jamieson.

    Maviscus, me∣rula, fallica.
  • MAWMENT.2. [It is evident that the name of Mahomet became, as in old French, a term denoting any idol; as also mahomerie, in low Latin mahomeria, was used to signify the worship of any false deity. Amongst the charges brought by the King of France against Pope Boniface VIII. one was that he "haunted maumetrie." Langt. Chron. p. 320. In the version of the Manuel des Pecches, R. Brunne uses the word, speaking of a "prest of Sarasyne," who lived in "maumetry." HARL. MS. 1701, f. 2. See also R. Glouc. p. 14; Chaucer, Cant. T. 4656; Persone's T. p. 85; the Wicliffite version, i. Cor. xii. 2; i. John, v. 21; and the relation of the conversion of King Lucius in Hardyng's Chron. Hall calls Perkin Warbeck the Duchess of Burgundy's "newly-invented mawmet," and speaks of him as the "feyned duke—but a peinted image." The cir∣cumstance that this name was applied to him is shown likewise by the passage in Pat. 14 Hen. VII. 1498, regarding the punishment of those persons in Devon and Cornwall who "Michaeli Joseph rebelli et proditori nostro, aut cuidam idolo, sive simulacro, nomine Petro Warbek, infimi status viro, adhoeserint." Rymer, xii. 696. So also Fabyan, relating the insurrections at Paris and Rouen in 1455, says that the men of Rouen "made theym a mamet fatte and vnweldy, as a vylayne of the cytye, and caryed him about the towne in a carte, and named hym, in dyrysyon of theyr prynce, theyr kynge." Chron. Part VII. 7 Charles VII. "Chamos, a mawmett. Pigmeus, a mawmett, or a fals mawmetrye, cubitalis est." MED. MS. CANT. "A mawmentt, idolum, simulachrum. Mawmentry; a mawment place; a mawment wyrscheper," &c. CATH. ANG. "Simulachrum—a mawmet, or an ydoll." ORTUS. "Maumentry, baguenaulde. Maument, marmoset, poupee." PALSG. "A maumet, i. a child's babe." GOULDMAN. See Mawment in Brockett, and the Craven Dialect.]Ydolum, simulacrum.
  • MA(W)MENTRYE. Ydolatria.
  • MAWMENTER, or he þat dothe mawmentrye. Ydolatra.
  • (MAWND, skype, S.3. ["Mawnde, ubi mete vesselle (escale.)" CATH. ANG. Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, "Ghyselin the mande maker (corbillier) hath sold his vannes, his mandes (corbilles) or corffes." "Manne, mande, a maunde, flasket, open basket, or pannier having handles." COTG. This word is given by Ray, as used in the North, and noticed likewise in the Craven Dialect. It is commonly used in Devon: see Palmer's Glos∣sary. Ang.-Sax. mand, corbis. It seems, as Spelman has suggested, that the Maunday, or dole distributed on Holy Thursday, derived its name from the baskets wherein it was given, and not from the Latin mandatum, in allusion to the command of Christ, or from the French mendier. See a full account of the customs on this occasion in Brand's Popular Antiquities. "Maundy thursday, ievuedy absolv." PALSG.]Sportula.)
  • MAWNDEMENT (of a kinge, or a lorde, P.) Mandatum, precep∣tum (edictum, P.)
  • MAYE, or mathe (worme, P.) idemPage  331quod MAKE, supra (may, or mache, S.)1. [From the alphabetical position, it appears that MAYE should here be read MAÞE. In the Treatise of fishing with an Angle, in the St. Alban's Book, the following are given as baits for roach in July: "The not worme, and mathewes, and maggotes, tyll Myghelmas." Sign. i. ij. Ang.-Sax. maða, vermis. In the Northern Dialect a maggot is called a mauk; see Brockett, Craven Glossary, and Jamieson. "A mawke, cimex, lendex, tarmus. Mawky, cimicosus, tarmosus." CATH. ANG. "Tarmus, simax, a mawke." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. "Tarma, vermis bladi, a mawke." ORTUS.]
  • MEDE, drynke. Medo, C. F. idro∣mellum, C. F. mulsum, UG. in idor, et C. F.
  • MEEDE, rewarde. Premium, re∣tribucio, merces.
  • MEDEFULLE. Meritorius.
  • (MEDEWE, or mydewe, infra. Pratum.)
  • (MEDYATOWRE, idem quod meene, et menowre, infra.)
  • MEDYCYNE (or metycyne, infra.) Medicina.
  • MEDYN̄, or rewardyn̄. Munero, remunero.
  • MEDLE, or mengyn̄ge to-gedur of dyuerse thyngys. Mixtura.
  • (MEDLE coloure, P. Mixtura.)
  • MEDLYN̄, or mengyn̄ (menglyn, S.) Misceo.
  • MEDLYN̄, or entermetyn̄ (inter∣mentyn, P.) Intromitto.
  • MEGYR, fysche.2. [It is not clear whether this is to be considered as an obsolete and local name for the mackarel, megarus having been previously given as the Latin name for that fish; see p. 321. The Maigre, Sciaena aquila, Cuv. Umbra Rondeletii, Willughby, the ce∣lebrated delicacy of the Mediterranean, is a wandering fish, which occasionally has been taken on the coasts of Britain; but the name here seems to be rather a corrup∣tion of the Latin, than derived from the French maigre. See that word in Cotgrave.]Megurus.
  • (MEHCHE, K. or fela, S. metche, P.) Par, compar.
  • (MEYNPRISYN, supra in mayn∣prisyn, P.)
  • (MEYNPRESYNGE, supra in mayn∣prisinge, K. meyme prysynge, S.)
  • (MEYNTEYNE, supra in maynteyn, P.)
  • MEYNTYNOUR, idem quod mayn∣tynour, supra, et in aliâ sillabâ. (Defensor, supportator.)
  • MEYR. Major, pretor, prepositus.
  • MEKE. Humilis, mansuetus.
  • MEKE, and mylde, and buxum. Pius, clemens, benignus.
  • MEKELY. Humiliter, pie, man∣suete, suppliciter.
  • MEKENESSE, or lownesse. Hu∣militas.
  • MEKENESSE, and softenesse. Man∣suetudo, clemencia.
  • MEKYN̄, or make meke, and buxum. Humilio.
  • MEKKYNGE, or a-botchement in byynge (mekment, or boche∣ment, K. meckynge, H.) Am∣plificamentum, CATH. supple∣mentum, CATH. augmentum (auctorium, CATH. P.)
  • MEEL of mete (mele, or mete, S. P.) Commestio, cibatus, UG. et C. F. pastus, refeccio.
  • MEELE of corne growndyn'. Fa∣rina, far, CATH.
  • MELODYE. Melodia.
  • MELODYOWS. Melodiosus.
  • Page  332MELTE, be the selfe. Liqueo, CATH. liquesco.
  • MELTYN̄, or make to melte. Liquo, CATH. liquido, CATH.
  • MELTYNGE. Liquefactio.
  • MELWE, or rype (melowe, P.) Maturus.
  • MEMORYAL. Memoriale.
  • MEMORYAL on a grawe, what so hyt be, in remembrawnce of a dede body (made in meend off ded man or woman, S.) Co∣lossus, i. colens ossa, UG. in colo.
  • MEMBRE, or lym̄. Membrum (artus, P.)
  • MENDE. Memoria, mencio, mens (recordacio, P.)
  • MEENDE HAVER, or mendowre. Memor.
  • MEENDFULLE, or of good meende. Memoriosus C. F. (memorosus, S.)
  • MEENE, myddys (medyl, H. P.) Medium.
  • MENE of a songe. Intercentus, KYLW. (introcentus, S.)
  • MEENE, massyngere (massegere, K.) Internuncius.
  • MEENE, or medyatowre (or me∣nowre, infra.) Mediator.
  • MENE WHYLE. Interim.
  • MEENLY in mesure (meneli, K.) Mediocriter, mensurate.
  • MENGYN̄, idem quod medelyn̄, supra.
  • (MENGYNGE, S. Mixtura, com∣mixtio.)
  • MENY, of howsholde.1. [This term, derived from the French maisnie or magnie, a family, troop, or the suite of a great personage, in low Latin maisnada, or mansionata, is very frequently used by the old writers. Thus in the Wicliffite version, Job i. 3 is thus rendered: "His possessioun was seuene thousand of shep—and ful meche meyne" (familia multa nimis, Vulg.) See also R. Glouc. pp. 167, 180; Tyrwhitt's Glossary appended to Chaucer, and his curious observations on "Hurlewaynes meyne." Sir John Maundevile relates how the Great Chan, Changuys, riding "with a fewe meynee," was assailed by a multitude of his foes, and unhorsed, but saved by means of an owl. Voiage, p. 271. The term is used also to signify the set of chess-men, called in Latin familia, as in the Wardrobe Book 28 Edw. I. p. 351: "una familia pro scaccario de jaspide et cristallo." R. Brunne, in his version of Wace's description of the Coronation of Arthur, says that some of the courtiers "drew forth meyné of the chequer." Caxton, in the Book of Travellers, says, "Grete me the lady or the damyselle of your hous, or of your her∣borough, your wyf, and all your meyne (vostre maisnye.)" "A menȝe, domus, domi∣cilium, familia." CATH. ANG. Horman says. "I dare not cople with myn ennemyes, for my meyny (turmae) be sycke and wounded. A great meny of men can nat ones wagge this stone. Here cometh a great meny (turba.)" Palsgrave gives "Meny, a housholde, menye. Meny of plantes, plantaige. Company, or meyny of shippes, flotte. After a great shower of rayne you shal se the water slyde downe from the hylles, as thoughe there were a menye of brokes (vng tas de ruisseaux) had their springȝ there."]Familia.
  • MENYN̄, or gōon be-twene ij. partyes for a-corde (goo a-twyx for a-cord, HARL. MS. 2274.) Medio.
  • MENYN̄ yn herte, wel or evyl. Intendo, CATH.
  • MENYNGE, a mannys purpos. In∣tencio.
  • MENKTE,2. [MENLTE, MS. menkte, K. S. P. menged, W. Gouldman gives the verb "to mein, vide mingle." Ang.-Sax. menȝan, miscere.] or medelyd. Mixtus, commixtus.
  • Page  333MENOWRE, or medyatowre, idem quod mene.
  • MENOUR FRERE, or frere menowre (menowre friyr', P.) Minor.
  • MENSAL KNYFE, or borde knyfe. Mensalis.
  • MENTEL. Mantellus, clamis, pal∣lium.
  • MENUCE, fysche.1. ["Aforus est piscis, a menuse." MED. See the Equivoca of John de Garlandia, with the interpretations of Magister Galfridus, probably the same as the compiler of the Promptorium, where it is said "Mena est quidam piscis, Anglice a penke, or a menew penke, sic dictus a mena, Grece, quod luna Latine; quia secundum incrementum et decrementum lune singulis mensibus crescit et decrescit." Ed. Pynson, 1514. The minnow is still called pink in Warwickshire, and some other parts of England; see also Plot's Hist. Oxf. and Isaac Walton. Gouldman gives "pisciculi minuti, small fishes called menews or peers."]Silurus, UG. in sileo, menusa, cinalis, KYLW.
  • MEERCERE. Marcerus (merce∣narius, K.)
  • MEERCERY, place or strete where mercerys syllyn̄ here ware (dwell or sell, P.) Merceria.
  • (MERCERY, chaffare, K. H. P. Mercimonium.)
  • MERCY. Misericordia, propici∣acio.
  • MERCYFULLE. Misericors, pro∣picius (propiciatus, P.)
  • MERCYFULLY. Misericorditer.
  • MERCYMENT, or a-mercyment (ameercyment, S.) Multa, C. F. et KYLW.
  • MERCURYE, sterre. Mercurius.
  • MERCURY, herbe.2. [Gautier de Bibelesworth speaks of "mercurial de graunt valur," where the English name, given in the Gloss, is "smerewort." The ancient herbalists are diffuse in their accounts of the virtues of this plant: it is stated by Dioscorides and other writers that the species mariparum and faeminiparum produced the effect of engendering male or female children.]Mercurialis.
  • MEERE, horse. Equa.
  • MERE, watur (mer, or see, water, W.) Mare.
  • MEER, marke be-twene ij. londys (atwen to londys, K.)3. [In Norfolk, according to Forby, a Mara-balk, or mere, is a narrow slip of un∣ploughed land, which separates properties in a common field. "Limes est callis et finis dividens agros, a meere. Bifinium, locus inter duos fines, a mere, or a hedlande." MED. MS. CANT. "A meyre stane, bifinium, limes." CATH. ANG. In a decree, t. Hen. VI. relating to Broadway, Worcestershire, printed by Sir Thomas Phillipps, part of the boundaries of Pershore Abbey is described as the "mere dyche." In the curious herbal, Arund. MS. 42, f. 55, it is said that "Carui—groweþ mykel in merys in þe feld, and in drye placys of gode erþe." In Sir Thos. Wharton's Letter to Hen. VIII. in 1543, regarding the preservation of peace in the North country, is the recommendation "that all the meir grounddes of Yngland and Scotland to bee certanely knowne to the marchers, the inhabitauntes of the same." State Papers, v. 309. The verb to mere, to have a common boundary, occurs in another document, printed in the same collec∣tion; see the Glossary in vol. ii. Leland relates, Itin. vi. p. 62, that "Sir John Dicons told me that yn digging of a balke or mere yn a felde longgyng to the paroche of Keninghaul in Northfolk ther were founde a great many yerthen pottes yn order, cum cineribus mortuorum." Elyot gives "terminalis lapis, a mere stone, laide or pyghte at the ende of sundry mens landes. Cardo, mere, or boundes which passeth through the field." The following words occur in Gouldman: "To cast a meer with a plough, urbo. A meer, or mark, terminus, meta, limes. A meer stone, v. Bound." Ang.-Sax. meare, finis.]Meta, meris, C. F. et UG. limes, C. F. (divia, interfinium, K. diuisa, P.)
  • Page  334MERESAUCE.1. ["Mere sauce for flesshe, savlmure." PALSG. The Anglo-Saxon name for pickle, or brine, was morode; in old French mure. "Saulmure, pickle, the brine of salt; the liquor of flesh, or fish pickled, or salted in barrels, &c." COTG.]Muria, NECC.
  • MERKE, tokyne. Signum, carac∣ter, UG.
  • MERKE of bowndys, as dolys, and other lyke (supra in mere, P.)2. [See the note on the word DOLE, p. 126.]Tramaricia, CATH. (meta, W.)
  • (MERKE, or prykke, infra. Meta.)
  • MERKYD, or merkyn̄ (or morkyn̄, infra; morkyn, K. P. tokenyd, W.) Signatus.
  • MERKYN̄. Signo, consigno.
  • MERKYNGE. Signacio.
  • MERLYNGE. fyshe. Gamarus, merlingus, COMM.
  • MERLYONE, byrd (merlinge, P.) Merulus, C. F. alietus, C. F.
  • MERMAYDYN̄. Cirena, siren, CATH.
  • MERVALE. Mirabile, prodigium, portentum, mirum.
  • MERVELYN̄. Miror, admiror.
  • MERVALYOWSE. Mirabilis, mirus.
  • MERVELYOWSE yn werkynge. Mi∣rificus.
  • MESSE of mete. Ferculum.
  • MESSE, or masse. Missa.
  • MESSBOKE. Missale, missalis.
  • MESTYF, hogge, or swyne.3. [See the note on the word MAST HOG, or mastid swyne, according to the reading of the Cambridge MS. In the Catholicon maialis is explained to be "porcus domesticus et pinguis, carens testiculis;" to which is added in the Ortus, "a bargh hogge." The Winchester MS. agrees here in the reading MESTYF, otherwise it might have been con∣jectured that it should have been written MESTYD hogge; the derivation in either case being apparently from the Ang.-Sax. maestan, saginare. Skinner supposes that the word mastiff, denoting a dog of unusual size, is also thence derived; but it seems more probable that it was taken from the old French mestif, which, according to Cotgrave, signified a mongrel. In the Craven Dialect a great dog is still called a masty.]Mai∣alis, CATH.
  • MESTYF, hownde, idem quod mastyf, supra; et spartanus, C. F. CATH. umber, KYLW.
  • MEYSTEN̄, idem quod mastyn̄.
  • MESTLYONE, or monge corne (or dragge, supra; mestilione, corne, K. mongorne, S.)4. [Meslin-bread, made with a mixture of equal part of wheat and rye, was, according to Forby, formerly considered as a delicacy in the Eastern counties, the household loaf being composed of rye alone. The mixed grain termed maslin is commended by Tusser. It was used in France in the concoction of beer, as appears by the regulations for the brewers of Paris, 1254, who were to use "grains, c'est à savoir, d'orge, de mestuel, et de dragée." Reglements, t. Louis IX. ed. Depping, p. 29. In 1327, it appears by the almoner's accounts at Ely that five quarters of mesling cost 20s. and two quarters of corn 9s. 4d. Stevenson's Supp. to Bentham, p. 53. In 1466 Sir John Howard paid, amongst various provisions for his "kervelle" on a voyage to "Sprewse, for a combe of mystelon, ij.s. vj.d." Household Expenses, presented to the Roxburghe Club by B. Botfield, Esq. p. 347. See also a letter, about 1482, in the Paston Correspondence, V. 292. In the Inventory of Merevale Abbey, taken in 1538, occurs "grayne at the monastery, myskelen, xij. strykes." At the dinner given in 1561 to the Duke of Norfolk by the Mayor of Norwich, there were provided "xvj. loves white bread, iv.d. xviij. loves wheaten bread, ix.d. iij. loves mislin bread, iij.d." Leland, Itin. vi. xvij. Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, that "Paulyn the meter of corne hath so moche moten of corne and of mestelyn (mestelon) that he may no more for age." Plot states that the Oxfordshire land termed sour is good for wheat and "miscellan," namely, wheat and rye mixed. Hist. Oxf. p. 242. In the Ortus, mixtilio is rendered "medeled corne;" in Harl. MS. 1587, "mastcleyne." "Mastilȝone, bigermen, mixtilio." CATH. ANG. Palsgrave gives "mestlyon corne," and "masclyne corne;" and Cotgrave "Tramois, meslin of oats and barlie mixed. Meteil, messling, or misslin, wheat and rie mingled, sowed, and used together." See DRAGGE, menglyd corne, p. 130.]Mixtilio, bi∣germen, UG. in bis.
  • MESURABLY. Mensurate (mo∣derate, P.)
  • Page  335MESURE (or met, infra.) Men∣sura.
  • MESURE, yn' manerys. Tempe∣rancia, moderacio, modificacio, mediocritas.
  • MESURE of mete, of lycorys, as pottys, and oþer lyke. Metreta, CATH.
  • MESURE, in vse of cloysterrys (sic) nedefulle thyngys (mesure, and wyse governawnce of clothys, and mete, and nedeful thyngys, S.) Frugalitas.
  • MESURYD wythe mesure. Men∣suratus.
  • MESURYD yn manerys. Moderatus.
  • MESURYD yn' qualyte. Tempo∣ratus.
  • MESURYN̄, or metyn̄. Mensuro, mencior, CATH.
  • MESURYN̄ yn vertu. Modifico, modero.
  • MET, idem quod mesure, supra (mette, S. P.)
  • MET, scantylyōn' (mete, or me∣sure, or scantlyon, S.)1. ["A mette, mensura, metreta, et proprie vini, metron Grece." CATH. ANG. "Amona dicitur calamus mensure." ORTUS. In the Northern Dialect met still sig∣nifies a measure. See SCANTLYON, or scanklyone. Equissium.]Amona, C. F. (et non annona, S.)
  • (METCHE, or peere, infra. Par.)
  • MEETE, fode. Cibus, esca, pran∣dium, epulum, epule.
  • METE, or fyt, or evene (meet, and feyt, or evyn, S.)2. [—for evene, MS. Mete or evyn, K.]Equus.
  • METYCYNE3. [MEDYCYNE, MS. metecyne, H. P.] (medycyn, or met∣tecyn, S.) Medicina.
  • METESYTEL, to kepe in mete (metfyttyl, or almary, K. mete fetyll, or almery, P.)4. [Cubitum, MS. In the Medulla cibutum is rendered "a mete whycche." See ALMERY, p. 10. Possibly the long chest, such as is frequently termed a bacon-hutch, is here intended, as it might serve also the purpose of a bench; Ang.-Sax. setl, sedile. A settle is, however, properly the high-backed bench placed near the fire. See Forby.]Cibutum, C. F. UG. in cilleo.
  • METEL. Metallum.
  • METE YEVARE (meteȝevare, K.) Dapsilis, dapaticus, UG. V. in A.
  • METE CORNE. Panicium, CATH. (calamus mensure, dicit C. F. S.)
  • METETABYL, that ys remevyd whan mete ys done. Cillaba, CATH.
  • METYN̄ to-gedyr yn̄ wey or place. Obvio.
  • MEET wythe an el wande (eln∣wonde, K.) Ulno, DICC.
  • Page  336MEETE londe, or set bowndys. Meto, CATH.
  • METYNGE to-gedyr. Obviacio.
  • METYNGE wythe mesurys. Men∣suracio.
  • METYR. Metrum.
  • (METWANDE, idem quod ȝerde, infra; met wonde, K. P. Ulna.)1. [Stowe asserts that Hen. I. reformed the measures, and fixed the ulna by the length of his own arm, "and now the same is called a yard, or a metwand." "A meat-wand, virga." GOULDMAN. "A meate-wand, verge par le moyen de laquelle on mesure quelque longueur ou distance." SHERWOOD. In Levit. xix. 35, mensura, Vulg. is rendered, in Coverdale's Bible, a "meteyarde." Ang.-Sax. met-ȝeard. Palsgrave gives the verb, "I measure clothe with a yerde, or mette yerde."]
  • MEVYN̄, or steryn̄. Moveo.
  • MEVYN̄, or remevyn̄ (or remown, infra.) Amoveo.
  • MEVYNGE, or sterynge. Motus, mocio, commocio.
  • MYCHARE.

    2. Tapax, MS. as also MYCHERY, Tapacitas, and MYCHYN̄, Tapio. A mychare seems to denote properly a sneaking thief. Gower thus describes secretum latrocinium;

    "With couetise yet I finde
    A seruant of the same kinde,
    Which stelth is hote, and micherie
    With hym is euer in company."

    See also Towneley Myst. pp. 216, 308, and the Hye way to the Spyttell house.

    "Mychers, hedge crepers, fylloks and luskes,
    That all the somer kepe dyches and buskes."

    Ed. Utterson, ii. 11.

    It signifies also one who commits any sneaking, mean, or miserly act: and, according to Nares, a truant. Horman says, "He strake hym through the syde with a dager, and ranne away like a mycher (latibundus aufugit.) He is a mychar (vagus, non dis∣colus;) a rennar awey or a mychar (fugitivus.)" "Micher, a lytell thefe, larronceav. Michar, bvissonnier." PALSG. "Dramer, to miche, pinch, dodge, to use, dispose of, or deliver out things by a precise weight, as if the measurer were afraid to touch them, &c. Vilain, a churle, also a miser, micher, pinch pennie, penny father. Senaud, a craftie Iacke, or a rich micher, a rich man that pretends himselfe to be very poore. Caqueraffe, a base micher, scuruie hagler, lowsie dodger, &c. Caqueduc, a niggard, micher," &c. COTG. "To mich in a corner, deliteo. A micher, vide Truant." GOULDM. Tusser uses the term micher, which is not given in the East-Anglian Glossaries.

    Capax, C. F. man∣ticulus, CATH. cleps vel cleptes, CATH. furunculus, erro, UG. V. in P.
  • MYCHEKYNE.3. [Chaucer uses the term mitche, R. of Rose, 5585, where it is explained by Tyrwhitt as signifying a manchet, a loaf of fine bread. The old French word miche, and Latin mica, or michia, signify, according to Roquefort and Ducange, a small loaf. "Mica ponitur pro pane modico qui fit in curiis magnatorum vel in monasteriis." CATH. Hearne gives in the notes to the Liber Niger, p. 654, a quotation from the Register of Oseney, 52 Hen. III, wherein mention occurs of magnae michiae, of the bisa and sala michia; and Spelman cites a document which describes "albos panes, vocatos michis." In 1351 Robert, Abbot of Lilleshall, granted "viij. magnas micas majoris ponderis de pane conventus" to Adam de Kaukbury; and a corrody is enregistered in the Leiger Book of Shrewsbury Abbey, by which Abbot Lye granted, in 1508, to his sister, "viij. panes conventuales vulgariter myches vocatos," &c. Blakeway's Hist. ii. 129. MYCHE∣KYNE seems to be merely a diminutive. "Pastilla, a cake, craknell, or wyg." ORTUS.]Pastilla.
  • Page  337MYCHERY. Capacitas, manticula∣tus, furtulum, CATH. cleptura.
  • (MYCHYN, P. Manticulo.)
  • MYCHYN̄, or pryuely stelyn̄ smale thyngys.1. [A distinction is here made in Pynson's and the other editions of the Promptorium. Mychyn. Manticulo. Mychyn, or stelyn pryuely. Surripio, clepo, capaxo.]Surripio, CATH. clepo, C. F. capio, C. F. furtulo (ca∣paxo, H. manticulo, HARL. MS. 2274.)
  • MYDDAY. Meridies, mesimbria, C. F.
  • MYDEWE, or medewe. Pratum.
  • MYDDYL, of þe waste of mannys body. Vastitas, CATH. astrosea.
  • MYDDYL, of a donghylle.

    2. The reading of the Winch. MS. is Myddyl, or dongyl, so termed possibly from its position in the fold-yard. In the North the Ang.-Sax. middinȝ, sterquilinium, is a term still in use, as in the Towneley Myst. p. 30. "Fumarium, myddyng." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. "A middynge, sterquilinium." CATH. ANG. The following lines occur in a poem, where man is exhorted to contemplate heaven and hell, the world, and sin:

    "A fuler mydding of vilonie,
    Saw thou neuere in londe of pes,
    Than thou art with in namely,
    Than hastow matere of pride to cesse."

    Add. MS. 10,053, p. 146.
    Forica.
  • MYDDYS, or the myd part of a thynge. Medium.
  • MYDRYF of a beste (midrym, K. H. S. P. myddryn̄, HARL, MS. 2274.) Diafragma, diafrag∣men, DICC.
  • MYDWARD, idem quod myddys, supra.
  • (MYDWE, supra in mydow, S.)
  • MYDWYFE. Obstetrix.
  • MYGREYME, sekenesse (migrym, K. midgrame, H. mygrene, S. midgrym, P.)3. ["Emigraneus, vermis capitis, Anglice the mygryne, or the hede worme.' ORTUS. "þe emygrane, emigraneus. þe mygrane, ubi emigrane." CATH. ANG. "Migrym, a sickenesse, chagrin, maigre." PALSG. Remedies are given in Arund. MS. 42, f. 105, vo.]Emigranea.
  • MYGHTE (mihte, K. myhtte, S.) Fortitudo, vigor, potencia.
  • MYGH̄TY (mihti, K. myhty, S.) Fortis, potens, vigorosus.
  • MYGH̄TYLY (mihtili, K. myhtyly, S.) Fortiter, potenter, valide, vigorose.
  • MYKYL. Multus.
  • MYLLARE. Molendinarius.
  • MYLLARYS THOWMBE, fysche (millathowme, fishe, K.) Capito.
  • MYLCHE, or mylte (or spleen, infra.) Splen, CATH. lactis, proprie mylche.
  • MYLCHE, or mylke of a cowe. Lac.
  • MYLCHE COWE. Bassaris, vel vacca mulsaria, C. F.
  • MYYLD, and buxum. Pius, be∣nignus mansuetus, supplex.
  • MYLDEW. Uredo, C. F. a(u)|rugo, CATH. erugo, C. F.
  • MYLE. Miliare, miliarium, C. F. (leuca, K.)
  • MYLLE. Molendinum, C. F.
  • MYLLYFOLY, herbe. Millefolium, sanguinaria, CATH.
  • MYLLEHOWSE. Molendina, mo∣lendinum, C. F.
  • MYLLESTONE. Molaris.
  • Page  338MYLLE TROW, or benge (mill troughe, or beugge, sic, P.)1. [See BENGERE of a mylle, p. 31. "Faricapsa, an hoper." ORTUS.]Farricapsa.
  • MYLKE, idem quod mylche, supra.
  • MYLKE METE, or mete made wythe mylke. Lactatum, CATH. (lac∣ticinium, P.)
  • MYLKE STOP, or payle. Multra, vel multrum, CATH.
  • MYLKYN̄. Mulgeo, CATH.
  • MYLTE, idem quod mylche, supra.
  • MYYNDE, idem quod meende.
  • MYNYN' of songys (mynym, HARL. MS. 2274, P.) Minima.
  • MYNSTRAL (or gluman̄, supra.) Ministraulus (histrio, P.)
  • MYNSTRALSYE (or glu, supra.) Musica, organicum.
  • MYNSTRE, chyrche. Monasterium.
  • MYNYSTER, servawnt (or mynster, K. P.) Minister, famulus, servus.
  • MYNTE, herbe. Minta.
  • MYNTYN̄, or amyn̄ towarde, for to assayen̄ (myntyn, or ame to∣wor, or assayen, H. P. sayyn, S.)2. ["I mente, I gesse or ayme to hytte a thynge that I shote or throwe at, Ie esme. I dyd ment at a fatte bucke, but I dyd hyt a pricket." PALSG. Forby gives "mink, mint, to attempt. Alem. meinta, intentio." See Brockett's Glossary, and Jamieson, v. mint, signifying to aim at, to have a mind to do something. Ang.-Sax. myntan, disponere.]Attempto.
  • (MYNURE, S.3. [Minera, according to Joh. de Garlandiâ, is a vein of ore, a mine; or, as Upton uses the word, a mine formed during a siege. Mil. Off. i. c. 3.]Minera.)
  • (MINUTE of an howur, K. S. Mi∣nuta.)
  • MYRACLE. Miraculum.
  • MYRE, or maryce. Labina, C. F. palus, CATH.
  • MYRY yn chere. Letus, jocundus, jocosus, hillaris.
  • MYRYLY. Gaudenter hillariter, letanter (jocose, P.)
  • MYRY TOTTYR, chylderys game (miritotyr, K.)

    4. Chaucer, in the Miller's Tale, puts the following taunt into the mouth of the Smith, who awakes Absolon, bidding him seek vengeance for the ill success of his amour:

    "What eileth you? some gay girle, God it wote,
    Hath brought you thus on the merytote."

    Cant. T. 3768.

    Tyrwhitt prints this line—"upon the viretote." Speght, in his Glossary, explains the word as signifying a swing, oscillum, suspended from a beam for the amusement of children. Strutt mentions the meritot, or merry trotter, in his Sports and Pastimes, p. 226, and in the Orbis Sensualium of Comenius it is given under the sports of boys, who are represented "swinging themselves upon a merry-totter, super petaurum se agitantes et oscillantes." Ed. Hoole, c. cxxxvj. Skinner gives this word on the au∣thority of the Diction. Angl. 1658, and supposes it to be of French derivation, from virer and tost, quickly. In the Cath. Ang. the word is twice given, under the letter M. "A Merytotyr, oscillum, petaurus;" and again under the letter T. "A mery Totyr, petaurus, etc. ubi a mere totyr." Palsgrave gives "Tyttertotter, a play for chyldre, balenchoeres." See the Craven Glossary, v. Merry-totter, and Brand's Po∣pular Antiqu. See hereafter TOTYR, or myry totyr, and the verb WAWYN̄, or waueryn yn a myry totyr, oscillo. According to Forby to titter, or titter-cum-totter, signifies in Norfolk to ride on each end of a balanced plank.

    Oscillum, CATH. et C. F.
  • MYRY WEDER, or softe weder Page  339 (mery weddyr, S.)1. [Merry is not infrequently used by the old writers in the sense of pleasant. Ang.-Sax. myriȝ, jucundus. In the version of Vegecius, attributed to Trevisa, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. it is observed that wise warriors in olden times used to "occupie theire foot menne in dedes of armes in the felde in mery wedire, and vndre roof in housing in fowle wedre." B. III. c. 2. Again, precaution is recommended at sea against unsettled weather, and the diversity of places, "the whiche maketh ofte of mery wedre grete tempestes, and of grete tempestes mery weder and clere." B. IV. c. 38. The arms borne by the name of Merewether are to be classed with the armoiries parlantes; namely, Or three martlets sable, on a chief azure a sun in splendour; the martlet being, as it was supposed, an omen of fair weather.]Malacia, C. F.
  • MYRKE, or dyrke (thirke, K. H. S. darke, P.)

    2. This word occurs in Brunne's version of Langtoft, p. 176; Chaucer's Rom. of R. v. 5339; the Vis. of Piers Ploughman; Awntyrs of Arthure, 68; Towneley Myst. p. 167. In a description of hell, in Add. MS. 10,053, p. 136, the following passage occurs:

    "Synne shal to endeles payne the lede
    In helle, that is hidous and merke.—
    Ther is stynk, and smoke a-mong,
    And merkenesse, more than euer was here."

    "Mirke, ater, caliginosus, fuscus, obscurus, umbrosus. A mirknes, ablucinacio, i. lucis alienacio, chaos, &c. To make or to be mirke, tenebrare, nigrere." CATH. ANG. "Myrke, or darke, brun, obscur. I myrke, I darke, or make darke (Lydgat), Ie obscurcys." PALSG. See Brockett, Craven Glossary, and Jamieson. Ang.-Sax. mirc, tenebrae. See THERKE, hereafter.

    Obscurus, tene∣brosus (opacus, P.)
  • MYRKENESSE, or dorkenesse (thirkenes, K. thyrknesse, S. derkenesse, P.) Tenebrositas, obscuritas, tenebre.
  • MYRTHE. Leticia, jocunditas, gaudium.
  • MYROWRE, or myrowre glasse. Speculum.
  • MYSAWNTER, or myscheve (mis∣aventure, K. P. myschefe, S.) Infortunium, disfortunium.
  • MYSCHAPYN' yn kynde. Mon∣struosus.
  • MYSCHAPE thynge yn kynde. Monstruosus, monstrum.
  • MYSCHAWNCE, idem quod my∣sawnter (or myschefe, S. P.)
  • MYSEL, or mesel, or lepre. Le∣prosus.
  • MYSELRYE, or lepre. Lepra.
  • MYSCHAP, idem quod myschaunce (or mysawnter, supra, or on∣hap, infra; mishef, K. myschef, H. myshap, S.)
  • MYSHAPPY, or vnhappy. Infor∣tunatus, disfortunatus.
  • MYSE, or mysys.3. [This term apparently denotes crumbs or grated particles of bread, called in French mies or mioches. "Mica, reliquie panis, vel quod cadit de pane dum frangitur et comeditur, &c. a crome of brede." ORTUS. In the Book of Cookery, written 1381, and printed by Pegge with the Forme of Cury, it is directed to take onions, "and myce hem riȝt smal," as also to "myse bred," &c. pp. 93, 95. The participle "myyd" occurs in Sloane MS. 1986, f. 85, and other passages, and signifies grated bread, which, as it has been observed in the note on the verb GRATE, p. 207, was much used in ancient cookery.]Mice, in plur.
  • Page  340MYSSYN̄, as eynē for dymnesse (as eyen, H. iyen, P.) Caligo.
  • MYSSYN̄, or wantyn̄. Careo, CATH.
  • MYST, or rooke (roke, K. H. S. P.) Nubilum C. F. nebula, CATH. utrumque UG. in nubo.
  • MYSTERY, or prevyte. Misterium.
  • (MYSTERYNGE, or musterynge, infra in romelynge.)
  • MYSTY, or prevey to mannys wytte. Misticus.
  • MYSTY, or rooky, as the eyre (roky, K. H. S.) Nebulosus, CATH.
  • MYSTY(N), or grow roky as wedur, and mysty. Obnubilo.
  • MYSTERE, or nede (mistyr, P.)1. ["A mister, ubi a nede. A nede, necessitas, necesse, opus," &c. CATH. ANG. Roquefort gives the following explanation of the French word, whence this appears to be taken: "Mester, mestier: besoin, nécessaire," &c. Chaucer uses the word "mis∣tere," signifying need, as of daily food, in the comparison between the wealthy miser and the poor man; R. of Rose, v. 5614; and again, in the sense of requiring the ser∣vices of any one; see the address of Love to False Semblant, ib. v. 6078. See Towneley Myst. pp. 90, 234, and Jamieson, v. Mister.]Indigencia, opus.
  • MYSTLYONE, supra in mestlyone. Bigermen UG. in bis, mixtilio.
  • MYSVSYN̄. Abutor, UG. in utor.
  • MYNUTE (myte, K. HARL. MS. 2274, P.)2. [The position of this word in the alphabetical arrangement would indicate that the reading of the Cambridge MS. is here to be preferred. Mynute was, however, used synonymously with mite, as appears by the passage in the Wicliffite version, Mark xii. 42, quoted in the note on CU, halfe a farthynge, p. 106. Gouldman gives "a minute, or q. which is half a farthing, minutum." It is said in the Ortus, "minutum est quoddam genus ponderis, scilicet media pars quadrantis;" and a distinction appears to be made in the following citation: "A myte, mita: a myte, quod est pondus, mi∣nutum." CATH. ANG. Palsgrave gives "myte, the leest coyne that is, pite," which was a little piece struck at Poitiers, Pictavina, and of the value of half an obole; and Sherwood renders "Mite (the smallest of weights, or of coine) Minute; aussi, vne petite piece de monnoye non vsitée." There is no evidence that any coin of such value was ever struck in England, but small foreign pieces may have been circulated, such as the Poitevine, or the "dyner of Genoa," which also, according to R. Holme, was worth half a farthing. Acad. of Arm. B. III. c. 30. Roquefort explains mite as sig∣nifying a Flemish copper coin; but, according to Ducange, the value of the Flemish mita was four oboli. It is, however, possible that fractional parts of the silver penny or farthing might occasionally pass as mites: thus entries frequently occur in the Accounts of the Keeper of St. Cuthbert's Shrine, during the XVth cent. as cited by Raine, respecting "fracta pecunia;" and the petition of the Commons in 1444, 23 Hen. VI. complains of the great injury that arose from the division of coin, for want of small currency, and craves that the breaking of white money be forbidden under a heavy penalty. Rot. Parl. V. 109.]Minutum.
  • MYTEYNE (or cuffe, glove, supra.)

    3. "Mita est pilum frigium, or a myttane. Mantus, a myteyn, or a mantell." ORTUS. "A mytane, mitta, mitana." CATH. ANG. In the curious dictionary of John de Garlandiâ it is said that "cirothecarii decipiunt scolares Parisius (sic) ven∣dendo cirothecas simplices, et furratas pellibus agninis, cuniculinis, vulpinis, et mictas de corio factas." The following explanation is given in the gloss: "Mitas, Gallice mitanes (mitheines, al.) a mitos, quod est filum, quia primo fiebant de filo vel de panno laneo, et adhuc fiunt a vulgo." MS. Bibl. Rothom. It is said in the Catholicon that "a manus dicitur mantus, quia manus tegat tantum, est enim brevis amictus," &c. the primary sense of this Latin term being a short garment or mantle. In the minute description of the garb of the Ploughman are mentioned his "myteynes" made of cloutes, with the fingers "for-werd," or worn away; see Creed of Piers P. v. 851. Amongst the feigned miraculous gifts whereby the Pardoner in the Cant. Tales states that he turned to account the credulity of his hearers, one was a mitaine:

    He that his hand wol put in this mitaine,
    He shal have multiplying of his graine."

    Cant. T. v. 12307.

    In 1392 Rich. Bridesall, merchant, of York, bequeaths "meum magnum dowblet, et meum mytans de d'orre, et meum dagardum." Test. Ebor. i. p. 174.

    Page  341Mitta, DICC. mancus, CATH. et C. F.
  • (MYHTH, H. might, P. Fortitudo.)
  • (MYHTHY, H. mighty, P. Fortis, potens, vigorosus.)
  • (MYTHYLY, H. Fortiter.)
  • MYTRE (or mytir, P.) Mitra, tiara.
  • MYTRYD. Mitratus.
  • MYTRYN̄. Mitro.
  • MODY, or angry, supra in A.
  • MODYFYYN̄, or settyn̄ yn mene cowrse of resone (settyn in cure or reason, P.)1. [This verb is placed in the MSS. as likewise in the printed copies, between MOOR∣DERYN̄ and MORYN̄. "I modefye, I temperate, Ie me modifie, and Ie me trempe. What thoughe he speke a hastye worde, you muste modyfye your selfe." PALSG.]Modifico.
  • MODER, servaunte, or wenche (moddyr, S.)2. [The term mauther has been recognised as peculiarly East-Anglian by Sir Thos. Browne, Spelman, Forby, and Moor. It is used by B. Jonson. Tusser, in his list of husbandly furniture, includes "a sling for a mother (moether, al. ed.) a bow for a boy," intended for driving away birds, as he advises, in September's husbandry, to set "mother or boy" to scare away pigeons and rooks from the newly-sown land, with loud cries, sling, or bow. "Puera, a woman chylde, callyd in Cambrydge shyre a modder. Pupa, a yonge wenche, a gyrle, a modder." ELYOT. "Baquelette, a young wench, mother, girle. Fille, a maid, girle, modder, lasse," &c. COTG. "A modder, fillette, jeune garse, garsette." SHERW. "A modder, wench or girl, puera, pupa." GOULDM. Compare FALSE MODDER, or wenche, p. 148. Dan. moer, Belg. modde, puella.]Carisia, CATH.
  • MOODER, forthe bryngere. Mater, genitrix.
  • MOODUR IN LAWE. Socrus.
  • MODERLES chylde. Pupillus, pu∣pilla.
  • MODYR QWELLARE (modyrsleere, K.) Matricida.
  • MODUR QWELLYNGE. Matrici∣dium.
  • MODYR WORTE, herbe (or mug∣worte, infra.) Artemesia.
  • MOYST. Humidus.
  • MOYSTYN̄, or make moyste. Hu∣mecto.
  • MOYSTURE. Humor.
  • MOCKE, or mokke.3. [Possibly the correct reading should here be MOCKE, or mowe. See MOWE, or skorne.]Cachin(n)a.
  • MOCKE, or skorne. Valgia.
  • MOKKE londe wythe donge. Fimo, infimo.
  • MOKE vynys. Pastino, COMM.
  • MOKKYN̄, or iapyn̄, or tryfelyn̄. Ludifico, C. F.
  • MOLDALE (molde ale, S.)4. [See the account of funeral entertainments in Brand's Popular Antiquities. Wine or ale sweetened and spiced was termed mulled, as Skinner supposes, from the Latin mollitum; but more probably from the mulled or powdered condiments essential to the concoction. Compare MULLYN, or breke to powder. "Molle, pulver," &c. CATH. ANG. Island. mil, in minutas partes tundo; praeter. mulde.]Po∣tacio funerosa, vel funer(a)lis, UG. in fos.
  • Page  342MOOLDARE of paste (moldare of bred, K. P.) Pistricus, pistrica, pistrio, CATH. UG. pistrix, UG.
  • MOLD, forme. Duca.
  • MOOLD, or soyle of ertħe. Solum, humus.
  • MOOLD for a belle, or a potte. Effigies, KYLW.
  • MOOLDE breed. Pinso, CATH. et UG. pisto, CATH. pistrio, CATH. pindo, UG. V.
  • MOOLDYNGE of paste. Pistura, ducamen.
  • MOLLE. Talpa.
  • MOLEYNE, herbe. Tapsus, C. F. barbascus, vel tapsus barbascus.
  • MOLET, fysche. Mullus, C. F. et UG. in mollis.
  • MOLOWRE, gryndynge stone (for colourys, K.) Mola, CATH. et C. F.
  • MOME, or awnte, supra in A. (faders suster.1. [MONE, MS. Compare Teut. moeme, Germ. muhme, matertera.]Ameta, P.)
  • (MOME, or aunte, moders syster, P. Matertera, CATH.)
  • MOONE, or mornynge, idem quod waymentynge, infra in V. (or waylynge, infra; morne, S. Lamentacio.)
  • MONE, planete. Luna, phebes, vel febes, CATH. et C. F.
  • MONG CORNE (supra in mestlyon, S.) Mixtilio.
  • MONGE PRESAWNTE.2. ["Sichofanta, i. falsus calumniator, vel vilium rerum appetitor." CATH. "Maunche present, briffavlt. I manche, I eate gredylye. Are you nat ashamed to manche (briffer) your meate thus lyke a carter? I monche, I eate meate gredyly in a corner, ie loppine," &c. PALSG. Bp. Kennett gives "to munge, to eat greedily; Wilts." Lansd. MS. 1033. "A manch-present, dorophagus." GOULDM. "Brifaut, a hasty devourer, a fast eater, a ravenous feeder, a greedy glutton." COTG.]Sicho∣phanta, CATH. C. F. et UG.
  • MONY. Pecunia, moneta, pe∣culium, CATH.
  • MONYMENT, or charterys, or oþer lyke. Munimentum (monumen, S. monumentum, P.)
  • MONYON̄, or mōnyn̄, or bry(n)ge to mynde (monyynge, or moynynge, H. mouyn, P.) Commemoro.
  • MONYOWRE. Nummularius, mo∣netarius, C. F. erarius.
  • MONYTHE. Mensis.
  • MOPPE, or popynē.3. [MOPPE signifies here a child's doll, formed of rags, as POPYN is explained here∣after to be a "chylde of clowtys." Nares gives it as a term of endearment to a girl, as moppet is used in Suffolk, according to Moor. "A little mopse, puellula." GOULDM. In the Sevyn Sages, v. 1414, the foolish burgess who went from his home to seek a wife is said to have gone forth "as a moppe wild," where the word is ex∣plained by Weber as signifying a fool.]Pupa, pusio.
  • MOORE, or maryce. Mariscus.
  • MORE of the fenne. Palustrum, palustre.
  • MOORD(E)RARE (morederar, K. P.) Sicarius, CATH. et C. F.
  • MORDERYD. Sicariatus.
  • MOORDERYN̄, or prively kyllyn̄. Sicario.
  • MOORDERYNGE. Sicariacio, si∣cariatus, C. E.
  • MORE. Plus.
  • Page  343MORE, yn quantyte.1. [This comparative frequently signifies large dimension, and not number. Thus in Kyng Alis. v. 6529, the rhinoceros is described as "more than an olifaunt;" and in the Wicliffite version it is used to express superior, by priority of birth; where it is said that Isaac knew not Jacob, "for þe heery hondis expressiden þe licnesse of þe more son." Gen. xxvii. 23. In the Version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. XVIII. A. 12, the heavy-armed troops are said to have had two kinds of darts, "one of the more assise, the other of the lasse;" the "pile," which measured 5½ feet in length, and the "broche," which was shorter by two feet. So likewise in the Golden Legend the "more letanye," on St. Mark's day, is distinguished from the "less letanye, iij. days to fore the As∣cension." It is occasionally retained in names of places, as More Critchill, Dorset, probably so called by way of distinction from Long Critchill, and other neighbouring hamlets. The rebus, or canting device of the Mortons of Bushbury, Herefordshire, repeatedly used amongst the ornaments of the chantry founded by one of that family on the south side of the church, is a tun inscribed with the initial of his Christian name, the syllable Mor being, as it would seem, expressed by the supposed dimension of the tun, or its proportion to the scutcheon whereon it is placed.]Major.
  • MORE, in qualyte. Magis.
  • MOREYN, of pestylens. Mortali∣tas, pestilencia, pestis.
  • MOREL, herbe. Morella, sola∣trum, vel herba Sancte Marie.
  • MOREL, horse.2. [Morellus is explained by Ducange as meaning subfuscus; so likewise Roquefort gives "morel; noir, tanné, tirant sur le brun." According to Cotgrave cheval morel is a black horse. In the Towneley Mysteries, p. 9, "Morelle" occurs as the name of one of the horses yoked to Cain's plough.]Morellus.
  • MORFU, sekenesse. Morphea.
  • MORYN̄, or make more (mooryn, H.) Majoro.
  • MORYN̄, and largyn̄ (moryn, or makyn more large, K.) Amplio, amplifico.
  • MORYN̄, or yncresyn̄.

    3. Gower describes the glowing blush which restored beauty to the features of Lucrece, on meeting her husband, "so that it myght not be mored." Conf. Am. VII. In the curious metrical version of the most ancient grants to St. Edmund's Bury, preserved in the Register of Abbot Curteys, the following lines occur in the Charter of Canute:

    "Bexample of whom (St. Edmund) I Knut am gretly mevyd,
    To the holy martyr I wyl that al men se,
    That his chirche be fraunchised and relevyd,
    Moryd and encresyd as fer as lyth in me."

    Horman, amongst the passages from Terence, gives the following: "He dredith lest thy olde angyr or hardnes be mored or incresyd."

    Augeo, CATH. adaugeo.
  • MORYVE (morryve, S.)4. [Compare Ang.-Sax. morȝan-ȝifu, dos nuptialis. In Laȝamon "morȝeue" occurs in this sense, ed. Madden, iii. 249, and "moerȝeue" ii. 175, which is in Wace's original "douaire." See Hickes, Thes. i. p. ix. Pref. and Wachter, v. Morgengabe.]Dos.
  • MORKYN̄ (or merkyd, supra; morkinge, P.) Signatus.
  • MORMAL, sekenesse.5. [Chaucer, in the Prologue to Cant. T. v. 388, describes the Cook as afflicted with "a mormal," or gangrene on his shin, called in Latin malum mortuum, and in old French mauxmorz. Remedies for the mortmal may be found in Arund. MS. 42, f. 105, vo; and in Sloane MS. 100, f. 58, vo, a compound is described of litharge of gold, oil of roses, white wine, old urine, &c. which formed "a plastre þat William Faryngdoun knyȝt lete a squyer þat was his prisoner go quyt of his raunsum fore. This plastre wole hele a mormal, and cancre, and festre, and alle oþere sooris." Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, "Maximian the maistre of phisike can hele dropesye, blody flyxe, tesyke, mormale (mormal.)" "Mormall, (or marmoll,) a sore, lovp." PALSG.]Malum mortuum.
  • Page  344MOORNYN̄, and sorowyn̄. Mereo, gemo, CATH.
  • MOORNYNGE, or sorwynge. Meror, luctus, gemitus.
  • MORNYNGE, or morwenynge (mor∣wyn, K. H. morwynge, S. mor∣nynge, or morowe, P.) Mane, aurora, diluculum, C. F. lu∣canum, C. F. matuta, CATH. matutinum (matutina, P.)
  • MOROW SPECHE (morwespeche, K. H. morspech, S.)1. [This term denoted a periodical assembly of a gild: A.-Sax. morȝen-spaec. See Hickes, Thes. ii. 21, i., ix., and extracts from Registers of gilds at Lynn, Richards' Hist. pp. 422, 477.]Crastinum colloquium.
  • MORTAGONE, herbe. Herba Martis.
  • MORTEYS of a tenowne (morteys or tenon, P.) Gumphus, DICC. et KYLW. incastratura, KYLW.
  • MORTER, vesselle of stampynge (champynge, S.) Mortarium, BRIT. mortariolum, BRIT.
  • MORTERE, for wallys makynge. Cementum.
  • MORTER, for playsterynge (to playster with, K.) Litura, C. F. et CATH. in lino.
  • MORTRWYS, dyschmete (mor∣trews, K. morterews, S.)2. ["Mortrewes" occur amongst the dishes mentioned by Chaucer in the account of the Cook's abilities; Cant. T. Prol. v. 386. "Mortrws, pepo, peponum." CATH. ANG. "Pepo, i. melo, mortrews, et est similis cucurbite." ORTUS. Mortrews, according to various recipes given in Harl. MS. 279; Cott. MS. Jul. D. VIII. and Sloane MS. 1986, seems to have been fish, or white meat ground small, and mixed with crumbs, rice flour, &c. See in the last mentioned compilation "mortrews de chare, blanchyd mortrews, and mortrews of fysshe," pp. 55, 60, 66, given under the head de potagiis. The term is frequently written "morterel, mortrewys," &c. and is possibly derived from the mode of preparation, by braying the flesh in a morter. "Mortesse meate." PALSG.]Pe∣ponum, apilois, KYLW. pepo, mortaricium.
  • MOROW, idem quod mornynge, supra (morwyn, K. morwe, H.)3. [Many instances might be cited of the use of the word morrow, signifying the morning, as Chaucer uses it, when he says of the Frankelein, "wel loved he by the morwe a sop in win." Cant. T. 335. Sir John Maundevile speaks of the idolatry of the natives of Chana, who worshipped a serpent, or whatever animal "that thei meten first at morwe." In the Version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. XVIII. A. 12, it is said that it is requisite to ascertain the custom of the enemy, "if they be wonede to assaile or falle vpone the nyghte, or in the morow." B. III. c. 6. In the curious translation of Macer's treatise on the virtues of plants, MS. in the possession of Hugh Diamond, Esq. it is observed that "he þat etiþ caule (brassica) first at morwe, vnnethe shal he fynde drunkenesse þat day." The day-star likewise is called the MOROW STERRE. In the Golden Legend it is said of the Assumption of our Lady that an angel brought her "a bowe of palme, whose leues shone lyke to the morowe sterre."]
  • MOROW STERRE (morwynstere, K.) Lucifer, CATH. in vesper.
  • MOSSE, growynge a-mongys stonys. Muscus, CATH. UG. in marceus.
  • MOOSLE, or mosul for a nette (mosle, or mosyl, S.) Oristri∣gium (promossida est idem, S.)
  • MOOTE, of an horne blowynge (mot, K.)4. [This term is taken from the French mot, which is explained by Nicot to imply "le son de la trompe d'un Veneur, sonné d'art et maistrise." See Twety, Vesp. B. XII. f. 4; R. Holme, Acad. of Arm. iii. p. 76. Horman says that "blowyng of certain and diuers motis, and watchis, gydeth an host, and saueth it from many parellys. The trom∣pettours blowe a fytte or a mote (dant classicum)." "Mote, blast of a horne." PALSG.]Cornatus, classicum, CATH.
  • Page  345MOOTE, dyke, watyr closynge a place (motdyke, or watyr place closyd, K. dyche or water, P.) Circumfossatum, fossatum, COMM. mota, KYLW.
  • MOTARE, or pletare.1. ["To mute, allegare, ut ille allegat pro me; causare, contraversari, decertare, pla∣citare. A mute halle, capitolium. A muter, actor, advocatus, causidicus, &c. Mutynge, causa, pragma." CATH. ANG. "Mote or encheson, causa, causale, liti∣gium." Vocabulary, Harl. MS. 1587. "Causa, a cause or motynge. Causarius, a pledere, a motere. Causor, to plede or mote." MED. "Certamen, i. pugna vel liti∣gium, a chydynge or motynge. Controversor, to mote, plede, or chyde." ORTUS. Ang.-Sax. mot, conventus, motian, to meet for the purpose of discussion, disputare; mot-hus, or moð-heal, a place of meeting. In the poem on the evil times of Edw. II. Polit. Songs, p. 336, complaint is made of the corruption of Justices, and other legal authorities, who, instaed of fair and open dealing, "maken the mot-halle at hom in here chaumbre." In the Wicliffite version, John xviii. 28, praetorium is rendered "moot-halle." See also Vis. of Piers P. v. 2352. Compare PLEE, or motynge.]Disceptor, vel disceptator, placitator.
  • MOOTE yn þe sunne (or qhere it be, H. where it be, P.) Atthomus, (festuca, P.)
  • MOOTE HALLE. Pretorium, CATH.
  • MOTHE WOKE, neyder to nesche, ne to harde (moothewyc, or mothwoc, neþer to neysch, ne to hard, H. motewoke, S. mothwyc, or mothwoc, P.)2. [In the Winch. MS. RERE is given hereafter as synonymous with MOTHE WOKE. This appears to be a compound word, the last syllable of which may be derived from Ang.-Sax. wác, debilis, flexibilis, whence wác-mod, pusillanimis. The former syllable may possibly be taken from Ang.-Sax. mete, Isl. mot, modus. Hence also "methfulle," moderate. See Jamieson, v. Meith. Compare lith-wake, or leothe-wok, supple limbed, according to the citations given in the note on the word LYYE, p. 310.]Dimollis.
  • MOOTYN̄, or tolyon̄ (motyn, or pletyn, P.) Discepto, placito.
  • MOTYNGE, or tolyynge, or pleyt∣ynge. Disceptacio, placitacio.
  • MOTLE, colowre. Stromaticus, CATH. (mixtura, P.)
  • MOTONE, flesche. Ovilla, moto (multo, K.)
  • MOW, husbondys syster, or wyfys systyr, or syster in lawe.3. [Compare A.-S. maeȝ, parens, used very widely to denote a relative, son, sister, niece, &c. See Laȝamon, i. pp. 12, 73, 162, Madden's ed. R. Brunne uses the word "mouh."]Glos, C. F.
  • MOWARE wythe a sythe. Fal∣cator, metellus, CATH. falcarius, UG.
  • MOWARE, or makere of a mowe (and scorn, K. makar of mowys and scornys, H. P.)

    4. "Cachinnor, to grenne, or for to make a mowe." MED. "To mowe, cachinnare, narire, et cetera ubi to scorne. A mowynge, cachinnatus, rictus." CATH. ANG. "Cachinno, to mowe, or skorne with the mouth." ORTUS. "Mowe, a scorne, move, moe. Mower, skorner, mocquevr. I moo, I mocke, I mowe with the mouthe, ie fays la moue." PALSG. "Moue, a moe, or mouth; an ill-favoured extension, or thrusting out of the lips. Moüard, mumping, mowing, making mouths. Baybaye, a scornfull moe, or mouth made." COTG. "To mow, or mock with the mouth like an ape, dis∣torquere os, rictum deducere." GOULDM. In the poem on the evil times of Edw. II. a curious picture is given of the "countour," or barrister, who, pocketing the fee, and speaking a few words to little purpose, as soon as he had turned his back, "he makketh the a mouwe." Polit. Songs, p. 339. Such scornful gestures were deemed a great breach of good manners; thus, in the Boke of Curtasye, the youth is instructed as to his demeanour at table, where he should especially avoid quarreling, making "mawes," and stuffing the mouth with food.

    "Yf þou make mawes on any wyse,
    A velany þou kacches or euer þou rise.—
    A napys mow men sayne he makes,
    þat brede and flesshe in hys cheke bakes."

    Sloane MS. 1986, f. 18, vo.

    So also in the like admonition, printed with the title, Stans puer ad mensam, it is said, "grenynge and mowynge at the table eschewe."

    Valgiator (cachinnator, P.)
  • Page  346MOWE, or skorne. Vangia, vel valgia, CATH. et C. F. (ca∣chinna, P.)
  • MOWE, byrd, or semewe. As∣pergo, et alia infra in S. li∣terâ.
  • MOWE wythe a sythe. Falco.
  • MOWYN̄, or make a mow. Valgio, cachinno (vangio, P.)
  • MOWȜTE, clothe wyrme (mowhe, K. mow, S. mowghe, P.)1. ["Mought that eateth clothes, uers de drap." PALSG. Ang.-Sax. moððe, tinea.]Tinea.
  • MOWLE, sore.2. [In Arund. MS. 42, numerous remedies are given for mowles. "Plemina sunt ulcera in manibus et in pedibus callosis, weles or mowles." MED. "A mowle, pernio." CATH. ANG. This terms is taken from the French; "Kybe on the hele, mule." PALSG. W. Turner, in his Herbal, 1562, speaks of kibes or "mooles," and says that the broth of rape is good for "kybed, or moolde heles." Gerard states that "the downe of the reed mace, or cats tail, hath been proved to heale kibed, or humbled heeles (as they are termed) either before or after the skin is broken." And. Boorde, in the Bre∣viary of Health, c. 272, treats at length of the causes and remedies for such ailments. See Jamieson, v. Mule.]Pustula (pernio, H.)
  • MOWLYD, a(s) brede. Mussidus, vel mucidus, C. F. et CATH.
  • MOWLYN̄, as bred.3. ["To mowle, mucidare. Mowled, mucidus. Mowlenes, glis, mucor, mussa." CATH. ANG. "Mucor, to mowle as bredde." ORTUS. Palsgrave gives the verb "I mowlde, or fust, as corne or breed dothe, Ie moisis," but the word is usually written, according to the ancient spelling, as given in the Promptorium. Chaucer speaks of "mouled," or grey hairs. In the relation of a miraculous occurrence given in the Golden Legend, f. 65, vo, it is said, "as the kynge sate at mete, all the brede waxed anone mowly, and hoor, yt no man myght ete of it." Kilian gives "molen, vetus Flandr. cariem contrahere." Compare Dan. mulner, to grow mouldy; mulen, hoary or mouldy.]Mucidat, CATH.
  • MOWLYNGE, of mowle (or mowle, S.) Mucor, C. F. mucidus, CATH.
  • MOWN, or haue myȝħte (myȝt, K. myth, H. mowne, P.)4. ["To mughe, posse, valere, queo. To nott moghe, nequire, non posse." CATH. ANG. The verb to mow, to be able, is used by R. Glouc. p. 39, and Chaucer. In the Golden Legend it is said of the last judgment that "the eyghte sygne shall be ye generall tremblynge of the erthe, whiche shall be so grete that noo man ne beest shall not mowe stonde thereon, but fall to the grownde." Caxton states, in the Book for Tra∣vellers, that his intent was "to ordeyne this book, by the whiche me shall mowe resonably understande Frenssh and English, on pourra entendre," &c. The verb NOWTHE MOWN̄ occurs hereafter. Compare Dutch moghen, Germ. moegen, posse.]Possum.
  • MOWNT, hylle. Mons, collis.
  • Page  347MOWNTENAWNCE (mowntenesse, S.) Estimata quantitas (vel estimata mensura, aut quanti∣tas rei, P.)
  • MOWNTYNGE, or steynynge (sic, styynge, S.) Ascensus.
  • MOWSE, beste. Mus.
  • MOWSARE, as a catte. Musceps.
  • MOWSEER, herbe. Muricula (au∣ricalis muris, K. P.)
  • MOWSFALLE (or trap, K. P. or falle, supra.)1. [Compare FALLE, p. 147. "Paciscolia, i. muscipula, a mowse falle." MED. MS. CANT. In the Shepherd's Calendar it is said that "the couetous man is taken in the nette of the deuil, by the which he leseth euerlasting lyfe for small temporal goodes,—as the mouse is taken in a fall, or trappe (à la ratière, orig.) and leseth his lyfe for a lyttle bacon." Ed. J. Wally, sign. F. j. vo. Ang.-Sax. mus-fealle, muscipula.]Muscipula.
  • MOWSYN̄, or take myse. Muri∣capio.
  • MOWSYN̄, or prively stoddyn̄ (stondyn a dowt, K. stodyn a dowte, H. musen, or stodien a dought, P.) Muso, musso, CATH.
  • MOWTARE, or mowtard, byrde.2. ["Mowter, vide moulter,—quando avium pennae decidunt." GOULDM. To mute or moult, to change the feathers, is taken from the Latin. Palsgrave gives the verb to "mute, as a hauke or birde dothe his fethers, muer;" which is rendered by Cotgrave "to mue, to cast the head, coat, or skin." See Ducange, v. Muta. Hence the place where hawks were kept during the change of plumage was termed a mew; and mutare signified to keep them in a mew, as in a document dated 1425, edited by Bp. Kennett, Par. Antiqu.]Plutor, CATH. (plutus, P.)
  • MOWTHE. Os.
  • MOWTHE of a wesselle. Orificium, C. F.
  • MOWTHE of a botelle. Lura, C. F.
  • MOWTYD. Deplumatus (plutus, P.)
  • MOWTȲN', as fowlys. Plumeo, CATH. UG. V. deplumeo, UG. V.
  • MOWTYNGE, Deplumacio, plu∣tura.
  • MV, of hawkys.3. [Compare MWE, or cowle, a coop for keeping or fatting poultry, p. 350.]Falconarium.
  • MUD, or grutte. Limus.
  • MUGLARD, or nyggarde (or pynchar, infra.)4. [Muggard, in the Exmoor Dailect, signifies sullen and morose. In the sense of avaricious MUGLARD may be derived from the French "mugotter, to hoord; mugot, a hoord, or secret heap of treasure." COTG.]Tenax, ava∣rus, cupidi(n)arius, C. F.
  • MUGWORTE, herbe, idem quod moder worte, supra.5. [The virtues of mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris, Linn. are highly extolled by the ancient herbalists. The following observation occurs in Arund. MS. 42, f. 35, vo. "Mogwort, al on as seyn some, modirwort: lewed folk þat in manye wordes conne no ryȝt sownynge, but ofte shortyn wordys, and changyn lettrys and silablys, þey coruptyn þe o. in to u. and d. in to g. and syncopyn i. smytyn a-wey i. and r. and seyn mug∣wort." "Mugworte, arthemisia, i. mater herbarum." CATH. ANG. Ang.-Sax. muȝ∣wyrt, artemisia. Of the superstitious custom of seeking under the root of this plant for a coal, to serve as a talisman against many disasters, see Brand's Pop. Antiqu.]
  • Page  348MUKKE. Fimus, letamen, CATH.
  • MUKHYLLE, or donghylle. Ster∣quilinium, fimarium, forica, CATH.
  • MUK, or duste (mul, K. S. mull, P.)1. [The correct reading is here given, probably, by the other MSS. The term mull is still retained in the Eastern counties, and in the North, and signifies, according to Forby, soft breaking soil. "Molle, pulver, et cetera ubi powder." CATH. ANG. Compare Low-Germ. and Dutch, mul, Ang.-Sax. myl, pulvis. "Mullock, or mollock, vide dust, or dung." GOULDM. Chaucer uses the word "mullok," Cant. T. v. 3871, 16,408. See the North Country Glossaries.]Pulvis.
  • MULBERY. Morum, CATH. (sel∣sus, CATH. P.)
  • MULBERY, tre. Morus, CATH.
  • MULLYN̄, or breke to powder, or mulle (muldyn, S.)2. ["To mulbrede, interere, micare. To make molle, pulverizare." CATH. ANG. Hence, perhaps, as it has been suggested in the note on MOLDALE, p. 341, to mull ale or wine, to infuse powdered condiments therein.]Pulveriso.
  • MULLYN̄, or reynyn̄ a mulreyne. Plutinat, C. F.
  • MULREYNE.3. [Pultina, MS. The term MULREYNE may have been not inappropriately used to denote a mizzling shower, falling like fine powder, or mull; unless it may be preferred to seek a derivation from the French mouiller.]Plutina, C. F. plu∣viola, CATH.
  • (MULLOURE, supra in molowre, P.)
  • MULTIPLYYN̄. Multiplico.
  • MULTYTUDE, of grete nowmbyr. Multitudo.
  • MULWELLE, fysshe.4. [In the Inventory of Sir John Fastolf's effects at Caistor, 1459, is the entry "Larderia; Item, viij. lynges. Item, iiij. mulwellfyche. Item, j. barelle dim' alec' alb'." Archaeol. xxi. 278. Dr. Will. Turner, in his letter to Gesner on British fish, prefixed to the second ed. of Gesner, lib. iv. states that the fish called keling in the North, and cod in the South, on the Western coasts is termed melwel. Spelman states that the mulvellus of the Northern seas is the green fish, called in the Book of Customs at Lynn Regis melvel, and haddock, and in Lancashire milwyn. In the statute for the regulation of prices of fish and poultry, as given in Strype's Stowe, mulvel is mentioned. "Morue, the cod, or green fish, a lesse and dull-eyed kind whereof is called by some the morhwell." COTG. Merlangus virens, CUV.]Mulio, C. F.
  • MUMMAR. Mussator, CATH.
  • MUMMYN̄, as þey þat noȝt speke. Mutio, CATH. et C. F. et UG. in mugio.
  • MUMMYNGE.5. [Mummynge seems to have denoted originally a dumb show, a pantomime, per∣formed by masked actors, a Christmas diversion, regarding which many particulars will be found in Brand's Pop. Antiq. "Mummar, mommevr. I mumme in a mummynge. Let vs go mumme (mummer) to nyght in womens apparayle." PALSG. Compare Dutch mumme, Germ. momme, larva; Fr. "momme; mascarade, déguisement." ROQUEF. "Mommon, a troop of mummers; also, a visard, or mask; also, a set, by a mummer, at dice." COTG.]Mussacio, vel mussatus.
  • MUNKE. Monachus.
  • MURCHE, lytyll man.6. [This name for a dwarf does not appear to be retained in any of the local dialects, although preserved, as it would appear, in the surname Murchison.]Nanus, vel navus, C. F. sessillus, CATH. ho∣mullus, homuncio.
  • MUSSELLE (sic, K. murssell, P.) Morcellus, bolus, bucella.
  • MUSCHYL, or muskyl, fysche (mus∣shell, K.) Musculus, C. F.
  • Page  349MUSCHERŌN, toodys hatte. Bo∣letus, C. F. fungus, C. F.
  • MUSYK. Musica.
  • MUSKE. Muscatum.
  • (MUSKYL, fysche, or muschyl, supra.)
  • MUSKYTTE, byrde.1. ["A muskett, capus." CATH. ANG. "Musket, a lytell hauke, mouchet." PALSG. "Mouchet, espece d'oiseau de proye, c'est le tiercelet de l'espervier." NICOT. The most ancient names of fire-arms and artillery being derived either from monsters, as dragons or serpents, or from birds of prey, in allusion to velocity of movement, this little hawk supplied the appellation musket; as also at a much earlier period it had furnished a name for the missile termed muschetta, or mouchette, in the XIIIth cent.]Capus, C. F.
  • MUST, drynke.2. ["Must, carenum, mustum." CATH. ANG. "Mustacium, i. mustum vinum, vel potus (qui) ex musto fit, et aliis potionibus." ORTUS. Mulsa, or mulsus, according to the Catholicon, was a drink compounded of wine, or water, and honey, commonly called meed; occasionally the term denotes new wine, which is the usual signification of must, as in the Wicliffite version, Dedis ii. 13; Cov. Myst. p. 382. "Must, newe wyne, movst." PALSG. In Aelfric's Glossary, Julius, A. II. f. 127, are given "cervisa, vel celea, eale; medo, meodu; ydromellum, vel mulsum, beor." Horman says, "We shall drynke methe, or metheglin; mulsum vel hydromel, non medonem." According to the account given of Apomel, in Arund. MS. 42, f. 32, vo, mulsa, or mellicratium, is formed of eight parts water, and one of honey, boiled together; "idromellum, as oþer facultes vsen it; it is a lycur þat we callen wort, and it is seyd of ydor, water, and of hony, noȝt þat hony goþ þer to, for hony towcheþ it but for it is swete as hony. It is water of malt, mulsum."]Mustum, mulsum, CATH.
  • MUSTARDE. Sinapium.
  • MUSTARD, or warlok, or se(n)|vyne, herbe (mustard syd, K. sede, P. senwyn, S.) Sinapis.
  • MUSTARD POTTE. Ceriola, KYLW.
  • MUSTERYN̄, or gadyr to-gedur. Commonstro, coaduno.
  • MUST(E)RYN̄, or qwysp(e)ryn̄ pri∣vyly (or rummuelōn, infra; whyspryn, H.) Mussito.
  • MUSTERYNGE, or qwysperynge (or romelynge, infra; whisper∣ynge, K. P.) Mussitacio.
  • MUSTERYNGE, or gaderynge to∣geder of men to be schewyde (gaderynge togeder of sowd∣yours, K. P.) Coadunacio, commonstracio.
  • MUSTUR, idem est; et bellicrepa.3. [Previously to the existence of a standing stipendiary force, provision was made for the defence of the realm, in any sudden emergency, by the law that every householder should have in his dwelling a warlike equipment suitable to his means and station, and should at certain fixed seasons present himself before the constables, or appointed officers, with his accoutrements, for inspection. This was termed the monstre, mon∣strum, or armilustrium, in N. Britain the "weapon-schawynge," often mentioned in the Scotch acts, and in later times in England, the muster. The most curious and ancient ordinance to this effect is that passed at Winchester, 1285, 13 Edw. I. Stat. of Realm, i. 97; but the existence of a similar scrutiny at an earlier period appears by the docu∣ments printed by Wats, M. Paris, Auctarium, addit. p. 230. Spelman cites Rot. Parl. 5 Hen. IV. regarding the monstrum or monstratio of men-at-arms; see also the ordi∣nance of Hen. V. in his statutes in time of war, "de monstris publicis, seu ostenci∣onibus." Upton. Mil. Off. 136. "Muster of men, bellicrepa." CATH. ANG. Palsgrave gives the verbs "I muster, as men do yt shall go to a felde, ie me monstre. I muster, I take the muster of men, as a capytayne doth, ie fais les monstres. What place will you sygne to muster your folkes in. Mustre of harnest men, monstre."]
  • Page  350MWE, or cowle (mv, K.)1. [Siginarium, MS. The distinction between MV of hawkys, p. 347, and a mew for fatting poultry, deserves notice. Chaucer uses the word in the latter sense, Cant. T. 351.]Sagi∣narium, DICC.
  • NACYONE. Nacio.
  • NACORNE, ynstrument of myn∣stralsye (nacorne of mynstralle, K.)

    2. This instrument of martial music appears to have been a sort of drum, of Oriental origin, and introduced into Europe by the Crusaders. Joinville speaks of the minstrels of the Soudan, "qui avoient cors Sarrazinnois, et tabours, et nacaires;" the term being evidently identical with the naqârah, or drum of the Arabs and Moors. See Ducange, v. Nacara, Roquefort, and Wachter. Menage, and other writers, supposed the nacaire to be a kind of wind-instrument, but the observations of Ducange on Join∣ville, p. 59, and the remarks of Daniel, Milice Franc. i. p. 536, prove beyond question that it was a drum. Cotgrave, however, gives "Naquaire, a lowd instrument of musicke, somewhat resembling a hoboy." Nakerys are mentioned in Gawayn and the Grene Knyȝht, v. 118, 1016; and Chaucer's Knight's T. v. 2513. Froissart re∣lates that Hugh Despenser the younger, being taken by the Queen's army in 1326, was led about "après le route de la Royne, par toutes les villes ou ils passoyent, à trompes et nacaires." Vol. i. c. xiii. Amongst the minstrels in the household of Edw. III. 1344, is named "makerers, j." which may be erroneously written for nakerer, but in the Gesta Ludov. VII. c. 8, it is said "tympanis et macariis, et aliis similibus instru∣mentis resonabant." See Household Ordin. p. 4, Harl. MS. 782, p. 63. Sir John Maundevile relates that near the River Phison is the Vale perilous, in which "heren men often tyme grete tempestes—and gret noyse, as it were sown of tabours, and of nakeres, and trompes, as thoughe it were a gret feste." Voiage, p. 340. Trevisa, in his version of Barthol. de Propr. lib. xix. c. 141, says that "Armonia Rithmica is a sownynge melody—and diuers instrumentes serue to this maner armony, as tabour, and timbre, harpe, and sawtry, and nakyres." Palsgrave gives "nauquayre, a kynde of instrument, naquair." The precise period when the use of drums as martial music was adopted by the English is uncertain; R. Glouc. p. 396, alludes to their Saracenic origin, and describes the terror caused thereby, so that the horses of the Christians were "al astoned." Nakers were used at the battle of Halidown-Hill, 1332, as appears by the "Romance," or ballad on that victory, Harl. MS. 4690, f. 80; they are termed tabers in the prose account of the same, f. 79, vo. Minot says, in his poem on the alliance of Edw. III. with the Duke of Brabant, and other foreign powers, 1336, and their pre∣parations for war with Philip de Valois,

    "The princes, that war riche on raw,
    Gert nakers strike, and trumpes blaw."

    The NACORNE, or nacaire, was probably the small kettle-drum, used in pairs, as seen in the figures given by Strutt, Horda, vol. i. pl. vi. from the Liber Regalis, written during the reign of Rich. II. The most curious representation is that etched by Carter, in his Ancient Sculpture and Painting, from a carved miserere, of the close of the XIVth cent. formerly in one of the stalls at Worcester Cathedral, and now place on the cornice of the modern organ-screen, over the entrance from the nave.

    Nabulum (mablum, P.)
  • NACORNERE. Nabularius.
  • NAGGE, or lytylle beest, Bestula, equillus.
  • NAY. Non.
  • NAYL of metalle. Clavus.
  • NAYLE of tymbyr. Cavilla, C. F.
  • NAYL of fyngyr, or too. Un∣guis.
  • NAYLYD wythe yryne. C(l)ava∣tus, conclavatus.
  • NAYLYD wythe tymbyr. Cavil∣latus.
  • NAYLYD, as fyngers, or toos (nay∣led on fyngers, P.) Unguatus.
  • Page  351NAYLYN̄. Clavo.
  • NAYTYN̄, or denyyn̄ (nayyn, S.) Nego, abnego, denego.
  • NAKARE, or he þat spoylythe men of cloths. Denudator.
  • NAKYD. Nudus.
  • NAKYD, or made nakyd. Denu∣datus.
  • NAKYN̄, or make nakyd (or strypyn̄, or streppyn̄, infra.)

    1. "To nakyne, nudare, detegere, exuere. A nakynynge, nudacio." CATH. ANG. "Nudo, i. expoliare, &c. to naken. Denudacio, a nakenynge." ORTUS. In R. Brunne's version of Langtoft's Chron. a satirical ballad is given on the victory of Edw. I. over the Scots at Dunbar, 1294. Ed. Hearne, p. 277.

    "Oure fote folk put þam in þe polk, and nakned þer nages."

    Compare the extract from the original Chron. given by Mr. Wright, App. to Polit. Songs, p. 295. In Roy. MS. 20 A. XI. the word is written "nakid;" in Cott. MS. Julius, A. v. "nackened." In the earlier Wicliffite version Levit. xx. 19 is thus ren∣dered: "The filþheed of thi moder sister, and thi fader sister thow shalt not discouer; who that doth this, the shenship of his flesh he shal nakyn." A.-Sax. benacan, nudare.

    Nudo, denudo.
  • NAKYNGE, or nakydnesse (or stryppyng, infra.) Nudacio, denudacio.
  • NAME. Nomen.
  • NAMELY. Precipue.
  • NAMELY, or syngulere. Preci∣puus (singularis, P.)
  • NAMYN̄ (or nemelyn', infra.) No∣mino, denomino, cognomino.
  • NAPE of an hedde (or naterelle, infra.) Occiput, cervix, vertex.
  • NAPET, or napekyn̄. Napella, manupiarum (mapella, P.)
  • NAPYN̄, or slen̄ be the nape (sclape in ye nape, HARL. MS. 2274, slepe be þe nese, S. slene in the nape, P.)2. ["I nawpe one in ye necke, I stryke one in ye necke, ie accollette, and ie frappe au col. Beware of hym, he wyll nawpe boyes in ye necke, as men do conyes." PALSG. "A nawp, a blow. Hit him a nawpe. See Yorksh. Dial. p. 68." Bp. Kennett's Gloss. Coll. Lansd. MS. 1033. Compare Brockett, and Craven Gl. v. Naup.]Occipito.
  • NAPPYN̄, or slomeryn̄ (sclomar∣ynge, HARL. MS. 2274.) Dor∣mito.
  • NAPPYNGE, of slomerynge. Dor∣mitacio.
  • NAPRUN (or barmclothe, supra.) Limas, CATH. et UG. in limis, limata.
  • NAROWE (narwe, K. H. S.) Stric∣tus.
  • NAROWHEDE. Strictura.
  • NATTE, or matte.3. ["A natte, storium, storiolum. A natte maker, storiator. To make nattes, storiare." CATH. ANG. "Storiolo, to cover with nattes." ORTUS. "Nat maker, natier." PALSG. In the curious poem entitled the Pilgrimage to Jerusalem, Cott. MS. Vitell. C. XIII. f. 172, vo, one of the characters introduced is the "Natte makere," who holds long discourse with the Pilgrim. NATTES are mentioned again under the word NEDYL, as "boystows ware," or coarse manufacture.]Matta, storium, CATH. et C. F.
  • NATERELLE, idem quod nape, supra.4. [This word is usually written haterelle, but the letter n. taken from the preceding article, is here, as in many other like cases, by prosthesis prefixed to the substantive. "Occipicium, þe haterelle of þe hede. Imeon, dicitur cervix, a haterel." MED. In the Lat.-Eng. Vocabulary, Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. are given "Occiput, nodyll: vertex, haterele: discrimen, schade: tupa, fortoppe." "An haterelle, cervix, cervicula, vertex." CATH. ANG. "Hatteroll, hascerel." PALSG. Cotgrave says that a man's throat, or neck, is termed by the Walloons hastereau; but hasterel, or haterel, is an old French word of frequent occurrence, which signifies, according to Roquefort, the nuque, or nape of the neck. Hence, probably, may be derived the name of the Hatterel Hills, between Brecon and Hereford.]
  • NAVE of a qwele (qwyl, S. whele, Page  352 P.)1. ["Meditullium, a carte nathe (al. navelle.)" MED. "Modiolus, lignum grossum in medio rote, per quod caput axis immittitur, &c. Anglice nathe." ORTUS. "Naue of a whele, moyevl. Nathe, stocke of a whele." PALSG. Ang.-Sax. nafa, modiolus.]Modius, et modiolus, C. F. timpanum, CATH. cantus, CATH. meditullium, UG. in medius.
  • NAVEE, or gaderynge to-gedyr of many shyppys. Classis, na∣vigium, CATH. stolus, CATH.
  • NEB, or byl of a byrd (neble, S.)2. ["A nebbe, rostrum, rostrillum." CATH. ANG. "Neble of a womans pappe, bout de la mamelle." PALSG. Ang.-Sax. neb, caput.]Rostrum.
  • NEDE. Necessitas, necessitudo, necesse, indigencia, egestas (in∣edia, P.)
  • NEDEFULLE. Necessarius.
  • NEDY. Egens, indigens.
  • NEDY, or pore. Inops.
  • NEDLE (nedil, K.) Acus.
  • NEDYL, to sow wythe nattys, or oþer boystows ware (nettys, or oder boystys ware, S.)3. [—boystors, MS. Compare BOYSTOWS, rudis, p. 42, and STOOR, or hard, or boys∣tows, hereafter. Broccus, or broca, in French broche, is a packing needle, an awl, or a goad. See Blount's Tenures, under Havering, Essex.]Broccus, UG.
  • NEDYL CASE. Acuarius, C. F.
  • NEDYN̄. Indigeo, egeo.
  • NEDDYR, or eddyr. Serpens.
  • NEYHBOROWRE (neybour, K. ney∣bowre, S. neyghbour, P.) Prox∣imus, vicinus, proxima, vicina.
  • NEYHBORE, of þe same strete. Convicanius, convicania.
  • NEYBOREDE (neyghbourhede, P.) Proximitas, vicinitas.
  • NEYHHYN', or come ny (neyhin, K. neighen, or come nere, P.) Appropinquo, approximo.
  • NEYYN̄, as hors (or neyȝynge, HARL. MS. 2274.) Hinnio.
  • NEYYNGE of horse (nyng, K. neyynge, or nyȝynge, HARL. MS. 2274.) Hinnitus.
  • NEY(SE), tene, or dyshese (neyse, or tene, or disese, K. H. P.)4. [See NOYYNGE, or noyze, and TENE. Compare French noise, ennui; Lat. noxia.]Tedium, nocumentum, grava∣men.
  • NEYTHYR (neydyr, S. neyyir, P.) Neuter.
  • NEKKE. Collum.
  • NEKE NAME, or eke name.5. [Junius derives nick-name from nom de nique, an expression borrowed, as he sup∣poses, from the Ital. niquo, iniquo; but there can be little doubt that the word is formed simply by prosthesis, the final n. being transferred from the article to the sub∣stantive. "Agnomen, an ekename, or a surename." MED. "An ekname, agnomen, dicitur a specie, vel accione, agnominacio." CATH. ANG. "Nyckename, brocquart." PALSG. "Sobriquet, a surname; also, a nickname, or by-word." COTG. "Susurro, a priuye whisperer, or secret carrytale that slaundereth, backebiteth, and nicketh ones name." Junius, Nomenclator, by John Higins, 1585.]Ag∣nomen.
  • Page  353NEMELYN', idem quod namyn̄.
  • NEPE, herbe.1. [Compare WYYLNEPE, cucurbita. Ang.-Sax. naepe, napus.]Coloquintida, cu∣curbita (cucurbica agrestis, P.)
  • NEPTE, herbe.2. [Nepeta cataria. Linn. common cat-mint, or nep. Ang.-Sax. naepte, nepeta. "Filtrum, quedam herba venifera, neppe." ORTUS. "Neppe, an herbe, herbe du chat." PALSG. Forby gives the Norfolk simile "as white as nep," in allusion to the white down which covers this herb.]Nepta.
  • NEERE, or ny. Prope, juxta.
  • NEERE of a beest.

    3. "Ren, the nere." MED. "Lumbus, a leynde, vel idem quod ren, Anglicè a nayre." ORTUS. "Neare of a beest, roignon." PALSG. Gautier de Bibelesworth says, Arund. MS. 220,

    "De dens le cors en checun homme
    Est troué quer, foye, e pomoun (liuere ant lunge)
    Let, plen, boueles, et reinoun (neres)."

    In Sir Thomas Phillipps' MS. "reynoun, kydeneyre." In the later Wicliffite version Levit. iii. 33 is thus rendered: "þei schul offre twey kideneiren (duos renes, Vulg.) wiþ þe fatnesse by whic þe guttis clepid ylion ben hilid." The following recipe is given in Harl. MS. 279, f. 8: "To make bowres (browes?)—take pypis, hertys, nerys, an rybbys of the swyne, an chop them—an serue it forthe for a good potage." In Norfolk, according to Forby, near signifies the fat only of the kidneys, pronounced in Suffolk nyre. Pegge gives the term as denoting the kidneys themselves. Compare Dan. nyre, the kidneys.

    Ren.
  • NETHYRTHELES (nertheles, K. neythirlesse, S. neuerthelesse, P.) Nichilominus, tamen (ve∣runtamen, P.)
  • NESCHYN̄, or make nesche.4. ["Molliculus, neisshe, or softe. Mollicia, softenesse, or neisshe. Molleo, to be nesshe." MED. "Nesche, mollis, etc. ubi softe." CATH. ANG. "Tendre—nice, nesh, puling, delicate." COTG. "In hard and in nesche," Will. and Werwolf, 19, 20, is, according to Sir F. Madden, a common poetical phrase: it is used by Chaucer. In the later Wicliffite version the word occurs as follows, 2 Chron. xxiv. 27: "For þou herdist þe wordis of þe book, and þi herte is maad neische (emollitum est, Vulg.) and þou art mekid in þe siȝt of the lord." See also R. Brunne; Octouian, v. 1210; Seuyn Sages, v. 732. Among recipes for the craft of limning books, MS. in the collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps, 8186, f. 148, is the following: "To make coral. Take hertys hornes and mader, an handful or more, and sethe hit tyl hit be as neysche as glewe." One of the virtues of betony, as detailed in Cott. MS. Jul. D. VIII. f. 121, is that with honey "hit is good for þe coȝghe, and hit makethe nesshe wombe." A marvellous recipe is preserved in Sloane MS. 73, f. 215, vo: "For to make glas nesche. Take þe gotes blode lewke, and þe iuyse of seneuey, and boile hem wel to-gederis; and wiþ þo tweye materes boyle wel þi glas; and þi glas schal bycome nesche as past, and if it be cast aȝeyne a wal, it schal not breke." Sir John Maundevile, speaking of the form of the earth, says that the hills were formed by the deluge, that wasted the soft ground, "and the harde erthe and the rocke abyden mountaynes, whan the soft erthe, and tendre, wax nessche throghe the water, and felle, and becamen valeyes." Voiage, p. 368. Trevisa, in his version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 8 A. XII. says of stores in a fortified city, "loke thou haue iren and stele of diuers tempere, both harde and nesshe, for to make with armoure;" and of the selection of good recruits, "fishers, foulers, runnours, and gestours, lechours, and holours (are) not to be chosen to knyghtehode, ne not be suffred to comme nyghe the strengthes—for thies maner of menne with her lustes shulle rather nasshe the hartes of warriours to lustes, thenne hardenne theim to fighte." This word is still commonly used in Shropshire, and some of the adjoining counties. See Hartshorne's Salopia, and the Herefordshire Glossary. Ang.-Sax. nesc, mollis; hnescian, mollire.]Molli∣fico.
  • Page  354NESE, or nose. Nasus.
  • NESE THYRLYS.

    1. In the earlier Wicliffite version the word "noos thrillis" occurs, iv Kings xix. 28; and "nesethirles" in the later version, Job xl. 21. In the Boke of Curtasye the following admonition is given; Sloane MS. 1986, f. 28, vo:

    "Ne delf þou neuer nose thyrle,
    With thombe ne fyngur as ȝong gyrle."

    In the gloss on Gautier de Bibelesworth narys is rendered "nase þirlis." "A nese thyrle, naris." CATH. ANG. "Nose thrill, tendron du nez, narine." PALSG. Ang.|Sax. naes þyrel, naris, þyrl, foramen.

    Naris.
  • NESYN̄. Sternuto, CATH.
  • NESYNGE.2. [The leeches of former times highly esteemed sternutatory powders, as efficacious especially in disorders of the brain. The root of hellebore was most in request for this purpose, of which was formed "neesing powder," and the plant was called in England, as in Germany, "nieswoort," according to Gerarde, who mentions also the wild pellitory, Achillea Ptarmica, as called "sneesewoort, or neesing wort." Horman says that "two or iij. nesys be holsom, one is a shrowed token;" and Palsgrave gives the observation, "the physicians saye whan one neseth it is a good sygne, but an yuell cause;" as likewise And. Boorde, in the Breviary of Health, c. 333, says, "in English it is named sternutacion, or knesing, the which is a good signe of an euyll cause." He seems, however, to approve of the moderate use of sneezing by means of the powder of Eleborus albus, called "knesing powder." In Brand's Popular Antiqu. may be found many curious details regarding superstitions connected with sneezing. The following curious passage in the Golden Legend has not been noticed; it thereby appears that a similar superstition existed in regard to yawning. The "more Letanye," it is stated, was instituted by Pope Gregory during the pestilence called the botch, which afflicted the people of Rome with sudden death. "In this maner somme snesynge they deyed: soo whan ony persone was herde snesinge, anone they yt were by sayd to him, God helpe you, or Cryst helpe you; and yet endureth ye custome. And also whan he snesyth or gapeth he maketh tofore his face the sygne of the crosse, and blysseth hym, and yet endureth this custome." f. xxiiij. vo. "Nesyng with the nose, esternuement." PALSG. Ang.-Sax. niesan, sternutare.]Sternutacio.
  • NEXT, or moost ny (nest, K. neest, S. P.) Proximus, propin∣quissimus.
  • NEST of byrdys. Nidus.
  • NESTLYD. Nidificatus.
  • NESTLYN̄ (as byrdys, S.) Nidifico.
  • NESTELYNGE. Nidificacio.
  • NETT, to take wythe fysche. Rete, sagena, reciaculum (reticu∣lum, P.)
  • NEET, beest. Bos.
  • (NEET, or hekfere, infra in styrk. Juvenca.)
  • NEET BREYDARE. Reciarius.
  • NEET DRYVARE. Armentarius, C. F.
  • NEET HYRDE.3. [NEET BYRDE, MS. nethirde, K. "Noetherde, or bulherde, bovuier." PALSG.]Bubulcus.
  • NEET HOWSE. Boscar, CATH.
  • NETYL, herbe. Urtica.
  • Page  355NETTYL SEEDE. Gnydisperma, UG. in grus.
  • NETLYD. Urticatus.
  • NETLYN̄ (wyth netlys, S.) Ur∣tico, vel urticis urere, CATH.
  • NETLYNGE. Urticacio.
  • NEVE, sonys sone. Nepos, C. F. quasi natus post.
  • NEVE, broderys sone. Neptis, C. F.
  • NEVE, systerys sonne. Sororius, CATH. sobrinus, UG. in sereno.
  • NEVE, neuerthryfte, or wastour (nefyne thryfte, or wastowre, S.)1. [It appears that the term nephew was used in reproach, as nepos had been by Cicero, Horace, and other classical writers. In the Ortus nepos is explained as sig∣nifying luxuriosus: "neptatio dicitur luxuria, et tunc dicitur a nepa, quod est valde ardens in luxuriâ."]Nepos, et dicitur nepos, quia negans passum, scilicet ad bonum.
  • (NEWYN, or innuwyn, H. innwyn, P. Innovo.)
  • NEVYR. Nunquam.
  • NEWME of a songe (nevme, H. neme, S.)2. ["Neuma, i. vocum emissio vel modulatio," &c. CATH. The Abbé Lebeuf, in his Traité de chant ecclesiastique, p. 239, defines neuma to be an "abrégé, ou recapitula∣tion des sons principaux d'une antienne, qui se fait sur la dernière syllabe par une simple variété de sons, sans y joindre aucune parole." See Ducange, v. Pneuma.]Neupma, -atis, neup∣ma, -me, CATH. et est differentia inter neupma scriptum cum p. que est cantus, et neuma, sine p. quod est Spiritus sanctus, secundum quosdam, versus non habeo.
  • NEWTE, or ewte, wyrme. Lacertus.
  • NETHYR PART of a thynge (or that is by-nethe, HARL. MS. 2274, that yt is bethen, sic, P.) Inferior.
  • NY, or neere (ney or ny, HARL. MS. 2274.) Prope, juxta.
  • NYCE.3. [In the Seuyn Sages, v. 1414, the foolish burgess is said to have quitted his home to seek a wife, "als moppe and nice." The word is also used by Chaucer in the sense of foolish; Cant. T. v. 5508, 6520. "Insolens, nyce, superbus, fatuus, moribus non conveniens. Insolentia, nycete. Insoleo, to be wantowne, to be nyce, and prowde." MED. Nice, according to Roquefort, signifies "mal-avisé, ignorant, niais;" and Cotgrave renders it precisely in the sense given in the Promptorium. "Nice, lither, lazie, slothfull, idle, faint, slack; dull, simple." Palsgrave gives "Nyse, strange, nice, nyes, nyese. Nyse, proper or feate, mignot, gobe, coint. Nicenesse, cointerie, niceté." See Jamieson, v. Nice.]Iners.
  • NYCEHEDE, or nycete. Inercia.
  • NYCELY. Inerte.
  • NYPTE (nifte, K. nyfte, H. S. P.)4. ["Neptis est filia filii vel filie." MED. Compare NEVE, broderys sone, neptis. NYPTE appears to be taken from the Latin word, as likewise the old French word neps, a nephew. "Trinepos, tercius, a nepote." MED. MS. CANT. It may be re∣marked that nephew is occasionally used to denote a grandchild, as nepos in Latin. Thus Eliz. de la Pole, writing in 1501 to Sir Rob. Plompton respecting Germayne her grandson, who had married the Knight's daughter, speaks of them as her "neveu" and "nese." See Mr. Stapleton's note on Plumpton Corr. p. 163.]Neptis.
  • NYPT, broderys douter (nyfte, S.) Lectis, C. F.
  • NYGGARDE (or muglard, supra, or nygun, or pynchar, infra.) Tenax.
  • Page  356NYGGARDSHEPE. Tenacitas.
  • NYGROMANCERE (nygramoncer', P.) Nigromanticus.
  • NYGROMANCY. Nigromancia.
  • NYGUN, idem quod nygard, supra (or muglard. Tenax.)
  • NYGHTE (nihte, K. nyth, H.) Nox.
  • NYGHTE CROWE.1. [The night jar, Caprimulgus Europaeus, Linn. is called in the North, according to the Craven Glossary, the night-crow. "A nyghte ravene, cetuma, nicticorax, noctua, strix." CATH. ANG. "Night crowe, cresserelle." PALSG.]Nict(ic)orax.
  • NYGHTYNGALE. Filomena, C. F.
  • NYGHTE MARE (or mare, or wytche, infra.) Epialtes, vel effialtes, C. F. geronoxa, et strix (geromaxa, P.)
  • NYKYR.2. [WYKYR, MS. nikyr, K. nykyr, H. nykir, P. Compare Mermaydyn̄, p. 334. A.-Sax. nicor, monstrum fluviatile. "Niceras," Beowulf, v. 838. Kilian gives Teut. "necker, Daemon aquaticus, Neptunus, ennosigeus." The Deity of the Sea, according to the Northern mythology, was called Neckur, a name which was taken, as Wachter supposes, from nack, equus, and nack, cymba, equus fluviatilis. See Keysler, Antiq. Sept. p. 262. Boucher's Gl. v. Auld-Nick; and Sir F. Madden's note on Laȝamon, 1322. Of ancient tales regarding the mermaid see Gesner, lib. iv. Stowe gives in his Annals, A. D. 1187, a marvellous relation of a merman taken near Orford Castle, Suffolk, and kept there many months by Barth. de Glanvile, as recorded by Rad. the Coggeshale, Cott. MS. Vesp. D. x. f. 88. The subject of Christian symbolism has been hitherto so neglected that no explanation has been suggested with regard to the frequent occurrence of the mermaid among decorations of a sacred character. It was likewise very frequently introduced, in medieval times, in the designs of embroidery, and ornaments of ordinary use.]Sirene, plur. Nota supra in (mer)maydynne.
  • NYLE of wulle (nyl or wyl, S.)3. [The Latin term given here seems to denote that NYLE signifies something of no weight or account; it may possibly denote the light flying particles, or flue, of wool. The white downy substance which arises when brass is exposed to strong heat is called nill. "Nill, the sparkles, or ashes that come of brass tried in the furnace, pompholyx, tucia, nil album, nihili, ceris et cadmiae favilla." GOULDM. "Nill, les escailles d'airain." SHERW. Palsgrave gives only "nayle of woll," without any French word. Noils, according to Forby, signify, in Norfolk, coarse refuse locks of wool, fit for making mops. The reading of the Harl. MS. 2274 is "nyle, or wulle;" but the reading of the Winch. MS. would induce the supposition that the word had quite a different signification from that which has been suggested, and were derived from Ang.-Sax. nill, non velle.]Nullipensa, plur.
  • NYMYL.4. ["Nemyll, cautus, etc. ubi wyse." CATH. ANG. It would appear that the sense in which the word occurs in the Promptorium were handy and skilful in taking or nyming anything. Compare the use of the adverb "neemly;" Townl. Myst. p. 105. MY∣CHARE, a pilferer, is rendered capax, p. 336. "Capax, i. assidue capiens, ofte holdynge, or tokynge." ORTUS. Palsgrave gives "nymble, delyuer, or quycke of ones lymmes, souple. Nymble, quycke, deliure."]Capax.
  • NYM KEPE, or take hede. Intendo, attendo, asculto, considero.
  • NYMYN̄, or takyn̄.5. [This old word is still in use in the North, according to Brockett, signifying to take up hastily, or steal privately. "To nim, accipere, furari, subducere, surripere." GOULDM. See Nares. Ang.-Sax. niman, capere. Compounded with the preposition be, or by, it occurs frequently, as used by Chaucer, in the sense of bereaving. Douglas, the monk of Glastonbury, writes in his Chronicle that the King of France "sompnedde King Edwarde to come to Parys by a certeine day, to do his homage, and elles he wolde beneme him Gascoigne." Harl. MS. 4690, f. 65, vo. "I nomme, I take (Lydgate), Ie prens. This terme is dawche, and nowe none Englysshe." PALSG.]Accipio, et alia supra in takyn̄.
  • Page  357NYNE. Novem.
  • NYNE HUNDRYD. Nonaginti.
  • NYNTENE. Novemdecim, vel de∣cem et novem.
  • NYNETY. Nonaginta.
  • NYPARE. Compressor, trusor.
  • NYPYN̄. Premo, stringo.
  • NYPYNGE. Compressio.
  • NYRVYL, or lytyl manne.1. [In Herefordshire a little person is termed a nurpin, and in the North, according to Jamieson, a knurl, nirb, nirl, nurg, nurrit, or nauchle. Brockett gives nerled, ill-treated, pinched, as a child unkindly used by a step-mother. See NURVYLL, dwerfe.]Pusil∣lus, nanus, C. F.
  • NYTE. wyrme. Lens.
  • NOBYLLE, of mony. Nobile.
  • NOBUL, or wurthy (nobil, or wor∣chip, K.) Inclitus, nobilis, egre∣gius, insignis.
  • NOBYLNESSE, or grete worthynesse (nobiley, K. nobley, S. P.) No∣bilitas, excellencia.
  • NOBYLY. Nobiliter, excellenter, inclite, egregie, insigniter.
  • NODDYNGE wythe the heed. Con∣quiniscio.
  • NODYL, or nodle of þe heed (or nolle, infra.) Occiput.
  • NOYYN̄, or grevyn̄.2. [The verb to "noye," or hurt, occurs in R. Brunne; the Wicliffite version, i. Pet. iii. 13; Apoc. vii. 3; Vis. of P. P. &c. "To noye (or desese), adversari, anxiari, gravare, molestare. A noye, angor, angustia, gravamen, &c. Anguyse, ubi noe. Noied—Noyous—Un. noyous, &c." CATH. ANG. "Tedium, noye. Tedet, it noyethe." MED. "I noye, I yrke one, Pennuye. We noye you paraduenture. I noye, I greue one, Ie nuys. I noye, or hurte one, Ie nuys. The felowe is so lothsome that he noyeth me horrybly. Noyeng, nuisance. Noysomnesse, or yrksomnesse, ennuy." PALSG. Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, "fro noyeng of meschief (d'ennui) I wyll kepe me, but alleway lyue in ioye shall be my byledyng (mon deduit.)" Compare NEY(SE), tene, or dyshese, p. 352.]Noceo; quere supra in grevyn̄.
  • NOYYNGE, or noyze (or derynge, supra; noyzynge, HARL. MS. 2274.) Nocumentum, grava∣men, tedium.
  • NOYSE, or dene (dyne, K.) Stre∣pitus, sonitus.
  • NOYOWSE, or grevowse. Nocivus, noxius, tediosus, infestus.
  • NOKKE of a bowe, or a spyndylle, or other lyke.3. ["Nocke of a bowe, oche de l'arc. Nocke of a shafte, oche de la flesche, penon, coche, loche. I nocke an arrowe, I put ye nocke in to ye strynge, Ie encoyche." PALSG. "Oche, a nick, nock, or notch; the cut of a tally. Coche, a nock, notch, nick, snip, or neb; and hence also, the nut-hole of a corsse-bow." COTG. Palsgrave gives the pro∣verbial expression, "he commendeth hym by yonde the nocke, il le prise oultre bort, et oultre mesure."]Tenorculus, KYLW. clavicula, KYLW. (tenus, tenarculus, P.)
  • NOLLE, supra, idem quod nodul.4. [In the later Wicliffite version Isai. iii. 17 is thus rendered: "þe lord schal make ballid þe nol of the douȝtris of Sion (decalvabit verticem," Vulg.) Tusser, in his abstract for February, gives the direction to strike off "the nowls of delving mowls," that is, of their hillocks. Ang.-Sax. cnoll, cacumen. Noddle of ye heed, coupeau de la test." PALSG.]
  • NOMANNE. Nemo.
  • Page  358NOMYN̄, or take wythe þe palsye.1. [See the note on NYMYN̄. "I benōme, I make lame or take away the vse of one's lymmes, Ie perclos. I haue sene hym as lusty a man as any was in Englande, but by ryot, and to moche trauayle, he is nowe benomme of hys lymmes. Benomme (or benombe of one's lymbes), perclus." PALSG. It is said in the Golden Legend, "his hondes were so benomen, and so lame, that he myght not worke. Their armes were bynom, and of noo power." "He is taken or be nomed, attonitus est. This man is taken, or benomed, syderatus." HORM. Ang.-Sax. benaeman, stupefacere; p. part. benemed, benumen.]Paraliticus.
  • NOONE, or neuer one (none, K. P.) Nullus.
  • NOONE, mydday (none, S. P.) Nona.
  • (NONYS, supra in F. for the nonys.)
  • NOPPE of a clothe.2. ["A noppe of clothe, tuberus, tuber, tumentum. To noppe, detuberare; -tor, -trix, -ocio." CATH. ANG. "Noppe of wolle, or clothe, cotton de tapis. Noppy, as clothe is that hath a grosse woffe, gros. Noppy, as ale is, vigoreux." Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, "Clarisse the nopster (esbourysse) can well her craft, syth whan she lerned it, cloth for to noppe (esbourier.)" Ang.-Sax. hnoppa, villus. NOPPE is synonymous with BURLE of clothe, p. 56, and denotes those little knots, which, after cloth has passed through the fulling-mill, are removed by women with little nippers; a process termed burling cloth.]Villus, to∣mentum, C. F. tumentum, UG.
  • NOPPYD (noppy or wully, HARL. MS. 2274, P.) Villosus.
  • (NOPPYD, P. Villatus.)
  • NOPPYNGE. Villositas, villatura.
  • NORYCE, or norys of chylder. Nutrix, gerula, CATH.
  • NORYCE, or noryschare, and forthe bryngar fro ȝouthe to age. Nu∣tricius, nutricia.
  • NORSCHYD, or forthe browȝt. Nutritus, enutritus.
  • NORSCHYD, and tawȝte (norisshed, P.) Educatus.
  • NORSCHYN̄, (norisshen, P.) Nu∣trio, foveo, alo, CATH. educo.
  • NORSCHYNGE, forthe bryngynge. Nutricio.
  • NORSCHYNGE, in manerys and condycyons (norshynge of god manere, K.) Educacio.
  • NORSCHYNGE, of mete and fode (of mete and drynk, S.) Nutri∣mentum, fomentum.
  • NORYSRYE, where yonge chyldur arn kept (norshery, where ȝong childyr ben, K. arn putte, S. norcery, P.) Bephotrophium, CATH. et UG. v. in T.
  • NORTHE. Borea, aquilo,3. [A flo, MS. aquilo, S. P. "Northe parte or wynde, septentrion, byse." PALSG.]sep∣tentrio.
  • NORTHE EST. Euro aquilo, C. F. tiphonia, C. F. vulturnus, C. F.
  • NORTHE WESTE. Aquilo ze∣phirus, C. F.
  • NORTURE, or curtesye.4. [Horman says, "It is nourture (officium est) to gyue place to your better."]Curi∣alitas, urbanitas.
  • (NOSE, idem quod nese, K. H. P. Nasus.)
  • NOSELYNGGYS (noslyngys, S.)5. ["Supinus, naselynge." MED. HARL. MS. 2257. "Supinus, layenge vpon the backe." ORTUS, Supinus appears to be given in the Promptorium, as previously, under the word GROVELYNGE, p. 215, in the sense of resupinus: NOSELYNGGYS seems to be synonymous with that word, as also with wombelyng, and compounded of Ang.-Sax. naes, and lanȝ, along.]Suppinus (resupinus, S.)
  • Page  359(NOSE THYRLYS, idem quod nese thyrlys, K.)
  • NOSTYLLE of nettys (nostul, H.) Nastula, C. F. instita, nasculus, C. F.
  • NOOTE, of songe yn a boke.1. [NOOTE, or synge, MS. noote of songe, S.]Nota.
  • NOTARY. Notarius, tabellio, C. F.
  • NOTE, frute. Nux.
  • NOTE, kyrnel (mete, or kyrnel, K.) Nucleus, CATH.
  • NOTE, tree. Nux, nucliarius, CATH.
  • NOTE, dede of occupacyon. Opus, occupacio.
  • NOTHAK, byrde.2. ["A nutte hake, picus, corciscus." CATH. ANG. "Picus, a nuthawke." ORTUS. "Nothagge, a byrde, iaye." PALSG. Sitta Europea, Linn. the nuthatch, or nut∣jobber, Willughby, the woodcracker, Plot, Hist. Oxf. 175, named from its singular habit of hacking and cleaving nuts. In the Grammar of R. Whitinton, part first, is mentioned "picus, avis que cavat arbores, Anglice, a vynde."]Picus, C. F. UG. V.
  • NOTEMYGGE. Nux muscata.
  • NOTYD. Notatus.
  • NOTYNGE. Notacio.
  • NOTUN songe. Noto.
  • NOTUN, or vsyn̄. Utor.
  • NOW. Nunc, jam, modo.
  • NOWCHE.3. [It might be at first sight concluded that this word was merely a variation of spelling, the final n. being taken from the article, and by prosthesis prefixed to the substantive ouch. It seems, however, probable that NOWCHE is a corruption of the Latin word nusca, or nuxa, a broach or fibula. See Ducange. In the Inventory of the Jewels of Blanche of Spain, 1299, Liber Gard. 28 Edw. I. p. 353, are mentioned with firmacula, broaches or clasps, "j. nouchia ad modum aquile aurea, cum rub' et ameraudis, precii d. li. turon' nigrorum. j. nouchia auri, cum imaginibus Regis et Regine, de armis Franc', cum petrariâ diversâ, precii cc. xl. li. turon'." In the list of jewels taken 1310, preserved in the Wardrobe Book 2 Edw. II. Harl. MS. 315, f. 48, is the entry "nusche auri precii cx. s." two others, of the value of iiij. li. and vij. marks; and iv. firmacula of gold, one of which was worth XXV. marks. "Lunule sunt proprie auree bullule de∣pendentes, ad similitudinem lune facte, quibus mulieres solebant ornare pectus suum; Anglice an ouche or a barre." ORTUS. "My mother hath a ryche ouche (preciosissimum segmentum) hangynge aboute her necke. He hath an ouche (monile) of golde gar∣nisshed with precyouse stoonys. Ladis of Ynde were preciouse stonys and ouches in theyr earis (elenchis et crotaliis.) He gave her an ouche couched with pearlys and precious stonys (monile margaretis et gemmis consertum.") HORM. "Nouche, or broche, afficquet. Ouche for a bonnet, afficquet, affichet." PALSG. "Fermaglio, the hangeyng owche, or flowre that women use to tye at the chaine or lace that they weare about their neckes." W. Thomas, Ital. Grammar, 1548. The designs of Holbein, executed for Hen. VIII. afford exquisite specimens of this kind of ornament. Sloane MS. 5308.]Monile, C. F. et DICC. scutula, CATH.
  • NOWHTE (nowth, K. nowte, S. nought, P.) Nichil.
  • NOWȜTE WURTHE. Invalidus.
  • NOWTHE CUN, or haue no cun∣ny(n)ge (cone, H. nought kun, P.)4. [Compare CONYN, p. 89, and CUNNE, or to haue cunnynge, p. 109. "To cunne, scire, etc. ubi to cone." CATH. ANG.]Nescio.
  • NOWTHE KNOW. Ignoro.
  • NOWTHE MOWN̄. Nequeo.
  • Page  360NOWTHE WYLN (nowtwyllyn, K. nought willyn, P.) Nolo.
  • NOUYCE, or novys. Novisius.
  • NOVYSRYE (nouycery, H. S. P.) Noviciatus.
  • NOVYL, or navyl. Umbilicus.
  • NOWMELYS of a beest (nowm∣belys, K. nowmel, H.)1. [The interpretation given by Uguitio is "Burbulia, intestina majora." AR. MS. 508. "þe nownbils of a dere, burbilia, pepinum." CATH. ANG. "Burbilia, Anglice nombles. Popinum, nombles." ORTUS. "Noumbles of a dere, or beest, entrailles." PALSG. "Praecordia, the numbles, as the hart, the splene, the lunges, and lyuer." ELYOT. See Ducange, v. Numbile, Numble, and Roquefort, v. Nomble, a portion cut from between the thighs of the deer. "Noumbles" are mentioned in Gawayn and the Grene Knyȝt, v. 1347. See Sir F. Madden's notes, p. 322; and A Jewell for Gentrie, 1614, sign. F. e. The term nombles did not, as it would seem, denote only the entrails of the deer. In "Dame Julyans Bernes boke of huntynge" minute instruc∣tions are given "how ye shall breke an harte," sign. e. j. vo, ed. 1496. The skin having been stripped off, and the inwards removed, the nombles are to be cut according to particular directions, the "nerys" or kidneys belonging to them; and they are to be trussed up carefully in the skin, and carried home for the lord; whilst the inwards and other parts are otherwise distributed. "Nombles, piece de chair, qui se leue entre es cuisses du cerf: cervi petimen, cervinum spetile." MONET. See a recipe for l "Nomblys of þe venyson," Harl. MS. 279, f. 9. See also Forme of Cury, pp. 15, 16, 94. Skinner writes the word the "humbles" of a stag, and rightly considers it as derived from umbilicus.]Bur∣balia, plur. C. F. vel burbia, KYLW. et UG. in burgus.
  • NOWMERE. Numerus.
  • NOWMERŌN'. Numero, annumero.
  • NOWMERYNGE. Numeracio.
  • N(O)WMPERE, or owmpere (nowm∣powre, or wompowre, S.) Ar∣biter, sequester, CATH. et C. F.
  • NOWUNDYR (nowonder, P.) Ni∣mirum.
  • NOWTUN, or syettyn̄ at nowhte (nowhtyn, or sette at noȝte, S. sett at nowth, HARL. MS. 2274, noughtyn, P.) Vilipendo, floc∣tipendo, C. F. nullo, adnullo, nichilo, nichilpendo.
  • NWE (nev, S.) Novus.
  • NWE ALE.2. [Compare ALE, whyle it is newe, p. 9; and GYYLDE, or new ale, p. 193.]Celia, C. F.
  • NVLY (nwely, K.) Noviter.
  • NWE MONE. Neomenia.
  • NWYN̄, or make newe. Innovo (renovo, P.)
  • (NVYNGE, or ynnewynge, HARL. MS. 2274. Innovo.)
  • NUNE, womann of relygione (nvnne, K. P.) Monialis, mo∣nacha.
  • (NUN, or none, P. Nona.)
  • NUNMETE.3. ["Merenda, a none meete. Anticenia, a nonemele. Cenobita, a none mele." MED. "A nvne mete, antecena, anticenum, merenda." CATH. ANG. "Merenda est comestio vel spaciatus in meridie, vel est cibus qui declinante die sumitur. Merendula, a beuer after none." "Merenda, breakefast, or noone meate." Thomas, Ital. Gramm. 1548. In the Towneley Myst. p. 234, noyning signifies, as explained in the Glossary, a noon∣nap, or siesta. "He has myster of nyghtes rest that nappys not in noyning." Bp. Kennett gives the following note in his Glossarial Collections, Lansd. MS. 1033. "Nooning, beavre, drinking, or repast ad nonam, three in the afternoon, called by the Saxons non-maete, in ye North parts a noonchion, an afternoon's nunchion." In Norfolk and Suffolk, according to Grose, Forby, and Moor, the meal taken by reapers or labourers, at noon, is still called noonings. See also Noonin, in the Craven Glos∣sary; and Nummet, Somerset. Harrison, in his Description of England, written about 1579, gives some curious remarks on the customs of ancient times respecting meals, cited in the note on BEUER, p. 34. Holinsh. Chron. i. 170.]Merenda, CATH. an∣tecenium, CATH.
  • Page  361(NURUYLL, dwerfe, supra in nyruyll, P.)
  • (NUSSE, fisshe, P.)1. [Haldorson gives Islandic, "hnysa, delphinus minimus, delphiniscus; Dan. marsvin." "Husse, a fysshe, rousette." PALSG. Compare HUSKE. fyshe, p. 254.]
  • OBEYYN̄, or be buxum. Obedio, pareo, CATH. obtempero.
  • OBLY, or vbly (brede to sey wythe masse, infra.)2. [In the Latin-Eng. Vocab. Harl. MS. 1587, is given "oblatum, a oblay:" in Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. f. 26, "nebula, noble; vafra, wayfyre." "Oblema, an obley. Nebula, a wafron—panis nebula coctus cum duplici ferro." ORTUS. See the minute directions of Abp. Lanfranc as to the mode of preparing the wafer for sacred purposes; Wilkins, Conc. i. 349. In the regulations for the allowance to the Household of Hen. II. Liber Niger, ed. Hearne, i. 344, the "nebularius" and his man occur after the pistores. Oblys were not exclusively of sacred use; in the Forme of Cury, p. 21, it is directed to "take obleys, oþer wafrouns, in stede of lozeyns, and cowche in dysshes," as sippets for "hares in papdele." During the Coventry Pageant, on oc∣casion of the visit of Prince Edward, 1474, "at the Crosse in the Croschepyng were iij. prophets standyng seynsyng; and upon the crosse a-boven were childer of Issarell syngyng, and castyng out whete obles, and floures." Sharp, Cov. Myst. p. 153. The following physical charm is found in a collection made towards the close of the XVth cent. Add. MS. 12,195, f. 136, vo: "For feueres. Take iij. oblyes, and wryte in one of hem, ✚ .l. Elyze ✚ Sabeth ✚ In the oþer, Adonay ✚ Alpha and oo. ✚ Messias ✚ In þe iij. pastor ✚ Agnus fons ✚ Let hym ete these iij. in iij. dayes, with holy water fastyng, and he xal be heyl be the grace of God; and sey v. pater nostris, v. aue Maria, dic crede, in the worschip of God, and of Seynt Pernel." In the detailed account of the coronation of Queen Mary, 1553, preserved at the College of Arms, it is stated that gold and an "oble" were laid as an offering upon the altar.]Nebula, DICC. UG. V. in C. (adoria, infra.)
  • OBLYCŌN, or byynd be worde (oblycyon, H. oblygacōne, S. oblygeren, W.) Obligo.
  • OBLYGACYŌN. Obligacio, ciro∣graphus, CATH. et C. F. et UG. in grama.
  • OCCASYONE, or enchesone (or cause, supra.) Occasio.
  • OCORN, or acorn, frute of an oke (occorne, or akorne, P.) Glans, CATH.
  • OCULUS CHRISTI, herbe.3. [Compare MATFELŌN, p. 329, where cow wede is said to be the Jacia alba. In Sloane MS. 5, Oculus Christi is said to be the same as calendula and "solsequium, Gall. solsicle, Ang. Seynte Marie rode. Solsequium, Rodewort, oþer marygoldys." Cotgrave gives "Orvale sauvage, wild clary, double clary, ocle Christi."]Hispia, vel hispia minor, et major di∣citur cow wede (cheken wede, P.)
  • OCCUPACYONE, or dede. Occu∣pacio.
  • OCCUPYON̄.4. [This verb very commonly occurs in the sense of to use. Horman says, "Some shipmen occupie saylis of lether, nat of lynen, nether of canuas. Women occupye pynnis to araye them." "This latton basen cankeryth, for faulte of occupyeng, par faulte d'estre vsité. I occupye, ie vsite, for ie vse is to weare. I praye you be nat angrye, thoughe I haue occupyed your knyfe a lytell." PALSG.]Occupo.
  • Page  362OCUR, or vsure of gowle.

    1. "Feneror, (to) okur. Fenerator, an okerere." MED. "Okyr, fenus, usura. An okerer; to do okyr, &c. An vsure, usura, etc. ubi okyr." CATH. ANG. Ang.-Sax. wocer, fructus, usura. In the earlier Wicliffite version it is said of the "comelyng," Deut. xxviii. 44, "He shal oker to thee (al. gauyl) and thou shalt not oker to hym," in the later version "leene," (foenerabit, Vulg.) Hardyng says of the times of Edw. I. that great complaints were made of the "okoure and vsury" practised by the Jews abiding in the land. Chron. c. 150. The curious compilation, entitled Flos florum, Burney MS. 356, comprises the points and articles of "Corsynge or mansynge," to be shewn by each parson to his flock four times in the year, in the mother tongue; in which are named "alle vsureres, alle þat makeþ oþer writeþ þat oker shal be payd; oþer yf hyt be payd, þat hyt ne be restored." p. 98. So likewise it is said in the ancient treatise cited in Becon's Reliques of Rome, 1563, p. 252, that "all okereris and usureris (ben accursed), that is to say, if a man or woman lend good to her neyhbour for to take aduauntage for her lending." In the verses on the seventh commandment in the "Speculum Xpistiani" (by John Watton?) it is said,

    "Be thou no theef, no theuys fere,
    Ne nothyng wynne thurgh trechery:
    Okur nor symonye come thou not nere,
    But conscience clere kepe ay truly."

    See also Towneley Myst. p. 162; Reliqu. Ant. ii. 113; and the Castell of Labour, W. de Worde, 1506, sign. c. iij. where the companions of avarice are said to be usury, rapine, false swearing, and "okerye."

    Usura.
  • OCUR, colure. Ocra, KYLW.
  • ODDE. Impar.
  • ODYOWS, or be-hatyd. Odiosus.
  • ODOWRE, or relece. Odor.
  • OOF, threde for webbynge.2. [In the earlier Wicliffite version, Lev. xiii. 47 is thus rendered: "A wullun clooth, or lynnen that hath a lepre in the oof (in stamine, Vulg.) or in the werpe—it shal be holdun a lepre." Stamen is properly the warp, or ground-work of the web, as it is rendered in the Ortus; trama is the woof, or transverse texture. Ang.-Sax. weft, sub∣tegmen. The reading of the MS. is Traura, but as no such word is found in the Catholicon, the reading of the Winch. MS. and Pynson's edit. has been adopted. "Trama, filum inter stamen discurrens." CATH.]Trama, CATH. stamen, C. F. subtegmen, CATH.
  • OFFAL, that ys bleuit of a thynge, as chyppys, or oþer lyke (þat levyd of a thinge, as chippys of tre, K. that beleueth of a thinge, as chyppys of trees, P.) Ca∣ducum, C. F.
  • OF HOWSHOLDE, or dwellynge in howsholde. Mancionarius, mancionaria, domesticus, do∣mestica.
  • OFFERYN̄. Offero.
  • OFFERON̄, or make sacryfyce. Immolo.
  • OFFERYNGE. Oblacio.
  • OFFERYNGE, or presaunt to a lorde at Crystemasse, or oþer tymys.3. ["Nefrendicium, a cherles rent, and a present of a disciple." MED. HARL. MS. 2270. Compare OMAGE, which is rendered likewise by the word nefrendicium. In the Catholicon nefrendicium is said to be derived from nefrendis, a barrow pig, and to signify "annuale tributum quod rustici suis dominis circa nativitatem, vel alio tempore anni, solent afferre; et quod parvi discipuli suis doctoribus apportant, duntaxat sit carneum, scilicet porcellus vel hujusmodi." In Brand's Popular Antiquities much curious information may be found on the origin and custom of presenting gifts at Christmas and the New Year; but the particular usage to which allusion is made in the Promptorium has been insufficiently noticed. It seems that it was customary for in∣feriors to present gifts to their superiors at this season, as the dependants of the court to the Sovereign, the vassals to their lord, or the scholars to the pedagogue. M. Paris complains of the extortion of "primitiva, quae vulgares nova dona novi anni superstitiose solent appellare," from each of the wealthier citizens of London, in 1249. The precise period at which this became an established usage has not been ascertained: numerous evidences regarding it may be found in the Inquisitions which set forth the customs of manors, such as those printed in Clutterbuck's Hertfordshire, iii. pp. 614, 618, the Household Books, Privy Purse Expenses, and Nichols's Progresses of Queen Elizabeth and James the First.]Nefrendicium, CATH. in nefrendis.
  • OFFERTORY. Offertorium.
  • OFFYCE. Officium.
  • Page  363OFFYCE, or place of offyce. Offi∣cina, C. F.
  • OFFYCYALLE. Officialis.
  • OFFYCERE. Officiarius.
  • OFFYCERE of cruelte, as bayly, or iaylere, or other lyke. Satelles, COMM.
  • OF O COLOWRE (one colowre, S.) Unicolor.
  • OF O LYKENESSE (or lyke, K. S. P. of one lykenesse, S. P.) Uni∣formis.
  • O FOTE (offote, H. P. on fote, S.) Pedester.
  • O FOTYD beest (o foted, or one foted best, P.) Loripes, CATH.
  • OF O WYLLE (of one wyll, S. P.) Unanimis, CATH, unius moris, CATH. in iija. parte.
  • OFTYNE. Sepe, multocies, fre∣quenter, plerumque.
  • (OYL, idem quod oly, infra.)
  • OYLE wythe oyle.
  • (OYNEMENT, or onyment, infra. Unguentum.)
  • OYSTER, fysche. Ostrea, vel ostreum, C. F.
  • OYSTER, shelle. Ostrea.
  • OKE, tre. Quercus, ylex, C. F.
  • (OOLD OOK, H. olde oke, P. Ilex, C. F.)
  • OKE APPUL. Galla.
  • (OKE plante, P. Ornus.)
  • OLDE, or elde. Antiquus, vetus, veteranus, senex, grandevus, annosus (veteratus, P.)
  • OLE, for-weryd, as clothys, and other thyngys. Vetustus, de∣tritus.
  • OLDE SHEPE, beest. Adasia, UG. in agnus. (Arva valet vite, sed adasia crassa laniste, S.)
  • OLDE WOMANN, supra in elde woman.
  • OLY, or oyl. Oleum.
  • OLY DRESTYS.1. [See DRESTYS, p. 131. "Fex, drestus. Fecula, a litul drast." MED. The term "drastis" (faeces, Vulg.) occurs in the Wicliffite version, Isai. xlix. 6. Of the medi∣cinal properties of "drestis" of wine, see Arund. MS. 42, f. 86.]Amurca, C. F.
  • OLYET, made yn a clothe, for sperynge (made on a cloth to spere, P.)2. ["Oyliet hole, oillet." PALSG. "Oeillet, an oilet-hole." COTG.]Fibularium, CATH. (gusibularium, K.)
  • OLYET, hole yn a walle (olyet, lytell hole, H. P.) Foramulum, CATH. (theca, forulus, P.)
  • OLYFAWNT, or elephawnt. Ele∣phas, barrus, C. F. elephantus.
  • OLY MANN, or he that makythe, or syllythe oyle. Olearius, olearia, UG.
  • Page  364OLY POTTE, or oly vesselle. Emi∣cadium, C. F. et UG. in mico, olearium, UG.
  • OLYVE, propyr name. Oliva.
  • OLYVE, tre. Oliva.
  • OYLYYNGE wythe oyle. Oleacio.
  • OMAGE (or viuage, infra.) Ho∣magium, nefrendicium, CATH. et UG. in apes.
  • OMAGER. Homagiarius, ho∣magiaria.
  • OONE. Unus.
  • ONABLE. Inhabilis, ineptus.
  • OONE a-cordyd, or ful a-cordyd to-gedur in herte or wylle (ona∣cord, K. of one acorde, S.) Unanimis.
  • ON A THRONGE, or to-gedur (onarowe, K.) Gregatim, tur∣matim.
  • OON, a-lone. Unicus.
  • ON-A-VYSYD. Inprovisus.
  • OON BE-GOTYN̄. Unigenitus.
  • ONBYNDYN̄, or losyn̄ (onbyyndyn, or solvyn, S.) Solvo, exsolvo.
  • ONBUXUM (or sturdy, infra.) Inobediens, contumax, rebellis.
  • ONCERTEYNE. Incertus.
  • ON-CHASTE. Inpudicus, lu∣bricus, incontinens.
  • ONCLENE. Inmundus, inpurus.
  • ON-COMELY. Indecens, difformis.
  • ON-CUNNYNGE. Inscius, ignarus.
  • ONCURYN̄, or on-hyllyn̄. Detego, discooperio, CATH.
  • ONCURTEYS. Incurialis (ingra∣tus, P.)
  • OONDE, or brethe (onde, K. H. P.)

    1. Onde, signifying breath, occurs in Kyng Alis. 3501; Rich. Coer de Lion, 4848. Gant. de Bibelesworth says that ladies take good care to wash well their mouths,

    "Kar l'enchesoun est certeyne,
    Ke eles le fount pur bon aleyne (god onde.)"

    Ar. MS. 220, f. 297, vo.

    In Arund. MS. 42, f. 48, Betonica is recommended as a specific "for cowh, and streyt onde: po(wder) of hym myȝt with clarefied hony noble for hem þat ben streyȝt ondyd, and han þe cowh, and for doþ haketynge, and swuch." Bolus Armenicus also is said to afford "noble helpe for hem þat han þe asme, as for elde folk þat arn streyt ondyd, if þey drynkyn it;" f. 50, vo. See also a remedy for "shorte onde," f. 53, b.; and the virtues of thyme "for hem þat ben anelows, i. streyt ondyd," f. 80. "Halo, to onde, or brethe, or raxulle. Alitus, oondynge, and norysshynge. Anelo, to oonde, or pantt. Anelitus, oonde." MED. Andrew Boorde, in the Breviary of Health, 1575, c. 20, writes, "of a man's breth, or ende, anelitus; in Englyshe it is named the breath, or ende of a man, the which other whyle doth stynk, or hath an euyll savour." See Aynd, Eynd, and End, in Jamieson. Grose gives yane, the breath, in the Northern Dialect. Ang.-Sax. ond, spiritus. Compare Islandic, anda, spiro; önd, anima.

    Anelitus.
  • ONDYN̄, or brethyn̄. Aspiro, anelo.
  • ONDEDELY. Immortalis.
  • ON-DEFYYD.2. [See the note on DEFYYN mete, p. 115. In the earlier Wicliffite version, 1 Kings, XXV. 37 is thus rendered: "Forsoþe in þe morewtid whanne Nabal hadde defied þe wijn (digessisset, Vulg.) his wijf schewide to hym all þise wordis, and his herte was almest deed wiþ ynne." In the later the following passage occurs, Deut. xxiii. 13: "þou schalt haue a place wiþout þe castels, to which þou schalt go out to nedeful þingis of kynde, and þou schalt bere a litil stake in þe girdil, and whanne þou hast sete, þou schalt digge bi cumpas, and þou schalt hile wiþ erþe þingis defied out" (egesta, Vulg.) In Arund. MS. 42, f. 70, vo, it is said of orange, that "some etyn it with hony, þowh hony be badde mete, for it is wik to defyin." See also Vis. of Piers P. v. 457.]Indigestus.
  • Page  365ON-DEFOWLYD (on-fowlyd, S.) Immaculatus, incontaminatus.
  • ONDOAR, or expownare. Expo∣sitor, interpres.
  • ONDOARE, or dystroyare. De∣structor, dissipator, confusor.
  • ONDOARE, or opynnare of thyngys schet or closyd (expowndare, S.) Apertor.
  • ONDOON̄, or dystroyyn̄. Destruo, et alia supra in destroyon̄ (confundo, extermino, P.)
  • ONDON̄, or expownyn̄. Expono, interpretor, resero.
  • ONDOON̄, or ondo lokys or spe∣ryngys (springes, P.) Aperio.
  • ONDOYNGE, or dystroyynge. Dis∣sipacio, destruccio (confusio, P.)
  • ONDOYNGE, or expownynge (ex∣powndyng, S.) Exposicio, de∣claracio, interpretacio.
  • ONDOYNGE, or op(y)nynge of schettellys, or sperellys (on∣pynnynge schettys, S.) Apercio (apericio, P.)
  • OONE EYYD (one eyyle, S.) Mo∣noculus, monotalmus, luscus, CATH. et C. F. monocula, lusca.
  • ONEST. Honestus.
  • ONESTE. Honestas.
  • (ONESTLY, K. Honeste.)
  • ON EVYRYSYDE. Undique, cir∣cumquaque (undicumque, ubi∣cunque, P.)
  • ONFESTYN̄, idem quod on-losyn̄ (idem quod on-solvyn, S.)
  • (ONFOTYD, supra in ofotyd, K.)
  • ON-GENTYL, supra in oncurteys.
  • ON-GENTYLLE of kynne. Igno∣bilis, degener, C. F. ingene∣rosus; et alia supra in B. bastarde.
  • ON-GENTYL be fadyr, and moder. Ybridus, UG. V. in U.
  • ON-GYLTY. Immunis, innocens (inculpabilis, P.)
  • ON-GRACYOWS. Ingraciosus, aca∣ris, CATH. vel acharis, C. F.
  • OON HANDYD (on handyl, S.) Mancus, et manca, CATH.
  • ON-HAP, or myshappe. Infor∣tunium, disfortunium.
  • ON-HAPPY. Infortunatus, infelix, disfortunatus.
  • ONEHEDE, or on a-cord (ooned, H. P.) Unitas.
  • (ONHILLYN, K. or oncuryn̄, supra. Discooperio, detego.)
  • ON-HOLSUM (or on-sety, infra.) Insalubris.
  • ON-HURTE. Illesus.
  • ONY, or ony thynge. Ullus.
  • ONYD.1. [The participle "oned," united, occurs in Chaucer, Cant. T. v. 7550. Compare PUT to-geder, and onyd. Continuus.]Unitus.
  • ONYN̄ to-gedyr (onyn, or vnyn to-geder, P.) Unio, aduno.
  • ONYNGE to-gedyr. Unio, adu∣nacio.
  • ONYMENT, or oynement. Ungu∣entum.
  • ONYONE. Sepe.
  • ON-KYNDE yn herte (or ongentyl, K. P.) Ingratus, acaris, CATH.
  • ON-KYYND, or nowȝt after cowrs of kynde. Innaturalis.
  • ON-KYNDELY yn herte. Ingra∣tanter, acaride.
  • ON-KYNDE yn kynde, or nature. Innaturalis.
  • ON-KYNDELY. Innaturaliter.
  • Page  366ON-KNOWE (onknowyn, K.) Ig∣notus, incognitus.
  • ON-KNOWYNGLY. Ignoranter, ignote, inscienter.
  • ONLAWFULLE.1. [The proper distinction is evidently made in the Promptorium between lawful and LEFULLE. Compare LAWFULLE, legitimus, p. 289, and LEFULLE, or lawfulle, licitus, p. 293. The etymology of the two words is manifestly distinct, the first being derived from Ang.-Sax. lah, lex; the second from Ang.-Sax. leaf, permissio. "Lawfulle, legalis, licitus. Lefulle, licitus, faustus. Vnlefulle, illicitus, illecebrosus." CATH. ANG. "Legitimo, to make lawfull. Legitimus, bonus, secundum legem habitus, vel factus. Licitus, lefull." ORTUS. By Wicliff this last word is written "leveful," which approaches more closely to the original orthography, and the distinction is ob∣served by the old writers. W. Thorpe, in his examination by Abp. Arundel, 1407, stated that he had said that the law of Holy Church teaches in the decrees that no servant ought to obey his lord, child his parent, or wife her husband, "except in lefull things and lawfull." This document was published by Tindal from Thorpe's autograph. The same phrase occurs in the Statutes of the Gild of St. Francis at Lynn, 1454, re∣garding the summons of the fraternity "in lefull and lawfull tyme." Richards, vol. i. 478. Palsgrave renders both "laufull" and "lefull," French, "licite, loysible."]Illegittimus.
  • ONLAWFULLY. Illegittime.
  • ON-LEEFULLE. Illicitus, nephas, nepharius.
  • ON-LEFULLY. Illicite, nepharie.
  • ON-LETTERYD. Illiteratus, agra∣matus, C. F.
  • ON-LETTERYDLY. Illiterate, agra∣mate.
  • ONLY. Solomodo.
  • ON-LOTHESUM.
  • ON-LYSTY, or lystles.2. [Compare LYSTY, delectabilis, p. 307; LUSTY, or lysty, delectuosus, p. 317. Ang.-Sax. lystan, velle, cupere; lystlice, libenter. Hence the negative listless, indifferent, having no desire. See OWLYST man, Deses.]Deses.
  • ON-MEUABLE. Immobilis.
  • ON-MEU(A)BLY. Immobiliter.
  • ON-MEVYD. Immotus.
  • ONMYGH̄TY. Inpotens.
  • ON-MYGHTLY. Inpotenter.
  • ON-NUMERABLE. Innumerabilis.
  • ONNUMERABLY. Innumerabiliter.
  • ONPACYENT. Inpaciens.
  • ON-PACYENTLY. Inpacienter.
  • ON-POWDERYD.3. [See POWDERON̄, and powderyd wythe salt, hereafter.]Insalsus, CATH. et C. F.
  • ON-POWDERYD, on-saltyd. In∣salitus.
  • ONPREVYN̄, or imprevyn̄ (in∣preuyn, H. S. P.) Improbo.
  • ON-PROFYTABLE. Inutilis.
  • ON-PROFYTABLY. Inutiliter.
  • ON-PUNSC(H)YD (onponysshed, P.) Inpunitus.
  • ON-PUNSCHYD, or wythe-owte pun∣schy(n)ge. Inpune.
  • (ONPONYSSHINGLY, P. Impunite.)
  • ON-QWELMYN̄ (onwhelmen, P.)4. [This word is placed between ONSADELYN̄ and ON-WYNDYN, as if written ON∣WHELMYN̄. Compare OVYR QWELMYN̄, p. 374, TURNŌN, or qwelman, and WHELMYN.]Desuppino, discooperio.
  • ON-QWEMABLE.5. [See QVEMYN̄, or plesyn̄; PEESYD, or qwemyd, &c. Ang.-Sax. cweman, placere.]Inplacabilis.
  • ON-QWEMABLY. Inplacabiliter.
  • ON-REPENTAUNT. Inpenitens.
  • ON-REPENTAWNTLY. Inpeni∣tenter.
  • ON-RYGHTEFULLE. Injustus.
  • Page  367ON-RYGHTEFULLY. Injuste.
  • (ONSADDDE, as fysche, infra in thoke.1. [See SAD, or hard. Solidus.]Humorosus, CATH. et UG. insolidus.)
  • ONSADELYN̄ hors, or takyn̄ a-wey fro hēm byrdenys. Desterno, CATH.
  • ONSAUERY. Insipidus.
  • ONSAVERYLY. Insipide.
  • ON-SCHAME-FAST. Inpudens, in∣verecundus, effrons.
  • ON-SCHAMEFASTLY. Inpudenter, inverecunde, effronter.
  • ON-SEMELY. Indecens, inconve∣niens, disconveniens.
  • ON-SEMELY, or yn on-semely wyse. Indecenter, inconvenien∣ter, disconvenienter.
  • ON-SETY, idem quod on-holsum, supra.2. [Compare Ang.-Sax. un-sida, pravitas, vitium; or un-sið, iter infelix. Teut. on-sedigh, male moratus.] (Insalubris.)
  • ON-SYGHTY. Invisibilis.
  • ON-SYGHTYLY. Invisibiliter.
  • ON-SYTTYNGE, idem quod on∣semely, supra (on-lykly, S. on∣sittinge, supra onsemynge, P.)3. [Neither the adjective, nor the impersonal verb sitteth, it is becoming, occur here∣after in the Promptorium, but they are not unfrequently used by Chaucer, Gower, and other writers. In Trevisa's version of Vegecius, B. ii. c. 18, it is said that "it semed vnsittyng that he þat shulde receyue of the Emperour lyverey, clothing, and sowde, shulde be occupied in eny oþer office but in the Emperours werres." Roy. MS. XVIII. A. 12. "It sytteth, it becometh, il siet: it sytteth nat for your estate to weare so fyne furres." PALSG.]
  • (ONSITTINGLY, supra in on∣semely, P.)
  • ONSTABYL. Instabilis.
  • ONSTABYLLY. Instabiliter.
  • ONSTEDEFAST, idem quod vn∣stabyl, supra.
  • ONSTEDEFASTNESSE. Instabilitas.
  • ON-SUFFERABYL, or ontollerable. Intollerabilis, insufferabilis (in∣sustentabilis, P.)
  • ON-SUFFERABLY (or intollerably, P.) Intollerabiliter.
  • ON-TAWHTE. Indoctus, instructus.
  • ONTELLEABLE. Inenarrabilis.
  • ON-THENDE. Invalidus.
  • ON-THENDLY. Invalide.
  • ON-THENDE, and fowl, and owt cast.

    4. Wrath, in the Vision of Piers Ploughman, v. 2825, complaining of the austerities and discipline to which he was subjected in a monastery, says,

    "I ete there unthende fisshe,
    And feble ale drynke."

    Mr. Wright explains the word as signifying unserved, without sauce. Ang.-Sax. þenian, ministrare.

    Abjectus.
  • ONTHRYFYN̄. Devigeo.
  • ON-TH(R)YFTE.5. [The reading of the MS. admits of a slight doubt here, as from the similarity of s. and f. it appears to be ON-THYSTE; as also in the Winch. MS. on-thryste. Compare THRYFTE and THRYFTY, hereafter.]Devigencia.
  • ONTHRYFTY, idem quod on∣thende (on-tryfty, S.)
  • ON-TYDY. Intemptatus (intemptus, durisipus, S. intemperatus, P.)
  • ON-TYDELY.
  • Page  368ON-TRUSTY (or on-trysty, S.) Insecurus, infidus (infidelis, P.)
  • ON-TROSTLY (ontruly, or untrustly. Infideliter, insecure, P.)
  • ON-TREWE. Infidelis.
  • ON-TREWLY. Infideliter.
  • ON-WARE. Incautus.
  • ON-WARLY. Incaute.
  • ON-WASCHYD. Illotus.
  • ON-WYNDYN̄, or on-twynyn̄ (on∣twyndyn, S.) Detorqueo, CATH.
  • ON-WYSE. Insipiens, imprudens, inscius (stultus, P.)
  • ON-WYSELY. Imprudenter, in∣sipienter, inscie.
  • ON-WYTYNGE. Ignorans.
  • ON-WYTYNGLY. Ignoranter.
  • ON-WURTHY. Indignus.
  • ON-WURTHYLY. Indigne.
  • ON PYLGYRMAGE (sic, opylgry∣mage, K. H. S. P.) Peregre.
  • OPYN̄, or opnyn̄. Aperio.
  • OPYNYONE. Opinio.
  • OPENYNGE, or ondoynge of schet∣tynge (opning, vndoynge of þat is sperd, K. undonynge that is hyd, P.) Apercio.
  • (OPNYNG, or expownynge, K. S. oppnynge, H. openynge, P. Exposicio.)
  • (OPOSYN, supra in aposen, K. H. S. P.1. [Chaucer uses the verb to appose, signifying to object to, or put to the question; Cant. T. v. 7179, 15,831. "I oppose one, I make a tryall of his lernyng, or I laye a thyng to his charge, ie apose. I am nat to lerne nowe to appose a felowe, à apposer un gallant." PALSG. See Towneley Myst. pp. 193, 195.]Oppono.)
  • OPPOSYNGE. Opposicio.
  • OPPRESSYNGE, or ouer ledynge (oppressyon, S.) Oppressio.
  • OPVN̄. Apertus (patulus, P.)
  • OPUN, fulle knowyn̄. Manifestus.
  • OPUNLY. Manifeste, palam.
  • OPVN̄ SYNNARE, wythe-owtȳn' schame. Puplicanus, pupli∣cana, CATH.
  • ORATORYE. Oratorium.
  • (ORCHERDE, supra in appull∣yerde. Pomerium.)
  • ORDEYNYD. Ordinatus, consti∣tutus.
  • ORDEYNYN. Ordino.
  • ORDEYNYN̄, or settyn̄ a thynge to be don̄. Statuo, constituo, in∣stituo.
  • ORDYNAWNCE, or ordynacyon. Ordinacio, constitucio, ordo.
  • (ORDYR, S. P. Ordo.)
  • OORE, for rowynge (ore, K. H. P.) Remus.
  • ORFREY of a westyment2. [This term seems to be directly taken from the French orfrais, or low Latin orfrea, the band or bordure of embroidery with which rich garments, and especially vestments of sacred use, were decorated. Menage supposes it to have been formed from aurum Phrygium, attributing to Phrygia the invention of such embroideries. The orfrey was originally, but not always, as the name expresses, a work broidered in gold. The most remarkable specimens existing in England are the relics of vestments discovered at Durham, in the tomb attributed to St. Cuthbert, and wrought by order of Queen Aelfleda for Frithelstan, Bp. Winchester, A. D. 905. See the note on the word FANVN', p. 149. The skill of the embroiderers and goldsmiths of England from an early period had extended their reputation over the Continent. The following statement occurs in the Gesta Gul. Ducis Norm. et Regis Angl. p. 211: "Anglice nationis femine multum acu et auri texturâ, egregie viri in omni valent artificio." In the Chronicle of Casino, it appears that the jewelled work termed Anglicum opus was, at the commencement of the XIth cent. in high esteem even in Italy (Murat. Script. Ital. iv. 360:) and in the times of Boniface VIII. about the year 1300, are mentioned "v. aurifrigia, quorum iij. fiunt de opere Cyprensi nobilissimo, et unum est de opere Anglicano, et unum est ad smaltos." Lib. Anniv. Basilice Vatic. ap. Joan. Rubeus. Among the gifts of Thos. Langley, Bp. Durham, who died 1437, were a vestment of crimson velvet, "casulâ, ij. tuniculis, et capâ principali habente orfrays consimiles auri de Cyprys," and other vestments of baudkyn, with "orfrays de baudekyn rubeo, context' cum cervis et avibus auri de Cyprys," &c. Wills and Inv. Surtees Soc. i. 88. The orfrays seem to have been frequently separate, so as to be used at pleasure with the vestment of colour suitable to the day. Inventories and wills afford innumerable evidences of the extra∣ordinary richness of these decorations, and curious information as to the perfection to which the arts were carried in England at a remote period.] (vest∣ment, Page  369 S.) Aurifigium, C. F. et NECC. aurifrigium, glossa Me∣rarii dicit.
  • ORGONE.1. [The precise period when the use of the organ was introduced into Britain has not been ascertained; it is supposed to have been first used in France in 757. Compare Ann. Fr. breves; Ann. Francorum; and Eginh. Ann. Pepini; which concur in naming that year as the date of the introduction. Eginhard also mentions the arrival in France of a priest from Venice, who was able to construct organs, in 826; but the instrument does not appear to have been generally used in Western Europe before the Xth cent. At that period Elphegus, Bp. Winchester, constructed an organ, the melodious sounds of which are highly commended in the verses of Wolstan. In the time of Edgar, St. Dunstan, who died 988, caused "organa" to be constructed for the church of Glas∣tonbury, according to Joh. Glaston.; and in that of Malmesbury, where he bestowed "organa, ubi per ereas fistulas musicis mensuris elaboratas dudum conceptas follis vomit anxius auras." W. Malmesb. Life of Aldhelm, Bp. Shirburn, founder of Malmes∣bury Abbey. Numerous curious particulars are recorded respecting the use of organs in England, as at St. Alban's, in Cott. MS. Nero, D. VII.; and Croyland, where there were "organa solennia in introitu ecclesie superius situata," as well as smaller organs in the choir. Portable instruments, called frequently regals, were much in use, and representations occur in many illuminations and sculptures. A very curious repre∣sentation of the organ exists in Eadwine's Psalter, Trin. Coll. Camb. R. 17, i. and has been copied in Strutt's Horda, I. pl. 33. Organs were imported from Flanders, as ap∣pears by the Louth accounts, about the year 1500, Archaeol. x. 91; the price of a pair suitable to be set up in the rood-loft of that noble church being £13. 6s. 8d. It appears that the usual term, a pair of organs, has reference to the double bellows whereby con∣tinuous sound was produced; or, according to Douce, to their being formed with a double row of pipes. See O'Connor's curious observations on the early use of organs and psalmody in the Irish church, Hib. Script. iv. 153.]Organum.
  • ORGONYSTER (organer, S.) Or∣gonista, organicus, orgonicus, -ca, -cum, CATH.
  • ORGON PYPE, or pype of an orgōn'. Cantes, CATH. ydraula, BRIT. vocabula musica.
  • ORRYBLE. (H)orridus, horribilis.
  • ORYEL of a wyndowe (of windown', S.)2. ["Est cancellus pro alâ palacii, parvum foramen parietis, intersticium inter pro∣pugnacula, muratorum parietes sive tectura, sicut que claudunt chorum. Dicitur et can∣cellus fenestra reticulata. Prov. vij. 6." CATH. Little can be added to Mr. Hamper's curious memoir on Oriels, Archaeol. xxiii. in which he explains the varied uses of the term.]Cancellus, CATH. inten∣dicula, KYLW.
  • (ORYELLE tre, supra in aldyr tre.3. [The ORYELLE is possibly the small variety of the aller or alder, given by Parkinson as alnus folio incano, the hoary alder, p. 1409. Mr. Hartshorne states that the alder is called, on the Herefordshire side, co. Salop, the orl. The alder is called in the North eller, whence may be derived many names, as Ellerbeck, Allerthorpe, &c. "An ellyrtre, alnus." CATH. ANG. "Alnetum, an allur grounde." ORTUS. "Aulne, an aller, or alder-tree." COTG. Ang.-Sax. alr, alnus.]Alnus, C. F.)
  • Page  370ORYNAL, or vrynal. Urinale.
  • ORYSONE. Oracio.
  • ORLAGE.1. [Compare DYALE, or an horlege, p. 120; and PYNNE of an orlage, or other lyke schowynge the owrys. Sciotirus. Hence it seems that ORLAGE, implying generally an indicator of time, signifies here either a sun-dial or a clock. "An horlege, horologium. An horlege lokar, horuspex." CATH. ANG. "Horologium, an orologe, a clocke. Ho∣roscopus, i. horarum inspector, an orologe maker, or a keper of a clocke." ORTUS. "Oriloge, a clocke, horiloge." PALSG. In the sense of a dial the term occurs in the Wicliffite version, iv. Kings, xx. 11: "Isaye þe profete clepide ynwardly þe Lord, and browȝte aȝen bacward by x. degrees þe schadewe bi lynes, bi whiche it hadde go doun þanne in þe orologie of Achaz." Daines Barrington has given observations on the earliest introduction of clocks, Archaeol. v. 416, but could find no instance of an horo∣logium, which, being described as striking the hours, was undeniably a clock, and not a dial, previously to the construction of the remarkable clock near Westminster Hall, supplied out of a fine imposed on Rad. de Hengham, Chief justice of the King's Bench, 1288. But there can be little question that clocks were in use at an earlier period. It may be doubted whether the "Orelogium insigne" given by William the Sacrist to Sherborn, in the XIIth cent., were of this nature (Sherborn Cartulary, in the possession of Sir Thos. Phillipps); and the horologium, or alarum, the fall of which before the hour of matins gave the alarm of the conflagration of the church of Bury, in 1198, as described by Jocelin de Brakelonda, p. 78, appears by the context to have been a kind of clepsydra. Numerous notices might be collected regarding the orloges of a later time, such as that in Canterbury Cathedral, which cost £30, in 1292; and the celebrated one given to the Church of St. Alban's in 1326, by Abbot Ric. de Wallingford, which, as it is stated, Cott. MS. Nero, D. VII. f. 196, surpassed any other in England, or even in Europe, according to Leland, Script. Brit. ii. 401. A remarkable clock still exists at Exeter, generally regarded as the gift of Bp. Courtenay, who was consecrated 1478, but it is highly probable that it is the same horologium which is named in Pat. 11 Edw. II. 1317. Frequent mention occurs of "horologii Regis infra palatium Westm'," as in Pat. 1 Hen. V. in favour of the keeper, Hen. Berton, "valectus camere Regis;" and in the Acts of Privy Council, especially in 6 Hen. VI. 1428, vol. iii. 288, where ac∣counts of repairs done to the "orelege" may be found, which supply curious terms of the craft. Amongst the valuable effects of Hen. V. enumerated 1423, was "j. orlage, fait al manere d'un nief, l'argent preis' par estimation, lx. s." Rot. Parl. iv. 216. Fabyan relates, on the authority of Gaguin, that amongst the presents sent A. D. 807 to Charlemagne by the King of Persia "was an horologe of a clocke of laten of a wonder artyfycyall makyng, that at euery oure of the daye and nyghte, when the sayd clocke shuld stryke, images on horse backe apperyd out of sondry places, and aftir departid agayn by meane of certayne vyces." Part VI. c. 156. To such a device Horman seems to allude when he says, f. 231, vo, "Some for a tryfull pley the deuyll in the orlege; aliqui in nugis tragedias agunt." It seems, however, certain from the Chron. Turon. Martene, Coll. Ampl. V. 960, and Eginh. Ann. Fr. that Charlemagne's "horologe" was a clepsydra. Abp. Parker devised in 1575, to the Bp. of Ely, "baculum meum de cannâ Indicâ, qui horologium habet in summitate." See Professor Hamberger's curious dissertation on clocks in Beckman's Hist. of Inventions.]Horilogium.
  • ORLAGERE, or he þat kepythe an orlage (the orlage, P.)2. [The orlagere seems to have been properly the keeper of a clock, but sometimes a clock-maker was so called. In the version of Vegecius attributed to Trevisa, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. f. 68, directions are given for watch and ward, when an army is encamped, especially for the out-watch by night, "þe whiche must be departed in foure quarters of þe nyght, the whiche quarters most be departede by the orlageres (ad clepsydram sunt divisae.)" The daily fee of the orlagere of the King's clock at Westminster, 1 Hen. V. was sixpence; in 4 Hen. VI. the yearly reward to the clock-maker, besides incidental expenses, was 13s. 4d. Acts of Privy Council, vol. iii. The rapid advance of civilization and luxury during the reign of Edw. III. induced foreign artificers to settle in England, as appears by the Pat. 42 Edw. III. which grants safe conduct for three "orlagiers," natives of Delft, coming to exercise their craft in England. Rymer, vi. 590.]Ho∣ruspex, vel horispex, CATH.
  • Page  371ORNAMENT. Ornamentum.
  • ORONGE, fruete.1. [Le Grand d'Aussy, Vie Privée des Français, i. 246, could not trace the introduc∣tion of the orange to an earlier period than 1333. It is said to have been brought from China by the Portuguese, but it is more probable that its introduction into Europe is due to the Arab conquerors of Spain. A document preserved in the Tower, and cited in the valuable Introduction to Household Expenses in England, presented to the Roxburghe Club by B. Botfield, Esq. records that in 1290 a large Spanish ship arrived at Portsmouth, from the cargo of which Queen Eleanor purchased a frail of Seville figs, dates, pomegranates, 15 citrons, and "vij. poma de Orenge." A full account of the properties of this fruit may be found in the curious compilation written early in the XVth cent. Arund. MS. 42, f. 33, vo. Oranges are mentioned as a present, Paston Letters, ii. 30; and repeatedly in the Privy Purse Expenses of Hen. VIII. Pynson, in the Boke to lerne French, gives "aples of orrenge, pommes d'orraingne."]Pomum citri∣num, citrum, CATH. in medica (pomum orientale, P.)
  • ORROWRE. Horror.
  • ORPUD (ornwode, S. sic pro orp∣wode?)

    2. This word, signifying stout, courageous, is used by R. Glouc. Gower, and Lydgate.

    "His folk ful of orpedschype
    Quicliche leputh to hepe."

    K. Alis. v. 1413.

    Trevisa likewise, in his version of the Polychron. speaks of "an orped man, and stall∣worth." The epithet is applied to hounds in the Master of Game, Cott. MS. Vesp. B. XII. f. 63, b. Dowglas, the monk of Glastonbury, in his Chronicle, Harl. MS. 4690, speaks of the conflict of Edw. III. with the Normans in 1347, "atte the brigge of Cadon, manly and orpedly strengthed and defended," f. 82; and again, in his re∣lation of the hasty expedition of Edw. III. to Calais, 1350, says that "he towke wiþ him þe nobleis, and þe gentelles, and oþer worþi and orpedde menne of armes," f. 83, vo. See also Caxton's Chron. f. 37; Hearne's Glossary to Rob. Glouc.; and Jamieson, v. Orpit. Compare Ang.-Sax. orpedlice, palam, SOMN.

    Audax, bellipotens.
  • ORPYN, herbe.3. ["Acantus, Anglice, orpyne." Harl. MS. 1002. Gerarde gives Crassula major, Spanish orpyne; Crassula fabaria, common orpyne, liblong, or livelong. This herb was called also in French orpin. "Orpyn, an herbe, orpin." PALSG. Skinner would derive the name from Belg. oor püne, aurium dolor, in allusion to its narcotic properties.]Crassula major, et media dicitur howsleek, et minima dicitur stoncrop.
  • ORTUS, releef of beestys mete.4. ["Ortys, forrago, ruscus, or fodder." CATH. ANG. The word orts, fragments of victuals, which occurs in Shakespeare, is still vulgary used in many counties: in the South it is pronounced aughts. See the Salopian and Craven Glossaries, and Nares.]Ramentum, KYLW. ruscum, CATH. et C. F.
  • OSAGE, or vsage. Usus.
  • OSYERE (osyȝer, H. P.) Vimen, COMM. vitulamen.
  • Page  372OSPYTALLE. Hospitale, zeno∣dochium, vel cenodochium, CATH. orphanotrophium.
  • OSPRYNGE, of kynred, idem quod kynrede, supra in K. (ospringe or kenrede, K. or kyndrode, S. Progenies, prosapia, stirps.)
  • OOST of menne. Excercitus.
  • OOST, geste. Hospes.
  • OOST, sacrement. Hostia (sa∣cramentum, P.)
  • OOSTAGE, or plegge (as a wedde, infra.) Obses, C. F. vas, CATH. pligius.
  • OSTEL, or inne of herborowe (in, or herborwe, K. S. of harborowe, P.) Hospicium, diversorium, hospiciarium, COMM.
  • OSTELERE. Hospiciarius, hospi∣ciaria, hospes (hospita, P.)
  • OOSTESSE (osteles, S.) Hospita, hospiciaria.
  • OSTRYCHE, byrd. Strucio, C. F.
  • OTE, or havur corne.1. ["Avena, otys or havere." MED. MS. CANT. "Otys, ubi haver. Havyr, avena, avenula." CATH. ANG. In the Memoriale of Henry, Prior of Canterbury, early in the XIVth cent. Cott. MS. Galba, E. IV. "avere" occurs in the "redditus manerium Prioratus," f. 165, vo. It is repeatedly mentioned in documents connected with the North Country; see Wills and Invent. Surtees Soc. i. pp. 244, 423. W. Turner, in his Herbal, 1551, remarks that "Avena is named in Englyshe otes, or etes, or hauer, in Duche hauer, or haber." Gerarde gives haver as the common name for oats in Lancashire, and observes that it is "their chiefest bread corne for Iannocks, Hauer∣cakes, Tharffe-cakes," &c. The Festuca Italica has, as he says, the common name "Hauer-grasse." "Aveneron (averon, or avoin folle) wild oats, barren oats, haver, or oat grass." COTG. In the North, oats are still called haver, according to Brockett and the Craven Glossary, but the name seems to be no longer known in the Eastern counties. Hence, however, appears to be derived Haver-croft Street, the name of a hamlet near Attleborough, Norfolk. Dan. havre, Dutch, haver, Swed. hafre, oats.]Avena.
  • OTHE, of swerynge. Juramentum.
  • OOTHE, or woode.2. [Compare Germ. Wuth, ira; wüthig, furiosus; Welsh, gwyth, anger.]Amens, de∣mens, furiosus, furibundus.
  • OTUR, watyr beest. Lutricius.
  • OWE dette. Debeo.
  • OVENE. Furnus, fornax, cli∣banus.
  • OWHTE, or sumwhat (ovt, H.) Quicquam, quid, adverbia.
  • OWYNE, as myne owyn' (owne, P.) Proprius.
  • OVYR. Ultra, trans.
  • OVYRAL. Ubique, utrobique.
  • OVYR CASTE, or ovyr hyllyd. Pretectus, contectus.
  • OVYRCUMME (or ovyr settyn̄, infra.)3. [OVYRCŪNE, MS. ovyrcome, S.]Supero.
  • OVYR HYPPYN̄, or ouer skyppyn̄, or passe a-wey, and levyn̄.

    4. Compare HYPPYNGE, p. 241; Low German, hippen, salire. Langtoft has pre∣served a "Couwe," or satirical ballad on Baliol, and the conquest of the Scots by Edw. I. in which the verb "ouerhipped" is used, ed. Hearne, p. 280; and again, p. 296:

    "Oure kyng Sir Edward ouer litille he gaf,
    Tille his barons was hard, ouerhipped þam ouerhaf."

    R. Brunne, in the Prologue to his Chronicle, as cited by Hearne, Langt. Chron. App. to Preface, p xcviii. states that he had followed Wace's original more closely than Peter Langtoft had done;

    "For mayster Wace þe Latyn alle rymes,
    þat Pers ouerhippis many tymes."

    The verb "overhuppe," to skip over, occurs in Vis. of Piers P. v. 8167, and 10,395. Gower uses "overhippeth" in a like sense; it occurs also in writers of the XVIth Cent. See Fryth's Works, p. 17; Udal, Hebr, c. 11. "I overhyppe (or ouerskyp) a thyng in redyng, or suche lyke, ie trespasse. I overhyppe, Ie trespasse, and ie passe. Loke you ouerhyppe (surpassez) nothyng, remember that the thynge that is well doone is twyse done, and the thyng that is yuell done muste be begon agayne." PALSG. Howell, in the Grammar prefixed to Cotgrave's Dict. 1660, observes that "the reason why the French o're hips so many consonants is, to make the speech more easie and fluent." To hip, signifying to hop, is still used in the North. See Brockett and Jamieson.

    Omitto.
  • Page  373OVY(R) HYPPYNGE, or ovyr skyppynge, or levynge (over chyppynge, S.) Omissio.
  • OVYRLEDARE (or ovyr settar, infra.)1. [This verb is used in Vis. of Piers P. v. 2001; and by Lydgate, Boccace, v. 104, as quoted by Mr. Halliwell in his Glossary, Coventry Mysteries, in which it occurs also in the like sense of over-reaching, or over-bearing, p. 262. To lead, as it has been ob∣served p. 293, was used in the sense of carrying, as by Rob. Glouc. p. 416, "lede and brynge," where he speaks of loaded wains passing frozen streams during the severe winter, A. D. 1092. To over-lead appears to be taken in the same manner as to carry and to bear are used, denoting behaviour or demeanour. Palsgrave gives the verb "I overley, as a tyrāne, or myghty man ouerlayeth his subiectes, declared in I oppresse."]Oppressor.
  • OVYR LEDYN̄, or oppressyn̄. Op∣primo.
  • OVYR LEDYNGE (or oppressynge, supra.) Oppressio.
  • OVYR LETHYR of a schoo (ouer∣ledyr, H.) Impedia. DICC. et KYLW.
  • OVYRLY. Superficialiter.
  • OVYRLYTYL(L)E. Minus, vel nimis modicum.
  • OVYRLEVARE after a noþer. Superstes.
  • OVYR MYKYLLE (ouer moche, P.) Nimis, vel nim(i)us.
  • OVYR MORE. Ultra, preterea, ulterius.
  • OVYRPLAW.2. [See PLAWYN̄ ovyr, hereafter.]Ebullicio.
  • OVYR SETTAR, idem quod ouer ledare, supra.
  • OVYR SETTYN̄, or ovyr comyn̄.3. [SYETTYN̄, MS. ouersettyn, K. ovyr settyn, S. "I oversette, I overcome, declared in I ouercome, I vaynquysshe or get the vper hande of one." PALSG.]Supero, vinco.
  • OVYR SETTYN̄, or dyscōmfytyn̄. Confuto.
  • (OUERSETTINGE, P. Oppressio.)
  • OVYR SETTYNGE, or ovyr syt∣tynge of dede or tyme. Omissio.
  • (OUER SKYPPYN̄, supra in ovyr hyppyn̄. Omitto.)
  • OVYR THROWYN̄, and caste doōn. Obruo, prosterno.
  • OVYR (TYR)VYN̄ (ovyr tyrvyn, K. ouerturnyn, S. H. ouyrturuyn, P.)4. [A blank space has been here left by the scribe, the first syllable of the word TYRVYN being apparently defective in the MS. from which the transcript was made. TERWYN̄ occurs hereafter in the sense of to weary, fatigo; but it seems very question∣able, notwithstanding that the King's Coll. MS. agrees with the Harl. MS. in the reading, TYRVYN̄, whether the scribes may not inadvertently have taken n. for u. and the true reading should be OVYR TYRNYN̄. Compare TURNON̄ vpse doune, subverto.]Subverto, everto.
  • Page  374OVYRTHWERT (ouerqwertly, K. ovyr wharte, S. ouerthwart, P.)1. [Chaucer uses over-thwart in the sense of across, and of over against. See Towneley Myst. p. 85, "over twhart, and endlang." "Ouertwharte, au travers de, de trauers, as Et soudayn il luy myt l'espée au trauers du corps. Ilz sont corrigez de long et de trauers. Ouerthwartly, paruersement." PALSG. Forby gives overwhart, across, as to plough overwhart, or at right angles to the former furrows. Higins, in his version of Junius, renders "Transtra, the transams, or ouerthwart beames." A.-Sax. þweorh, Dan. tvaert, perversus.]Transversus.
  • OVYRTHWER(T)LY (ouerqwertly, K.) Transverse.
  • OVYR QWELMYD, or ouer hyllyde.2. [Skinner supposes whelm to be derived from Ang.-Sax. ahwylfan, obruere. Compare also hwealfian, camerare. Chaucer uses the verb to over-whelve, as in Boec. ii. where he speaks of the North wind which "moueth boiling tempeste, and ouerwhelueth the see; verso concitat aequore." Fabyan, ann. 1429, describes a barge, which, running against the piers of a bridge, was "whelmyd;" but here, as in other passages, it is difficult to define whether the precise meaning of the word be to overturn, or to cover over. "I whelme an holowe thyng ouer an other thyng, Ie mets dessus. Whelme a platter vpon it to saue it from flyes." PALSG. "No bodie lighteth a candle, and hideth it in a priuie derke corner, or couereth it by whelming a bushell ouer it." Udal, Luke xi. 33. "To whelve, vide cover." GOULDM. Compare ON-QUELMYN̄, p. 366.]Obvolutus.
  • OVYR QWELMYN̄, or qwelme (ouerwhelmyn, P.)3. [Compare TURNŌN, or qwelmān. Suppino R. Brunne, in his version of Langtoft, p. 190, relating how King Richard smote a Soudan such a blow on the helm that he fell backwards, and was unhorsed, says "þe body he did ouerwhelm, his hede touched þe croupe." "I wyll nat curse the, but an olde house ouerwhelme the, te puisse renuerser, or ragrauanter." PALSG.]Suppino.
  • OVYRSLAY of a doore.

    4. The following passage occurs in Gaut. de Bibelesworth, Arund. MS. 220:

    "Al entré del hus est la lyme (the therswald, al. threshwald,)
    Et outre la teste la suslyme (the ouerslay.)"

    In Sir Thos. Phillipps's MS. "ouerslauth;" in Femina, MS. Trin. Coll. Camb. B. 14, 40, "le suislyne—þe ouerchek." "Superliminare, ouerslay." Vocab. Harl. MS. 17 C. XVII. "Superliminare, ouer lytys." MED. Horman says, "I hytte my heed ageynst the soyle, or transumpt (hiperthyron, superliminare.)"

    Super∣liminare.
  • OWLE, or howle, byrde. Bubo, CATH.
  • OWLYST.5. [Compare ONLYSTY. Deses.]Desidiosus, segnis (te∣diosus, S.)
  • OWLYST MAN, or womann (ow∣list, or vnl(u)sty, K.) Deses.
  • OWLYSTHEDE. Desidia, segnicies.
  • OWMAWTYN̄, or swownyn' (sownyn, S.)6. [See Jamieson's observations on Muth, exhausted with fatigue, Mawten, and Mait. These words may be derived from Fr. mater. "I mate, or ouercome, He hath vtterly mated me, amatté." PALSG. Compare Teut. matt, fessus; A.-S. meðiz., defatigatus.]Sincopiso, C. F.
  • O(W)MAWTYNGE (or swow∣nynge, P.) Sincopis.
  • Page  375OWMBRER of bacenet (owmbrere of basnet, K. H. vmbrere, or basnette, S. owmbrer' or a basnet, P.)1. ["An ovmbere, umbra." CATH. ANG. In the relation given by Stowe of the combat in Smithfield before Henry VI. 1442, between John de Astley (whom he calls Ansley or Antsley) and a knight of Arragon, it is related that the latter with his axe "stroke many strokes hard and sore vpon his basenet, and on his hand, and made him loose and let fall his axe to the ground, and brast vp his vmbar three times, and caught his dagger, and would haue smitten him in the face." Annales, p. 383, ed. 1631. In the Survay of London, B. iii. this word is misprinted "brake up his uniber." From this passage it seems to be evident that the OWMBRER was a defence that covered the face, but it is not clear in what respect it differed from the visor, with which in previous times the basinet had been furnished, when used without the tilting helm. "Umbrell of an heed pece, uisiére." PALSG.]Umbraculum.
  • OWMPERE, supra in nowmpere.2. [See Tyrwhitt's Glossary, v. Nompere; Chaucer, Test. of Love, i. 319. It occurs also in Vis. of Piers P. v. 3149, signifying an arbitrator. "An ovmper, impar." CATH. ANG.] (Arbiter, sequester.)
  • (OW(N)ERE of a schyp, or schyp∣lord, infra.3. [In the other MSS., as likewise in the printed editions, this word is written owner. It must be observed, however, that the verb to owe, A.-Sax. aȝan, possidere, now written own, occurs very frequently. Bp. Hall speaks of the Deity as "the great ower of heaven." Sermon at Exeter, Aug. 1637.]Navarchus, CATH. navargus, C. F.)
  • OWRE of the day, or nyghte. Hora.
  • OWRE OWENE. Noster.
  • OWTAS, crye.

    4. R. Brunne, in his version of Langtoft's Chron. p. 339, relates how Sir John de Waleis, being taken prisoner, was hung at London:

    "Siþen lete him doun eft, and his hede of snyten,
    And born to London brigge fulle hie with outheys."
    "Yet saw I woodnesse laughing in his rate,
    Armed complaint, outhees, and fiers outrage."

    Cant. Tales, v. 2014

    "God graunte—yt an outas and clamour be made upon the Lord Scales." Paston Letters, vol. iii. 136, circa 1450. See Ducange, and Spelman, v. Hutesium, Huesium.

    Tumultus, C. F.
  • OWTE CASTE, or refuse. Refuta∣men, refutamentum (abjectus, S.)
  • OWTE CASTE, or refuse, or cora∣lyce of cornē (coralys, S. careyle of corne, P.)5. [See CORALLE, or drasse of corne (draffe?) p. 92.]Cribalum, C. F.
  • OWT, or owte (sic, S.) Extra, foras.
  • OWTE, OWT. At, at, interjectio.
  • OWT, or qwenchyd, as candylle, or lyghte. Extinctus.
  • OWTE GATE. Exitus.
  • OWTYNGE, or a-woydaunce. Eva∣cuacio, deliberacio.
  • OWTE LAW. Exlex, C. F. utle∣gatus (exul, relegatus, S.)
  • OWTLAWYN̄. Utlego, extermino, UG. V. in T. secundum scrip∣turas cartarum.
  • OWTLAWRY. Utlegacio, exter∣minium, UG. V. in T. (exilium, UG. V. in T. relegacio, S.)
  • OWTERAGE, or excesse. Excessus.
  • OWTRAGYN̄, or doōn excesse. Excedo.
  • OWTE TAKYN̄ (owtakyn, K.)6. [See Langtoft's Chron. Hearne, p. 332. In the Wicliffite version, Exod. xxii. 20 is thus rendered: "He þat offriþ to goddis, outakun to þe Lord aloone, be slayn (prae-terquam Domino," Vulg.) Chaucer uses "out take" in like manner, Rom. of Rose; and "out-taken," excepted, Cant. T. v. 4697; as likewise does Sir John Maundevile, Voiage, p. 301. In the account of a scandalous assault which occurred in the reign of Hen. VI. Rot. Parl. V. III. it is said, "He vilanously toke of all the attire of her hed, also her clothis of her body, otake her smokke." "I out take, I except. I wyll ron as swyft as any man in this towne, I out take none, for a bonette, Ie n'excepte nul. Out takyng, exception. I outcept, ie excepte," &c. PALSG.]Excipio.
  • Page  376OXE, beest. Bos.
  • OXEFORTHE. Oxonia.
  • OÞYR, or othyr.1. [OTHYR, or othyr, MS. Oþir, K. Oþer, or othyr, S. Other, P. The alpha∣betical position shows that th. has here been substituted by the second hand for the character þ. as likewise in the succeeding word, which in the MS. is written OTHYR TYME. þ. always occurs in the penultimate place, as in the Anglo-Saxon alphabet.]Alius, alter.
  • OÞYR TYME. Alias.
  • PACE, of goynge. Passus.
  • PACE FORTHE. Preterio, pro∣gredior.
  • (PASSAGE ouer a water, S. Vadum, CATH.)
  • PACYENCE, or sufferaunce. Pa∣ciencia, sufferencia, tollerancia.
  • PACYENCE, herbe. Paciencia.
  • PACYENT of sufferynge. Paciens, sufferens, tollerans, animequius, CATH.
  • PACYN̄ (in godnesse, K. H. P.) Excello, precello.
  • PACYN̄ yn goodnesse, or badnesse. Excedo, superemineo.
  • PACYN̄ OVYR. Transgredior, trans(c)endo.
  • PACYN̄ OUER þe see, or watyr.2. [In Pynson's edition the following distinction is here made: Pace ouer the see. Transfreto. Pace ouer water. Transmeo. "I passe, I go ouer, or passe for by, ie passe. Wylte thou beare me in hande I sawe hym nat to daye, he passed forby euyn nowe, il passa par icy. I passe my boundes, I ouer esteme myselfe, ie me surcuyde, and ie me mescongnoys." PALSG.]Transfreto, transmeo.
  • PACYN̄, yn walkynge, or goynge be the wey (supra in pace forthe, P.) Preterio, CATH.
  • PADDOK, toode.

    3. The strange diet of the natives of Taracounte, in India, is thus described:

    "Evetis, and snakes, and paddokes brode,
    That heom thoughte mete gode."

    Kyng Alis. v. 6126.

    "Pade," a toad, Awntyrs of Arthure, ix. 10, is in one MS. written "tade." See also Syr Gaw. and Sir Gal. i. 9. In the later Wicliffite version the frogs that came up on the land of Egypt, Exod. viii. 6, are called "paddockis." See Cov. Myst. p. 164, and Glossary; Towneley Myst. p. 325. "Paddocke, crapavlt. My bely crowleth (croulle) I wene there be some padockes in it (grenouilles.)" PALSG. "Bufo, crapaut, a Tode, a paddocke." Junius, Nomencl. by Higins. "Grenouille, a frog, a paddocke." COTG. "A paddock, rana pagana." GOULDM. See Nares. Argent, a fess between three frogs vert, is borne by the name of Paddock. This word has not been noticed by Forby; Moor gives Paddock and Pudduck, signifying a toad, in Suffolk, and Ray gives it as a word used in Essex. Brockett states that in the North it denotes a frog, and is never applied to a toad. See Jamieson, v. Pade, a toad. Hence is de∣rived the old name for a toad-stool, still in use in the North, according to Brockett. "A padokstole, boletus, fungus, tuber, trusca, asperagus." CATH. ANG. Gerarde calls Fungi "paddock stooles." In the Vocabulary, Harl. MS. 1002, f. 144, vo, boletus is rendered "a padokchese," as likewise in a list of herbs, MS. Ant. Soc. 101. "Fungus, a stede stole." MED. Ang.-Sax. pada, bufo; Teut. padden-stoele, boletus.

    Bufo.
  • Page  377PAGE. Pageta, pedissequus, pedes, DICC.
  • PAGE of a stabylle. Equarius, stabularius.
  • PAGENT.1. [Skinner suggests that pageant may be derived from the Greek 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, or "Belg. Waeghen, currus, q. d. currus pompaticus." Tooke considers it to be the pres. part. paeceand, of the Ang.-Sax. verb paecan, decipere, to illude by simulated re∣presentations. The primary signification of the word appears to have been a stage or scaffold, which was called pagina, it may be supposed, from its construction, being a machine compaginata, framed and compacted together. The curious extracts from the Coventry records given by Mr. Sharp, in his Dissertation on the Pageants or Mysteries performed there, afford definite information on this subject. The term is variously written, and occasionally "pagyn, pagen," approaching closely to the Latin pagina. The various plays or pageants composing the Chester mysteries, each of which is ap∣propriated to one of the trades, are entitled, "Pagina prima, de celi, angelorum, &c. creacion(e). The tanners' play. Incipit Pagina secunda, qualiter Deus creavit mundum, &c. The drapers' playe;" and so forth. See Chester Plays, Wright's edition from Add. MS. 10,305. A curious contemporary account has been preserved of the con∣struction of the pageants at Chester during the XVIth cent. "which pagiants weare a high scafold with 2 rowmes, a higher and a lower, upon 4 wheeles." Sharp, Cov. Myst. p. 17. The term denoting the stage whereon the play was exhibited subse∣quently denoted also the play itself; but the primary sense, clearly defined by the Coventry documents, is observed by several writers, as by Higins, in his version of Junius's Nomenclator, 1585. "Pegma, lignea machina in altum educta, tabulatis etiam in sublime crescentibus compaginata, de loco in locum portatilis, aut quae vehi potest, ut in pompis fieri solet: Eschaffaut, a pageant, or scaffold." "Pegma est machina super quam statue ponuntur." ORTUS. "A paiande, lusorium." CATH. ANG. "Pagiant in a playe, mystére." PALSG. "Fercules, the thing whereon images or Pageants are carried; also beers for dead men. Pegmate, a stage or frame, whereon Pageants be set or carried." COTG. Horman says, "There were v. coursis in the feest, and as many paiantis in the pley. I wyll haue made v. stagȝ (sic) or bouthis in this playe (scenas.) I wolde haue a place in the middyl of the pley (orchestra), that I myght se euery paiaunt. Of all the crafty and subtyle paiantis and pecis of warke made by mannys wyt, to go or moue by them selfe, the clocke is one of the beste." In this passage the term seems to be taken as denoting stage machinery. Of the gorgeous pageants set up by the citizens of London on occasions such as the reception of the Emperor Charles V. 1522, detailed descriptions have been preserved by Hall, the Chronicler. See on this subject Collier's Hist. of Dram. Poetry, ii. 151, and the Appendix to Davies's Municipal Records of York, 8vo. 1843.]Pagina (sic, S. P.)
  • PATCHE, or clowt sett on a thyn̄ge (pahche, K. pacch, S. patche clowte, sett to a thinge, P.) Scrutum, pictacium, C. F.
  • PAY, or payment. Solucio.
  • PAYARE. Solutor, solutrix.
  • PAYARE of hyrys, or mony vnder a lorde. Mercedarius, CATH.
  • PAYYD, of dette. Solutus, per∣solutus.
  • PAYYD, and qvemyd, or plesyd, Placatus.
  • PAYYN̄. Solvo, persolvo.
  • PAYLE, or mylke stoppe. Mul∣trale, multrum, vel multra, CATH.
  • (PAYMENT, idem quod pay, K.)
  • Page  378PAYNMAYNE.

    1. Various conjectures have been made on the origin of this term, derived by Skinner from panis matutinus, by Tyrwhitt from Maine, the province where it might have been made, perhaps, in great perfection, and by Sibbald from pain d'amand, almond bread. Mr. Pinkerton explains it as signifying the chief bread, the bread of main, or strength. It is called "breid of mane," Dunbar, Maitl. Poems, p. 71; and "mayne bread" in Sir John Neville's accounts of the expenses of his daughter's wedding, 1526; Forme of Cury, p. 180, where the item also occurs "6 doz. Manchetts, 6s." It would hence appear that Jamieson's conjecture that bread of mane and manchet-bread are synonymous is questionable. Kilian gives Teut. "Maene, i. wegghe, libum lunatum. Wegghe, panis triticeus, libum oblongum." Compare WYGGE, brede, hereafter. The derivation is obscure, but the term clearly denotes bread of a superior quality; thus Chaucer uses the simile "white as paindemaine," Sire Thopas, Cant. T. v. 13,655; Gower also speaks of "paindemaine" as a delicacy fit for the rich alone. Conf. Am. vi. In the Anturs of Arther at the Tarnewathelan, it is said that

    "Thre soppus of demayn
    Wos broȝte to Sir Gauan,
    For to comford his brayne."

    St. 37, ed. Robson.

    The Harl. MS. 279, f. 10, supplies instructions for the preparation of such consolatory sops. "Lyode Soppes. Take mylke an boyle it, and þanne tak ȝolkys of eyroun, ytryid fro þe whyte, an draw hem þorwe a straynoure, and caste hem in to þe mylke, an sette it on þe fyre, an hete it, but let it nowt boyle, and stere it wyl tyl it be som what þikke; þenne cast þer to salt and sugre, an kytte fayre paynemaynnys in round soppys, an caste þe soppys þer on, and serue it forth for a potage." In the Forme of Cury repeated mention occurs of "flour of payndemayn," probably the fine white flour of which it was made; see pp. 27, 30. The delicacy called "cryspes" was composed thereof, p. 73; and "payndemayn" itself is mentioned, pp. 34, 65. The Issue Roll of Exch. 27 Hen. VI. 1449, records the payment of £10 to John Eton, baker of "paynman" for the King's table, in consideration of good services, and the great charge incurred by him in providing bread for the Sovereign. It appears also that in 1455, in the Household of Hen. VI. there were, in the Office of the Bake∣house, one "Yoman Pay(n)men-baker," and a groom. Household Ordin. published by Ant. Soc. p. *19. "Payne mayne, payn de bouche." PALSG. "Payn de bouche, as Pain mollet. A very light, very crusty and savory white bread, full of eies, leaven, and salt." COTG.

    Panis vigoris.
  • PAYNYN̄ (paynim, K. P.) Pa∣ganus, pagana, gentilis.
  • PAYNYN̄, or hethyn̄. Ethnicus.
  • PAKKE. Sarcina, fardellus.
  • PAKKYN̄. Sarcino, fardello (in∣dorso, S.)
  • PALE, of coloure. Pallidus.
  • PALE, or palys of a parke. Palus (vallus, P.)
  • PALLE, or pelle, or other clothe leyd on a dede body (on a dede mane, or woman, S.) Capu∣lare, UG. in capio.
  • PALE, for vynys. Paxillus, COMM.
  • PALEYS, loordys dwellynge. Pa∣lacium.
  • PALENESSE, of colowre. Pallor.
  • PALET, or roof of the mowthe. Palatum.
  • PALET, armowre for the heed.

    2. A PALET was a kind of head-piece, usually formed of leather or cuir-bouilli, whence the name seems to have been derived. "Pelliris, galea ex coreo et pelle." CATH. "Pelliris, a helme of lethyr. Galerus, a coyfe of lethere." MED. In Vocab. Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. f. 56, vo, is given "Cassis, palette." Charpentier likewise cites a Glos∣sary, MS. Reg. Paris, which gives "pelluris, heaume de cuir ou de pel." Palet appears to have been a term adopted from the French: "palet: sorte d'armure de tête." ROQUEF. It is not evident whether there was any distinctive difference between the palet and the kettle-hat. Compare KETYLLE HAT, Pelliris, galerus, p. 273. Minot, alluding to the battle of Cressy, in a poem written about 1352, tells the Frenchman,

    "Inglis men sall ȝit to-ȝere
    Knok thi palet or thou pas."

    Poems, p. 31.

    Possibly the word may here, as Ritson and Jamieson explain it, imply the scull; it is so used by Skelton, who makes Elinour Rumming threaten her garrulous customers with broken "palettes," v. 348. In the Inventory of armour and effects of Sir Edw. de Appelby, 48 Edw. III. 1374, are these entries: "Item, j. basenet, cum aduentayle, prec' ij. marc'. Item, ij. ketelhattes, et ij. paletes, prec' vj. s. viij. d." Sloanne charter, xxxi. 2. Charpentier cites a doucment, dated 1382, which describes a knight as "armé d'un haubergeon d'acier, un palet encamallié sur sa teste." In the curious Inventory, in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillipps, of the effects of Sir Simon Burley, beheaded 1388, occur, under the head "Armour pur la guerre. j. paller (sic) de asser: j. palet de quierboyllé, coueré de stakes blanc et vert." The Stat. 20 Ric. II. 1396, enacts that no person shall ride armed, by night or day, "ne porte palet, ne chapelle de ferre, n'autre armure," rendered in the English version "sallet, nor skull of iron." Stat. of Realm, ii. 93. In the Kalend. of Exch. iii. 309, the following remarkable example of the palet is mentioned, 22 Ric. II. 1398. "Une corone d'or d'Espaigne, &c. j. palet d'or d'Espaigne, qe poise en nobles, cccc. xx. li. garn' ove gross' baleys, perles, &c. ij. Jowes pur mesme le palet, garnis' ove saphirs, &c. j. gross' saphire, baleys et perles en le couwer du d'ce' palet; xxxvj. perles en iij. botons, et ij. claspes pur mesme le palet." The entire value was estimated at £1708. It does not appear whether these costly items were royal gifts from Spain, or merely of Spanish workmanship. In the curious extract from the MS. version of Clariodes cited by Sir Walter Scott, notes to Sir Tristrem, fytte 1, it is said that amongst the various fashions of head-pieces some will have "a pryckynge palet of plate the cover." The list of military stores at Hadlegh Castle, in the grant by Hen. IV. in 1405, to Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, comprises "doublettes, jakkes, basynettes, vysers, palettes, aventailles," &c. "A palet coverd wyth rede velvet" is mentioned in the bequest of armour by Sir Wm. Langford, 1411. Sarum Registers. In 1450 the proclamation of Hen. VI. forbade all men to bear armour or arms, as "palettos, loricas," &c. Rymer, xi. 262.

    Pelliris, CATH. galerus, CATH.
  • Page  379PALFREY. Palafridus, mannus, CATH. C. F. gradarius, CATH.
  • PALY of brynne (payly, or brynne, S.)1. [Compare BREN, or bryn, or paley, p. 49; and SYVEDYS, or brynne, or palyys. This word is to be traced to Lat. palea. "Paille, chaffe, the huske wherein corn lieth." COTG.]Cantabrum.
  • PALYCE, or pale of closynge. Palus.
  • PALLYD, as drynke (palled, as ale, K.) Emortuus, C. F.
  • PALYET, lytylle bed. Lectica, C. F.
  • PALLYN̄, as ale and drynke (ale or other licoure, P.)

    2. "Palde, as ale, defructus." CATH. ANG. Lydgate says, in the Order of Fools,

    "Who forsakith wyne, and drynkithe ale pallid,
    Suche foltisshe foolis, God lete hem never the!"

    Harl. MS. 2251, f. 303.

    "I palle, as drinke or bloode dothe, by longe standyng in a thynge, ie appallys. This drinke wyll pall (s'appallyra) if it stande vncouered all nyght. I palle, I fade of freshe∣nesse in colour or beautye, ie flaitris." PALSG. In the Customs of London, Arnold's Chron. p. 85, are given articles desired by the commons of the city, such as that the Mayor and council should enact that all barrels of ale and beer be filled quite full, "after thei be leyde on the gyest; for by reason that the vessels haue not been full afore tyme, the occupiers haue had gret losse, and also the ale and byere haue palled, and were nought, by cause such ale and biere hathe taken wynde in spurgyng." In the version of Beza's Sum of the Christian Faith, by R. Fyll, Lond. 1572, f. 134, it is observed of the usage of the Church of Rome, "It is meruaile that they doe not reserue—the wine as well as the breade, for the one is as precious as the other. It were out of order to saye they feare the wine will eger, or waxe palled, for they hold that it is no more wine."

    Emo∣rior.
  • Page  380PALMARE, or pylgryme. Pere∣grinus, et peregrina.
  • PALME. Palma.
  • (PALME of wulle, or loke, supra. Palma.)
  • PALSYE. Paralisis, paraclisis.
  • PALTOK.1. [It is worthy of remark that Baltheus, which usually denotes a belt, or arming∣girdle, seems to be taken in the Promptorium in the sense of a close-fitting or closely girt garment, such as was used first under armour of mail, or of plate, to bear off the weight, and preserve the skin from being chafed, and subsequently in the place of armour. Compare COTE ARMURE, p. 95; DOBBELET, p. 124; and IAKKE of defence, p. 256; all of these being rendered Baltheus. Sir Roger de Norwico bequeaths, in 1370, "unum paltoke de veluete cum armis meis; unum par de platis, coopertum cum rubeo veluet," &c. Harl. MS. 10; Transcripts from Norwich Registers. Mention occurs of the "paltok," in Vision of Piers P. v. 12,122; 14,362; in both passages as a gar∣ment of defence. Camden, in his Remains, in the chapter on apparel, cites a history called Eulogium, which seems to have been written about A. D. 1400, and mentions, amongst extravagant fashions used by the commons, "a weed of silk which they call a Paltocke: their hose are of two colours, or pied with more, which, with lachets which they call Herlots, they tie to their Paltocks without any breeches." Here the term apparently does not designate a military garment. The Ordinance of Peter, Duke of Brittany, to call the nobles and archers to arms in 1450, directs that "les nobles tenant au dessous de lx. li. de rente aient brigandines—ou à tout le moins bons paletocques, armez de nouvelle façon, sans manches, à laisches de fer, ou mailles sur le bras." Monstrelet states that the town of Neelle surrendered to the Comte de Charrolois, A. D. 1464, on condition that the men-at-arms should be at liberty to depart with their harness, "et les archiers s'en iroient en leurs pourpoints, ou paletoz, chacun une ver∣gette en sa main." Chron. iii. c. 112. The term seems here to denote a military defence of an inferior description. According to Roquefort the paletot was a kind of pourpoint, or a sort of military cloak, so called from palla, or as Borel suggests, from peltum. "Acupicta, i. vestis acu texta, a paltoke, or a doublette." MED. "Bombicina, paltoke." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. f. 44, vo. "Paltocke of lether, pellice. Paltocke, a garment, halcret. Paltocke, a patche, palleteau." PALSG. "Palletoc, palthoc, a long and thick Pelt, or cassock; a garment like a short cloak, with sleeves; or such a one as most of our modern Pages are attired in." COTG. Spanish, "Paletoque, a jerkin with short skirts." MINSHEU. Skelton uses this term to denote a patch, as given by Pals∣grave, or some kind of head-gear, in a Poem against Master Garnesche, addressing him thus: "Ye cappyd Cayface copious, your paltoke on your pate." Ed. Dyce, i. p. 118.]Baltheus.
  • PANKAKE. Laganum, C. F.
  • PANE, or parte of a thynge (party, P.)2. [Forby observes that in Norfolk a regular division of some sorts of husbandry work, as digging or sowing, is called a pane; and that curtains formed of narrow stripes of different colours are termed paned. In the Indenture for building the church of Fo∣theringhay, 1435, it is directed that the steeple should be square in the lower part, and, after being carried as high as the body of the church, "hit shall be chaungid, and turnyd in viij. panes." Dugd. Mon. Ang. iii. Hall, speaking of the richly-decorated lodging of Hen. VIII. at Guisnes, 1520, says that from "the iawe pece of the selyng, whiche pece was guylte with fine golde, were woorkes in paan paled." He also describes maskers in garments of "blewe satten pauned with sipres;" (11 Hen. VIII.) and says that the royal "henxemenne wear coates of purple velvet pieled, and paned with riche cloth of siluer;" 14 Hen. VIII. Ang.-Sax. pan, lacinia. Bp. Kennett, in his Glos∣sarial Collections, Lansd. MS. 1033, gives another meaning of the term pan, as de∣noting in stone houses the piece of wood that is laid on the top of the wall, and to which the spars are fastened, called in the South "the rasen, or resen, or resening: Ang.-S. raesn, laquear." "A panne of a house, panna." CATH. ANG. "Pane of a wall, pan de mur. Panell of a wall, pan de mur." PALSG. "Panne de bois is particularly the piece of timber that sustains a gutter between the roofs of two fronts, or houses." COTG.]Pagina (pars, P.)
  • Page  381PANE, of a furrure.1. ["Pane of furre, panne." PALSG. "Panne, a skinne, fell, or hide." COTG. "Pane, pene: Peau, fourrure, étoffe, cuir; de pannus." ROQUEF. Joinville, speaking of the modest attire used by St. Louis, says, "Ses pennes de ses couvertouers et de ses robes estoient de gamites (doe) ou de jambes de lièvres, ou d'aigneaulx." Neccham, in his treatise de nominibus utensilium, Cott. MS. Titus, D. xx. f. 8, vo, uses the term "penula (pane)" in a passage which has been given in the note on GRYCE, p. 211.]Penula, DICC. et COMM. (panula, P.)
  • PANNE, vessel. Patella.
  • PANNE of an heed. Craneum.
  • PANELE. Pagella, panellus, DICC.
  • PANYERE (or pedde, infra; pany∣ȝer, or paner, H. P.) Calathus.
  • PANYER, or basket, supra in B.
  • PANTEERE, beest. Pantera.
  • PANTERE, snare for byrdys.2. [This term, derived from Fr. pantiére, a kind of snare which was used for catching woodcocks and other birds, is used by Chaucer, Rom. of R. 1621; Legende of good Women, 131. In a poem on the evil times of Edw. II. printed by Mr. Wright from a MS. in the Advocates' Libr. the complaint is made that "pride hath in his paunter kauht the heie and the lowe." Polit. Songs, p. 344. See also the note, p. 400; and Piers of Fulham, Hartshorne's Metr. Tales, p. 122. "A pantelle strynge, pedica." CATH. ANG. "Pedica, instrumentum capiendi pedes animalium, vel laqueus, a fettour, or a snare, or a pantel. Setorium, a pantell." ORTUS. "Panther to catche byrdes with, panneau." PALSG. "Panneau, a large net, or toile." COTG.]La∣queus, pedica, COMM. setan(i)um, COMM. (setarium, S.)
  • PANTYN̄. Anelo.
  • PANTYNGE. Anelacio, vel ane∣latus (anelitus, P.)
  • PANTLERE.3. [R. Brunne, in his version of Langtoft's Chron. p. 33, relates the death of King Edmund, A. D. 947, by the hand of an outlaw "pantelere," who had formerly served in the royal "panterie." The word is more frequently written panter, Fr. pannetier, Lat. panetarius, as by Rob. Glouc. p. 187, who says that Arthur gave "þat lond of Aungeo Kaxe ys panter." See the account of the "Office of the Panetry," and of the duties of the Serjeant thereof, "whiche is called Chief Pantrer of the Kinge's mouthe." Liber Niger domus Edw. IV. Household Ordin. p. 70. "A pantelere, ubi a butlere." CATH. ANG. "Panitor, panista, a panter." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. "Panter, an offycer, pannetier. Pantrye, an house of office, panneterie." PALSG. "Panetier, a pantler." COTG. "A pantler, panis custos, promus." GOULDM. The term is still pre∣served in the surname Pantler.]Panitarius.
  • Page  382PA(N)TRYE. Panitorium, vel panitria.
  • PAPPE. Mamilla, uber.
  • PAPER. Papirus, CATH.
  • PAPMETE for chylder. Papatum, UG. V. in P. papa, CATH. ap∣plauda, CATH.
  • PARABLE. Parabola, enigma (peradigma, P.)
  • PARADYCE. Paradisus.
  • PARAF of a booke (or paragraf, H. paragraffe, P.) Paraphus, paragraphus, CATH.
  • PARAFYD. Paragraphatus.
  • PARAFFYN̄. Paragrapho, KYLW.
  • PARAMOWRE.1. ["A paramour, filorcium, etc. ubi a lemman." CATH. ANG. "Paramour, a man, acoincte. Paramour, a woman, dame peramour." PALSG.]Preamatus.
  • PARBOYLYD. Parbullitus.
  • PARBOYLYN̄ mete. Semibullio, CATH. parbullio.
  • PARBOYLYNGE. Parbullicio.
  • (PARBRAKYNGE, or spwynge, or brakynge, supra.2. [This word is used by Skelton, in his Poem on the flight of the Duke of Albany, v. 322. ed. Dyce. "I cast my gorge, as a haulke doth, or a man yt parbraketh, ie desgorge, and ie vomis. Parbrekyng, uomissement. I parbrake, ie vomis, and ie gomys. It is a shreude token, that he parbrakyth thus." PALSG. "He wyll nat cease fro surfettynge, tyll he be redy to parbrake." HORM. Andrew Boorde says in his Breviary of Health, c. 373, "Vo∣mitus: in English it is named vometinge, or a vomit, or perbrakinge." See Parbreak, and Braking, Jamieson. This word is retained in the Devon dialect, signifying to strain in vomiting. See BRAKYNGE, p. 47. Compare Teut. braecken, Dan. braekke sig, vomere.]Vomitus, evomitus.)
  • PARCARE. Indagator, KYLW. lucarius.
  • PARCEYVYD. Perceptus.
  • PARCEYVYN̄. Percipio, perpendo, C. F.
  • PARCEYUYN̄, or take heede. Ani∣madverto, adverto.
  • PARCEYVYNGE. Percepcio.
  • PAARCHE pecyn, or benys. Frigo, CATH. ustillo, UG. V. in T.
  • PARCHEMYNE. Pergamenum, CATH. membranum, membrana, C. F.
  • PARCHEMYNERE. Membranarius.
  • PARCHYD, as pesys, or benys (pesone, K. pesyn, P.) Fresus, CATH.
  • PARCYAL, or he that more holdyth wythe on part, than wythe a noþer, for favowre, or couetyse. Parcialis.
  • PARCLOOS.3. [This term appears here to be taken as denoting the open screen, which serves in a convent to permit occasional intercourse with the external world, in the parlour, or lo∣cutorium, which also, in those monasteries where silence was enjoined at other times, was reserved as a place for occasional discourse. Pargulum appears to be the dimi∣nutive of pargus, a corruption of parcus, explained by Ducange as signifying "septum quo oves includuntur." These screens or gratings were also termed locutoria fenestra. "Parclos to parte two roumes, separation." PALSG. "Cinclidae are bayes or par∣beholde, and here what is done and spoken amonge the juges and pledours. Such a lyke thing is at Westmynster Hall about the common place, and is called the bekens. Vacerra, percloses or rayles, made of tymber, within the whiche some thynge is en∣closed." ELIOT. This term is frequently used in connection with ecclesiastical architec∣ture; as in the contract for carpenter's work in the Beauchamp Chapel, Warwick, A. D. 1450, as regards "a parclose of tymber" to be constructed about an organ-loft, to stand over the west door. Dugdale, Hist. Warw. Walter, Lord Montjoy, gives di∣rections in his will, A. D. 1474, for the embellishment of a chapel in Derbyshire "with a quire and perclose, and two altars without ye quire." Testam. Vet. i. 335. Blomfield describes the "perclose, or chapel included with cancelli or lattices," constructed A. D. 1500, in the Church of St. Martin at the Plain, Norwich. Hist. Norf.] (Pargulum, vel per∣locutorium, S.)
  • Page  383PARDŌN'. Indulgencia.
  • PARDONERE.1. [The pardoner was an ecclesiastic authorised by the head of the Roman Church to travel throughout Catholic Europe for the purpose of vending pardons or indulgences, with the intention of raising a sum for some special purpose. Chaucer, in his lively portraiture of the Pardoner, Cant. T. v 710, shows the expedients and pretences to which such itinerants had recourse, in turning to profitable account the superstition or ignorance of the people, a practice to which a check was given by several councils. They were termed questores, or questionarii, in French questeurs. Frequent allusion is made in the Vision of Piers Ploughman to the abuse of the authority of the Church, which rendered the credulous a prey to crafty itinerants. By Stat. 22 Hen. VIII. c. 12, all proctors and pardoners travelling the country without sufficient authority were to be treated as vagabonds. "Pardonere, pardonnier." PALSG.]Questor.
  • PARE frute. Peripsimo.
  • PARFYTE (parfyȝt, K. parfyth, H. parfight, P.) Perfectus.
  • PARFYTNESSE. Perfeccio.
  • PARFORMYD (supra in parfight, K. P.) Perfectus, completus.
  • PARFORMYN̄, or fulfyllyn̄.2. [To perform, as frequently used by the old writers, has the sense of to work, to bring to completion. Caxton, in the Book for Travellers, says, "Donaas the doblet maker hath performed my doublet, and my iaquet." Amongst the disbursements for building Little Saxham Hall, 1507, given by Mr. Rokewode, in the Hist. of Thingoe Hundred, Suffolk, p. 145, is a payment to "Oliver mason for performing a dore." Parforner or parfournir signifies, according to Roquefort, achever, compléter. "I performe (Lydgat) ie achieue, declared in I parforme." PALSG.]Per∣ficio.
  • PAARFORMYN̄ (or fulfyllyn, K. P.) yn dede. Exequor.
  • PARFORMYNGE. Complecio, per∣fectio.
  • PA(R)GET, or playster for wallys.3. [This term is thus used in the later Wicliffite version, Eccl. xxii. 21: "As ournyng (eþer pargeting) ful of grauel in a cleer wal, so and a ferdful herte in þe þouȝt of a fool: caementa sine impensâ posita contra faciem venti non permanebunt," Vulg. In the Accounts of Sir John Howard, A. D. 1467, is the following entry: "Item, the vj. day of Aprylle my mastyr made a comenaunt wyth Saunsam the tylere, that he schalle pergete, and whighte, and bemefelle all the new byldynge; and he schal have fore his labore xiij.s. iv.d." Househ. Exp. presented to the Roxburghe Club by B. Botfield, Esq. p. 395. Amongst the charges for building Little Saxham Hall, A. D. 1506, are payments "for lathing, pargetting, tiryng, and white casting all the roves, walles, particyons, &c. for pargetments, and zelyng with mortre and here." Rokewode's Thingoe Hund. pp. 146, 148. Horman says, in the chapter de re Aedificatoriâ, "Some men wyll haue theyr wallys plastred, some pergetted, and whytlymed; some roughe caste, some pricked, some wrought with playster of Paris. Quidam parietes amant loricatos, et tectorio vestitos; quidam gypsum inducunt; quidam albaria grummulis aspergunt; quidam puncturis distingunt; quidam malthâ eos convestiunt." "I parget or whyte lyme, ie vnie, and ie blanchis. I wyll perget my walles, for it is a better syght. Pariette for walles, blanchissevre." PALSG. "Trulissare, to parget." ELYOT. "Smalto, plaister, or pergitte. Smaltato, pergitted." W. Thomas, Ital. Grammar, 1548. "To parget or plaister, crusto, gypso, trulliso, gypsum inducere, gypso illino, dealbo. To new-parget, or white-lyme, interpolo." GOULDM. Compare SPARGETTYN̄, or pargette wallys, hereafter.]Gipsum, C. F. litura.
  • Page  384PARGETYN̄ wallys. Gipso, linio.
  • PARGETTYNGE (or spargettynge of wallis, infra.) Gipsacio, (gipsura, infra; gipsatura, P.)
  • PARYD, as breede. Decrustatus, COMM.
  • PARYNGE, or parow(re) of frute, and othyr lyke. Peripsima, CATH. et UG. in peri, et C. F.
  • PARYNGE of frute, or oþer lyke. Peripsimacio.
  • PAARK. Indago, C. F. et KYLW. parca.
  • (PARKERE, K. H. P. Indagator.)
  • PARLEMENT. Parliamentum (lo∣cutorium, CATH. P.)
  • PARLEMENT HOWSE. Conciona∣bulum, C. F.
  • PARLOWRE. Locutorium, cum c. non q. secundum CATH.
  • PARROK, or cowle.1. [PARROK of cowle, MS. or cowle, K. S. Compare COOWLE to closyn mennys fowlys, saginarium; p. 97. In the North a chicken coop is termed a hen-caul; and the sy∣nonymous term PARROK seems to denote a similar enclosure. Ang.-Sax. pearroc, septum ferarium, clausura. In N. Britain, according to Jamieson, a very small en∣closure or apartment is called a parrock, and to parrach signifies to crowd together, like many sheep in a small fold. "Parrocke, a lytell parke, parquet." PALSG. A fenced enclosure of nine acres at Hawsted, in which deer were kept in pens for the course, was termed the Parrock. Cullum's Hawsted, p. 210. In Norfolk, according to Forby, an enclosed place for domestic animals, as calves, is called a par, and the farm-yard, con∣taining pars for the various animals which inhabit it, is called a par-yard.]Saginarium, KYLW. cavea, C. F. pargulus, NECC. et DICC.
  • PARROK, or cabān. Preteriolum, CATH. capana, CATH.
  • PARROKKYN̄, or speryn̄ in streyte place (speryn in strey(t)ly, K. closyn in streythly, S. streightly, P.) Intrudo, obtrudo.
  • PAROS, or parysche (pares, or parych, S.) Parochia.
  • (PAROUR of frute, idem quod paringe, supra, H. parowre, P.)
  • PAROWRE of a vestyment.2. [Parura signifies, according to Ducange, opus Phrygium, embroidery of silver or gold, or an ORFREY; see p. 368, supra. Amongst the gifts to Peterborough by Abbot Akarius, who died A. D. 1210, occurs "alba brusdata—cujus paratura violeticum habet colorem, et amita et stola cum manipulo ejusdem coloris brusdata." Rob. Swapham, Sparke, p. 104. Descriptions of a similar kind occur without number in ancient inventories of sacred vestments. The ornaments of the alb, properly desig∣nated by the term PAROWRE, were square or oblong pieces of rich embroidered stuff attached to the vestment at each wrist, and at the feet, or lower part of the alb, one before and another behind, being, with the PAROWRE of the amice, five in number, and symbolical, as it is supposed, of the wounds on the hands and feet, and the crown of thorns, of the Saviour. Papebrochius, Acta SS. Propyl. Maii, giving the explanation of this usage, speaks of it as quite obsolete. The large PAROWRE, at the bottom of the alb in front, is exhibited in a profusion of instances on sepulchral brasses and effigies; that which decorated the amice, according to its ancient fashion, appears like a standing collar above the chasuble, with which it is sometimes erroneously supposed to have been connected. It must be observed that these ornaments were most commonly, if not properly, of the same suit, de eâdem sectâ, as the stole and maniple. Their variety was remarkable: in the Lives of the Abbots of St. Albans we find "paruras auro et aurifrigio, et acu plumario decoratas." Occasionally they were set with gems: "Pa∣ruram positam cum perreiâ, et armis Anglie." Rymer, X. 346. Remarkable specimens of the PAROWRE of the amice supposed to have been worn by St. Thomas of Canter∣bury, and preserved in the Treasury at Sens, are represented in Shaw's Dresses and Decorations. Wyntown speaks of "albys wyth parurys." See Jamieson. The term was applied to similar ornamental work on other vestments, as "chirothece parate," &c. The term apparel is occasionally used in the same sense, as in the Inventory of Winch. Cath. 1535, where certain vestments are named, with the "parel of the albes of the same work, of my L. Cardinal Beauford's gift" Strype's Mem. of Cranmer.]Para∣tura, vel parura.
  • PAART. Pars.
  • Page  385PAART, or deele. Porcio.
  • PARTABLE. Partibilis, divisi∣bilis (partiabilis, S.)
  • PARTENERE. Particeps.
  • PARTY, supra in part.
  • PARTY CLOTHE, or clothe made of dyuers colowrys. Pannucia, CATH.
  • PARTYD a-sundyr. Divisus, se∣paratus.
  • PARTYD, or dyvydyd, and delte a-bowte (deuyded or dalt aboute, P.) Partitus, distributus.
  • PARTYN̄ a-sundyr, or clevyn̄ (clyuyn, P.) Divido.
  • PARTYN̄ a-sundyr that were to∣gedyr yn one place. Segrego, disgrego, separo.
  • PARTYN̄, cantyn̄, or delyn̄. Par∣tior, impercior.
  • PARTYNGE, or delynge. Particio, distribucio.
  • PARTYNGE a-sundyr (partinge fro sunder, H. P.) Separacio, se∣gregacio, divisio.
  • PARVYCE.1. [The parvise, a term of Greek origin, which occurs in Chaucer's Rom. of R. v. 7158, is explained as being the portico of a church, called Paradisus, or paravisus, possibly on account of the trees which environed the entrances of the Greek churches. See Ducange, Tyrwhitt's Glossary to Chaucer, and Towneley Myst. p. 200. "Place nere a churche to walke in, paruis." PALSG. "Parvis, the porch of a Church; also (or more properly) the utter court of a Palace, or great house." COTG. "Hortor, suadere, &c. unde hortator, hortamen, et hortatorium, i. palmatorium (sic) monachorum, locus ubi hortamina fiunt." Uguitionis Vocab. Arund. MS. 127, f. 34, vo.]Parlatorium, UG. in hortor.
  • PASTE of dowe. Pasta.
  • PASTY (or pye, infra.) Pastilla, vel pascilla, artocrea, CATH. pastillus, C. F. (pastella, P.)
  • PASTLERE.2. ["A pasteler, pastillarius." CATH. ANG. "Pastler that baketh, pastisier." PALSG. Dulciarius, a pastlar." ELYOT. "Pastisier, a pasterer, or pie maker." COTG.]Cer(e)agius, CATH. pastillarius, DICC.
  • PASTURE of beestys. Pascua, pastura, C. F. pastorale, BRIT.
  • PASTURYN̄ beestys, or fedyn̄. Pasco, CATH.
  • PASTURYN̄, or ete the pasture, as beestys. Depasco, pasco.
  • PATENE, or pateyne of a chalys (patent of the chalys, K. paten, or payten, S.) Patena, C. F.
  • PATEYNE, fote vp berynge (pa∣teyne of tymbyre, K. or yron, to walke with, P.)3. ["A patane, calopodium, lignipes, lignipedum." CATH. ANG. "Calopodium. a style or a paten. Calopifex, a maker of patens or styltes." ORTUS. "Paten for a fote, galoche. Paten maker, patinier." PALSG. Compare GALACHE, p. 184, and GALLOCHE, p. 185. Pattens were used anciently by ecclesiastics, probably to protect the feet from the chill occasioned by the bare pavement of a church, an unbecoming practice which was condemned severely. In Hutton's Excerpta from the Registers of the Diocese of York, Harl. MS. 6971, it is stated in an archiepiscopal visitation, A. D. 1390, "Item, omnes ministri ecclesie pro majore parte utuntur in ecclesiâ et in processione patens et clogges, contra honestatem ecclesie, et antiquam consuetudinem capituli." Ducange also cites an ordinance of the Chapter of Auxerre, "non portentur calopodia in choro, sub poenâ distributionum unius diei;" and in the accounts of the Churchwardens of St. Mary-Hill, London, A. D. 1491, the item occurs, "for ij. pair of pattens for the priests." Pattens, at the period when the Promptorium was compiled, formed an ordinary part of the costume of a gentleman. In the Histoire du petit Saintré, written about 1459, his well-supplied wardrobe, as page of the court, comprised "souliers et patins, qui soient bien faicts," of each three pair. So also in 1464, the steward of Sir John Howard made these entries of expenses in London: "Payd fore a payre of patynys, iij.d. For a payre patynys for my master, iij.d." Household Exp. in Eng. In the same year the craft of "patyn" makers of London petitioned the crown that the Stat. 4 Hen. V. which forbade them to use the wood of the aspen-tree, as being that which was chiefly used by the fletchers, might be repealed, representing that it was the best "and lightest tymbre to make of patyns or clogges." Rot. Parl. iv. 567. A drawing which represents King John, Cott. MS. Julius, E. IV., affords a curious re∣presentation of the pattens of this period. See Shaw's Dresses. Horman, speaking of various dances, alludes to those which were performed on pattens, and rendered by him gyracula. "Let us daunce patende, or with styltis."]Calopodium, ferripodium.
  • Page  386PATENT (of, K. P.) þe kyngys seele. Patens.
  • PATHE, wey of men. Semita, CATH. orbita.
  • PATHE, wey of beestys. Callis, CATH.
  • PATRYARK. Patriarcha.
  • PATRONAGE. Patronatus.
  • PATRONE of a benyfece (patron or patrun, P.) Patronus.
  • PATRONE, forme to werk by (patrone, or exawmplere, K. ex∣saumpyl, H. patron or example, P.) Exemplar.
  • PATRONESSE. Patronissa (pa∣trona, P.)
  • PAWE of a beest. Palmula, palma.
  • PAVYNGE STONE, or pathynge stōne.1. ["Petalum, i. forma marmorea instar tessere quadrata, unde pavimenta templorum vel domorum et palaciorum quondam sternebantur." CATH. In Norfolk a square paving brick is called a pamment. "Rudus, a pament stoone." MED. "Pament of a strete, pauiment, pauee. Paument of a strete, pauê. Pauyng stone, quarreau." PALSG.]Petalum, CATH.
  • PAVYCE, or defence (for defence, S.)2. [This term denotes a kind of large shield of plain wood, or covered with skins, such as the parma described by Brito in the Philippidos, x. 216, called pavesia, and in French pavois. Th. Walsingham speaks of armed pavisarii in the service of Edw. III. and in the rates of wages of the household of that king, A. D. 1344, are mentioned "pauews, pauecos," and "peuecers," but in the Househ. Ordin. published by the Antiqu. Soc. these words have erroneously been printed with an n. The pavise was almost essential to the balistarius, affording him a protection whilst winding up the cross-bow, as men∣tioned in the Chron. B. du Guesclin, v. 3106, and represented in the Life of Richard Beauchamp, Cott. MS. Jul. E. IV. Strutt's Horda, ii. pl. 43. Frequently the pavi∣sarius was merely the attendant who carried that defence. In Talbot's ordinances for the army, A. D. 1419, it is directed that every "ij. yomen make them a good pavise of bordes, or of pap', in the beste maner they cane best devise, that on may hold it, whiles that other dothe shete." Excerpta Hist. 42. In Trevisa's version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. are enumerated the machines and great shot with which a legion was provided, such as "spryngoltes, tripgettes, bowes of brake, arblastes bende, &c. the strengthe and myghte of his shot may nothing with-stonde, neyther hors man with plates and haberions, ne foot man with paves and shelde." B. ii. c. 24. Again they are mentioned as wall-shields, of which kind a curious specimen formed of iron is preserved in the porter's lodge at Warwick castle. "It nedethe þat ther be good plentie of targes, pauysses, and sheldes in þe citie, to keuer and to hill or stop the gappes of the enbatil∣mentes of þe walles fro shot." B. iv. c. 6. They are also mentioned as useful in sea∣fights. In the passage of arms between Lord Scales and the Bastard of Burgundy, A. D. 1467, it is said, "We shalle doo armes on foote—and shalle mowe bere a targe or a pavis, aftir the wille and pleasire of everich of us." Lansd. MS. 285; in the French, Harl. MS. 4632, "pavoisine." In Sir John Talbot's great hall at Caistor, A. D. 1459, was "j. rede pavys. Item, j. target." Archaeol. xxi. 272. The pavyce was retained in use after the adoption of fire-arms. Thus Hall, in his account of the battle at Flodden, 1513, describes the furious fire kept up by the artillery on both sides: "And after the shotte was done, which they (the Scotch?) defended with pauishes, they came to handestrokes." "Tragea, a pauys." Harl. MS. 1002, f. 152. "A pavysse, castrum." CATH. ANG. "Paues to defende one with, pauais." PALSG. "Testudine (Ital.) a great shield, target, or paluoise. Pauese, pauesce, a kinde of target called a palueise." FLORIO.]
  • PAWME of an hande. Palma.
  • Page  387PAWMENT. Pavimentum.
  • PAWMERE.1. ["Wande, flagellum. Palmere, palmatorium, ferula, percussorium." Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. In the Equivoca of Joh. de Garlandiâ, with the interpretations of Master Geoffry, probably the compiler of the Promptorium, it is said that "ferula est instrumentum quo discipuli percutiuntur in manibus, quod et alio nomine palmatorium appellatur. Anglice a palmer." "A palmare in þe scole, ferula, hortatorium, palma∣torium." CATH. ANG. "Ferula, a rod or stycke wherwith children's handes be striken in scholes, a palmer." ELYOT.]Ferula.
  • PAWNCHECLOWT, or trype (or wamclowte, infra; pawnclout, S.) Scrutum, CATH. tripa, CATH. magmentum, CATH. et C. F.
  • PAWNCHERE (pawunchere, P.)2. [Compare BRYGYRDYLE, lumbare, renale; p. 51. "Lumbare, a brekgyrdyl. Renale, a breche gyrdyl." MED. "Epifemora, panchere." Harl. MS. 1002. "A pawncherde, renale, etc. ubi a brekebelt." CATH. ANG. Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, "On the perche hongen your clothes, mantelles, &c. upon the keuerchief chertes, breches, with the panutcher (sic) whan ye be vnclothed; brayes à tout le braieul quand vous estes devestues." In the Invent. of the effects of Hen. V. A. D. 1423, occurs the item, "j. pauncher enbroudes d'or, ovec iij. bokull, iij. pendantz garniz d'argent dorrez: pris de l'argent, ovec le gower garniz des garnades, et j. bokull, et j. pendant d'argent dorrez, xx. s." Rot. Parl. iv. 221.]Lumbare, renale.
  • PAWSE, of stynty(n)ge, or a-byd∣y(n)ge. Pausacio, pausa.
  • PAWSE, yn redynge of bokys. Periodus. CATH. et C. F.
  • PAWTENERE.3. ["Marsupium, a pawtenere, a powche. Cassidile est pera aucupis, vel mercipium, vel sacculus, a pautenier or a pouche." MED. Cassidile dicitur pera, sarciperium, sicatium, marsupium, moculus, loculus, crumena, &c. a paneter, a pouche, a breyded gyrdel. Cremena, a pautener (al. pantenet) or syluer. Lenonem lena non diligit absque cremena." ORTUS. The term "pautenere" occurs in Syr Degore, written early in XIVth cent. In 1379 Thos. de Farnylawe, Chancellor of York, bequeaths his "paw∣tener de serico." Test. Ebor. i. 103. Caxton mentions, in the Book for Travellers, "pawteners, tasses, aloyeres, tasses." Aloiere was, according to Roquefort, the large flat purse, commonly worn in the XVth cent. appended to the girdle, Lat. alloverium. It appears very frequently on the Norfolk sepulchral brasses, which represent secular or mercantile persons. "Pautner, malette." PALSG.]Cassidile, CATH. C. F.
  • Page  388PAX, of kyssynge (or kyssynge, S.) Osculum, vel osculum pacis.
  • PAX BREDE.1. [Of the usage in the service of the mass of kissing a small tablet of wood or metal, ornamented with some sacred figure or device, see Dr. Milner's observations, Archaeol. xx. 534. The tabula pro pace, called in French portepaix, was formed of every pos∣sible and costly material, or in earlier and more simple times of wood, whence it was called "pax borde," as in the will of Sir Thos. Littleton, 1481, or PAX BREDE. Compare BREDE, or litille borde, p. 48. By the synod of Exeter, 1287, it was ordained that in every parish church there should be "asser ad pacem." Wilkins, ii. 139. The name was used, however, without any regard to the propriety of its application. In the will of Henry le Scrop, 1415, is mentioned "una Paxbrede argentea et deaurata." Rymer, ix. 273. In an Inventory of St. Dunstan's, Canterbury, 1500, occurs "a pax borde off latin, a crucyfyx for a pax borde off coper and gyltt." Amongst the gifts of Abp. Chichele to All Souls, Oxford, Invent. taken about 1460, are "vj. paxys de vitro." In the Inventory of St. Paul's, 1298, given by Dugdale, and that of St. George's, Windsor, 1384, splendid paxilla are described. "Paxillum, Anglice paxbrede." ORTUS. The use of the pax was one of those symbolic ceremonies which were not immediately abolished in the Reformed Church; it was enforced by the Ecclesiastical Commission of Edw. VI., and even rendered more conspicuous than before, as a token of joyful peace between God and man's conscience. See the Injunction for the Deanery of Doncaster, cited from Burnet by Dr. Milner.]Osculatorium.
  • PAXWAX, synewe.

    2. This term, which is given by Sir T. Browne, is retained in Norfolk and Suffolk, ac∣cording to Forby and Moor. Ray gives pack-wax as common in all counties; it sig∣nifies the strong tendon in the neck of animals. "Fix fax, nomen cartilaginis quâ caput humeris utrinque alligatur, Yorkshire; pax wax, Norf." Bp. Kennett, Lansd. MS. 1033. Compare Brockett, Craven Dial. and Jamieson, who would derive the word from Germ. Flachs, a sinew. Gautier de Bibelesworth says, of a man's body,

    "Et si ad le wenne (fex wex) au col derere."

    "Le vendon, the fax wax." Harl. MS. 219, f. 150. In the curious treatise on vege∣table remedies, Arund. MS. 42, f. 44, vo, it is said of "Bdellius, Delle—it resoluyth blod þat is congelyd, i. cold slawyn, and cloddyd, and clumperyd, and helpeþ for brus∣sures of þe paxwax and of þe brawn, and for congelacyon of þe senewys." Again, f. 47, the virtues of capers are commended "for desese in þe pascwax, and in þe senewys;" and of Galbanum, f. 90, vo, "it is gode for alyzere, i. þe crompe, and for þe spasme, þe shote in þe lacertys, i. in þe paswaxis."

    (paxwex, P.)
  • PECE, cuppe.3. ["A pece of siluer or of metalle, crater, cratera." CATH. ANG. "Crater, vas vi∣narium, a pyece or wyne cuppe." ORTUS. "Pece to drinke in, tasse. Pece, a cuppe, tasse, hanap."]Pecia, crater, DICC. cratera, CATH. patera, CATH. et DICC. albinus, C. F.
  • PECE, or part (party, P.) Perti∣cula, pars, porcium(cu)la.
  • PECHE, or peske, frute.4. [In a roll of purchases for the palace at Westminster, preserved amongst the mis∣cellaneous Records of the Queen's Remembrancer, a payment occurs "Will. le Gar∣dener, pro iij. koygnere, ij. pichere, iij.s.—pro groseillere, iij.d. pro j. peschere, vj.d." A. D. 1275, 4 Edw. I. Phillips, however, states as his opinion that the peach-tree was brought from Italy with the apricot, by Wolf, gardener to Hen. VIII. in 1524. Pomarium Brit. 283.]Pesca, pomum Percicum.
  • (PECHYNGE, or appechynge, S.) Appellacio, C. F.
  • PECYN̄, or set pecys to a thynge, Page  389 or clowtyn̄. Repecio, reb(r)occo, sarcio, CATH. reficio.
  • PEKOKKE, byrde. Pavo, pavus, CATH.
  • PECTORAL of a vestyment, or other a-rayment.1. [The pectoral, as a sacred ornament used by the prelates of the Christian church, appears to have derived its origin from the jewelled breast-plate of the Jewish high∣priest, the 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, or rationale judicii, according to the Vulgate, Exod. xxviii. 15, rendered in the earlier Wicliffite version "the breest broche of dom," in the later "the racional of doom." It was worn attached to the breast of the chasuble, and although never, as it appears, in general use, yet many examples present themselves in England. As regards the obscure subject of the early use of the rationale, much infor∣mation may be gained from the authors cited by Ducange. It is minutely described in an ancient inventory of pontifical ornaments at Rheims, given by Marlot in the Hist. of that see, and appears to have closely resembled the Jewish breast-plate, being formed of 12 stones, whereon the names of the 12 sons of Israel were inscribed, fixed upon cloth of gold, and attached by means of chains over the shoulders, whereupon also there were two stones called "camayeux," in imitation of those which were worn by the high∣priest. A second rationale for less solemn occasions is described in the same document, which resembled less closely the Jewish ornament: it was formed of one stone of un∣usual brilliancy and size, called "camayeu," around which were set 4 emeralds, and as many balais rubies. A representation of this remarkable ornament may be seen in the plate given by Du Bouchet, in the Hist. of the House of Courtenay, p. 174, which represents the sepulchral effigy of Robert de Courtenay, Archbishop of Rheims, who died 1323. The most remarkable representation which exists in England is afforded by the effigy placed under Prince Arthur's chantry in Worcester cathedral, and attributed to Bp. Godfrey Giffard, 1268-1301. The rationale here appears as a square plate upon the breast of the chasuble, with a quatrefoil in the centre, and set with eight gems. This ornament appears in England chiefly during the XIIIth cent. See the seals of Joceline, Bp. Bath, and John, Bp. Winch. 1205; of Eustace, Bp. Lond. 1222, Walter, Bp. Carlisle, 1223, Ralph, Bp. Heref. 1239, Sylvester, Bp. Carlisle, 1246, Henry, Bp. Lincoln, 1300; and the effigy of Bp. Laurence, at Rochester, who died 1274. In the Invent. of St. Paul's, 1295, given by Dugdale, several chasubles are described as furnished with the pectorale, formed of gold, or cloth of gold, set with gems. Its use was not entirely abandoned at a later period: it appears upon the seal of Richard, Bp. Lincoln, 1420, and in the Invent. taken at Winchester cathedral at the Dissolution, occur a pectoral of gold; another partly of gold, and six of silver gilt, all garnished with stones. Strype's Mem. of Cranmer, App. p. 25. The term pectoral occasionally designates an ornament of the cope, as in the Invent. taken at St. Paul's, and given by Dugdale, in which mention occurs of a "capa, cum Petro et Paulo in pectorali: Capa—cum rotundis pectoralibus aurifrigiis," &c.]Pectorale, racionale.
  • PEDDARE.2. [In the Eastern Counties, according to Forby and Moor, a pannier, such as serves to carry provisions to market, is termed a ped, the market in Norwich, where wares brought in from the country are exposed for sale, being known as the ped-market, and a dealer who transports his wares in such manner is termed a pedder. Hence is de∣rived the name by which the ancient Roman line of road is known which leads from the great camp at Holme, on the N. W. Norfolk coast, towards Ixworth, in Suffolk, and seems to have fallen into the line leading from Thetford to Stow-market. The greater part of this road across the champaign parts of Norfolk is still called the Peddar Way, doubtless because, like the Welshman's Road in Warwickshire and the parts adjacent, the straight direction of its course caused it to be frequented by itinerant traders. The Peddar Way may be traced upon the Ordnance Survey through nearly its whole extent. It is also given in Woodward's Map of Roman Norfolk, Archaeol. xxiii. 358. There is also a vicinal road leading from Ightham, Kent, to Farnham, Surrey, which is called the Pedlar's Way. The Norfolk term pack-way seems to be synonymous. Sir John Paston, writing A. D. 1473, says, "I most have myn instruments hyddur, whyche are in the chyst in my chambre at Norwyche, whyche I praye you and Berney togedre joyntly, but nat seuerally, to trusse in a pedde, and sende them hyddur in hast." Paston Letters, V. 58. Tusser, in his list of husbandly furniture, given under September's husbandry, enumerates "a pannell and wanty, pack-saddle, and ped." Ray speaks of dorsers as the kind of peds or panniers used by the fish-jobbers of Lyme to bring their fish to London. The original Glossary to Spenser, Sheph. Cal. Nov. V. 16, gives this expla∣nation: "A haske is a wicker ped, wherein they use to carrie fish." It is owing to this use of peds that, in Pynson's edit. of the Promptorium, peddare is rendered pis∣carius. East Winch, in Norfolk, is called in old documents Pedder's Winch. "A pedder, revolus, negociator." CATH. ANG. See Jamieson, v. Peddir.]Calatharius (qui facit calathos, K.) quaxillarius, quas∣sillarius, C. F. (piscarius, P.)
  • Page  390PEDDE, idem quod panere, supra (calathus, P.)
  • PEDEGRU, or petygru, lyne of kyn∣rede, and awncetrye (pedegrw, avnsetry, K. pedegru, or pedygru, S. pedegrewe, or petygrwe, lyne or leny of kynred, P.) Stemma, CATH. C. F. et UG. in scalis.
  • PEDLARE, shapmann (chepman, S.) Particus, UG. in parcior.
  • PEGGE, or pynne of tymbyr. Cavilla.
  • PE-HENNE. Pavona.
  • PEYCE, or wyghte (peise of whyght, K.)1. [R. Brunne uses the word "peis" in the sense of weight; Langt. Chron. See also Vision of Piers Pl. v. 2957; Cov. Myst. p. 236. "Peyce, a weyght, peys, pesant." PALSG. "When the yse melted and brake, the payse therof brake many a stronge brydge." Fabyan, Chron. 6 Will. Rufus. The adjective "paisand," heavy, occurs in Golagros and Gawane, 463; and Chaucer uses the verb to peise, to weigh. The PEYS of a well appears to designate the counter-poised beam, termed also KYPTRE, supra, p. 276, whereby in Southern Europe, as also in other countries, water is raised.]Pondus.
  • PEYS of a welle. Telo, in K. kyptre (ciconia, supra.)
  • PEYNE. Pena.
  • PEYNFULLE. Penalis.
  • PEYNYD. Cruciatus.
  • PEYNYN̄, or gretely grevyn̄. Crucio, torqueo, CATH.
  • PEYNYN̄, or pynyn̄ yn wo or sekenesse. Langueo, elangueo.
  • PEYNYNGE. Cruciatus.
  • PEYNYS, yvyl yn horsys fete.
  • PEYNTYD, or poyntyd, or por∣trayd. Pictus, depictus.
  • PEYNTYN̄, or portrayyn̄ (or poyn∣ton̄, infra.) Pingo, depingo.
  • PEYNTYNGE, or portrature (or poyntynge, infra.) Pictura.
  • PEYNTOWRE (or poyntowre, in∣fra.) Pictor.
  • PEYSYN̄, or weyyn̄. Pondero, libro, trutino, C. F. et CATH.
  • PEYTREL, of horsys harneys (peyn∣trel, K.) Antela, C. F.
  • Page  391PEYR, or a peyr, of tweyne thyngys (peyȝyr, H. peyyre, S. peysyr of two thinges, P.) Par.
  • PEKKE, mesure. Batus.
  • PELE, of bellys ryngynge (or a-pele of belle ryngynge, supra.) Classicum, CATH.
  • (PELE, of owen, K. peel for þe ovyn, S. pele for ouyn, P.) Palmula, pellica (pala, P.)
  • PELETYR, herbe. Serpillum, pire∣t(r)um, C. F. (piretrum, P.)
  • PELFYR (pelfrey, S.) Spolium.
  • (PELLE, or other clothe leyd on a dede body, supra in palle. Ca∣pulare, UG. in capio.)
  • PELLYCANN, byrd. Pellicanus.
  • PELYN̄, or apelyn̄. Appello, CATH.
  • PELOT, rownde stone of erthe, or other mater (pelet, H. P.)1. [—rownde stone, or erthe, MS. of herth, S. of erthe, P. The term pellet, Fr. pelotte, designated the stone balls, or missiles which were projected by the mangonels, and war∣like engines of early times, and by artillery, bullets of stone being disused only in the XVIth cent. Missiles formed of indurated clay have also been found, the use of which is perhaps indicated in the Promptorium. In Golagros and Gawane, v. 463, are mentioned "pellokis paisand," with "gapand gunnis of brase;" and Chaucer uses the simile "swifte as a pellet out of a gonne." House of Fame, iii. Horman says, "The mes∣senger was slayne with a pellet, glande," and Hall speaks of shooting "great pellettes, whiche made a greate noyse." Chron. 24 Hen. VIII. "A pelet of stone, or lede, glans." CATH. ANG. "Pellet, a rounde stone, plomme." PALSG. See Mr. Archi∣bald's observations on stone shot found in the island of Walney, Archaeol. xxviii., and Mr. Porrett's notice of shot found in the Tower moat, Archaeol. xxx. Compare CALYON, rounde stone, rudus, p. 58.]Pi∣leus, vel piliolus, rudus, C. F.
  • PELOURE, theef. Appellator.
  • PELLURE, or furrure.

    2. The Stat. 11 Edw. III. c. 2, ordains that no one under the rank of a knight, and churchmen, who may spend £100 in the year, "ne use peleure en ses draps," upon pain of forfeiture. Stat. of R. vol. I. 281. In the Romance of Kyng Alisaunder that prince is described as alighting from his steed, when having been disarmed, he "dude on a robe of peolour." v. 4129. See also the passages cited in the Glossary to Syr Gawayn. Wicliffe, in the complaint to the King and Parliament, objects that the poor were con∣strained to provide a worldly priest in pride and gluttony "with fair hors and jolly, and gay saddles and bridles ringing by the way, and himself in costly cloths and pelure," whilst they perished from cold and hunger. Hardyng speaks of the state of King Arthur, who was attended by a thousand knights,

    "Clad all in graye of pelury preordinate,
    That was full riche, accordyng to there estate."

    Chron. c. 74.
    Pellura.
  • PENAWNCE. Penitencia.
  • PENAWNTE (penaunscer, H. pe∣nawynt, S. penauncer', P.) Pe∣nitenciatus, ta, tum.
  • PENCEL, for portrayynge. Peni∣culus, C. F. pincella, KYLW. pinca, C. F. (penicillus, K. S.)
  • PENCYF, or hevy in herte (pen∣cyue, S.) Pensati(v)us, cogi∣tati(v)us.
  • PENCYFNESSE. Pensum, CATH.
  • PENCYONE, dette to be payed. Pensio.
  • PENDAWNT, of a gyrdylle.3. ["A pendande of a belte, pendulum." CATH. ANG. The rich decoration of the extremity of the girdle appears on monumental effigies in great variety, and is fre∣quently described in Inventories, as is one taken at York cathedral, and printed in Mon. Angl., in which is mentioned "una le pendant parva de auro Veneto, cum lapi∣dibus et perles." Mordaculum, in French mordant, is usually taken in the sense of the tongue of the buckle, but occasionally appears to signify a distinct ornament of the girdle. "Pendant of a gyrdell, pendant." PALSG.]Mor∣daculum, DICC. et KYLW.
  • Page  392PENDAWNT, of wrytys crafte, or masunry.1. [Palsgrave gives this term, denoting a plumb-line. "Pendant for carpenters, niueau."]Pendicula, KYLW.
  • PENNE.2. [PENNE is not unfrequently used by the old writers in the sense of feather; Fr. penne. In the Vision of Piers Pl. mention occurs of the "pennes of the pecok." v. 7923. In the Golden Legend it is said that "the foule that—hathe but fewe pennes or fethers, may not well flee;" and again, "David sayth, he flewe vpon the pennes of the wyndes."]Penna.
  • PENNE KNYFE. Artafus, DICC. (artavus, S. P.)
  • PENNARE. Pennarium, calama∣rium, CATH.
  • PENNARE, or ynkhorne yn' o worde (penner' and ynkorne, H. P.) Scriptorium, calama∣rium, CATH. (atramentarium, P.)
  • (PENY, K. P. Denarius, nummus.)
  • PENYWORTHE, of what þynge hyt be. Denariatus, nummatus.
  • PENONE, lytylle banere.3. [A pennon was a small flag attached to the lance, whereby the rank of the bearer was known. Wace appropriates it to the knight, and the gonfanon to the baron, but at a later time it appears to have designated the bachelor. Oliv. de la Marche describes the cere∣mony of the bachelor being made a banneret, when the "queue du pennon armoyé" was cut off, "et demoura quaré," was converted into a banner." L. vi. c. 25. Trevisa, in his version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. says that "horsmen ben cleped the wynges of the hoost—and thies ben cleped banarers, for they bere baners and pynons; velis, hoc est flammulis utuntur." B. ii. c. 1. In an Invent. of church ornaments, in the enumeration of banners, occurs "a pynon off St. Donston." Gent. Mag. viii. N. S. 571. "Pennon, a banner, pennon. Penon, a lytell baner in a felde, pennon." PALSG. In Lansd. MS. 225, f. 431, is given the size of standards, banners, pennons, &c. as set down by the Constable and Marshal. "A guydon to be in length ij. yardes and a half, or iij. A pennon of armes round att the end, and to be in length ij. yardes." In Harl. MS. 358, f. 5, may be seen sketches of all these ensigns; the getone being swallow-tailed, the penon triangular, and charged with the armorial bearing, the former being appropriated to the esquire or gentleman, the latter to the knight.]Bandum, pennum, C. F. et UG. in baltheus.
  • PENTAWNCERE.4. ["A penytenciary, penitenciarius." CATH. ANG. The institution of this dignity in cathedral churches is usually dated from the Council of Trent, 1545; but it is certain that poenitentiarii, persons authorised in certain cases to give absolution, in place of the bishop himself, existed from a much earlier period. See Ducange and Macer. Chaucer speaks of the penitencer in the Persones Tale as one empowered to give absolution in extraordinary cases. "Penytauncer, penitancier." PALSG.]Penitenciarius.
  • PENTCOST (or Whysson tyde, infra; Pencost, K. P.) Hec Pentecoste.
  • PENTYCE, of an howse ende.5. [In a French Vocabulary, Harl. MS. 219, f. 148, vo, is given "eiectice, a pentys." Caxton, in the Boke of the Fayt of Armes, explains how a fortress ought to be supplied with fresh water, cisterns being provided, "where men may receiue inne the rayne watres that fallen doune a-long the thackes of thappentyzes and houses." Part ii. c. 17. "A pentis, appendix, appendicium, apheduo, (sic) ut dicit Brito; et dicitur profectum, si de ligno, menianum, si de lapidibus." CATH. ANG. "Penthouse of a house, appentis. Pentys over a stall, avuent. Pentes or paues, estal, soubtil." PALSG. Bp. Kennett states that in Chester there was a "curia penticiarum tenta in aulâ penticiâ ejusdem civitatis." Lansd. MS. 1033.]Appendicium, C. F. imbulus, CATH. et UG. V. in A. et KYLW. appendix, UG. in pendo.
  • PEPYR. Piper.
  • Page  393PEPYR QWERNE (pepirwherne, K. S.)1. ["A paire of pepyr qwherns, fraxillus, fretellum, pistillus, pistillum." CATH. ANG. "Peperquerne, gregoyr à poyure." PALSG. See QUERNE. Ang.-Sax. cwyrn, mola.]Fractillum, C. F. mo∣linellum piperis, UG. in frango, fritillum, CATH. mola piperalis, NECC.
  • PERAWNTYR (peraventure, H. P.) Forte, fortasse, fortassis.
  • PERCHE, fysche. Percha, DICC. parcha, COMM.
  • PERCHE, or perke.2. ["A perke, pertica." CATH. ANG. Amongst the ancient furniture of the chamber the perch appears to have answered the same purpose as the clothes-horse of later times. The falconer had likewise his perch, whereon the hawks were accustomed to sit. In the dictionary composed by Joh. de Gallandiâ it is said, "Supra perticam magistri Johannis diversa indumenta pendent: tunice, supertunicalia, pallia, scapu∣laria, capa, coopertorium, lintheamina, renones, sarabarre, stragule, camisie, bracce, bumbicinia et tapeta," &c.; and it is added in the Gloss, "pertica, Gallice perche, unde versus: Pertica diversos pannos retinere solebat." Documens inédits: Paris sous Philippe le Bel, ed. Géraud, App. p. 603. Caxton says, in the Book for Travellers, amongst the appliances of the chamber, "On the perche hongen your clothes, man∣telles, frockes, clokes, cotes, doblettes, furres, wynter clothes and of somer," &c. In Norfolk a perch, of a wooden frame, against which sawn timber is set up to dry, is called, according to Forby, a perk.]Pertica.
  • PERCHER, candylle (perche can∣dell, P.)

    3. This term appears to designate a wax candle of certain dimensions, such as it was customary to place on the pertica or pergula, a small transverse beam or bar, whereon in churches or other places candles were affixed. Edw. Phillips, in the World of Words, states that perchers were the same as Paris candle, anciently used in England, also a bigger sort of candles, commonly set upon the altars. According to the ancient assise recorded in the Memoriale multorum of Henry, Prior of Canterbury, 1285-1331, Cott. MS. Galba, E. IV. f. 45, the Sacrist was bound to provide for the Prior's chamber cereos of the weight of half a lb. each, candelas, 24 to the pound, torticios, 2 ells in length, and weighing 5lb. each, with smaller ones of different weights, some of which had the appellation "prikette," being 12 in. long, and weighing 8 to the pound. "Item, candele que vocantur perchers continent in longitudine xv. pollic'; unde xviij. perchers pond' j.li. cere." These appear to have been used at the Prior's table. They are thus mentioned in the metrical treatise de Officiariis in curiis Dominorum, XVth cent. under the head "de candelario, of the chandeler,"

    "þat torches, and tortes, and preketes con make,
    Perchours, smale condel, I vnder take."

    Sloane MS. 1986, f. 46, vo.
    Perticalis.
  • PEERCYD, or boryd. Perforatus.
  • PEERCYN̄, or boryn̄. Penetro, perforo.
  • PEERCYNGE, or borynge (perch∣inge, or persinge, P.) Perfo racio.
  • PERSLEY, herbe (percyly, K. per∣cyle, S. percyll, P.) Petrocillum, Page  394 vel petrocilium, vel petrocili∣num, UG. in petros.
  • PERDYCLE, precyous stōn.1. [Aetites, from 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, aquila. Echites, as stated in Trevisa's version of Glanville, B. xvi. c. 38, is a stone of red colour found on the coasts of India and Persia: it was supposed to be of two kinds, male and female, and two were always found in the nest of the eagle. It was accounted to have singular virtues in parturition, in augmenting wealth and affection, in keeping a man sober, and as a charm against poisoned food. See also the metrical Latin treatise on the virtues of gems, attributed to Marbodeus, Harl. MSS. 80, f. 100: 321, f. 68, vo. There was another red stone called perides, according to Glanville, which cast forth fiery sparks, and when held fast, burned the hand; possibly the same which is here designated as the PERDYCLE.]Ethi∣tes, C. F.
  • PEERE, frute. Pirum.
  • PERE, tre. Pirus.
  • PEERE APPLE. Pirumpomum.
  • PEERE, metche. Par (compar, H.)
  • PERE, or pyle of a brygge, or other fundament. Pila.
  • PERRE, perle.

    2. Pearls appear to have been considered as precious stones, their origin being im∣perfectly known; and hence, probably, the synonym PERRE, from the French perré, is here given. "A perle stone, margarita." CATH. ANG. "Peerle, a stone, perle." PALSG. The following passage occurs in Trevisa's version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII.: "There is neyther games ne garnementes, golde nor siluer, so shynyng of precious stones ne pery, þat makethe our ennemyes subgettes, ne obedient vnto us, but only drede and doughtenesse of dedes of armes." B. i. c. 13. Lydgate says, in one of his minor poems,

    "When thou art fryke and in thy flowres,
    Thou werest purpure, perreye, ore palle."

    Make Amendes.

    See also Vis. of Piers Pl. v. 5618; Cant. Tales, v. 2938, 5926.

    Margarita.
  • PERRE, drynke. Piretum, NECC.
  • PERETRE, herbe (or petyr, infra; peretyr, P.) Peretrum.
  • PERFECCYONE. Perfectio.
  • (PERFOURMYN, supra in par∣fourmyn, P.)
  • PERYLE. Periculum.
  • PERYLE of lyfe. Discrimen, CATH.
  • (PERKE, or perche, supra, K. H. P. Pertica.)
  • PEERLE. Margarita, granulum, DICC.
  • PEERLE, yn the eye.3. [Glāconia, MS. and S. The term glaucoma, derived from the Greek 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, is rendered by Elyot "an humour in the eyen, lyke christall, whiche letteth the syght;" and Gouldman observes, "It seemeth to be the pin and web." "Gravia, a perle in an eie." MED. "A perle in ye ee, epifora." CATH. ANG. "Epiphora, a perle in ye eye." ORTUS. "Peerle in the eye, maille. Hawe in the eye, paille." PALSG. "Maille, a web in the eie." COTG. Compare STYANYE.]Glaucoma, DIST.
  • (PERLOYNYN, idem quod pur∣loynyn, H. P.)
  • PERMUTACYON, or ful changynge. Permutacio.
  • PERMUTYN', or holy chawgynn̄. Permuto.
  • PERPOYNT, beest (or poork-poynt, infra.)4. [See POORK POYNT, hereafter. "Porkepyn a beest, porc espin." PALSG.]Histrix, C. F.
  • PERSCHYN̄ (perchyne, S. perisshen, P.) Pereo, CATH. periclito.
  • (PERSID, K. H. P. Perforatus.)
  • (PERSYNGE, or boryng, K. H. P. Perforacio.)
  • Page  395 PERSONE, or o manne (man alone, K. P.) Persona.
  • PERSONE, curate. Rector.
  • PERSOWRE (or wymbyl, infra.) Terebellum, C. F. (terebrum, S.)
  • PERTRYCHE, byrd. Perdix.
  • PERVENKE, herbe. Pervenca.
  • PEES. Pax.
  • PESE, frute of corne. Pisa.
  • PESCODDE. Siliqua, CATH.
  • PESYBLE. Pacificus.
  • PEESYD, or qwemyd. Pacificatus, pacatus, C. F. (placatus, P.)
  • PEESYN̄, or styllyn̄ of wrethe.1. [—styllyn̄, or wrethe, MS. "To pese, componere, mitigare, pacificare, sedare, sopire." CATH. ANG. "I pease, I styll one, le rapaise." PALSG.]Pacifico, placo, paco.
  • PEESYNGE, or qwemynge. Pa∣cificacio.
  • (PESKE, or peche, frute, supra; peesk, s. peshe, J. Pesca, pomum Percicum.)
  • PESTELLE, of flesche. Pestellus.
  • PESTEL, of stampynge. Pila, pistillus, pistellus, CATH. et UG. in pinso.
  • PESTYLENCE. Pestilencia.
  • PETYCOTE.2. [The petticoat, at the time when the Promptorium was compiled, was a garment worn by men: thus in Sir John Fastolfe's wardrobe, 1459, under tunice, occur "j. pettecote of lynen clothe, stoffyd with flokys: j. petticote of lynen clothe, withought slyves." Archaeol. xxi. 253. Horman says, "One maner of correction of the sowdiours was that they shulde stande forthe in the host in theyr pety cotis, tunicati." Amongst the Privy Purse Expenses of Henr. VIII. 1532, occurs a payment to a London tailor "for a doubelet, and a pety cote for Sexten," the King's fool. "Petycote, corsent simple, cotte simple, chemise de blanchet." PALSG. Duwes, in his Introductorie to teach the Lady Mary the French tongue, gives, under women's attire, "the kyrtell, le corset: the kyrtell, la cottelette: the petycoat, la cotte simple." In 1582, petticoats appear in the Custom-house rates as an article of import: "Peticotes, knit, of silk, the doz. £12, do. knit, of wul or cottin, the dosen, 30s." In the time of James I. petticoats of silk were still rated at 20s. each.]Tunicula, UG. in tono.
  • PETYR, propyr name. Petrus.
  • PETYR, herbe (or peretre, supra; pertyr, P.) Peretrum.
  • PEWTYR, metalle. Electrum, se∣cundum communem scolam, sed pocius diceretur stannum, vel stanneus.
  • PEWTRERE. Electuarius, vel stannarius, CATH.
  • PYANY, herbe. Pionia.
  • (PYCTURE, or portratowre, infra. Pictura.)
  • PYKARE, lytylle theef. Furculus, vel furunculus, latrunculus; et inde furcula, &c. formantur, ut supra in mychare.
  • PYCHARE, pot (pycher, or pychar, s.) Urna, C. F. ollula, CATH. amula, CATH. picarium, COMM. picharius, BRIT. pinca, KYLW. et COMM.
  • PYE, bryd. Pica.
  • PYE, pasty. Artocrea, pastillulus, KYLW.
  • PYE BAKER.3. [Coragiūs, MS. Ceragius, S. "Cereagius, pistor qui ad modum cere deducit pastam." CATH. Compare PASTLERE, supra, p. 385.]Cereagius.
  • PYGGE, gryce. Porcellus, et alia supra in G. gryce.
  • PYGMEW (pygme, S.)4. ["A peghte, pigmeus." CATH. ANG. According to Jamieson a deformed and diminutive person is called in the North a picht, and the lower orders still designate by this term the supposed race of pigmies. Several remarkable relations illustrative of the ancient popular belief in such supernatural beings are given by the old historians, such as that of the priest Elidorus, recounted by Giraldus, Itin. Camb. i. c. 8; the account of the demons called in England Portuni, and in France Neptuni, according to Gerv. Tilbur. Ot. Imp. Dec. iii. c. 61; the extraordinary tale of Rad. de Coggeshale re∣specting the boy and girl discovered near Wolpit, in Suffolk, and kept for a long time by Sir Rich. de Calne, at Wikes, which are described as having had the human form, but wholly of a green colour, and as having been led by the sound of bells to emerge into the rays of the sun from their land beneath, where twilight reigned, and everything was green. Roy. MS. 13 A. XII. f. 73, vo. See Keightley's Fairy Mythology, and compare ELF, supra, p. 138.]Pigmeus, COMM.
  • Page  396PYIONE, yonge dove. Columbella.
  • PYK, or pych̄e (or terre, infra.)1. ["Pix, pycche, or pycke." MED. "Pikke, pix, bitumen. To pykke, bituminare." CATH. ANG. Ang.-Sax. pic, bitumen.]Pix, pissa, C. F. et CATH. pis∣saxara, CATH. UG. (depissa, P.)
  • PYKE, fysche. Dentrix, C. F. lu∣cius, C. F. lupus, C. F.
  • PYKE, of a staffe, or oþer lyke. Cuspis, stiga, C. F.
  • PYKE, of a schoo.2. ["A pyke of a scho, or of a staffe, rostrum." CATH. ANG. Liripipium usually denotes the hood with a long appendage, which, as Knyghton describes it, was twisted around the head; but here it seems to be synonymous with poleine, or cracowe, the proper appellation whereby the singular long-peaked shoe, which was in fashion during the early part of the XVth cent., was known. These terms are supposed to be derived from the fashion having been introduced from Poland, and Cracow, its metropolis, possibly by some of the suite of Anne of Bohemia, Queen of Ric. II. Will. Malmsb. however, states that among the effeminate habits of the times of Rufus, "usus cal∣ceorum cum arcuatis aculeis inventus:" the pouleines were also much in vogue in France during the reign of Charles V. and forbidden in 1340 and 1365. The monk of Evesham, in the Life of Rich. II. ed. Hearne, p. 53, relates the indignity that was shown in the diocese of Oxford to the messenger of Abp. Courtenay, in 1384, when he was compelled to eat the prelate's mandate, seal and all; but in retaliation the Archbishop's adhe∣rents "sciderunt cracowys de sotularibus aliquorum de familiâ Epi. Oxon. et ipsos cracowis edere cogerunt." In a treatse on the virtues of plants, written about the same time, the seed, or cod, of the Cassia fistula is described as of the "gretnesse of a saucestre, and shap most lyk þe pyk of a crakow sho." Arund. MS. 42, f. 60, vo. At the period when the Promptorium was compiled such peaked shoes were worn of an extravagant length, and the fashion was restricted by the statutes of apparel, during the reign of Edw. IV. when the length of "pykes of shoen or boteux" was cut down to two inches. See Parl. Rolls, V. 505, 566; Stat. of Realm. Although no early sump∣tuary statute is found whereby the use of such shoes was restricted to knights or persons of estate, they are mentioned repeatedly, as if accounted specially a part of knightly equipment. Thus in the description of the comely attire of Sir Degore, it is said, "His shone was croked as a knighte." v. 700. This Romance is supposed to have been written early in the XIIIth cent. The young Torrent of Portugal is de∣scribed as craving knighthood from the King of Provens, who bids him engage in a feat of arms, "and wyn the shone," v. 1117; having acquitted himself manfully, he comes at "myd-mete," and presents himself at the deis in his squire's habit, "withoute couped shone," to claim the guerdon; v. 1193. Compare this passage with Vis. of Piers Pl. v. 12,099, where a description occurs of one who comes, as if to a just, after the manner of a knight who comes to be dubbed, to win his gilt spurs, "or galoches y-couped." "Milleus, a coppid shoo." ORTUS. Ang.-Sax. cop, apex. A large number of poleine shoes, with the wooden pattens which were worn with them during the XVth cent., in accordance with the fashion represented in the drawing in Cott. MS. Julius E. IV. designated as King John, and given in Shaw's Dresses, were discovered in London, Nov. 1843, and are in the possession of Mr. C. R. Smith, F.S.A.]Liripium, DICC. (liripipium, P.)
  • PYKE, or tyynde of yryne (or prekyl, infra in T.) Carnica.
  • Page  397PYKKFORKE. Merga, CATH. merges, C. F.
  • PYKEYS, mattokke. Ligo, CATH. marra, CATH. in ligo.
  • PYKELYNGE. Purgulacio.
  • PYKEREL. Dentriculus, lucillus, KYLW. (dentricula, P.)
  • PYKEWALLE (or gabyl, supra.) Murus conalis, piramis, vel piramidalis, C. F.
  • PYKEPENY.

    1. "Cupidinarius, i. mercator, nummos cupiens, a coueytour of money." ORTUS. In the Vision of Piers P. v. 14,448, the disorderly followers of an army are described as "brybours, pylours, and pyke-harneys." This last term occurs also in Towneley Myst. p. 9. The verb to pick, as used by the old writers, has, amongst various signi∣fications, that of obtaining anything by mean, underhand proceedings, or pilfering. Thus Gaut. de Bibelesworth says,

    "Eschuuet flatour (loseniour) ke seet flater,
    Trop seet ben espeluker (piken.)"

    Arund. MS. 220, f. 299.

    "Leue thy flaterynge wordes, that goth aboute to pyke a thanke (verbis ad gratiam comparatis.)" HORM. See Nares.

    Cupidinarius.
  • PYKYD, as a staffe. Cuspidatus.
  • PYKYD, or purgyd fro fylthe, or oþer thynge grevows. Purgatus.
  • PYKYL, sawce. Picula, KYLW. (separium, S.)
  • PYKYN̄, or clensyn̄, or cullyn̄ owte the on-clene.2. ["I pyke, or make clene, ie nettoye. I praye you pyke my combe. I pyke safforne or any floure or corne whan I sorte one parte of them from an other, Ie espluche. All men can nat pycke saffron, some men must pyke pesyn." PALSG. Chaucer uses this verb, speaking thus of the spruce Damian: "He kembeth him, he proineth him and piketh." Marchant's T. v. 9885. Again he describes the gear of the five artificers, who were clad in the livery of a great fraternity, as "ful freshe, and newe—ypiked." Prol. v. 367. See Nares, v. Picked. Bullinger, in his 40th Sermon on the Apocalypse, inveighing against the Roman clergy, says, "They be commed, and piked, and very finely apparelled, delightyng in wemens jewels, wearing costely garments." There is apparently an allusion to birds, which set the plumage with the bill. A.-S. pycan, eruere.]Purgo, purgulo (segrego, P.)
  • PYKKYN̄, or a-noyntyn̄ wythe pyk. Piceo, CATH.
  • PYKYNGE, or clensynge. Pur∣gacio.
  • PYKYNGE, of a staffe, or oþer lyke. Cuspidacio.
  • PYLCHE.3. ["A pilch, or pylch, properly a furr gown, or a garment of skins with the hair on. Sax. pylce, toga pellicea. A cyrtell of wollen, and a pylche. Polychr. li. vii. c. 4. Cled in pilches, pellibus. Dougl. f. 175. Island. pyls, vestis muliebris. A pilch, a piece of flannel or other woolen put under a child next ye clout is called in Kent a pilch. A coarse shagged piece of rug laid over a saddle for ease of a rider is in our midland parts called a pilch." Bp. Kennett's Glossarial Coll. Lansd. MS. 1033. In Norfolk a flannel wrapper for a child is called a pilch. See Forby and Jamieson. The term is used by Chaucer, denoting a warm wrapper: Proverb against Covetise; it occurs also in Creed of Piers P. v. 484; Lydgate's Minor Poems, p. 154, ed. Halliwell. Sir John Maun∣devile, describing the rich attire of the Tartars dwelling in Chatay, says, "Thei clothen hem also with pylches, and the hyde with outen, habent et pelliceas, quibus utuntur ex transversis;" in the French "et vestent des pellices." Voiage, p. 298. In the Inventory of the effects of Roger de Kyrkby, Vicar of Gaynford, who died 1412, occurs "unum pylche de stranlion, xx.s." Wills and Inv. Surtees Soc. p. 56. Coats furred with "stranlyne" are mentioned in another document, ib. p. 35. Amongst the furred garments in the Invent. of the wardrobe of Hen. V. 1423, occur "ij. pulches de Cristigrey, iiij. pulches pur femmes, de grey," valued at 30s. and 20s. each. Rot. Parl. iv. 236. Caxton says in the Book for Travellers, "Me fyndeth furres of beuers, of lombes, pylches of hares and of conyes; (plichons de lieures et de conins.) Vedast the gray∣werker (vairrier) solde whilor to my lady a pylche of graye, and of good furres. Wau∣burge the pylchemaker (pelletiére) formaketh a pylche well (refaicte ung plice.)" Bp. Ridley, in his letter of farewell, quotes Hebr. xi. 37, as follows: "Some wandered to and fro in sheep's pilches, in goat's pilches." "Pellicia, a pilche, est quoddam indumentum quod de pellis fit." MED. "A pylche, endromida, endromis, pellicium, reno. A pilche maker, pelliparius." CATH. ANG. "Pelliparium, a pylchery." ORTUS. "Pytche (sic) of lether, pelice." PALSG. Compare Dutch, Dan. and Swed. pels; Germ. Pelz, &c.]Pellicium, pellicia, C. F. et UG. in pello, et CATH. et KYLW.
  • Page  398PYLCRAFTE, yn a booke (pile∣crafte, K.)

    1. "Paragrapha, pylcraft in wry(t)ynge." MED. "Paragraphus, Anglice a pargrafte in vrytynge." ORTUS. "Pilkrow contractum esse videtur, corruptumque ex para∣grapho." MINSHEU. "Paragraphe, a paragraffe, or Pill-crow, a full sentence, head, or title." COTG. "A pilkcrow, v. Paragraph." GOULDAM. See Nares. Tusser com∣mences his Points of Husbandry and Book of Huswifery with "a lesson how to confer every Abstract with his month, and find out Huswifery Verses by the Pilcrow:"

    "¶ In Husbandry matters, where Pilcrow ye find,
    That verse appertaineth to Huswif'ry kind;
    So have ye more lessons, if there ye look well,
    Than Huswifery Book doth utter or tell."
    Asteriscus, C. F. paragraphus, C. F. et UG. in gramma (furmicula, S.)
  • PYLE, of a bryggys fote, or oþer byggynge (or pere, supra.) Pila.
  • PYLE, of clothys (or other lyke, K.) on a presse. Panniplicium (cumulus, K.)
  • PYLE, of weyynge.2. [In the Invent. of effects of Hen. V. 1423, occurs, "Item, j. Pile pur poiser or et argent, pris vj.s. viij.d." Rot. Parl. iv. 234. "Pile: trébuchet à peser, sorte de balance; pila." ROQUEFORT.]Libramentum, CATH. libra, C. F. (libramen, K.)
  • PYLE, or heep, where of hyt be. Cumulus.
  • PYLERE. Columpna.
  • PYLLERY. Collistrigium.
  • PYLET, skyn'. Pellis (cutis, P.)
  • PYLGREME, idem quod palmer, supra; et proselitus, C. F. (peregrinus, peregrina, P.)
  • PYLGRYMAGE.3. [PYLGYRMAGE, MS.]Peregrinacio.
  • PYLLYD, fro the barke. Decor∣ticatus.
  • PYLLYD, or scallyd (shaled, S. skalled, P.)4. [PYLLYD signifies not only deprived of the skin, but worn smooth, stripped of hair or bald, as in the Creed of Piers P. v. 1665, where mention occurs of a "pild pate." Compare Cant. Tales, v. 629; 3933; Cov. Myst. p. 384. Dowglas, the Glastonbury monk, in his Chron. of England, speaks with contempt of "Maister Robert Baldokke, a fals piledde clerke of the Kinge's courte." Harl. MS. 4690, f. 62 vo. and 63 vo. So likewise Shakspeare uses the epithet, 1 Hen. VI. 1. 3, "peel'd priest!" "Pylled as one that wanteth heare, pellu. Pylled as ones heed is, pellé. Pylled scalled, tigneux." PALSG. In this sense the following passages in the authorised version of the Scriptures are to be understood: "Go, ye swift messengers, to a nation scattered and peeled." Isai. xviii. 2, 7. The word in the original signifies deprived of hair, plucked, con∣sidered in Eastern countries the highest indignity. Compare Isai. 1. 6. Again, in Ezek. xxix. 18, it is said, "Every head was made bald, and every shoulder was peeled." (depilatus, Vulg.) The term is likewise applied to velvet or napped stuffs which are worn threadbare, shorn, or cut. Hall, relating the treachery of Humphrey Banaster, in betraying the Duke of Buckingham to Rich. III. says that the sheriff, having appre∣hended the Duke, "in greate hast and euyll spede conneighed him appareled in a pilled blacke cloke to the cytie of Salsburie, where Kynge Richard then kepte his houshold." 3 Rich. III. Again, he describes the rich attire of the royal henxmen, who appeared in "coates of purple veluet pieled, and paned in riche cloth of siluer." 14 Hen. VIII.]Depilatus, glabel∣lus, CATH. (c)apitonsus, C. F. glabrosus.
  • Page  399PYLLYN̄, or pylle bark, or oþer lyke. Decortico.
  • PYLLYN̄, or schalyn̄ nottys, or garlyk. Vellifico.
  • PYLYOL MOUNTEYNE, herbe. Pu∣legium.
  • PYLEOL RYAL. Origonum.
  • PYLOWRE, or he þat pelythe oþer menne, as catchepollys, and oþer lyke. Pilator, UG. in pinso, de∣predator, vespilio, UG. in spolio.
  • PYLWE (pyllowe, P.) Pulvinar, cervical, pulvillus, plumacium (pulvinacium, S.)
  • PYMENTE, drynke.

    1. PYNTNENTE, MS. Pyment, K. H. S. P. Pigmentum, or pimentum, wine spiced, or mingled with honey, called in French piment, was anciently in high estimation. See Kyng Alis. v. 4178, and Weber's note. Chaucer speaks of it in Rom. of R. 6027, Boeth. ii. Gower says of Love,

    "That neuer pyment ne vernage
    Was halfe so swete for to drynke."

    Conf. Am. B. vi.

    Under the head nomina pertinencia promptuario, Harl. MS. 1002, is given "Nectar, pigmentum, pyment." "Pyment, piment." PALSG. Amongst the receipts of cookery in a MS. of the XIVth cent. in the collection of Sir Thomas Phillipps, No. 1470, there is one entitled "Pymte. Wyn, sucre yboilled togedere, gyngebred and hony, poudre of gynger, and of clouwes, i-piht wiþ þornes gret plentee, and schal beon adressed in coffyns of flour of chasteyns: þe colour ȝolou wyþ saffroun."

    Pigmentum, nectar, mellicratum, C. F.
  • PYMPYRNOL, herbe. Pimpinella.
  • PYNNE, of tymbyr (or pegge, supra.) Cavilla, UG. in caveo.
  • PYNNE, of metalle, as yryne, or oþer lyke (or pryke, infra.) Spintrum, vel spinter, CATH.
  • PYNNE, of an orlage, or oþer lyke, schowynge þe owrys of the day or of þe nyghte (pyn, or other lyke, shewynge the owre in a dyall, H. P.)2. [From this description of the gnomon of a dial it appears that the term orlage de∣signated, as in accordance with its derivation, not only a clock, but any indicator of time. "Sciocerus est stilus positus in circulo ad metiendum horas vel formas." ORTUS.]Scio∣tirus, C. F. et UG. in scio.
  • PYNACLE. Pinnaculum, pinna.
  • PYNCHAR, or nyggarde, idem quod nyggard, supra in N. literâ.3. ["I pynche, I spare as a nygarde, ie fays du chiche. I pynche courtaysye, as one doth that is nyce of condyscions, ie fays le nyce." PALSG. Elyot renders "aridus homo, a pelt, or pynchebeke, a drye felowe, of whome nothynge maye be gotten." "Sordidus, chiche, (Fr.) a niggard, a palterer, a dodger, a penyfather, a pinchpeny, one that will not lose the droppings of his nose." Junius' Nomenclator, version by J. Higins. "Pinse-maille, a pinch penny, scrapegood, niggard, penny-father." COTG. "A pinch-fist, cupidinarius; vide Niggard. A pincher and piller, vide Plucker. A pinch-penny, parcus," &c. GOULDM. Forby observes that a very parsimonious eco∣nomist is still called in Norfolk a pinch.]
  • Page  400PYNCHYN̄. Impingo, CATH.
  • PYNCHYNGE (or nyggardshepe, supra.) Tenacitas.
  • PYNDARE of beestys (pynnar, P.)1. ["Angarius, bedellus, compulsor, injustus exactor, a pyndere on an haywarde." MED. "Tescuo, i. castrare, to pynde. Tescua, a pynde-folde. To pynde, includere, trudere. A pynder, inclusarius, inclusor, inactor. A pynfolde, catabulum, testula, inclusorium." CATH. ANG. "To pin cattel, vide To pound. A pinner or pounder of cattel, inclusor." GOULDM. Amongst manorial or municipal officials the pounder of stray cattle is still in some places, as in Warwickshire, termed the Pinner. Bp. Kennett gives the following remarks: "To pynd, to pound or impound cattle, Dunelm. Sax. pyndan, includere. Hence in these midland parts the money that is given to the Heyward, or to any person who locks and unlocks the pound gate, is called Pinne lock" Lansd. MS. 1033.]Inclusor, CATH. inclusarius, UG.
  • PYNFOLDE. Inclusorium.
  • PYNNYN̄, or put ȳn a pynfold. In∣trudo, detrudo.
  • PYNYN̄, or languryn̄ in sekenesse (or peynyn̄, supra.)2. [The verb to pine is used not uncommonly in an active sense, as by Chaucer, R. of Rose, 3511. "To pine, punire, afficere, etc. ubi to punysche." CATH. ANG. "They (the priests) sleen thy sheep, for they pyenen them for hunger of their soule to the death." Complaint of the Ploughman, Fox, Acts and Mon. Ao. 1360. "I pyne one as men do theues or mysruled persons to confesse ye truth, le riue en aigneaux. Pynyng of a man in prisone, to confesse the trouthe, torture." PALSG. Ang.-Sax. pinan, cruciare; pinunȝ, tormentum.]Langueo, elangueo.
  • PYNNYN̄, or spere wythe a pynne (or festyn, P.) Concavillo (conclavo, P.)
  • PYNYON, of a wynge. Pennula.
  • PYNYONYD. Pennulatus.
  • PYNOTE, frute. Pinum.
  • PYNOT, tre. Pinus.
  • PYNSONE.3. ["A pynson, pedribriomita, a pes, et brios, mensura, et mitos, gutta; quasi calceus guttatus." CATH. ANG. "Pedibomita, Anglice a pynson." ORTUS. "Baillez moy mes cafignouns, take me my pynsouns." Harl. MS. 219, f. 151, vo. "Pynson sho, caffignon." PALSG. Master Stanbridge renders calceolus "a pynson," and Elyot gives "Calceamen, a pynson showe, or socke;" to which Gouldman adds another synonym, "a pinson or pump, calceamen," &c. Duwes, in his Introductorie, composed to teach the Princess Mary the French tongue, gives "womens raiments—the pynson showes, les eschapins." The derivation of this term is very obscure; it denotes, possibly, the pumps, or high unsoled shoes of thin leather, which were commonly worn with pattens about the time when the Promptorium was compiled. A large collection of these, recently discovered in London, are in the possession of C. R. Smith, Esq. F.S.A. Pinsons are mentioned in the Howard Household Book, p. 314.]Tenella, cancer, C. F. et KYLW. cancellulus, KYLW. (manualis, C. F., H. P.)
  • PYNSONE, to drawe owt tethe. Dentaria, UG. in demo.
  • PYNSONE, sokke.4. ["Pinsons" are named amongst various articles, chiefly of hard-ware, the impor∣tation of which was forbidden by Stat. 3 Edw. IV. 1463. Stat. of R. II. 397. "Pynsons of yrone, estricquoyerrs." PALSG. The term seems to be a diminutive of the Fr. pince.]Pedipomita.
  • Page  401PYYNTE, mesure. Pinta, sexta∣rium, dicit Biblia libro Le∣vitic. cap. 14o.
  • PYONY, herbe, idem quod pyanye, supra; et poenia, C. F.
  • PYPARE. Fistulator.
  • PYPE (pypet, S.) Fistula.
  • PYPE, of orgonys. Ydraula,1. [Praula, MS. ydraula, S. Compare OROGON PYPE, ydraula; p. 369.] BRIT. vocabulo Mus(ic)a, cantes, CATH. in plur. aule, UG. V. in A.
  • PYPE, vessel, or halfe tunne. Se∣midolium, pipa.
  • PYPPE, sekenesse.2. ["þe pippe, pituita." CATH. ANG. "Pyppe, a sickenesse, pepye." PALSG. In the version of Macer's treatise on the virtues of herbs, MS. in the possession of Hugh Diamond, Esq., it is said that "cerfoile y-dronke with mulsa wole destroie þe pippe." So likewise is it stated in Arund. MS. 42, f. 66: "Chervel, y-dronkyn with muls, oftyn for-doþ þe pippe." "I pyppe a henne or a capon, I take the pyppe from them, ie prens la pepie dune geline. Your hennes shall neuer waxe fatte tyll they be pypped." PALSG.]Pituita, CATH. et UG. in pis.
  • PYPYNE, of vyne, or grape (pe∣pyne of wyne, P.)3. [In the earlier Wicliffite version Numb. vi. 4 is thus rendered: "Newe grapes and dried they shulen not eete, alle the daies in the which of auowe to the Lord thei ben sacryd; what thing may be of vyn, of grape dried vnto the popyn (pepyn, al.) thei shulen not eete;" in the later version "grape dried til to the draf" (uva passa usque ad acinum, Vulg.) The marginal gloss is added, "in Ebreu it is, fro the rynde til to the litil greynes that ben in the myddis of the grape." "A pepyn or a grafte, acinus, fecinum, granum." CATH. ANG. "Pepin, a pippin, or kernell, the seed of frute, the stones of grapes." COTG.]Acinus, UG. vel acinum, CATH. et C. F.
  • PYPYN̄, wythe a pype. Fistulo, fistulor, UG. in fos.
  • PYPYN̄, or ȝyppe, as henn byrdys (ȝippyn, as bryddys, K. H. yepyn, P.)4. [Gaut. de Bibelesworth says, in the chapter "de naturele noyse des bestes—crapaud koaille, reine gaille, tadde croukeþ, frogge pypeþ." "To pyne as a bryrde (sic) pipiare." CATH. ANG. "Minurio, i. minutum cantare, to pype as small byrdes." ORTUS. "Pepier, to peep, to cheep, or pule, as a young bird in the neast. Pepie∣ment, the cheeping, or peeping of young birds, any such puling noise." COTG. Hence, perhaps, the phrase "at daye pype, à la pipe du jour." PALSG.]Pipio, pipulo, CATH.
  • PYPYNGE, of pypys. Fistulacio, vel fistulatus.
  • PYPYNGE, crye of yonge bryddys. Pipulatus.
  • PYRY, or storme.5. ["Pyrry, a storme of wynde, orage, bovffée de uent." PALSG. Hall, at the com∣mencement of his Chronicle of 17 Hen. VI. says, "What should I reherse the great tempestes, the sharpe blastes, the sodain piries, the vnmeasurable wyndes, the con∣tinuall raynes, whiche fell and chaunced this yere in England." W. Harrison, in the description of Britain prefixed to Holinshed's Chron. i. p. 45, observes, speaking of islands on the Eastern coast, "Forasmuch as a perrie of wind—caught hold of our sailes, and caried us forth the right waie toward London, I could not tarie to see what things were hereabouts." Cotgrave renders "Tourbillon, a gust, flaw, berrie, sudden blast or boisterous tempest of wind. Vent, a gale, flaw, or berrie of wind." Se Nares, v. Pirrie, and Jamieson, v. Pirr, a gentle breeze: Isl, oyr, ventus secundus.]Nimbus, CATH. et C. F.
  • Page  402PYRNE, of a webstarys loome (pyrne or webstars lome, P.)1. ["Pyrne, or webstars lome, mestier à tisser." PALSG. Ducange cites an ancient Glossary, in which panus is explained to be "instrumentum textoris, lignum circa quod involvitur filum," called also panucula. "Pannus est instrumentum textoris, a spytell, or a shotell pynne, or a spole. Pannicula, dim. i. manicula textricum, quia ejus discursu panni texantur." ORTUS. "Panus is a weuers roll, whereon the webbe of clothe is rolled or wounden." ELYOT.]Panus.
  • PYSSE, or pysche. Urina, minc∣tura (minccio, P.)
  • PYSSYN, or pyschyn̄. Mingo, CATH.
  • PYSSYNGE PLACE. Oletum, CATH.
  • PYSSYNGE VESSELLE. Manio∣della, (sic0) CATH. madula, C. F. madellum, CATH. et UG. sca∣phium, UG. in scando.
  • PYSMERE. Formica.
  • PYSMERYSHYLLE. Formicarium, CATH. (formicetum, P.)
  • PYSPOTT, idem quod pyssynge vessel, supra.
  • PYSTYL. Epistola.
  • PYTTE. Puteus, lacus.
  • PYT, or flasche where mekyl water (standythe after a reyne (or plasche, infra.) Columbus, C. F.
  • PYTAGRU, idem quod, pedegru, supra; et stemma, CATH. (py∣tagrwe or lyne or kinrede, Es∣temma, C. F., P.)
  • PYTAWNCE. Pietancia.
  • PYTE. Pietas.
  • PYTFALLE. Decipula, avicipula, COMM. et UG. V. in T.
  • PYTHE. Medulla, vel pulpa.
  • PYTHE, of a stalke.2. [PYTHE, or a stalke, MS. "Hilus, putamen quod adheret fabe, vel medulla penne, scilicet illud tenue quod est in medio penne." CATH. "þe pythe of a penne, ile, ilus, nauci." CATH. ANG. "Pythe of a stalke or of a tree, cuevr." PALSG.]Hilus, CATH.
  • PYTHE, of a tree. Hilum, UG. V.
  • PYTYOWS, or ful of pyte (pyte∣vous, H. pitiuous, P.) P(i)e∣ticus, compassivus.
  • PYTYOWS, or rufulle yn syȝhte. Dolorosus, penosus.
  • PLACE. Locus.
  • PLACE, of dwellynge. Mansio.
  • PLACE, or stede. Situs.
  • PLAGE. Plaga.
  • PLAYCE, fysche. Pecten.
  • PLAYSTYR for sorys. Emplastrum, CATH. malagma, cataplasma, CATH. implastrum, C. F. epi∣lema, UG. in epi.
  • PLAYSTYR for wallys (or pa(r)get, supra,) Gipsum, CATH. litura, plastrum, COMM.
  • PLAYSTERYD, as sorys. Cata∣plasmatus.
  • PLAYSTERYD, as wallys. Gip∣satus, litatus (litus, P.)
  • PLA(Y)STRYN̄ sorys. Cataplasmo, UG. in cathegoro.
  • PLA(Y)STRYN wallys. Gipso, C. F. lino, ut supra in pargettyn̄.
  • PLA(Y)STERYNGE of sorys. Ca∣taplasmacio.
  • PLA(Y)STRYNGE of wallys. Li∣tura, gipsatus.
  • PLAYTE, of a clothe. Plica, CATH. plicatura.
  • PLAYTYD. Plicatus.
  • PLAYTYN̄. Plico, CATH.
  • PLAYTYNGE. Plicacio.
  • PLANE, instrument (to makyn pleyn, H. P.) Leviga.
  • PLANE, tre. Platanus.
  • PLANETE. Planeta.
  • Page  403PLANYD. Levigatus.
  • PLANYN̄. Levigo, plano.
  • PLANYNGE. Levigacio.
  • PLANK, boord. Planca, CATH. et UG. in platos, plancula, UG. pluteum, CATH.
  • PLANTE, of a tre, or herbe. Planta, plantarium, CATH.
  • PLANTEYNE, or plawnteyn, herbe. Plantago.
  • PLANTYD. Plantatus.
  • PLANTYN̄. Planto.
  • PLANTYNGE. Plantacio.
  • PLASCHE, or flasche, where reyne watyr stondythe (or pyt, supra.)1. [In the MS. in Sir Thos. Phillipps's collection, as likewise in the printed editions, the following distinction is here made: Plasche, flasche, or broke: Torrens, lacuna. Plasche, or flasch after a rayne: Colluvio, colluvium. "Plasshe of a water, flacquet." PALSG. Elyot speaks of an herb "growynge in plashes, hauynge a lyttell stalke, whiche excedeth not foure fyngers high. It is called Heraclion syderion. Nepeta, an herbe—which of some men is called wylde peny royalle, and groweth in plasshye groundes." Harrison, in the Description of Britain, says that the preservation of fresh-water fish "is prouided for by verie sharpe lawes, not onelie in our riuers, but also in plashes, or lakes, and ponds." Holinsh. Chron. i. 224. "Lavage, a plash; a peece of land surrounded or drowned up by water. Patouillas, a plash or puddle." COTG. "A plash, lacus, lacuna." GOULDM. Bp. Kennett gives "Plashy waies, wet under foot: to plash in the dirt; all plash'd, made wet and dirty. To plash a tra∣veller, or strike up the dirt upon him. In the North ploshy, to plosh," &c. Lansd. MS. 1033. The word plash does not appear in Forby's Glossary as still retained in East Anglia; it is used by Sir T. Brown, Vulgar Errors, B. iii. c. 13, where he speaks of the "polwygle." Compare Teut. plas, plasch, lacuna; fossa in quâ stat aqua. Hence, perhaps, may be derived, some names of places, as Plashet Farm, near Lewes; Plashet, in the Essex marsh-lands; Plaistow, Pleshey.]Torrens, lacuna, C. F. colluvio, vel col(l)uvium, C. F. plassetum, COMM.
  • PLAT, or pleyne. Planus.
  • PLATE, of armure. Squama, CATH.
  • PLATE, of metalle. Lamina, vel lama, CATH. crusta, CATH. bra∣teum, vel brateola, CATH.
  • PLATE, of a fyyr herthe.2. [Compare HERTHE STOK, or kynlym̄, p. 237, and KYNLYNE, p. 275.]La∣mina, repocilium, C. F. repo∣(fo)cillium, CATH.
  • PLATERE. Parapsis, rotundale, scutella, patina, CATH.
  • PLATLY. Plane.
  • PLAW, or plawynge. Bullicio, ebullicio.
  • PLAWYN', as pottys.3. [In Norfolk, according to Forby, to plaw signifies to parboil; the phrase, give meat a plaw, denotes a slight boiling. Ray, in the South and East Country words, gives "To play, spoken of a pot, kettle, or other vessel full of liquor, i. e. to boil; playing hot, boiling hot. In Norfolk they pronounce it plaw." The word is used in the fol∣lowing recipe for making vinegar, Sloane MS. 3548, f. 16, vo: "Take a pot ful of wyne, and steke yt wele aboue þat no þynges go ynne nor owte, and put it ynne a cowdrun ful of water, and layt yt play longe þerin, and yt schal be gode ayselle sone." Compare OVYRPLAW, p. 373.]Bullio, ferveo.
  • PLAWYN̄ OVYR. Efferveo, ebullio.
  • PLAUNCHERE.4. [This term is taken directly from the French. "Plancher made of bordes, planché." PALSG. In a letter written during the siege of Caistor castle, about 1459, complaint is made that "ye holys yat ben made for hand gunnys ben scarse kne hey fro ye plawncher." Paston Letters, iv. 316. According to Forby, a boarded floor is still called in Norfolk a plancher. Hence, doubtless, the term plansher-nail. See Jamieson.]Plancula, CATH. in planca.
  • Page  404PLAUNCHERYD. Planculatus.
  • (PLAWNTEYNE, supra in plan∣teyne, herbe, P. Plantago.)
  • PLEE, of motynge. Placitum, CATH.
  • PLEGGE, as a wedde (or oostage, infra.) Obses, CATH. vas, CATH. pligius, Latinum est Anglie et non alibi.
  • PLEY. Ludus, jocus.
  • PLEY, or somyr game. Spec∣taculum.
  • PLEY (or ioy, supra) þat begyn∣nythe wythe myrthe, and end∣ythe wythe sorowe. Tragedia, UG. in oda.
  • PLEY (or ioy, supra) þat begyn∣nythe wythe (mornynge and S.) sorow, and endythe wythe myrthe.1. ["Comedia, a toun song. Comedus, a writer of toun songus." MED. "Playe, an enterlude, farce. Play sport, carolle, deduit, esbat. Playe of sadde matters, moralité. Commedy of a christmas playe, commedie Playe maker, facteur, factiste. Player in a playe, parsonnage. Player or goer vpon a corde, batellevr." PALSG.]Comedia, UG. in oda.
  • PLEYARE. Lusor.
  • PLEYARE, þat alwey wyl pley. Ludibundus, ludibunda.
  • PLEYAR, at the bal. Pililudius, CATH.
  • PLEYFERE.2. [In the account of Jephtha's daughter, as rendered in the Wicliffite version, it is said, "And whanne sche hadde go wiþ hir felowis and pleiferis (sodalibus, Vulg.) sche biwepte hir maidenhed in þe hillis." Judges, xi. 38. "Playfere, mignon." PALSG. Fere, a companion, is a word used by Chaucer, as also the expression "in fere," in com∣pany; Cant. T. 4748, 4814. Hall, in his relation of the death of James II. of Scotland, in 1460, says, that, having slain the Douglases, "thynking himself a kyng without either peere or fere," he assembled a great army, and laid siege to Roxburghe castle, where he perished by the bursting of one of his own cannon, 38 Hen. VI. Ang.-Sax. foera, ȝeféra, socius.]Collusor.
  • PLEYYN̄. Ludo.
  • PLEYYN̄ at the bal. Pililudo.
  • PLEYYN̄ BUK HYDE.3. [This ancient name of the sport of hide and seek has not been noticed by Strutt. "All hidde, jeu ou un se cache pour estre trouvé des autres." SHERW. "Cline∣muçette, the game called Hod-mad-blind; Harry-racket, or, are you all hid. Capifou, a play which is not much unlike our Harry-racket, or Hidman-blind." COTG.]Angulo, C. F. in exangulatus, deliteo, CATH.
  • PLEYYNGE. Collusio, lusus.
  • PLEYYNGE GARMENT. Ludix, UG. in ludo.
  • PLEYYNGE PLACE (pleyinge in place, P.) Diludium, CATH.
  • PLEYYNGE THYNGE, or thynge þat menn or chyldyr pley wythe. Adluricum, UG. in agri vel adros. Nota supra in laykyne.
  • (PLEYKSTARE, infra in why(t)|star. Candidarius.)4. [Jamieson gives To pleche, or bleach; Pleching, bleaching.]
  • PLEYNE.5. [In the MS. PLEYNE is found placed between pleyfere and pleyynge: possibly it had been written pleyyn by the first hand. The King's Coll. MS. reads pleyin place, and pleyint. PLEYNYN̄ likewise occurs in the MS. between plawyn and pleyyn̄, pos∣sibly because it had been written originally pleyynyn̄.]Planus.
  • PLEYNE, place. Planicies.
  • PLEYNYN̄. Conqueror, causor.
  • Page  405PLEYNT. Querimonia, querela.
  • PLECKE, or plotte.1. [In the Master of the Game, Harl. MS. 5086, f. 47, vo, in the chapter on hare∣hunting, instructions are given in case the hunter "se that the hare hathe be at pasture in grene corne, or in eny other plek, and hys houndes fynde of hire." Pleck is given by Cole, Ray, and Grose as a North-country word, signifying a place, and is likewise noticed by Tim Bobbin. Ang.-Sax. plaec, platea.]Porciuncula.
  • PLENTE. Abundancia, copia, plenitudo.
  • PLENTE, of frutys. Ubertas, fer∣tilitas.
  • PLENTYVOWS. Copiosus, fertilis, abundans.
  • PLENTYVOWS, yn frutys (or other lyke, K.) Ubertuosus, CATH. fertilis (fecundus, P.)
  • PLENTYVOWSNESSE, idem quod plente, supra.
  • PLESAWNS, or plesynge. Com∣placencia, beneplacitum.
  • PLESAUNT (or plesyng, K.) Com∣placens, beneplacens.
  • (PLESAWNTLY, K.) Placenter, complacenter, placa(bili)ter.
  • PLESYN̄. Placeo.
  • PLETARE. Placitor, causidicus, causarius, C. F.
  • PLETYN̄. Placitor, CATH.
  • PLETYNGE. Placitacio.
  • PLETYNGE HOWSE, or place. Placitorium, CATH.
  • PLYAUNT (or beyn, supra, or supple, infra.) Flexibilis, len∣tus, C. F.
  • PLYTE, or state (plight, P.) Status.
  • PLYGHTYN̄ TRUTHE (plityn trwthe, K. trouthe, P.) Affido, CATH.
  • (PLOMERE, or plumber, infra. Plumbarius.)
  • PLOT, idem quod plek, supra.
  • PLOW. Aratrum, caruca, C. F.
  • PLOWBEEM. Buris, C. F. temo. CATH. et UG. in telon.
  • PLOWYNGE, or erynge. Aracio (aratura, P.)
  • PLOWLOND. Carrucata, C. F.
  • PLOWLOND, þat a plow may tylle on̄ a day. Jugerum, C. F. juger.
  • PLOWMANNE. Arator, carru∣carius, C. F. georgicus, CATH. glebo, C. F.
  • PLOWSTERT.2. ["Plowe handell, manche. Plowe starte, manche. Ploughe beem, queve de la charrue, mancheron." PALSG. "A ploghe handylle, stina." CATH. ANG. Compare STERT.]Stina, CATH.
  • PLOW WRYH̄TE. Carrucarius, DICC.
  • PLOVERE (bryd, S.) Pluviarius, DICC.
  • PLOWME. Prunum.
  • PLOWRYN̄, or wepyn. Ploro, fleo, CATH.
  • PLOWRYNGE, or wepynge. Plo∣ratus, fletus, lacrimacio.
  • PLUK, or plukkynge. Tractus.
  • PLUKKYN̄ bryddys. Excatheriso, UG. in scateo, deplumo, ex∣penno (depenno, excatariso, P.)
  • PLUKKYN̄, or pulle frute. Vellico, CATH. avello.
  • PLUKKYNGE, or pullynge of fowlys. Expennacio, vel ex∣pennatus, deplumacio.
  • PLUMBE, of leed. Plumbum.
  • PLUMBE, of wryhtys or masonys (plumme of carpentrye, or ma∣sonrye, K. P.)3. [PLUMBE, or wryhtys, MS. Palsgrave makes the like distinction between the car∣penter's plumb-line, "riglet," and the mariner's lead, "plomb de sonde." The plummet was used in ancient times as an instrument of torture, and also as a weapon. It is said in the Golden Legend that "the Provost of Rome dyde so bete St. Urban wt plummettes." Horman remarks that "Champyons smyte at eche other with plum∣metȝ of leed sowed in leather."]Perpendiculum, C. F.
  • Page  406PLUMBE, of schypmen. Bolidis, vel bolis, C. F.
  • PLUMBER, or plomere. Plum∣barius.
  • PLUMTRE. Prunus.
  • PLUNKET (coloure, K. P.)

    1. "Plonkete," or in another MS. "blunket," occurs in the Awntyrs of Arthure, and is explained by Sir F. Madden as signifying a white stuff.

    "Hir belte was of plonkete, withe birdis fulle baulde."

    In Mr. Robson's edition "blenket," st. xxix.; possibly the white stuff called in French blanchet. "Ploncket colour, blev." PALSG. "Caesius, graye of colour, or blunkette. Scyricum, blonket colour, or light wachet. Venetus, lyght blewe, or blunket." ELYOT. "Couleur pers, skie colour, a blunket or light blue." COTG. The old Gloss on Spenser's Sheph. Cal. May, explains it as signifying grey. See Nares, and Jamieson, v. Bloncat.

    Ja∣cinctus.
  • (PODAGRE, or potacre, infra, seke∣nesse. Potagra.)
  • (PODEL, or poyel, slothe, infra. Lacuna.)
  • POETE. Poeta.
  • POETRYE. Poetria.
  • POYN̄TE. Punctus, CATH. vel punctum, CATH.
  • POYNTE, of a scharpe toole (poynte of egge, or, &c. S.) Cuspis, mucro, pennum, CATH. et C. F.
  • POYNTEL.

    2. The poyntel, formed of metal, or other hard material, was used like the Roman stilus for writing upon portable tablets, or writing-tables. It appears in the well∣known portraits of Chaucer, and is appended by a little lace to the lowest of three buttons which serve to close the fent of the collar of his gown at the throat. Copies of this interesting portrait are found in Roy. MS. 17, D. VI., f. 90, vo: Harl. MS. 4866, f. 88; Lansd. MS. 851, and Add. MS. 5141. The last has been taken as the subject of a plate in Shaw's Dresses and Decorations. Chaucer describes the Limitour in his progress, who preached and begged alms as he went, whilst his attendant was furnished with

    "A pair of tables all of ivory,
    And a pointel ypolished fetisly,
    And wrote alway the names, as he stood,
    Of alle folk that yave hem any good."

    Sompn. Tale, v. 7324.

    A beautiful ivory pointel, of the workmanship of the earlier part of the fourteenth cen∣tury, formerly in the Du Sommerard Collection, is preserved in the Musée des Thermes, at Paris. It is stated in the Golden Legend that "a grefe (or greffe) is properly called a pointell to wryte in tables of waxe." St. Felix was killed by his scholars therewith. Horman, in his chapter on writing, mentions the various materials of which pointels were formed: "Poyntillis of yron, and of siluer, bras, boone, or stoone, hauynge a pynne at the ende, be put in theyr case (graphiario.)" "Poyntell or caracte, esplingue de fer." PALSG. Bishop Kennett, in his Glossarial Collections, gives "Poitrel, a stile or writing instrument, with one end sharp, and the other broad." Lansd. MS. 1033.

    Stilus, graphium, CATH. vel graphius, CATH.
  • POYNTYD, or prykkyd. Punc∣tatus (punctus, P.)
  • Page  407POYNTYD, or peyntyd, or por∣trayed. Pictus.
  • POYNTON̄, or pawson̄, yn redynge. Pauso.
  • POYNTON̄, or portrayyn̄ (or peyntyn̄, supra.) Pingo (de∣pingo, K.)
  • (POYNTYN, K. P. Puncto.)
  • POYNTYNGE, or prykkynge. Punc∣tacio (prisacio, S.)
  • POYNTYNGE, or pawsynge in re∣dynge. Punctuacio, pausacio.
  • POYNTYNGE, or portrayynge (or peyntynge, supra.)1. [Poyntynge, or portarynge, MS. portrayynge, S. portrayinge, P.]Pictura.
  • POYNTOWRE, or peyntoure. Pic∣tor.
  • POYSE. Poema.
  • POYSONE. Intoxicum, mortife∣rum, venificum, C. F. virus.
  • POYSENYD. Intoxicatus, viru∣lentus, C. F.
  • POYSENYNGE. Intoxicacio.
  • POYS(N)YN̄, supra in impoysyn̄, in I.2. [This word is placed in the MS. amongst the verbs between Poyelon̄ (sic, Poþelon̄?) and Powderon̄. The word appears to have been misplaced; the reference also is erro∣neously given in the MS. to the word impoysyn̄, instead of inpoysyon̄, or poysnyn̄, as written in the MS. under the letter I. See p. 262.] (Intoxico.)
  • POOKE (or poket, or walette, in∣fra.) Sacculus.
  • POKKE, sekenesse. Porrigo, C. F. et CATH. variolus, vel morbulus, secundum medicos; cesia, UG. V. in C. contagium, UG. V. in L.
  • POKBROKYN̄'. Porriginosus.
  • POKET, idem quod POOK.
  • POL, or heed. Caput.
  • POL, of carpentrye (polere, or carpentrye, S.)3. [This term seems here to designate the capial or head of a pillar, which in like manner was called in French chef. In the Catholicon it is said that "capitella di∣cuntur que superponuntur columnis, quia columnarum sunt capita, quasi super collum caput; que Grece dicuntur epistilia."]Capitellum.
  • POOL, or ponde of watyr.4. [POOLE, or poot, MS. ponde, K. S. P.]Stag∣num.
  • POOL, or ponde for fysche kep∣ynge. Vivarium, C. F. stagnum.
  • POLAYLE, bryddys, or fowlys (or pullayly, infra.) Altilis, C. F.
  • POLAYLE, made fette. Altile, C. F.
  • POLAX. Bipennis.
  • POLBERE, corne, idem quod hasty∣bere.5. [See the note on HASTYBERE, p. 228. This appears to have been a kind of barley which ripened in the third month after it was sown, and thence, probably, called trimensis.] (Trimensis.)
  • POLKAT, idem quod fulmere.6. [PULKAT, MS. Polcat, see fulmarde, K.]
  • POLE, longe rodde. Contus, per∣tica, C. F. (contortus, P.)
  • POLEYNE.7. [The first of the Latin words here given is written in the MS. torclea; the other MSS. and Pynson's edition give troclea, but neither of these words is found in the Catholicon, in which is given the following explanation: "a trochos dicitur trochea, i. torcular; vel rota modica super puteum; vel illud quod apponitur malo navis, quia habet rotulas per quas funes trahuntur." The Ortus gives "Torclea, a wyndas or pressoure, vel parva rota super puteum." The term pulley (Fr. poulie) is written by Chaucer "polive," according to the reading which has been usually given. Squire's Tale, v. 10,948. POLEYNE may possibly be taken from the diminutive poulion, a little pulley. In Pynson's and the other editions the word is printed Poleyn. Palsgrave gives "Pullayne, povllane."]Troclea, CATH. car∣chesia, CATH. trochea, CATH.
  • POLLYD, or forcyd. Capitonsus.
  • Page  408POLLYNGE. Capitonsio, capi∣tonsura.
  • POLYPODYE, herbe. Polipodia, C. F.
  • POLKE (of watyr, K.) or pul yn a watur (pulk water, H. polke or pulke water, P.)

    1. Vertex MS. vortex, P. "Vortex est revoluto aquarum." ORTUS.

    "Ther was swilke dreping of the folk,
    That on the feld was neuere a polk,
    That it ne stod of blod so ful,
    That the strem ran intil the hul."

    Havelok, v. 2685.

    "Scrobs, idem qu. fossa, a deche or a polke." Harl. MS. 1002, f. 148, vo. Sir Thomas Browne, in his account of fish taken on the coast of Norfolk, speaks of congers, which, in frosty weather, upon the ebb of the tide, are left in "pulks and plashes" on the Northern coast. The word is still used in Norfolk and Suffolk, and signifies a hole full of mud, a shallow place containing water. See Forby and Moor. Ray includes it amongst North-country words, and Jennings gives it as retained in Somersetshire.

    Vortex, C. F.
  • POLWYGLE, wyrme.2. [Sir Thomas Browne, in his Vulgar Errors, makes mention of "the Aquatile or water-frog, whereof in ditches and standing plashes we may behold many millions every spring in England," produced from spawn which becomes "that which the ancients called Gyrinus, we a Porwigle, or Tadpole." B. iii. c. 13. Forby gives Purwiggy, a tadpole, and polliwig, which he considers to be a corruption of the former word. Moor, however, states that the tadpole is called a pollywiggle in Suffolk. The fishermen of the Thames have given the name polewig to the spotted goby. Yarrell, i. 258. The tadpole was also called in former times a poled, or pole-head. In the Latin-English Vocabu∣lary, Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. f. 55, vo, occur under "Nomina vermium, Lumbricus, Pole, hede; Rullus, (?) Polhed." Palsgrave gives "poled, a yonge tode, cauesot. Polet, the blacke thynge that a tode cometh of, cauesot," and cavesot is rendered by Cotgrave "a pole-head, or bull-head, the little black vermine whereof toads and frogs do come."]
  • POMEGARNET, frute. Pomum granatum, vel malum grana∣tum.
  • POMEYS, or pomyce. Pomex, CATH. fingia, C. F. (finga, P.)
  • POMEL, of a swerde, or knyfe. Tolus, DICC. et C. F.
  • PONDE, idem quod pool, supra. (Stagnum, vivarium, P.)
  • PONYAWNT. Acutus, acer.
  • PONYET, of a sleue (ponyed, P.)3. ["Mantus, a myteyn, or a mantell." ORTUS. "A punȝet, permanica" (sic.) CATH. ANG. "Poygniet for ones sleues, poignet." PALSG. Matilda, wife of John de Smeeton of York, tanner, bequeathed, A.D. 1402, "ij. flammeola de Cipres, et j. lampas volet, et j. par de ponyets de scarlet." Testam. Ebor. i. 289. Compare CUFFE, p. 106, and MYTEYNE, p. 340.]Premanica, mantus, C. F. (et CATH. maricus, S.)
  • POOPE. Papa.
  • POPELERE, byrd (or schovelerd, infra.)4. [Sir Richard de Scrop, in 1400, bequeathed "aulam de poplers tentam, et lectum integrum cum costeris de rubeo, cum poplers et armis meis broudatum." Test. Ebor. i. 276. This bird, as likewise the parrot, seems to have been a favourite ornament, in∣troduced on tapestry or embroidered works. It is again mentioned in the Inventory of Sir John Fastolfe's effects, taken 1459, "Clothis of Arras, and of Tapstre warke. Item, ij. clothis portrayed full of popelers;" and again, in one of the bed-chambers, "Item, j. hangyng clothe of Popelers." Archaeol. xxi., pp. 258, 264. It appears sub∣sequently that the POPELERE was considered by the compiler of the Promptorium to be the same as the shoveler-duck, Anas clypeata, Linn.; and it may be observed that in medieval decorations such birds were not unfrequently represented, as appears by the Caistor inventory, above cited, the vestments discovered at Durham, attributed to St. Cuthbert, and the entry in the Bursar's accounts, given by Mr. Raine, respecting an altar there, on "le rerdos" of which were depicted the eider-ducks, termed the birds of St. Cuthbert.]Populus.
  • POPLERE, or popultre. Populus.
  • Page  409POPY, weed. Papaver, codia, C. F. nigella, C. F. git.
  • POPYN, chylde of clowtys (or moppe, supra.)1. [Forby gives the words Poppin, a puppet, and poppin-shew, as still retained in use in Norfolk. He supposes it to be derived from "Popin, spruce, neat, briske, prettie." COTG. It may more properly, perhaps, be derived from poupon, a baby. "Popet for childre to play with, povpée." PALSG.]Pupa, CATH.
  • POPYN IAY, byrd. P(s)itacus, CATH.
  • POPUL TRE, idem quod poplere, supra.
  • PORCHE. Porticus, UG. vestibu∣lum, C. F. et CATH.
  • PORCYONE. Porcio, quantitas.
  • PORE, hole yn a beestys flesche. Porus.
  • PORE, nedy. Pauper, codrus (indigens, S. P.)
  • PORE MANNE, or womann. Pau∣per, pauperculus, paupercula.
  • PORRE, or purre, potage (pese potage, S.)2. ["Porray, porreta, porrata." CATH. ANG. This term implies generally pease pottage, still called in French purée, and the treatises on ancient cookery contain numerous recipes for its concoction See the instructions of the chief master-cook of Richard II., regarding "Perrey of pensone," Forme of Cury, p. 39, and the recipe for "Blaunche perreye," Harl. MS. 279, f. 25. It has, however, other significations. In the Canterbury MS. of the Medulla occurs "porrata, porrey," with this marginal ad∣dition, attributed to Somner, "ȝesoden wyrt mete." According to the Ortus it seems to have denoted a pottage of leeks, "poratum est cibus de poris factus, Anglice por∣raye;" and in a curious MS. at Middle Hill, formerly in the Heber Collection, 8336, it appears that the dish called "rampaunt poree" was chiefly compounded of pears. Poreta or poirata signify, according to Ducange, leek-pottage, and likewise the vege∣table called beet, in French poirée, or porrée. It is related in the Golden Legend that St. Bernard was so frugal that often he made pottage of holm leaves; whereat a de∣moniac being brought to him, the evil spirit thus reviled the saint: "Thou eter of porrette, wenest yu for to take me oute of my hous? Nay, thou shalt, not."]Piseum, vel pisea, CATH.
  • PORET, herbe (or leek, supra.) Porrum, C. F. et in plur. porri, CATH.
  • POORGYN̄, or clensyn̄. Purgo, purifico.
  • PORYN̄ IN. Infundo.
  • (PORYN OWT, K. Effundo.)
  • PORYNGE YN̄'. Infusio.
  • POORK, flesche. Suilla, C. F.
  • POORK POYNT, beste (or perpoynt, supra; porpeys, K. porpoynte, S.) Histrix, CATH. et C. F.
  • POORT, of cowntenawnce. Gestus.3. [Histrix usually signifies an hedge-hog, as in the Ortus, "Histrix est animal spinosum, an vrchen." Palsgrave gives "Porkepyn, a beest, porc espin." The porcupine appears to have been known in England at an early period: it is described by the ap∣pellation strix in the account of the park formed at Woodstock by Henry I., as given by Will. Malms. lib. v. p. 161. He speaks of it as a native of Africa, and states that it was sent to the King by "Willielmo de monte Pislerio." Stowe mentions also the "porpentines," and divers strange beasts which were sent from far countries, and pre∣served in the royal park at Woodstock. In the original edition of Hamlet this animal is termed a "porpentine," and the name occurs likewise in Machyn's Diary, 1552, edited for the Camden Society by Mr. John Gough Nichols, p. 31, where the crest of Sir W. Sidney is said to have been a "porpentyn."]
  • Page  410POORT, havene, idem quod havene, supra.
  • PORTAGE, of berynge. Portagium, latura, vectura.
  • POORT COLYCE. Antephalarica, KYLW. secerniculum.
  • PORTEN AUNCE, of a thynge. Per∣tinencia, in plurali excidie.
  • PORTERE. Janitor, portarius.
  • POORTOS, booke. Portiforium, breviarium.
  • PORTOWRE. Portitor, portator, gestor, calo, bajulus, C. F.
  • (PORTRAYYN̄, or peyntyn̄, or poynton̄, supra. Pingo.)
  • PORTRATOWRE, or pycture. Pic∣tura.
  • POS, or depos (wed, H. P.)1. [See Jamieson, v. Pose.]De∣positum.
  • POSE (or sneke, infra.)2. [In Norfolk a cold in the head is still, according to Forby, called a pose. This word is used by Chaucer, Cant. T. v. 4150, 17,011. The following remedy for a rheum is given in a manual of miscellaneous collections, Add. MS. 12,195: "For the pose: Take smale note kernelys, and roost hem, and ete hem with a lytyl powder of peper whane thou gost to bedde." Andrew Boorde says, in the Breviary of Health, "Coriza—in English it is named the pose, or reume, stopping or opilating the nosethrilles that a man can not smell," c. 91; and again, c. 306, "of the pose or snyke: Rupia is the Latin word. In English it is named the pose." "þe pose, brancus, caterrus, coriza." CATH. ANG. "Coriza est morbus narium, i. e. prefocatio, Anglice the pose. Ca∣tarrus est fluxus reumatis jugis ex naribus, the pose." ORTUS. "Pose in the nose, rime. Pose dysease, caterre. You have caught ye pose, me thynke, you be so horce. Sneke, pose, rime. Ryme, the reume of the heed, rime." PALSG. "The pose, or rheum, or sickness in the head, coriza, gravedo, catarrhus. That hath or causeth the murr, or pose, gravedinosus." GOULDM. "Rheume, a catharre, pose, mur." COTG. See Nares. Ang.-Sax. ȝepose, gravedo, dolor capitis.]Catar∣rus, C. F. corisa, C. F.
  • POSSESSYONE. Possessio.
  • POSNET.3. ["A posnett, orca, orcicula, urceus." CATH. ANG. "Aenulum, a posnet." ORTUS. "Posnet, a lytell potte." PALSG. "Casole, a posnet." COTG. This term is thus used by Horman, "Seth this in a possenet (anxilla) by hymself." Grose explained it as denoting a small iron pot with a handle on the side, and in the Craven Dialect it sig∣nifies a boiler. See Nares and Jamieson.]Urcius, DICC. urciolus, orca, CATH. (urcinus, P.)
  • POSSON̄, or schowe forthe (pocyn, K. pressyn, or showen, P.) Pello.
  • POSSON̄, presson̄, or schowe to∣gedur. Trudo, C. F.
  • POSSOT. Balducta, CATH. (ef∣frotum, UG. S.)
  • POOST, of an howse. Postis.
  • POSTERNE, ȝate. Posticum, C. F. COMM. posterula, postica, CATH. et C. F. posticus, COMM.
  • Page  411POSTYME, sekenesse. Apostema.
  • POTTE. Olla, urna, orca.
  • POTACRE, or podagre, sekenesse. Potagra.
  • POTACRE, manne, or woman. Po∣tagricus, COMM.
  • POTTARE. Ollarius, C. F. figulus.
  • POTTARYS ERTHE. Argilla, BRIT.
  • POTEL, mesure. Potellus, vel po∣tellum, laguncula, CATH.
  • POTENT, or crotche.1. ["Potence, a gibbit; also a crutch for a lame man." COTG. See Ducange, v. Po∣tentia. Chaucer termed the "tipped staf," carried by the itinerant Limitour, a "potent." Sompnoure's Tale, 7358. Compare R. of Rose, 368, 7417; Vision of P. Ploughman, 5092.]Podium, C. F.
  • POTSPONE, or ladyl. Concus, DICC. coclear, C. F.
  • POWCE, veyne. Pulsus.
  • POWCHE. Marsupium.
  • POWDYR. Pulvis.
  • POWDERYD, wythe salte. Salitus.
  • POWDERON̄. Condio, CATH.
  • POWDERYNGE, wythe powder. Pulverisacio.
  • POWER, or strengthe (strenkyþ, S.) Potestas, robus, fortitudo, nisus, vigor.
  • POWERE, of auctoryte. Auctoritas, jurisdictio.
  • POVERTE. Paupertas, pauperies.
  • POVERTE, and nede. Penuria, egestas (indigencia, inedia, in∣opia, P.)
  • POWLE, propyr name. Paulus.
  • POWMPERE, frute.2. [Palsgrave gives "Poumper frute," without any French word. Parkinson describes the "Pomipyrus, the pome-peare, or apple-peare, which is a small peare, but round at both ends like an apple." Compare PEERE APPLE, pirumpomum, above, p. 394.]Pomumpirum.
  • POWNE, of the chesse. Pedinus.
  • POWNDE, of wyghte. Libra.
  • POWPE, holstykke (hole styke, S.)3. [A pop-gun. Campulus, or caupulus, properly signifies a small boat, formed of a hollow tree, "caupillus, lignum cavatum, quasi cymba," according to Papias. See Ducange. "Poupe for a chylde, Povpée." PALSG.]Cāpulus, C. F. (copulus, S. cau∣pulus, P.)
  • POYEL, slothe, or podel (pothel, H.) Lacuna.
  • POYELON̄, or pothelyn̄, or grubbyn̄ yn the erthe. Fodito, CATH. fodio.
  • POWNSON̄ (poyntyn, K.P.) Puncto.
  • PRAY. Preda.
  • PRAYEL (prayȝel, H. prayyle, S. praysell, P.)4. [A little meadow, from the old French praiel. Caxton says, in the Boke for Tra∣vellers, "Rolande the handwerker shall make my pryelle (prayel, Fr.) an hegge aboute."]Pratellus.
  • PRANE, fysche. Stingus.
  • PRANKYD, as clothys.5. [Palsgrave gives ths verb "I pranke one's gowne, I set the plyghtes in order, ie mets le plies dune robe à poynt. Se yonder olde man his gowne in pranked as if he were but a yonge man." Compare Germ. Prangen, ornatum arrogantius osten∣dere, Wacht.; Belg. Pronken. Spenser speaks of some who "prancke their ruffes." Pranked signifies, in Hampshire, dressed out finely, and to prenk, in the Craven Dialect, is to dress in a showy manner.]Plicatus.
  • PRANKYNGE. Plicacio.
  • PRANK, of prankynge. Plica, plicatura.
  • PRATY. Elegans, formosus, ele∣gantulus, formulosus.
  • Page  412PRAWNCYNGE, or skyppynge. Sa∣litus (saltus, S. P.)
  • PRECYN̄ IN (prencyn or precyn, W.) Ingero.
  • PRECHYN̄. Predico, evangelizo.
  • PRECHYNGE. Predicacio.
  • PRECHOWRE. Predicator.
  • PRECYOWS. Preciosus.
  • PRECIOWSNESSE (or preciowste, P.) Preciositas.
  • PRECIOWS STONE, Gemma, CATH. vel lapis preciosus.
  • PREEF, or proof of a thynge. Probacio (temptacio, P.)
  • PREEF, or a-say(y)nge. Exami∣nacio.1. [Exarācō, MS. Compare the verb PREVYN̄, examino.]
  • PREYARE, or he that preyythe. Orator, exorator, deprecator, oratrix, etc.
  • PREYYD. Deprecatus, oratus, ex∣oratus.
  • PREYERE. Oracio, supplicacio, deprecacio, exoracio.
  • PREYYN̄, or besekyn̄ (preyyn, or preyȝyn, H. preyen or preysen, P.) Oro, supplico, exoro, in∣tercedo, obsecro.
  • PREYSABLE, or commendable. Laudabilis, commendabilis.
  • PREYSYD. Laudatus, commen∣datus.
  • PREYSYN̄. Commendo, laudo.
  • PREYSYNGE. Laus, laudacio, pre∣conium (commendacio, P.)
  • PRELATE. Prelatus, prelata.
  • PREMOSTER, whyȝte chanōn (Pre∣monster, H. P.) Premonstrensis.
  • PREENTE (prend, K. preynt, s.) Effigies, impressio (signacu∣lum, P.)
  • PRENTYCE. Apprenticius.
  • PREENTYN̄. Imprimo (infigo, P.)
  • PREES, or thronge. Pressura.
  • PRESAWNTE, ȝyfte. Encennium, nefrendicium, CATH. excen∣nium, KYLW.
  • PRESSE, or pyle of clothe. Pan∣niplicium, pressorium, CATH. involucrum.
  • PRESSE, for grapys, or oþer lyke. (presse of lycoure, P.) Tor∣cular, prelum, C. F. pressorium. CATH.
  • PRESEDENT. Presidens (prece∣dens, P.)
  • PRESENT, or now yn thys place, or tyme. Presens.
  • PRESENTYN̄. Presento.
  • PRESSYN̄. Premo, comprimo, presso, CATH.
  • PRESSE DOWNE. Deprimo, re∣primo.
  • PRESSYNGE. Compressio.
  • PREESTE. Sacerdos, presbiter, capellanus.
  • PREESTHOOD. Presbiteratus (sa∣cerdocium, P.)
  • PRESUMPTUOWSE, or bolde, or malapert (ouer bolde, P.) Pre∣sumptuosus.
  • (PRESUMPTUOWSNES, K. Pre∣sumptuositas.)
  • PRESSURE, idem quod presse.
  • PREVYN̄, or provyn̄. Probo.
  • PREVYN̄, or a-sayyn̄. Examino, tempto, attempto.
  • PREVYN̄, or chevyn̄, supra in C. chevyn̄ (prevyn, or shewyn, supra in cheryn, S.)2. [Compare PROVYN̄, or chevyn̄, prosperor: PROW, or profyte. See also the note on CHEVYN̄, or thryvyn, vigeo, P. 73. See Forby, v. Prove.]
  • PREVYNGE. Probacio.
  • Page  413PRYCE. Precium.
  • (PRICYNGE, K. prisinge, P. Lici∣tacio.)
  • PRYDE. Superbia, fastus, elacio, ambicio.
  • PRYDYN̄, or wax prowde. Su∣perbio.
  • PRYK, or prykyl (prykkar, S.) Stimulus, stiga, CATH.
  • PRYKKE, merke. Meta.
  • PRYKE, or pynne. Spintrum, vel spinter, cavilla.
  • PRYKKE, for pakkys. Broccus, UG. in bromus.
  • PRYKARE, of hors. Cursitator.
  • PRYKYL (or tyynde, infra.) Sti∣mulus, aculeus; idem quod pryk.
  • PRYKET, beest (prik, S.) Ca∣priolus.
  • PRYKET, of a candylstykke, or other lyke (pryket of a candell weyke, P.)1. [Candlesticks in ancient times were not fashioned with nozzles, but with long spikes or prykets. Representations of such candlesticks are given in Archaeologia, xiv. 279, xv. 402, xxiii. 317, xxviii. 441, Didron's Ann. Archéol. tome iii., and Shaw's Dresses and Decorations. In the description of the supper, in the Awntyrs of Arthure, "preketes, and broketes, and standertis" are mentioned, placed at intervals on the table; brochettes being tapers fixed, in the same manner as prykets, upon a broche, or spike. In the Memoriale of Henry prior of Canterbury, A.D. 1285, the term "prikett" denotes not the candlestick, but the candle, formed with a corresponding cavity at one end, whereby it was securely fixed upon the spike. Cott. MS. Galba, E. IV. f. 45. See the note on CHAWNDELERE, p. 71, where "preketes" are men∣tioned amongst various kinds of candles.]Stiga, CATH. (faga, P.)
  • PRYKYN̄ hors. Cursito.
  • PRYKKYN̄ wythe a prykke, or a scharpe thynge, as bokys (prykkyn with a prekyl, H.) Pungo, CATH. stimulo.
  • (PRYKKYN, or poynten, H. P. Puncto.)
  • (PRIKKYN, or punchyn, as men doþ beestis, S. Pungo.)
  • PRYKYNGE, of hors. Cursitacio.
  • PRYKKYNGE. Punctio, stimu∣lacio, punctura.
  • PRYLLE, or whyrlegygge, as chyl∣derys pley (or spylkok, infra: prille of chyldrys pleyynge, K. whyrgyg, S.)2. ["Giraculum, Anglicè a chyldes whyrle, or a hurre, cum quo pueri ludunt." ORTUS. In the Medulla, Harl. MS. 2257, it is rendered "a pirlle."]Giraculum, CATH.
  • PRYME. Prima.
  • PRYMERE. Primarius.
  • PRYMEROSE. Primula, calen∣dula, ligustrum, CATH.
  • PRYNCE. Princeps.
  • PRYNCE, of prestys. Arabarcus, in Historiâ Scolasticâ ha∣betur.
  • PRYYNCESSE. Principissa.
  • PRYNCYPAL. Principalis, pre∣cipuus.
  • PRINCYPALY.3. [This, and a few other words, written, as likewise the corresponding Latin terms, with the contraction pi—, are printed here in extenso, in accordance with the usual power of that contraction. In no case, however, in the Harl. MS., where a word is not contracted, has the scribe written Pri—, but invariably Pry.]Principaliter.
  • PRINCYPALYTE. Principalitas.
  • PRYOWRE. Prior.
  • PRYOWRESSE. Priorissa.
  • PRIOWRY (prioryte, P.) Prio∣ratus (prioritas, P.)
  • PRYSARE, or settar at price, yn̄ a merket, or oþer placys. Me∣taxarius, C. F., lici(t)ator, tax∣ator, CATH.
  • Page  414PRYSYN̄, or settyn̄ a pryce.

    1. "I prise ware, I sette a price of a thyng what it is worthe, Ie aprise. Medyll of yt you haue to do, and prise nat my ware." PALSG. "Prisier: estimer, en bas Lat. prisare." ROQUEF. In the Epitaph on Philip Marner, who died 1587, and was buried at Northleach, this verb is used in the sense of to reword.

    "In lent by wyll a sermon he divised,
    And yerely precher with a noble prised."
    Taxo, metaxo, CATH. licitor, C. F. et UG. in taxo.
  • PRYSYNGE. Li(ci)tatio, CATH.
  • PRYSON̄ (or presvn, H. P.) Car∣cer, ergastulum.
  • PRYSON̄, or put yn pryson̄ (pry∣sonyn, K.) Incarcero.
  • PRYSONERE (or presonere, H. P.) Incarceratus, incarcerata, priso, secundum Latinum An∣glicanum.
  • PRYSONER, takyn̄, and yeldyn̄ yn warre. Daticius, C. F. (cap∣tivus, P.)
  • PRYSONER, takyn̄ be stronge hande, nott yolde wylfully. Mancens, C. F. et CATH. captivus.
  • PRYVY CHAWMYR (chambyr, S.) Conclave.
  • PRYVY, or gonge (or kocay, supra.) Latrina, cloaca, ypo∣dromium, CATH. et C. F.
  • PRIVY HATE, yn mannys here.2. [PRIVY LATE, MS. Preuyhate, P.]Mistrum, C. F. et UG. in mistis.
  • PRYVY, nowt knowyn̄ (priuy, hid, K.) Occultus, secretus.
  • PRYVY, yn vnderstondynge. Mis∣ticus, archanus.
  • PRIVYD, or deprivyd. Privatus, orbatus, C. F.
  • PRYVYN̄, or depryvyn̄. Privo, orbo, C. F.
  • PRIVYNGE. Privacio.
  • PRYVYLEGE. Privilegium.
  • PRYVYLY. Secrete, occulte, clan∣culo, private, clam.
  • PRYVYTE. Misterium, secretum, archanum.
  • PROBLEME, or rydel. Problema, enigma, C. F.
  • PROCESSE, yn cawse. Processus.
  • PROCESSYONAL, or pr(oc)essyo∣nare.
  • PROCESSYONE. Processio.
  • PROCURYN̄. Procuro.
  • PROOF, idem quod preef, supra.
  • PROFYCYE. Prophecia.
  • PROFECYED. Prophetatus.
  • PROFERYN̄. Offero.
  • PROFESSYD. Professus.
  • PROFESSYŌN. Professio.
  • PROPHETE. Propheta, videns.
  • PROFYTABLE. Utilis, proficuus, commodus, CATH.
  • PROFYTE (or prow, infra, profy∣teth, P.) Profectus, commodum, emolumentum, commoditas.
  • PROFYTYN̄. Proficio, prosum.
  • PROFUR. Oblacio.
  • PROKECYE. Procuracia.
  • PROKETOWRE (prokeratour, K.) Procurator.
  • PROKYRMENT. Procuracio.
  • PROKKYN̄, or styfly askyn̄.3. [Skinner gives the verb "to Prog, à Lat. procurare," and the word has been explained by lexicographers as signifying to beg, and to steal. In th dialect of East Anglia at the present time to prog signifies to pry or poke into holes and corners, and Grose explains it as implying to hunt for provision, to forage. See Nares and Richardson.]Pro∣cor, procito, CATH.
  • Page  415PROLLYN̄, as ratchys (or purlyn̄', infra.)1. ["I prolle, I go here and there to seke a thyng, ie tracasse. Prolyng for a pro∣mocyon, ambition." PALSG. Horman says, "The nose is well sette ouer the mouthe, for he is a good proller (lecator) for the bely." A ratche is a hound that hunts by scent, "odorinsecus, quasi odorem sequens." See RATCHE, hereafter, p. 422.]Scrutor.
  • PROLLYNGE, or sekynge. Perscru∣tacio, investigacio, scrutinium.
  • PROMOCYONE, or fortherynge in worshyppe, or goodys (in wor∣shyp of godenesse, S.) Pro∣mocio.
  • PROMPTARE, or he þat promp∣tythe (promptowre, or promptar, P.) Promptator.
  • PROM(P)TYD. Promptus, CATH.
  • PROMPTYN̄'. Promo, CATH. in∣censo, insumo.
  • (PROMPTYNGE, K. P. Promptus.)
  • PRONGE.2. [Compare THROWE, womannys pronge, hereafter. "Prongge, proprete." PALSG.]Erumpna.
  • PROPPE, longe (staffe, S.) Contus, CATH.
  • PROPORCYONE. Proporcio.
  • PROPORCYONYD. Proporcionatus.
  • PROPYR, or prati. Elegans.
  • PROPURLY. Eleganter, decenter, formose.
  • PROPUR, owne. Proprius.
  • PROPURTE. Proprietas.
  • PROW,

    3. This word is derived from the old French prou, which signified, according to Ro∣quefort, gain, profit, profectus. It does not appear to have been retained in the East Anglian dialect. Margaret Paston, writing to her son, Sir John Paston, in 1475, com∣plained of the distress occasioned by the exorbitant demands of Edward IV., and the low price of grain in consequence; "I can nor sell corne nor catell to no good preue, malt is her but at xd. a comb; wheete, a comb, xxviijd.; ootes, a comb, xd." It is said in the Boke of Curtesye,

    "Looke the more worthier than thou
    Wasshe afore the, and that is thy prowe (et cela est ton preu)."

    See Robert Glouc., P. Langtoft, p. 278; Ipomedon, v. 51, and 588; Cant. Tales, v. 12,234, and 13,338.

    idem quod profyte.
  • PROWDE. Superbus, elatus, (pom∣posus, P.)
  • PROWDELY, Superbe.
  • PROWDE, in cuntenaunce, and chere. Pomposus.
  • PROUENDER, benefet (provendyr, benyfice, K. prebend, benfyce, S. probender, benfice, P.) Prebenda.
  • PROUENDER, for hors. Migma, avena, (probendum, P.)
  • PROVERBE. Proverbium.
  • PROVYN̄, or chevyn̄'. Prosperor, (vigeo, K.)
  • PROVYN̄', or a-sayyn̄', idem quod prevyn̄, supra.
  • PROVYNCE. Provincia.
  • PROVOKYN̄', or steryn̄ to good, or badde. Provoco.
  • (PTROT, skornefulle word, or trut, infra. Vath.)4. [Raca, ptrupt, or fye! Vath, interjeccio gaudentis, ut habetur Isai. xliv., et inter∣jectio derisionis vel increpacionis, ut havetur Matt. xxvij. Twort!" MED. MS. CANT. Palsgrave observes, in his enumeration of interjections, "Some be interiections of in∣dignacion, trut, as trut auant, trut!" "Trut, an interjection importing indignation, tush, tut, fy man. Trut avant, a fig's end, no such matter, you are much deceived; also, on afore for shame." COTG.]
  • Page  416PUDDYNGE. Fartum, omasus, CATH.
  • PUL, or draȝte (drawȝt, S) Tractus.
  • PULLAYLY, or pullay (pullery, K. pullayly, or pullayle, S.)1. [Compare POLAYLE, p. 407. Altile, according to the Catholicon, denotes any do∣mestic animal, swine or fowl, fattened for food. The word is of French derivation, poillaille signifying, according to Roquefort, volaille, pullastra. Palsgrave gives "Pullayne, povllane, poullayle." Poultry are called pullen by Tusser, and the word is retained in the Northern and Suffolk dialects. See Nares and Moor. Gerarde observes that in Cheshire they sow buck wheat "for their cattell, pullen, and such like."]Al∣tile, CATH. volatile, C. F.
  • PULCHŌN'. Polio, CATH.
  • PULLYN̄', or drawyn̄' (plvkken, H. P.) Traho.
  • PULLYNGE, or drawynge. Traccio, tractus.
  • PULLYNGE, or plukkynge of fowle, Deplumacio, expennacio.
  • (PULKE, supra in polke, P.)
  • PULPYTTE. Pulpitum.
  • PULTE, yonge hen. Gallinella, CATH.
  • PULTER. Avigerulus, CATH. gal∣linarius (poletarius, K.)
  • PULTRYE. Gallinaria.
  • PUMPE of a schyppe, or oþer lyke. Hauritorium, CATH.
  • PUNCHYN̄, idem quod prykkyn̄', supra.
  • PUNCHYN', or bunchyn̄'. Trudo, tundo, impello.
  • PUNCHYN̄', ir chastysyn̄' (pu∣nysshen, P.) Punio, castigo.
  • PUNCHYNGE, or bu(n)chynge (prykkynge, S.) Stimulacio, trusio.
  • PUNCHYNGE (punysshinge, P.) Punicio.
  • PUNCHŌN'. Stimulus, punctorium, KYLW.
  • PUNDER.2. ["Librilla est baculus cum corrigia plumbata, ad librandum carnes." ORTUS, from CATH. Forby gives the verb, as still used in Norfolk, to "Punder, to be exactly on an equipoise."]Librilla, C. F.
  • PUPLE (pupyll, or people, P.) Populus, plebs, gens, vulgus.
  • PURBLYNDE. Luscus, C. F.
  • PURCATORYE, or purgatorye. Purgatorium.
  • PURCHASE. Adquisicio.
  • PURCHASYD. Adquisitus.
  • PURCHASYN̄', Adquiro.
  • PURCHASOWRE. Adquisitor, ad∣quisitrix.
  • PURCY, in wynd drawynge. Car∣diacus, CATH.3. [Pursy, cardeacus, cardiacus, a pursynes, cardia, cardiaca." CATH. ANG. "Pur∣cyf, shorte wynded, or stuffed aboute the stomacke, pourcif." PALSG. "Poussif, pursie, short-winded." COTG.]
  • PURCYVAWNTE (purciwant, K.)
  • PURFYLE of a clothe (purfoyl, H. P.)4. ["Purfyll or hemme of a gowne, bort." PALSG. Horman says, "The purful (seg∣mentum) of the garment is to narowe." Tyrwhitt observes that purfiled is derived from the Fr. pourfiler, which properly signifies to work upon the edge. Note on Cant. T. v. 193. See Vision of P. P. v. 896, 2313, 2523; Hall's Chron. 25 Hen. VIII. Although purfle properly denoted the embroided or furred margin of the dress, it seems sometimes to have had a more extended signification, garments overlaid with gems or other ornaments being termed by Chaucer and other writers, purfled. "Pour∣filer d'or, to purfle, tinsell, or overcast with gold thread, &c. Pourfileure, purfling; a purfling lace or work; bodkin-work; tinselling." COTG. See Forby, v. Purle.]Limbus, C. F. hora∣rium (urla, S.)
  • PURGACYON. Purgacio.
  • Page  417PURYFYYN̄, clensyn, or make clene. Purifico.
  • PURLYN̄', idem quod prollyn̄', supra.
  • PURLONGYN̄, or prolongyn̄', or put fer a-wey. Prolongo, alieno.
  • PURPEYS, fysche. Foca, C. F. vitula marina, suillus, C. F.
  • PUR-POYNT, bed hyllynge. Pul∣vinarium, plumea, C. F. culcitra punctata, KYLW. COMM. et NECC. (plumarium, K. S. P.)
  • PURPOS. Propositum, industria.
  • PURPOSYN̄. Propono.
  • PURPLYS, sorys.1. [A purpylle, papula." CATH. ANG. "Pourpre, the Purples, or a pestilent ague which raises on the body certain red or purple spots." COTG.]Morbuli pur∣purei dicuntur.
  • PURPUL. Purpura, CATH.
  • PURS, or burs. Bursa, loculus, crumena, C. F. in cruma.
  • PURSKERUARE (purswerkere, S.) Bursida.
  • PURSLANE, herbe. Portulaca.
  • PURSUYN̄', yn harme. Prosequor, insequor.
  • PURSUYN̄', or folowyn̄'. Sequor.
  • PURVEYD. Provisus.
  • PURVEYYN̄'. Provideo, procuro.
  • PURVYANCE. Providencia.
  • PURVIOWRE. Provisor, procu∣rator.
  • PUT, or leyde. Positus, collocatus.
  • PUT (TO-)GEDYR, and onyd. Continuus.
  • PUT TO-GEDER, but not onyd. Contiguus.
  • PUTTYN̄', or leyyn̄'. Pono, col∣loco.
  • PUTTYN̄ AFTYR. Postpono.
  • PUTTYN̄ A-FORNE. Prepono.
  • PUTTYN̄ A-WEY. Depono, ex∣pello, depello.
  • PUTTYN̄ OWTE, or a-wey. Eruo.
  • PUTTYN̄ A-WEY, or refusyn̄'. Re∣pudio, refuto.
  • PUTT FORTHE, as a manne dothe hys hand, or other lyke. Por∣rigo, extendo, CATH.
  • PUTT TO a thynge. Appono.
  • PUTTYN̄ a thynge to syllyn̄' (sel∣lynge, H. P.) Licitor, C. F.
  • (PUTTYN̄, or schowwyn̄', infra.2. [To put, or push, as with the head or horns, a verb still in use in Yorkshire, has been derived from Fr. bouter, to butt. Robert Brunne uses it in this sense, App. to Pref. cxciv. See Jamieson. "To putte, pellere." CATH. ANG. To put signifies also to cast, as in Havelok: see Sir Frederick Madden's Glossary, and notes, p. 192; Sir Isumbras, v. 606, where the favourite sport of pitching stones is mentioned, of which Fitz Stephen speaks, as an exercise in which the citizens of London delighted. See also Langt. Chron. p. 26; Octovian, v. 895; and Jamieson. Marshall, in the Rural Eco∣nomy of Norfolk, gives amongst dialectical expressions the verb to put, to stumble, as a horse, but it is not noticed by Forby or Moor.]Impello, trudo, pello.)
  • PUTTYNGE TO-GEDER, yn onynge. Continuacio.
  • PUTTYNGE TO-GEDER, wythe-owt onynge. Contiguacio.
  • Page  418PUTTYNGE, or leyynge. Posicio, collocacio.
  • PUTTYNGE, or schowynge. Pulsus.
  • PUTTOK, bryd. Milvus.
  • QUADRANT. Quandrans.
  • QUAYER.1. [It may deserve notice that in old parlance, a quire, which properly denoted a bundle of paper, comprising a certain number of sheets, frequently was used to signify any similar bundle of sheets, or unbound volume. Chaucer, in the Envoy of his Praise of Women, bids his "little quaire" go to his heart's sovereign. Thus also the Poetical Lament written by James I. of Scots, during his detention in England, was called "the King's Quair." Horman remarks that "boughtes, whether they be hole, or hoked, set to gether in order, chartae complicatae, seu justae, seu unce-(? uncatae,) make a quayre. Though there be fewar or mo boughtȝ in a quayr yet it is com'only called a quayre." In inventories, wills, and other simiar documents, any book in sheets is com∣monly termed a quire; thus "Ion of Croxton," of York, bequeaths, in 1393, "a quayer of Emunde Mirrour in ynglysch." Test. Ebor. i. 185. Transcribers usually reckoned their work by quires, and numbered the quaterni, as it proceeded. I the Paston Correspondence mention is made, in a letter written about 1465, of a scribe who had copied the Chronicle of Jerusalem, and the valiant acts of Sir John Fastolf, and esti∣mated his labour, stating that "it drow more yan xxx. whaȝerys off paper." Vol. iv. 78. The word quire has been usually derived from the old Fr. quayer, cahier; or by some from quarreau, a square. Compare Isl. kwer, libellus, codicillus, unico perga∣meno conscriptus. Forby observes that a quire of paper is called in Norfolk a quaire. In the Issue Roll of the Exch. A. D. 1422, 9 Henry V., a payment of £3. 6s. is recorded, for 66 great "quaternes" of calf skins, purchased by John Heth, Clerk of the Privy Seal, to write a Bible thereon for the King's use. "Quayre of paper, une main de papier." PALSG.]Quaternus.
  • QUAYLE, byrde. Quistula, qualia, CATH. et UG. V. in Q.
  • QUAYLYD, as mylke, and oþer lyke. Coagulatus.
  • QVAYLYN̄, as mylke, and other lycowre.2. [To quail still signifies, in the dialect of East Anglia, to curdle, according to Forby and Moor. In Harl. MS. 5401, f. 192, the following direction is given, "For qualing of mylk—cast þerto a letil flour, and styre it wele." In a collection of recipes in Sir Thomas Phillipps' possession (MS. Heber, 8186) a caution occurs regarding the use of spices; "A lessone, lerne hit well: to all potage put all maner of spyces to the sethynge, safe gynger, for he wol quayle the potage for certayne." See other examples of the use of this word in the Forme of Cury, p. 73, and the Account of the Inthronization of Abp. Nevill, Leland, Coll. vi. 11. Ital. "Quagliare, to curd, or congeale as milke doth." FLORIO. "I quayle, as mylke dotthe, ie quaillebotte." PALSG.]Coagulo.
  • QUAYLYNGE, of lycoure. Coagu∣lacio.
  • QUAKYN̄. Tremo, contremo, tre∣pido.
  • QUAKYNGE. Tremor.
  • QUAKYNGE, for colde. Frigutus.
  • QUALE, fysche (or whale, infra; qwal, H. P.) Cetus.
  • QUANTE, or sprete, rodde (or whante, infra.)3. [QUANTE of sprete, redde, MS. Forby gives Quont, a pole to push a boat onwards, in the Vocabulary of East Anglia. See WHANTE, hereafter. In Kent a walking stick is termed a quant, and in East Sussex the word is used in the same signification as given by Forby.]Contus.
  • QUANTYTE. Quantitas.
  • Page  419QUAREL, or querel, or pleynt.1. ["A quarelle, querela, etc. ubi a plante." CATH. ANG. In the Golden Legend a relation is given of a certain knight, who made annual pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Mary Magdalen, and having been slain accidentally, "as his frendes wepte for hym lyenge on the byere they sayd with swete and deuoute querelles, which suffred her deuoute seruant to deye without confessyon and penaunce."]Querela.
  • QUAREL, arowe. Quadrellum.
  • QUARERE, or quarere of stone (quarer, K. quar, S. quarrye, P.) Lapidicina, CATH. saxifra∣gium, KYLW. lapifodina, CATH.
  • QUARRY, thykk mann, or womann (quarey, S.)

    2. Robert of Gloucester says that Robert Curthose was so named on account of his stature, "vor he was somdel schort."

    "þycke man he was ynou, bote he nas noȝt wel long:
    Quarry he was, and wel ymade vorto be strong."

    P. 412.

    Horman speaks of "a quarry and well pyght man, homo staturâ corporis quadratâ." "Quarry, fatte bodyed, or great, corpulent." PALSG. "A quarry or fat man, obesus." GOULDM. In the Dialect of East Anglia quaddy has the like signification, according to Forby. In Rich. Coeur de Lion the epithet is applied to a lance—"a long schafft stout and quarrey." v. 493. In the Seuyn Sages a large hall is described as "quaire."

    Corpulentus, grossus.
  • QUARYERE. Lapidicidius, lapidi∣cida, CATH.
  • QUART, mesure. Quarta.
  • QUARTEYNE, fevyr. Quartana, quartella, KYLW.
  • QUARTENARE, or þat hathe þe quarteyne. Quartenarius.
  • QUARTER, þe fowrte parte. Quarta.
  • QUARTERE, of corne, or oþer lyke. Quarterium.
  • QUARTLE (quarteryd, S.) Qua∣dripartitus.
  • QUASCHYD. Quassatus.
  • QVASCHYN̄, or brysyn (or crusch∣yn̄, supra.) Briso, quasso.
  • QVASCHYN̄, or daschȳn', or for∣don̄. Quasso, casso, CATH.
  • QUASCHYNGE. Quassacio.
  • (QWAT, or what, infra. Quod.)
  • QUAVE, of a myre (quaue, as of a myre, K. P.)3. [Horman, in his chapter de re edificatoriâ, observes that "a quauery or a maris, and unstable foundacion must be holpe with great pylys of alder rammed downe, and with a frame of tymbre called a crossaundre (fistucâ)." In Caxton's Mirrour of the World, part ii. c. 22, it is said, "understande ye—how the erthe quaueth and shaketh, that somme peple calle an erthe quaue, by cause they fele ther the meue and quave vnder their feet." "Quaue myre, foundriere, crouliere." PALSG. Forby gives Quavery∣mavery, undecided, hesitating how to decide.]Labina, C. F.
  • QVAVYN̄, as myre. Tremo, etc. ut supra.
  • (QWEYMOWS, infra in skeymowse, or sweymows. Abhominativus, S.)
  • QVELLYN̄, or querkyn̄ (qverlyn, or qverkyn, S.)4. [To quell, as used by the old writers, signifies to destroy life in any manner, although here apparently taken in the sense of stifling. Minot, speaking of the Comyn, says that "in haly kirk thai did him qwell." Chaucer, describing a farm-yard attacked by a fox, says, "the dokes crieden as men wold hem quelle." Cant. T. v. 15,396. Ang.- Sax. cwellan, trucidare.]Suffoco.
  • Page  420(QWELMEN, supra in ovyr qwel∣myn̄, et infra in turnōn.)
  • (QWEMYD, or peesyd, supra. Pa∣catus.)
  • QVEMYN̄, or plesyn̄ (pesyn, K. S. P.)1. [To queme, Ang.-Sax. cweman, placere, is commonly used by Langtoft, Chaucer, Gower, Spenser, and other writers. Chaucer uses also the verb to misqueme, to dis∣please. In the Wicliffite version quemeful occurs in the sense of pleasing. In the curate's instructions to his flock, according to the directions given in the Flos Florum, Burney MS. 356, f. 82, the following passage occurs, in reference to the third petition of the Lord's Prayer. "Here whe byddeþ þat as angeles and holy saules quemeth God in heuene, þat whe so mowhe wyth hys grace queme hym in erþe." Palsgrave gives the verb, "I queme, I please or I satysfye, Chauser, in his Caūterbury Tales; this worde is nowe out of vse." Jamieson gives it as retained in some parts of N. Britain.]Pacifico, placo, paco.
  • (QWEMYNGE, or peesynge, supra. Pacificacio.)
  • QUENCE, frute. Coctonum, sci∣tonium, C. F. (niconia, P.)
  • QUENCETREE. Coctonus.
  • QVENTYSE, or sleythe (qveyntesvr qveyntyze, sleyhte, H. quentysur' quentyze, sleight, P.) Astucia, calliditas, (cautela, P.)
  • QUEYNTYSE, yn gay florysschynge, or oþer lyke. Virilia, KYLW. et UG. V. francista, KYLW.
  • QVENE. Regina.
  • QUEN, womann of lytylle price.2. ["Queane, garse, paillarde, gaultiere." PALSG. Chaucer uses the word in this opprobrious sense. In the Vision of Piers Ploughman it is said that in the church it is hard to distinguish a knight from a knave, or "a queyne fro a queene." See Paston Letters, iv. 360.]Carisia, KYLW, et C. F.
  • (QWENCHYD, as candylle, or lyghte, iem quod owt, supra. Extinctus.)
  • QUENCHYN̄. Extinguo.
  • QUERDLYNGE, appulle. Dura∣cenum, KYLW.
  • QUEERE. Chorus.
  • QVEREL, pleynte. Querela.
  • QUERYSTER. Chorista, chorica∣nus, CATH. choricista, pari∣phonista, COMM.
  • QUERKENYD.3. ["Noyer, to drowne, to whirken, to stifle with water. Noié, whirkened, ouer∣whelmed, as with water. Suffoqué, stifled, whirkened, smothered." COTG. "Querk∣ned, suffocatus." GOULDM. Querken'd is still used in this sense, in the Craven Dialect.]Suffocatus.
  • QUERKENYNGE. Suffocacio.
  • QUERKYN̄, idem quod quellyn̄.
  • QUERNE. Mola manualis, C. F. trapeta, C. F. COMM.
  • (QWERT, or whert, infra.

    4. See Seuyn Sages, v. 771, 3862; Lydgate's Minor Poems, pp. 32, 38. "Quartyfulle, compos, prosper. To make quarfulle, prosperare. A quarfullnesse, prosperitas. "Inqwarte, ubi hale. Hale, acer, firmus, incolumis, integer, sanus, sospes." CATH. ANG.

    "The wiseman forsothe wil nat sette his herte
    On thinge that may not longe stande in querte."

    Speculum Xpianî.
    In∣columis, sanus, sospes.)
  • QUESTE. Duodena.
  • QUESTYONE. Questio.
  • QUEYM, or be-qvethyn̄ (quethyn, K. P. queyin, or be-quevyn, S.) Lego.
  • QUEYEWORDE (qvethe worde, K. Page  421 qveye word, or qvethe word, H. quetheword, S.)1. ["Legatum, a quethworde, et est quod in testato dimittitur. MED. "I queythe, ie donne en testement, or ie delaisse." PALSG.]Legatum.
  • QUYBYBE, spyce. Quiparum, CATH.
  • QVYCCHYN̄, or mevyn̄ (quichyn, K. qvyhchyn, H. qvytchyn, S. quynchyn, W.)2. [See King Alis, v. 4747. "I quytche, I styrre or moue with my bodye, or make noyse, ie tinte. His mother maketh hym a cokenay (ung nyes), but and he here me he dare nat quytche. She layde upon hym lyke a maulte sacke, and the poore boye durste nat ones quytche (tynter)." PALSG. The same author gives the verb "I quynche, I styrre, ie mouvue. I quynche, I make a noyse, ie tynte." "Il n'y a homme qui ose lever l'oeil devant luy, no man dare quitch or stirre before him." COTG.]Moveo.
  • (QWYCE TRE, or fyrrys, supra, or gorstys tre. Ruscus.)
  • QUYK, or a-lyve (or whyk, infra.) Vivus.
  • QUYK, or lyvely, or delyvyr. Vivax.
  • QUYKLY. Vivaciter.
  • QUYKNESSE, or lyvylynesse. Vi∣vacitas.
  • QUYKNESSE, of lyve (lyf, K.) Vita.
  • QUYKNYN̄ (quykyn, K. P.) Ve∣geto, vivifico.
  • QVYLLE, stalke. Calamus.
  • QVYLTE, of a bedde. Culcitra.
  • QUYNTYNE. Quirinarium, C. F. et UG. in quiparium.
  • QVYRLYLEBONE, yn a ioynt.3. [See WHYRLEBONE, or hole of a ioynt, hereafter.]Ancha.
  • QUYSPERON̄ (or mustryn̄, supra; qvysperyn, or qwysperyn, H. whysperyn, P.) Mussito.
  • (QWYSPERYNGE, or musterynge, supra. Mussitacio.)
  • QUYT, and delyuerd of a charge. Solutus, liberatus, deobligatus.
  • QVYTAUNCE. Acquietancia, apoca.
  • QVYTYN̄', or ȝyldyn̄'. Reddo, per∣solvo, quieto.
  • QUYVER, for to putt yn boltys. Pharetra.
  • RABET, yonge conye (conyne, K. H. Rabett, cony, P.) Cuni∣cellus.
  • RABET, yryne tool of carpentrye. Runcina, CATH.
  • RABET, in a werke of carpentrye. Runctura, incastratura, C. F.
  • (RABETYNGE to-gedyr of ij. bordys, supra in knyttynge, or ioynynge.)
  • RACARE, of a pytte (rakare of a cyte, K. S. P.) Merdifer, CATH. fumarius, C. F. olitor, C. F. (firmarius, S. fimarius, P.)
  • RACYN̄ (or rasyn, H. P.) bokys, or oþer lyke. Rado, abrado.
  • RAAF, propyr name. Radulphus.
  • RAAF, ware (raf ward, S.)
  • RAAF, man̄.
  • RAGGE. Cincinnus, UG. in cedo, scrutum, panniculus, lacinia, CATH.
  • RAGGYD (or torne, P.) Lacini∣osus, lacinosus, C. F. pannosus, laceratus, cincinnosus.
  • RAGYN̄'. Rabio, colluctor.
  • RAGYNGE. Rabies, rabb'itus, C. F.
  • RAGMANN, or he that goythe wythe iaggyd clothys (raggyd clothys, S.) Pannicius, vel pan∣nicia, UG. in pan.
  • Page  422RATCHE, hownde.1. [Compare PROLLYN, as ratchys, above, p. 415. In Dame Julyan Bernes' instruc∣tions, in the Boke of Huntynge, it is said that the hart, buck, and boar are beasts of chase, which "wyth the lymere shall be vpreryd in fryth or in felde," but that all other beasts that are hunted "shall be sought and founde wyth ratches so fre." Compare the Mayster of Game, Vesp. B. XII. f. 89. A dog that discovered his prey by scent was termed a ratche, as distinguished from a greyhound. Ang.-Sax. Raece, rendered in Aelfric's Glossary "bruccus," q. braccus, or bracco, indagator. Gesner gives a representation of the "Canis Scoticus sagax, vulgo dictus ane Rache," observing that Caius says of dogs which hunt by scent, that the male is generally called a hound, the female, by the English a Brack, by the Scotch "ane Rache." See Jamieson, v. Rache, and Brachell; Ducange, v. Bracco. In the Catholicon Angl. is given "Gabrielle rache, hic camalion."]Odorinsecus, quasi odorem sequens, rep(er)a∣rius, KYLW. et CATH. forte in reperio, venaticus, COMM.
  • RAIARE (ragere, K.) Rabiator, rabulus, C. F. et UG. rabiosus.
  • RAY, yn a clothe (rayid, K. rayyd with ray, s. rayed, P.) Stragu∣latus, radiatus, DICC.
  • (RAY, cloþ, S. P. Stragulum.)
  • (RAY, fysh, S. Uranoscopus.)
  • RAYD, or arayed wythe clothynge, or other thynge of honeste (thynge of clennesse, K. P.) Ornatus.
  • RAYD, or (a)rayde, or redy (rayed, or arayid, K. P.) Paratus.
  • RAYL, of vyneys (rayyl of vynyll, H. P.) Paxillus, CATH. retica, C. F. et UG. in resis.
  • RAYLE vynys. Retico, C. F.
  • RAYLYD, as wynys. Reticatus.
  • RAYLYNGE. Reticacio.
  • RAYMENT, or arayment (orna∣ment, K.) Ornatus, ornamentum.
  • RAKKE. Presepe.
  • RAKE, or ryve. Rastrum, CATH. et C. F. et UG. in rarus, ras∣tallum, CATH.
  • RAKYN̄ (or ryvyn̄, infra.) Rastro, KYLW.
  • RAKYNGE. Rastratura, C. F.
  • RAM, schepe. Vervex.
  • RAMME, ynstrument to ram wythe. Pilus, CATH. piletum, trudes, C. F. (pilentum, P.)
  • RAMAGE, or coragyows.2. [In Sloane MS. 2584, f. 173, it is said of "þe medicyns and vertues of the asche—þer ben bestis þat hau venym, as þe heynde, þe hounde, and þe wolf, and oþer bestis, þat whenne þei arn ramagous or joli, here venym gretly noyeþ, so þat oftyn siþes þei makyn men sike, and somme to dyen." The seed of the tree of life is recommended as a remedy, namely the "bellis" that grow on the ash, mixed with woman's milk. Chaucer uses ramage, and ramagious in a similar sense. See Hardyng's Chron. c. xcvii. st. 6.]Corra∣giosus, luitosus, UG. in luo.
  • (RAMAGE, or corage, H. P. Co∣ragium.)
  • RAMAGENESSE, or coragyowsnesse. Luita, UG. in luo.
  • RAMMYN̄', wythe an instrument.3. [RAMNYN, MS.]Trudo, tero, pilo.
  • RAMMYNGE, of a grownde. Tri∣tura, pressura, (compressio, P.)
  • RAMZYS, herbe (rammys, K. S. ramsis, H. ramseys, P.)4. [Gerarde states that the Allium ursinum is calld "Ramsies, Ramsons, or Buckrams. The broad-leaved garlick is commonly termed ramsons; in Craven Dialect rams, or ramps. "Ramsey, an herbe" (no French.) PALSG.]Affo∣dyllus, C. F.
  • Page  423RANDE, or Randolf, propyr name (Radyl, S.) Ranulphus, non Radulphus, Raaf.
  • RANDONE, or longe renge of wurdys, or other thyngys (long raunge, etc.)1. [Haringga seems here to be given for harenga, or arenga, a public declamation. See Ducange. Randon, in its primary signification, appears to be synonymous with the old Fr. randon, violence, impetuous speed, a sudden shock. Thus Sir John Maundevile relates that, on solemn festivals, at the Court of the Chan, "thei maken knyghtes to jousten in armes fulle lustyly, and thei rennen to gidre a gret randoum, and thei frusschen to gidere fully fiercely." p. 286. Holinshed describes the onslaught upon the Duke of Somerset at the battle of Tewkesbury, "with full randon," as made by certain spear-men placed by Edward IV. in ambush. "Aller à la grand randon, to go very fast. Randonner, to run violently." COTG. Elyot gives "Decursio, iustes as at the tilte or randon." In a seconary sense this word seems to have implied an array or line of combatants, or a continuous flow of words, as in an harangue.]Haringga, epis∣tola quedam denominata.
  • (RANKE, S. P. Crassus.)
  • (RANKENESSE, S. P. Crassi∣tudo.)
  • RANKOWRE, hertely wrethe (wreth in hert, S.) Rancor.
  • RANSAKYD. Investigatus, per∣scrutatus, vel scrutatus.
  • RANSAKYN̄'. Scrutor, lustro, in∣vestigo, perscrutor.
  • RANSAKYN̄', or demyn̄' yn wytte (demyn with in wytt, HARL. MS. 2274) Discucio.
  • RANSAKYNGE. Investigacio, scru∣tinium, indagacio, perscrutacio.
  • RAPPE, stroke. Ictus, percucio, percussura.
  • RAPE, or hast.2. [Chaucer uses this word both as a substantie and an adverb. In the Vision of P. Ploughman the verb to rape, to hasten, occurs, as also the adverbs rapely and rapelier.]Festinacio, fes∣tinancia.
  • RAPE, herbe. Raphanus, C. F. rapa, UG. in rumpo.
  • RAPYN̄', or hastyn̄'. Festino, ac∣celero.
  • RAPPYN̄', or knokkyn̄ at a dore. Pulso.
  • RAPPYN̄', or smytyn̄' a thynge a-ȝēn' a-noþer. Collido, allido.
  • (RAPPYN, or smytyn, H. P. Per∣cucio.)
  • RASCALYE, or symple puple (ras∣cayle, S. sympyl peple, K.)3. ["Plebecula, lytelle folke or raskalle. Plebs, folk or raskalle." MED. Fabyan, under the year 1456, speaks of "a multitude of rascall and poore people of the cytye." Certain animals, not accounted as beasts of chace, were likewise so termed. In the St. Alban's Book it is stated that "there be fiue beasts which we cal beasts of chace, the buke, the doe, the foxe, the marterne, and the roe; all other of what kinde soeuer terme them Rascall." It appears, however, from the Mayster of Game, that the hart, until he was six years old, was accounted "rascayle or foly." Vesp. B. XII., f. 25. In the Survey of the Estates of Glastonbury Abbey, taken at the Dissolution, the deer in the various parks are distinguished as "He hath bought rascals and other shepe, reiuculas emit et promiscuas oves—This is but rochel and rascall wine, tortiuum vinum." In the Household Ordinances of Henry VIII. A.D. 1526, some kind of fish is thus termed, possibly an inferior flat fish; one mess of "rascalls or flage," at the price of eight pence, was to be provided on fish days. "Rascall, refuse beest, refus." PALSG.]Popellus (plebs, S.)
  • Page  424RASCALY, or refuse, where of hyt be (qwere so hyt be, S.) Cu∣ducum, C. F.
  • RASYN̄', or scrapyn̄', idem quod racyn̄', supra.1. [Forby gives the verb to rase, pronounced race, to cut or scratch superficially, as used in East Anglia. "I race a writynge, I take out a worde with a pomyce or pen∣knyfe—ie efface des motȝ, &c.—I race a thynge that is made or graven out, as the weather or tyme dothe,—ie obblittere. Rase, a scrapping, rasure." PALSG. In Tre∣visa's version of Vegecius. B. ii. c. 13, it is said that besides banners the Roman chieftains had "crestes ouer thawrt her helmes and diuers signes and tokyns, that in caas her baner of her warde wt eny myshappe were voidede, rasede, or filede, or done out of her sighte, yet by the sights of her souereyns crestes they might returne ayen to her wardes." Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. Robert Fill, in the "Briefe sum of the Christian faith," translated from Beza, says, "My iniquities can no more fraye nor trouble me, my accountes and dettes beinge assuredly rased and wiped out by the precious blood of Jesus Christ." f. 19, b.]
  • RASYN, as hondys.2. ["Ringo, irasci sicut canis, vel rictum facere, to gner." ORTUS.]Ringo, CATH.
  • RASYNGE, of hondys (howndys, K. houndes, P.) Rictus, CATH.
  • RASYNGE, of scrapynge of bokys or other lyke. Abrasio, rasura.
  • RASKYN̄'. Exalo, UG V. in M. et UG. in alo.
  • RASOWRE, fysche. Rasorius (ra∣sorinus, P.)
  • RASOURE, knyfe (rasour of schav∣ynge, K. P.) Novacula, ra∣sorium, C. F.
  • RASTYLBOW, wede.3. [Gerarde says that the petty whinne, or rest harrow, is commonly called Aresta bovis, and remora aratri, in French areste boeuf. In Norfolk, according to Forby, it is called land-whin.]Resta bovis.
  • RASTYR HOWSE, or schavyng howse (rasyr hows, S.)4. ["A raster house, barbitondium, tonsorium. A raster clathe, ralla." CATH. ANG. "Ralla, a raster clothe." ORTUS.]Bar∣bitondium.
  • RATONERE. Soricus, soriceps, ratonarius.
  • RATUN, or ratōn'. Rato, sorex, C.F.
  • RAVARE. Delirus, CATH. deli∣rator, C. F.
  • RAW. Crudus.
  • RAWEYNE, hey (rawen, P.)5. [Tusser calls the eddish, or after-grass "rawings," and it is still so termed in the Dialect of East Anglia, according to Forby; in Hampshire and Sussex it is called rowings or roughings.]Fe∣num serotinum, CATH.
  • RAVEYNE. Rapina, spolium.
  • RAVENE, byrd. Cornix.
  • RAVENOWRE. Raptor, predo, rabidus, CATH. (rabulus, P.)
  • RAVYN̄', or dotyn'. Desipio, CATH. insanio, deliro.
  • RAVYNGE. Deliracio, C. F. deli∣ramentum, CATH.
  • RAVYSCHYN̄'. Rapio.
  • RAWNESSE, or rawhede. Cruditas.
  • RAWNSOME. Redempcio.
  • RAWNSOMYD. Redemptus.
  • RAWNSOMYN̄'. Multo (redimo, P.)
  • RATHARE (or sonnare, infra.) Pocius, cicius.
  • REAL. Realis.
  • REALTE. Realitas.
  • Page  425REBEL, or vnbuxum. Rebellis, inobediens.
  • REBELLYN̄'. Rebello.
  • REBELLYONE, or vnbuxumnesse. Rebellio, inobediencia.
  • REBOWNDYN̄', or sowndyn̄ a-ȝene.1. ["I rebounde, as the sownde of a horne, or the sounde of a bell, or ones voyce dothe, ie boundys, ie resonne, &c. Agaynst a holowe place voyce or noyse wyll re∣bounde and make an eccho." PALSG. Compare SOUNDYNGE A-ȜENE, resonatus, infra.]Reboo, CATH. rotundo (re∣dundo, S. P.)
  • REBO(W)NDYNGE, or so(w)nd∣y(n)ge a-ȝen (reboūdinge, P.) Reboacio, reboatus.
  • REBUKYN̄', or rebostōn (rebostyn, or vndyrnemyn, K.) Redarguo.
  • REEYVYD. Receptus, acceptus.
  • RECEYVYN̄'. Recipio, suscipio, (accipio, P.) capio.
  • (RECEYUYNG, P. Accepcio, re∣cepcio.)
  • (RECEYUOUR, P. Receptor, ac∣ceptor.)
  • RECEYT. Receptum.
  • RECHYN̄', as lethyr (retchyn' as leder, P.) Dilato, extendo.
  • RECHYN̄, or a-retchyn̄, and nyȝe to a thynge (astrechyn, K. stretchyn', P.) Attingo, pro∣tendo, VG. V. in M.
  • RECHYN̄', or put forthe, as a mann dothe hys honde (retchyn, or drawyn, owt, K. H. P.) E(x)|tendo, etc. ut supra.
  • RECHYNGE, or strethynge (rehch∣inge, K. rehoghynge, P.)2. [This word is placed in the MS. and in P. between REFUGE and REHERSYNGE, probably because by the first hand it had been written REHCHYNGE, as in the King's Coll. MS. Palsgrave gives various significations of the verb to reach. "I ratche, I stretche out a length, ie estends. If it be to shorte ratche it out. I ratche, I catche, I have raught (Lydgat) ie attayns. And I ratche ye thou shalt bhere me a blowe, si ie te peulx attayndre ie te donneray und soufflet. I reche, ie baille. I reche a thyng with my hande or with a weapen, or any other thyng that I holde in my hand, ie attayns." See Moor's Suffolk Glossary, v. Reech.]Ex∣tensio.
  • RECLEYME, or chalange. Cla∣meum, vendicacio (clamium, P.)
  • RECLEYMYD, as hawkys. Redo∣mitus, CATH.
  • RECLEYMYD, or chalangyd. Re∣clamatus
  • RECLEYMYN̄', or wythe feyn̄' (with stynt, S. withseyne, P.) Re∣clamo.
  • RECLEYMYN̄', or make tame. Domo (domestico, P.) redomo.
  • RECLEYMYNGE, of wyldenesse. Redomitacio.
  • (RECLUSE, or ankyr, supra. Ana∣chorita.)
  • RECORD, or wytnesse (record or witnesse, P.) Testimonium, tes∣tificacio, recordacio.
  • RECORDER, lytyl pype.3. [The musical instrument called a recorder appears to be the kind of flute of which a description and representation are given by Mersennus, designated as the "fluste d'Angleterre, que l'on appelle douce, et à neuf trous." Harmonie Univ. 1, p. 237. He exhibits the form and construction of a set of flutes which had been sent from England to one of the Kings of France, and these representations may serve to illustrate the observation of Bacon, that "the figure of recorders, and flutes, and pipes, are straight; but the recorder hath a less bore and a greater, above and below." Nat. Hist. S. 221. In Holland's version of Pliny the single pipe or recorder is mentioned. "Recorder, a pype, flevte à ix. trous." PALSG. Further information respecting the various flutes used during the middle ages is given by M. de Toulmon, in his Dissertaion on Musical In∣struments, Mem. des Antiqu. de France, xvii. p. 131. See Nares. The early note of song-birds was termed recording, probably, as Barrington suggests, from the instrument formerly called a recorder. "I recorde, as yonge byrdes do. Ie patelle. This byrde recordeth all redy, she wyll synge wtin a whyle." PALSG. "To record, as birds, regazouiller." SHERW.]Canula, C. F. in coraula.
  • Page  426RECORDYN lessonys. recordor, repeto (recordo, P.)
  • RECORDYN̄', or bere wytnesse. Testificor.
  • RECORDOWRE, wytnesse berer. Testis.
  • RECREACYON', or refreschynge (refeccion', P.) Recreatio,1. [Recordacio, MS. recreatio, K. P.]re∣focillacio.
  • RECREACYON', or howse of re∣freschynge.3. [This word occurs in the MS. between REDNESSE and REFECCYONE.]Recreatorium.
  • RECURYN̄, or a-ȝen getyn̄'. Re∣cupero.
  • RECURYN̄', of sekenesse. Con∣valeo, reconvaleo.
  • REDE, coloure. Rubeus, rubi∣cundus.
  • REED, of the fenne. Arundo, canna.
  • REED PYTTE, or fenne.3. [This word occurs in the MS. between REDNESSE and REFECCYONE.]Can∣netum, arundinetum, C. F.
  • REED, counsele, Consilium.
  • REEDE, on a booke (redyn bokys, K. P.) Lego.
  • REDARE, of bokys. Lector.
  • REDARE, or expownder of thyngys hard to vndyrstonde (redar or cow(n)celar in priuities, K. redar of counsellis and preuyteis, P.) Interpretator, edictor.
  • REDARE, of howsys. Calamator.
  • REDBRESTE, byrde. Rubellus, viridarius, frigella.
  • REDGOWND, sekenesse of yonge chyldryne.4. [Gownd signifies the foul matter of a sore, Ang.-Sax. ȝund, pus, sanies, as already noticed under the word GOWNDE of þe eye, p. 206. "Reed gounde, sickenesse of chyldren." PALSG. This eruptive humour is more commonly termed the Redgum, for which various remedies are to be found in old books of medicine. William Langham specially commends the water of columbine as "good for yong children to drinke against the redgum or fellon." Garden of Health, 1579. "Red-gum, a sickness of young children, scrophulus." GOULDM.]Scrophulus, C. F. scrophule, UG. in scortes.
  • REDY. Promptus, paratus.
  • REDYLY. Prompte, parate.
  • REDYNESSE. Promptitudo,
  • REDYN̄' howsys. Arundino, ca∣lamo, KYLW. (culmiso, P.)
  • REDYN̄', or expownyn̄' redellys, or parabol', and other privyteys, idem quod ondōn', supra in O. (parablys and odyr prevy termys, infra in vndoyn. S.)5. ["I rede, I gesse, ie diuine. Rede who tolde it me, and I wyll tell the trouthe. I rede or advise, ie conseille. Loke what you do I rede you." PALSG. Horman says, "Arede my dreme and I wyl say thou art Godis fellow." Ang.-Sax. araedan, conjectare. "Enigma, est sermo figuratus vel obscura locutio, vel questio obscura, que non intelli∣gitur nisi aperiatur, Anglice a redynge or demaunde." ORTUS.]
  • Page  427REDYNGE, of bokys. Lectura.
  • REDYNGE, colowre. Rubiculum, rubratura.
  • REDYNGE, of howsys. Arundi∣nacio.
  • REDYNGE, or expownynge of ry∣dellys, or oþer privyteys (vndo∣ynge of redellys and pryuynessys, K.) Interpretacio, edicio.
  • REDNESSE. Rubedo.
  • REDRESSYN̄. Dirigo, redirigo.
  • REFECCYŌN', (refet of fisshe, K. refet or fishe, H. reuet, P.)1. [This term may designate some kind of entremets, a reward or extra service of fish at a banquet: possibly it may denote the fast-day refection. Roquefort, howeer, gives—"Reffait: sorte de poisson de mer, rouget, parce qu'il est gros et gras" (refais).]Refectio, refectura.
  • REFECYD, or refeet (refeted, K. H. (reueted, P.)2. ["Reficio, to agayne stable, or to refete." MED. MS. CANT. Compare the use of the word "refetiden," (reficiebant, Vulg.) in the Wycliffite version, Deeds, c. xxviii.2.]Refectus, CATH.
  • REFORMYN̄'. Reformo.
  • REFREYNYN̄'. Refreno, CATH. cohibeo, compesco.
  • REFREYT, of a respowne (refreyth, S. respounde, K. refreyt or a ro∣spown', P.) Antistropha, CATH.
  • REFRESCHYD. Refocillatus, re∣creatus (refectus, P.)
  • REFRESCHYN̄'. Reficio, refocillo.
  • REFUCE, or owt caste, what so euer hyt be (refute, P.) Caducum, purgamentum.
  • REFUCYD. Refutatus.
  • REFUSYN̄', and forsakyn̄. Refuto, respuo, CATH. abdico.
  • REFUSYN, wythe hate. Repudio, C. F.
  • REFUSYNGE. Refutacio, recusacio.
  • REFUGE, or socowre (refute, K. P. refuce, S.)3. [The reading supplied by the King's Coll. MS.—Refute, is in accordance with the obsolete form of the word, as found in the Wycliffite version (Deut. xix. 12. Jer. xvi. 19: plur. refuytis, Ps. ciii. 18.) So also in the version of Vegicius ascribed to Trevisa, mention is made of a "refute to rynne to." (Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. B. i. c. 21.) In old French, Refuy.]Refugium, suc∣cursus.
  • REIAGGYN̄' (or reprevyn̄', infra.)4. [This verb, occurring in alphabetical order between Refusyn and Rehercyn̄, may have been written by the first hand—Regaggyn̄. It is used by an ancient writer on the virtues of herbs (Arund. MS. 42, f. 10 b.) Speaking of the cure of sore gums or "water cancre," as easy with prompt attention, he says—"I saw a worþy leche so angry & wroth with moderes & kepirs of children þt hadde longe a-byden, þt he reiagged hem hugely, and onneþis and (with) gret dyficulte durste he, or wolde, vnderfonge hem to cure." Skelton speaks of "beggars reiagged," (Why come ye nat to courte? v. 602,) which Mr. Dyce explains as signifying all-tattered.]Redarguo.
  • REHERCYN̄'. Recito.
  • REHERCYN̄' a thynge a-ȝen, or do the (sic) a thynge a-ȝen (re∣hercen' ageyne, or done ageyne, P.) Itero, recito.
  • REHERSYNGE. Recitacio.
  • REYHHE, fysche. Ragadia, KYLW.
  • REYKE, or royt, ydylle walky(n)ge abowt (reyke or royke, S.)5. [Forby gives the verb to Rake as still used in Norfolk, precisely in this sense. It means "to gad or ramble in mere idleness, without any immoral implication. It is often applied to truant children." Brockett has a similar word,—"Rake, v. to walk, to range or rove about. Su.-Got. reka, to roam."]Page  428Discursus, vagacio, vagitas, CATH. in vagor.
  • REYNE. Pluvia.
  • REYNEBOW. Iris.
  • REYN' FOWLE, bryd (or Wode∣wale, or Wodehake, infra.) Gaulus, C. F. picus, C. F. me∣ropes, C. F. (picus major, P.)1. [This name of the woodpecker is not given by the Glossarists of East Anglia as still used in that part of England; but in the North, as Brockett states, that bird is known by the popular appellation of the Rain-fowl, or Rain-bird, and its loud cry often re∣peated is supposed to prognosticate rain. The Romans called the woodpecker pluviae avis, for the same cause. Gesner gives amongst the names of the Picus in various countries,—"Anglis, a specht, vel a Wodpecker, vel raynbyrde."]
  • REYNYN̄', as kyngys. Regno.
  • REYNYN', water. Pluit, CATH.
  • REYNE WATER, or water of reyne. Nibata, CATH.
  • REYSYN̄' VP. Levo, sublevo, sus∣cito, erigo.
  • REYSYN' VP fro slepe (or wakyn̄, infra.) Excito, evigilo (ex∣pergefacio, P.)
  • REYSYNGE VP. Elevacio, ereccio, (exaltacio, P.)
  • REYSYNGE, or rerynge vp fro slepe. Expergefaccio, CATH.
  • REYSONE, or reysynge, frute. Uva passa, carica, UG. V. rase∣mus.
  • REEK, or golf (reyke, K. golfe or stak, P.) Arconius, acervus.
  • REEK, or smeke. Fumus.
  • REKKELES. Necgligens, incurius.
  • REKKELESLY. Necgligenter.
  • REKKELESNESSE (rekleshed, K.) Necgligencia, incuria.
  • REKKEN̄, or cha(r)gyn̄, or ȝen tale (chargyn or ȝenetale, K. reckyn' or chargen', or gyue tale, P.) Curo.
  • REKNARE. Computator.
  • REKNYN̄' or cowntyn' (rekkyn, S. reken', P.) Computo, CATH.
  • REKNYNGE. Computacio, com∣potus, racio.
  • (REKENYNGE, or a counte, K. a cowntes, H. accompte, P. Com∣potus.)
  • REEL, womannys ynstrument. Alabrum, C. F.
  • RELEEF.2. [In the Wycliffite version, Jos. x. 28, it is said of the utter destruction of Maceda,—"he lefte not þerinne nameli litle relyues,"—non dimisit in ea nisi parvas reliquias. Vulg. Roquefort explains Relief as signifying broken meat, the scraps of the kitchen; it is thus used in the Wycliffite version, as in Ruth, c. ii.—"Sche brouȝt forþ and ȝaf to her þe relifis of hir mete;"—and Matt. xiv.—"Thei token the relifis of broken gobetis twelve cofyns ful." In the version of Barth. de Propriet. Rerum, attributed to Trevisa, it is said of a banquet,—"At the laste comyth frute and spyces, and whan they haue ete, bord clothes and relyf ben borne awaye." In Caxton's Boke for Travellers,—"The leuynge of the table, le relief de la table." See also Maundevile's Travels, p. 250, ed. 1725. The term seems also applied to the basket in which the fragments were carried away; as in a list of kitchen furniture, in Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. f. 25. b.—"Relef, sporticula."]Reliquie.
  • RELEEF, or brocaly of mete (or blevynge, supra.) Fragmen∣tum, fragmen, mistelevium, COMM.
  • RELECE, or for-ȝeuenesse (for∣gyuenesse, P.) Relaxacio.
  • Page  429RELES, tast or odowre.

    1. This word has occurred previously,—Odowre or relece, p. 362. It occurs in Lyd∣gate's Destr. of Thebes, in the narration of the burning of the bodies of the Greeks de∣livered by Theseus to their wives, for funeral rites,

    "But what shuld I eny lenger dwelle
    The old ryytys by and by to telle—
    How the bodyes wer to ashes brent;
    Nor of the gommes in the flaumbe spent,
    To make the hayre swetter of relees."

    Arund. MS. 119, f. 76 vo.
    Odor.
  • RELECYN̄'. Relaxo.
  • RELENTYN̄'. Resolvo, liquo, es, 2 conj. CATH. liquo, as, prime conj. secundum CATH.
  • RELEVYN̄'. Relevo.
  • RELIGYONE. Religio.
  • RELYGYOWS. Religiosus.
  • RELYKE. Reliquia.
  • RELYN̄', wythe a reele. Alabriso.
  • REEM, kyngdam. Regnum.
  • (REEME, paper, P.)
  • REEM, or rewme of the hed, or of the breste. Reuma.
  • REMEDY. Remedium.
  • REMELAWNT (remenaunt, resi∣duum, F.)

    2. The use of the obsolete form of the word remnant appears in the Craven Glossary, v. Remlin, and in Palmer's Devonshire Words, v. Remlet. It occurs in the inventory of effects of a merchant at Newcastle, in 1571, in whose shop were certain "yeardes of worssett in Remlauntes." Durham Wills and Inv. Surtees Soc. vol. i. 362. So also in the Boke of Curtasye, amongst rules for behaviour at table;

    "Byt not on thy brede, and lay hyt doun,
    That is no curteyse to vse in towne;
    But breke as myche as þu wylle ete,
    The remelant to pore þu schalle lete."

    Sloane MS. 1986, f. 18 b.
    Residuus, reliquus.
  • REMYN̄', as ale or other lycoure (or cremyn̄', supra).3. [Compare Craven Dialect, v. Reamed. Ang.-Sax. Ream, Rem, cream. "Reme, quaccum." CATH. ANG.]Spumat, impersonale.
  • REMISSYŌN', or forȝevenesse. Remissio.
  • REMOWN, or remevyn̄ (remowne, K. S. remouyn', or remeuyn', P.) Amoveo, removeo.
  • REN, or rennynge. Cursus.
  • RENNARE. Cursor.
  • RENNARE, or vnstable a-bydare. Fugitivus, fugitiva, profugus, profuga, currax, C. F. et UG.
  • RENDERYN̄'. Reddo.
  • RENDERYNGE. Reddicio.
  • REENDYN̄'. Lacero, lanio, CATH.
  • RENDYNGE a-sundyr. Laceracio.
  • RENLYS, or rendlys, for mylke (rennelesse, K. renels, P.) Co∣agulum, CATH. et C. F. lactis, CATH. et UG.
  • REENE, of a brydylle. Habena, lira (sic, lora, P.)
  • REENGE, or rowe. Series.
  • RENNYN̄', or lepyn̄'. Curro, CATH.
  • RENNYN̄', as water, and other lycure. Manat, curanat (sic, emanat, P.)
  • RENNYN̄' be-forne. Precurro.
  • RENNYNGE, of bestys. Cursus.
  • RENNYNGE, of water, or oþer ly∣cure. Manacio.
  • RENNYNGE, of lycoure not stond∣ynge, as dyschmetys, or other lyke. Liquidus, fluvidus.
  • Page  430RENNYNGE, game. Bravium, CATH.
  • RENT, as clothys. Laceratus.
  • RENT, and raggyd (iaggyd, S.) Lacerosus, CATH.
  • RENT, ȝerly dette. Redditus, ne∣frendicium, CATH.
  • RENTE GADERERE. Censualis,1. [Sensualis, MS. and P. "Censualis. i. officialis qui sensum (sic) exigit provincialem." ORTUS.] C. F.
  • RENUWYN̄'.2. [The reding of the MS. may possibly be RENNWYN̄'.]Renovo.
  • REPARACYON, or reparaylynge, or a-mendynge of olde thynggys. Reparacio, sartum, C. F.
  • REPARE, hervystmanne. Mes∣sor, messellus, C. F. metellus, UG.
  • REPARYN̄' (or makyn aȝene, K. make ageyn, P.) Reparo, reficio.
  • REPE corne. Meto.
  • REPENTYN̄. Penitet.
  • REPYNGE, of corne. Messura, messio.
  • REPONE, of a balle or oþer lyke. Repulsa, repulus.
  • REPORTYN̄', or bere a-wey thynge þat hathe be seyde or tawȝte. Reporto.
  • REPREEF (repreve, K. S.) Oppro∣brium, improperium (vitupe∣rium, P.)
  • REPREFABLE. Reprehensibilis, increpabilis, culpabilis.
  • REPREVYN̄'. Reprehendo, depre∣hendo.
  • REPREVYN, or reiaggyn̄'. Redar∣guo.
  • REQUIRYN̄'. Requiro.
  • RERE, or nesche, as eggys (as eyre, H. eyyre, S.)3. [Bishop Kennett, in his Glossarial Collections, Lansd. MS. 1033, gives "Reer, raw, as, the meat is reer; a reer roasted egg. Kent. I had rather have meat a little reer than overdone." Ang.-Sax. hrere, crudus. Forby and Major Moor notice the word as retained in East Anglia. It is not uncommonly used by old writers. Thus Andrew Boorde, in his Breviary of Health, of things that comfort the heart, says "maces and ginger, rere egges, and poched egges not hard, theyr yolkes be a cordiall," and he re∣commends for Satyriasis to eat two or three "new layd egges rosted rere," with pow∣dered nettle seed. Langham, in his Garden of Health, frequently commends their use. "Reere, as an egge is, mol." PALSG. See also Nares.]Mollis, (sor∣bilis, P.)
  • RERE, or motewoke, supra in M. (mothewoke, S. Dimollis.)
  • RERE SOPERE.4. [Obsonium is defined in the Ortus Vocabulorum to be "parvus cibus et delicatus qui post cenam contra somnum sumitur." The curious notice of the habits of his times, given by Harrison, in which he ascribes the introduction of reare suppers to "hardie Canutus," is well known, and has been cited already in the note on BEUER, vol. i. p. 34. Horman observes, in his Vulgaria,—"Rere suppers (comesatio) slee many men. He kepeth rere suppers tyll mydnyght. In this vitaylers shoppe there is sette to sale all conceyttis and pleasuris for rere suppers and iunkettis and bankettis." Palsgrave has—"Rere supper, bancquet. Rere banket, Ralias," and Cotgrave renders "regoubillonner, To make a reare supper, steale an after supper; bancquet late anights." See Nares, v. Rere-banquet, and Halliwell's Dictionary.]Obsonium, C. F.
  • (RERYN̄', or revyn of slepe, infra in wakyn̄'. Excito.)
  • RESYNYN̄'. Resigno.
  • RESPYTE, or leysure, of tyme (res∣pight, or leyser, or tyme, P.) Inducie.
  • Page  431RESPOWNE (respounde, K. respon, P.) Responsorium.
  • REEST, as flesche (resty, P.) Ran∣cidus.
  • (RESTNESSE, of flesshe, K. resty∣nesse, P. Rancor.)
  • RESTARE, or a-restare. Arestator.
  • REST, after trauayle. Quies, re∣quies.
  • RESTYN̄', after trauayle. Quiesco, requiesco.
  • REESTYN̄', as flesche. Ranceo, CATH.
  • RESTORYN̄', or fulfyllyn̄ a-ȝene. Restauro.
  • RESTORYN̄, or ȝyldyn̄ a-ȝene. Restituo.
  • RESTREYNYN̄', Restringo.
  • RESUN, or resone. Racio.
  • RESUNABLE. Racionabilis.
  • RETTYN̄' tymbyr, hempe, or oþer lyke (retyn tymbyr, flax or hempe, K. P.)1. [In Norfolk, to Ret still signifies to soak or macerate in water; and a pond for soaking hemp is called a Retting-pit. See Forby's account of the modes of retting. He conjectures that the derivation of the term may be from Ang.-Sax. rith, rivus. Sea weeds were formerly called Reets. Bishop Kennett has the following note,—"Reits, sea weed, of some called reits, of others wrack, and of the Thanet men wore," &c. "Leppe, sea-grasse, sea-weed, reets." COTG. The term ot Ret may be derived from the Flemish,—"het vlas Reeten, to hickle, bruise, or breake flax: een Reete, a hitchell with teeth to bruise flax." Hexham's Netherdutch Dictionary. "Reten, Rouir du lin ou du chanvre." Olinger.]Rigo, infundo.
  • RECTYN̄', or rettyn̄', or wytyn̄' (rettyn, or a-rectyn, or weytyn, S. rettyn, K. P.) Imputo, re∣puto, ascribo.
  • RETURNYN̄', or turnyn̄ a-ȝene. Revertor, redio.
  • REWARDE. Retribucio, merces.
  • REWARDE, at mete, whan fode fallythe of the seruyce (qwane fode faylyth at þe seruyse, S. rewarde of mete whan fode faylethe at the boorde, P.)

    2. In the curious poem "de Officiariis in curiis dominorum," it is said,—

    "Whenne brede faylys at borde aboute,
    The marshalle gares sett wtouten doute
    More brede, þat clade is a rewarde."

    Sloane MS. 1386, f. 31.

    "Rewarde of meate, entremetz." PALSG. See the account of Rewards in the Rule of the Household of the Princess Cecill, mother of Edw. IV. (Household Ordinances, *38.) and the Service to the Archbishop of York, in 1464, (Leland, Coll. vol. vi. p. 7.) The dessert was thus called, it appears, in ancient festivities. "Impomentum est extremum ferculum quod ponitur in mensa, ut poma, nuces et pira." ORTUS.

    Auc∣torium, CATH. et UG. in augeo.
  • REWARDE, yn þe ende of mete, of frutys. Impomentum, UG. in pomo.
  • REWARDE, for syngarys, and myn∣st(r)allys. Siparium, UG. in sipe.
  • REWARDYN̄'. Rependo, CATH. re∣munero, reddo (recompenso, P.)
  • REVE, lordys serwawnte. Pre∣positus.
  • REUEL.
  • REUELOWRE.
  • REUERCE. Contrarium, oppo∣situm.
  • REVYLYN̄'. Aporio, C. F.
  • REVYN̄', or spoylyn̄'. Spolio, rapio.
  • REVYN̄, or be vyolence take awey, or hyntyn'. Rapio.
  • Page  432REVYN̄' of reest (or wakyn̄', infra). Inquieto.
  • REVYNGE, or spoylynge. Spo∣liacio.
  • REVYNGE of reste. Inquietacio.
  • REVYNGE, or dystruynge of pees. Turbacio, perturbacio.
  • REWLE, ynstrument. Regula.
  • REWLE, or gouernawnce. Guber∣nacio, regimen.
  • REWLE, of techynge. Regula, norma.
  • REWLYN̄, wythe instrument. Re∣gulo.
  • REWLYN̄', or gouernyn̄'. Guberno, rego.
  • (REWME of the hed or of the breste, supra in reem. Reuma.)
  • REVOKYN̄', or wythe clepyn̄ (rewkyn, P.) Revoco.
  • RYAL, of foom or berme (ryal, or fom of berme, K. ryall fome or barme, P.)1. ["Riall of wyne, fome, brouée, fleur." PALSG. Compare the Norfolk provincialism, to Rile, to stir up liquor and make it turbid, by moving the sediment. The figurative application of the word, so often heard in America, appears from Forby to be purely East Anglian. See Bartlett's Americanisms, v. To Roil, and Rily, turbid.]Spuma, CATH.
  • (RYALTE, supra in realte, P.)
  • RYBAND, of a clothe (ribawnde or liour, K. lyoure, P.) Limbus, CATH. et UG. redimiculum, CATH. (nimbus, CATH. P.)
  • RYBAWDE (rybawder', P.) Ri∣baldus, ribalda.
  • RYBAWDERYFE (ribawdrye, K. P.) Ribaldria.
  • RYBBE (bone, P.) Costa.
  • RYBBE, ynstrument.2. ["A ryb for lyne. To ryb lyne, costare, ex(costare), nebridare." CATH. ANG. Pals∣grave has—"Ribbe for flaxe." The cleaning or dressing of flax was termed ribbing, as in the version of Glanvile de Propriet. Rerum, attributed to Trevisa, lib. xvii. c. 97. Flax, it is stated, after being steeped and dried, is "bounde in praty nytches and boundels, and afterward knocked, beaten and brayed, and carfled, rodded and gnodded, ribbed and hekled, and at the last sponne." Rippling flax, the North Country term, is possibly synonymous with ribbing. See Ray, N. Country Words, and Brockett, who adds,—Su.-Got., repa lin, linum vellere, Teut. repen, stringere semen lini." Bishop Kennett also notices it thus,—"To ripple flax, to wipe off the seed vessels, Bor. Rather to repple flax with a repple or stick. A. S. repel, baculus. Rippo, or repple, a long walking-staff carried by countrymen. Cheshire." In an Inventory (taken at North∣allerton?) in 1499, are mentioned,—"a hekyll, j. d. a ryppyll came. iij. d—a payr of wool cames, v. d." Wills and Invent. Surtees Soc. vol. i. p. 104. See RYPELYNGE of flax, infra.]Rupa, DICC.
  • RYBBE SKYNNE (rybskyn, H. P.)

    3. This part of the appliances of a spinner is doubtless what is now called in Norfolk "a Tripskin,—a piece of leather, worn on the right-hand side of the petticoat by spinners with the rock, on which the spindle plays and the yarn is pressed by the hand of the spinner." FORBY. "A rybbynge skyne, nebrida, pellicudia." CATH. ANG. "Pellicudia, a rubbynge skynne." ORTUS. "Rybbe skynne" (no French word.) PALSG. See the curious list of articles pledged for ale to Elinour Rummyng:

    "And some went so narrowe,
    They layde to pledge their wharrowe,
    Their rybskyn and theyr spyndell."

    Skelton's Works, ed. Dyce, vol. i. p. 104, and ii. p. 168.
    Melotula.
  • Page  433RYBBYN̄' flax, hempe, or oþer lyke. Metaxo.
  • RYBYBE. Vitula, CATH. in vitulus.
  • RYBBEWORTE, herbe. Lanciola.
  • RYCE, frute. Risia, vel risi, n. indecl. secundum quosdam, vel risium, C. F. vel risorum gra∣num, C. F. et COMM. (rizi vel granum Indicum, P.)
  • RYCHARDE, propyr name. Ri∣cardus.
  • RYCHE. Dives, locuples, C. F. et CATH. opulentus.
  • RYCHESSE. (ryches, P.) Divicie, opulencia, opis, opes.
  • RYCHEST. Ditissimus.
  • RYCHELLYS (richelle, K.)1. [Compare CENSE, or incense, or rychelle, supra, vol. i. p. 66; and SCHYPPE, ves∣selle to put yn rychel, infra. "Rekels, incensum, olibanum." CATH. ANG. Incense was called in Anglo-Saxon Stor, (storium, the aromatic gum,) and Ricels, Recels. So also Ricels-faet, thuribulum, and Ricels-buce, acerra, a pyx or box for incense.]Thus, incensum, C. F.
  • RYDARE, horsman̄. Equester, (eques, equitator, P.)
  • RYDEL, curtyne. Cortina.
  • RYDEL, or probleme. Enigma, problema, paradigma, C. F. (probleuma, P.)
  • RYDYL, of corn̄ clensynge (ridil for wynwyn of corne, K. for weno∣wynge, P.) Cribrum, CATH. capisterium, C. F. ventilabrum, C. F. et CATH. currifrugium, KYLW. (velabrum, P.K.S.)
  • RYDELYN̄'. Cribro, capisterio.
  • RYDYN̄'. Equito.
  • RYDYNGE. Equitatus.
  • RYDOWRE, grete hardenesse (ri∣dowre or rigour, K.H.P.)

    2. Tyrwhitt, in his Glossary to Chaucer, gives the word "Reddour," explained as strength, violence. It is the old French "Redour, reddur,—Roideur, fermeté, dureté." ROQUEF. In a curious poem on sacred subjects, XV. cent. Add. MS. 10,053, it occurs thus (p. 159)—

    Also thenke with hert stedefast,
    Whan thou wote that Goddis mercy is,
    Hou mekels shal be yf thou can taste
    The reddur of his rightwesnesse," &c.

    And it is said in the context that the wicked at the day of doom "shol be dampned thorgh reddour of rightwesnesse," &c.

    Rigor.
  • RYE, corn̄. Siligo, C. F. et CATH.
  • RYYF, or opynly knowe (knowen, P.) Manifestus, puplicatus.
  • RYFELYN̄', or robbyn̄'. Spolio, perdo.
  • RYFLOWRE (ryflar or rifelor, P.) Depredator, spoliator.
  • RYFTE, in a walle, or boord, or oþer lyke (ryft or crany, P.) Rima, UG. et C. F. riscus, CATH.
  • RYFTE, or ryvynge of cloþe, or cuttynge. Scissura.
  • RYGGE, of a lond. Porca, CATH. et UG. (agger, P.)
  • RYGGE BONE of bakke (rigbone or bakbone, P.) Spina, spondile, C. F.
  • RYGGYN̄' howsys. Porco, CATH.
  • RYGGYNGE of howsys. Porcacio.
  • RYGHT, in forme of makynge, or growynge (ryth, with owtyn wrongnesse, K.) Rectus.
  • RYGHTE, of truthe (ryth or trwthe, K.) Justus, equus.
  • Page  434RYGHTE FOORTHE. Recte, directe.
  • RYGHTFULLE, idem quod ryghte, supra.
  • RYGHTFULLE, yn belevynge, and levynge (in leuenesse and leu∣ynge, P.) Ortodoxus, C. F.
  • RYGHTFULNESSE, or ryghtwys∣nesse. Justicia, equitas, recti∣tudo.
  • RYGHTE PARTE of a beest. Dexter.
  • RY(G)HTEYN̄', or make ryghte (ryhtyn, K. rythyn or maken ryth, P.) Rectifico.
  • RYLLE, thynne clothe.1. [This word occurs in the MS. between Ryggynge and Ryght. Hereafter will be found (under letter T)—Thinne clothe that is clepyd a Rylle. In the Ortus, Ralla is explained to be "a Raster clothe," which appears to have been used in shaving. See RASTYR HOWSE, supra, p. 424. Rylle is perhaps only another form of the word Rail, Ang.-Sax. raegl, hraegel, vestimentum. See Nares v. Raile. "Rayle for a womans necke, crevechief en quarttre doubles." PALSG. Sherwood gives—"a woman's raile, Pignon," and Cotgrave renders "un collet à peignoir,—a large raile which women put about their neckes when they comb themselves."]Ralla, UG. V. in B.
  • RYM, of a whele. Timpanum, CATH. circumferencia, CATH.
  • RYME. Rithmicus, vel rithmus, (rithma, UG. H.)
  • RYMARE. Gerro, UG. V. et C. F.
  • RYMYN̄'. Rithmico.
  • RYME, frost. Pruina.
  • RYMPYL, or rymple (or wrynkyl, infra.) Ruga, rugadia, KYLW.
  • RYMPLYD. Rugatus.
  • RYMTHE, or space, or rowme (rymthy, P.)2. [In the Book of Christian Prayers, Lond. 1590, f. 38 vo. it is said,—"Giue vnto the shepheardes, whome thou hast vouchsafed to put in thy roomth, the gift of prophesie." In a letter regarding the building of Abp. Whitgift's Hospital at Croydon, 1596, the writer states of certain trenches made in preparing foundation walls,—"We are now fillinge the voyde rometh therin." Ducarel's Croydon, p. 155. See also Drayton, Polyolb. s. 6.]Sapcium.
  • RYMTHE, or leysure, of tyme. Oportunitas, vel spacium tem∣poris.
  • RYMTHYN̄, or make rymthe and space. Eloco, UG. perloco, evacuo, (vacuo, P.)
  • RYYNCYN̄'.3. [RYYNTYN̄'. MS. The King's Coll. MS. has Ryncyn, and other readings are,—Ryynsyng, and Ryyncyn. Vincto may be an error for humecto. Plasgrave gives the verb to rynce a cup or clothes, "Raincer."]Rigo, vincto, as, lavaculo, (humecto, lavatilo, P.)
  • RYYNCYNGE (rynsinge of vessell, K. P.) Rigacio.
  • RYNGE. Anulus.
  • RYNGE WYRME. Serpigo, ser∣pego, C. F. et CATH. (serpedo, P.)
  • RYNGYN̄' bellys. Pulso.
  • RYPE. Maturus.
  • RYPENESSE. Maturitas.
  • RYPELYNGE, of flax, or oþer lyke.4. [Amulsio, MS. See the note on RYBBE, supra. Rippling flax is a term still in common use in North Britain. See Jamieson.]Avulsio.
  • RYPYN̄', or wax rype. Maturio, CATH.
  • RYPYN̄', or make rype. Maturo, CATH. et C. F.
  • RYPYN̄', or begynne to rype. Ma∣turesco.
  • RYSARE. Surrector.
  • RYSARE, or rebellowre a-ȝen pees. Rebellator, insurrector.
  • Page  435RYSCHE, or rusche. Cirpus, jun∣cus.1. [Junctus, ci, MS. junceus, P.]
  • RYSYN̄' vp fro sege. Surgo.
  • RYSYN̄' erly. Manico, CATH.
  • RYSE fro dede, or dethe. Resurgo.
  • RYSYN̄' a-ȝen pees. Insurgo, con∣surgo.
  • RYSYN̄' aȝen̄ a persōn' to dōn hym worschyppe (risyn aȝens a lord to don worchepe, K. reuerance, S. rysyn ageynst a lorde for worshyp, P.) Assurgo.
  • RYSYNGE vp fro sete, or restynge place. Surrexio, ressurrectio.
  • RYSYNGE a-ȝen pees. Insurrexio, rebellio.
  • RYSYNGE a-ȝene persone, for wor∣schyppe (rising up to worchype, K. P.) Assurrexio.
  • RYVE, or rake. Rastrum, CATH.
  • RYVERE, water. Rivus, (rivu∣lus, P.)
  • RYVYN̄', or rakyn̄'. Rastro.
  • RYVYN̄', or reendyn̄'. Lacero.
  • RYVYN̄', or clyvyn̄, as men̄ doo woodde. Findo.
  • RYVYN̄' to londe, as schyppys or botys, fro water. Applico, ap∣pello, C. F.
  • RYVYNGE vp to lond, fro water. Applicacio, applicatus.
  • ROO, beest. Capreus, capreolus, CATH. et COMM.
  • ROOBE, garment. Mutatorium.
  • ROBERD, propyr name. Ro∣bertus.
  • ROBBYN̄ (or revyn, K. S. P.) Furor, latrocinor, predor, (spolio, P.)
  • ROBBOWRE, on the londe. Spolia∣tor, predo, vispilio, KYLW.
  • ROBBOWRE, on the see. Pirata, CATH. vispilio, KYLW.
  • ROBOWS, or coldyr.2. [Compare COOLDER, supra, vol. I. p. 86. In the Wardrobe Account of Piers Courteys, Keeper of the Wardrobe 20 Edw. IV. 1480, occurs a payment to "John Carter, for cariage away of a grete loode of robeux, that was left in the strete after the reparacyone made uppon a hous apperteignyng unto the same Warderobe." Harl. MS. 4780. In later times the word is written "rubbrysshe." Thus Horman says, in his Vulgaria,—"Battȝ and great rubbrysshe serueth to fyl up in the myddell of the wall;" and Plasgrave gives "Robrisshe of stones, plastras, fourniture." Forby gives Rubbage as the term used in East Anglia.]Petrosa, petro, CATH.
  • ROCHE, fysche. Rocha, rochia, COMM.
  • ROCHE, stōn. Rupa, rupes, CATH. scopulus, CATH. saxum.
  • ROCHET, clothe. Supara.
  • RODE, of londe. Roda.
  • ROODE, crosse or rode lofte. Crux, Theostenoferum.
  • ROODE, of shyppys stondyng'.3. [The terminal contraction may here have the power of ys,—stondyngys, the Roads, places where vessels stand or lie at anchor. The printed editions give—"Rode of shyppes stondynge."]Bitalassum.
  • RODDE. Contus, (pertica, P.)
  • ROOF, of an howse. Tectum, doma, C. F. KYLW.
  • ROOF TREE, (or ruff tree, infra.) Festum, C. F.
  • ROGGYN, or mevyn̄' (or schoggyn̄, infra; rokkyn, K.) Agito.
  • ROGGYN, or waveryn' (or schakyn̄, infra.) Vacillo.
  • ROGGYNGE, or (s)chakynge. Va∣cillacio.
  • Page  436ROYTYN̄', or gōn ydyl a-bowte (roytyn, or roylyn, or gone ydyl abowte, P.) Vagor, CATH. dis∣curro.1. [This may be derived from rotare; as also irregular soldiery were termed, in Low Latin rutarii or rotarii. Palsgrave gives the verb "I rowte—I assemble together in routes, or I styre aboute, je me arroute. I lyke nat this geare, that ye commens begynneth to route on this facyon." See Jamieson, v. Royt.]
  • ROOK, bryd. Frugella, C. F. KYLW. graculus.
  • ROOK, of the chesse. Rocus.
  • ROKE, myste. Nebula, CATH. (mephis, P.)
  • ROKKE, yn þe see, idem quod roche, supra.
  • ROKKE, of spynnynge. Colus, C. F. UG. rocca, UG.
  • ROKET, of the rokke (roket of spynnynge, P.) Librum, C. F. pensum, DICC. CATH. et C. F.
  • ROKY, or mysty. Nebulosus.
  • ROKKE chylder, yn a cradyle. Cunagito, motito (vel movillo, S. agitare cuans, P.)
  • ROLLE. Rotula, matricula, CATH.
  • ROLLYN̄'. Volvo, CATH.
  • ROLLYNGE, or turnynge a-bowte. Volucio.
  • ROMAWNCE idem quod Ryme,2. [Rome, MS.]supra; et Rithmichum, Roma∣gium, KYLW.
  • ROMAWNCE MAKARE. Melopes, C. F.
  • ROME, cyte. Roma.
  • ROMELYNGE, or privy mysterynge (preuy mustringe, P.) Rumi∣nacio, mussitacio, CATH.
  • RONNON̄,3. [The power of the terminal contraction is questionable, and may be er—as in uer.] as mylke (ronnyn as mylke or other lycoure, K. P.) Coagulatus.
  • (RONNYN, as dojoun, or masere, or oþer lyke, H. P.)4. [RONNYN appears to signify congealed or run together,—Ang.-Sax. Gerunnen, coagulatus, as milk is coagulated by rennet, called in Gloucestershire running. See also Jamieson, v. To Rin, to become curdled, &c. As here used in reference to the knotted wood, of which masers were made, the term RONNYN seems to describe the coagulated appearance of the mottled grain, not dissimilar to ropy curds. See the note on MASERE, supra, p. 328. In the note on DORON̄, p. 125, it has been suggested that the reading of the MS. may be corrupt, and that the word should be Dogon̄'. In the Winchester MS. is found—"Doion̄', Dogena." This various reading had not been noticed, when the above mentioned note was printed. Dojoun, or dudgeon, appears to denote some kind of wood, used in like manner as the motley-grained material called Maser, but its precise nature has not been ascertained.]
  • ROOP. Funis, restis, corda.
  • ROPAR. Scenefactor, CATH. et UG. in scenos.
  • ROPYNGE, ale or oþer lycowre (ropy as ale, K. H. of ale, S.) Viscosus.5. [Riscosus, MS.]
  • RORE, or truble amonge þe puple.6. [Hall, relating the wiles practised by the Duke of Gloucester, says he persuaded the Queen that it was inexpedient to surround the young King Edward with a strong force, when he was brought to London for his coronation, for fear of reviving old variance of parties, "and thus should all the realme fal in a roare." Horman says—"all the world was full of fere and in a roare (sollicitudinis complebatur)." "Rore, trouble, trouble." PALSG.]Tumultus, commotio, disturbium.
  • Page  437ROORYN̄, as beestys. Rugio, CATH. irrugio.
  • ROORYN̄', or chaungyn on chaffare fro a nother (roryn, or chaungyn chaffare, K.) Cambio, CATH.
  • ROORYN̄', or ruffelyn̄' amonge dyuerse thyngys (rooryn or purlyn, amonge sundry thynges, H. P.) Manumitto.
  • RORYNGE, crye of beestys. Ru∣gitus, mugitus.
  • RORYNGE, or changynge of chaffer for a noþer. Cambium, per∣mutacio, commutacio.
  • ROSE, flowre. Rosa.
  • ROSE, propyr name. Rosa.
  • ROSE MARY, herbe (Rosemaryne, K.) Rosmarinus, rosa marina.
  • ROSEERE (rosiȝere, K.) Rosetum.
  • ROSYNE, gumme. Resina.
  • ROSPEYS, wyne. Vinum rosatum.
  • ROSPYNGE, or bolkynge (balkynge, S.) Eructacio.
  • ROOSTARE, or hastelere. Assator.
  • ROOSTYD. Assatus.
  • ROSTYD METE. Ascibarium.
  • ROST YRYN̄', or gradyryn̄', Cra∣ticula, crates, CATH.
  • ROSTYD, sum what brennyd (rost∣lyd, somwhat brent, P.) Ustillatus.
  • ROOSTYNGE. Assatura.
  • ROOSTYN̄. Asso, (cremo, P.)
  • ROOSTONE (rostelyn, K. rostlyn, H. P.) Ustulo, ustillo, CATH.
  • ROSTLYNGE. Ustyllacio.
  • ROT, or rotynge (rott, or corrup∣cion, K. P.) Corrupcio, pu∣trefaccio.
  • ROOT, of vse and custome (rot, or vse in custom, P.) Habitus, consuetudo, assuetudo.
  • ROTE, of a thynge growynge. Radix.
  • ROTYN̄, or take rote, as treys and herbys. Radico.
  • ROOTON̄, or turne to corrupcyon. Corrumpo, putreo.
  • ROTYN̄', as eyre. Flactesco.
  • ROTYNGE, or takyinge rote yn waxynge (rotynge in the grounde, K. J.) Radicacio.
  • ROTYNGE, to corruūpcyon chang∣yn̄ge. Corrupcio.
  • (ROTON, P. Corruptus, putridus.)
  • ROWGHE, as here or oþer lyke (row, K. H. S.) Hispidus, hirsutus.
  • ROWGHE, or vngoodely in chere (row, or vngodyly, K.) Torvus.
  • ROWGHE, scharp or knotty (row, sharp, and knottyd, H.) S(c)a∣ber, C. F.
  • ROWARE, yn a water. Remex, CATH. (remigex, S.)
  • ROBARE, or robbar yn the see (rovare, or thef of the se, K. rowar as thyf on the see, P.) Pirata, UG. CATH.
  • ROWCHERE. Acrimonia, UG. in acuo.
  • ROW CLOTHE, as faldynge, and oþer lyke. Endromis vel en∣droma,1. [Emdromis and Emdroma, MS. the reading in the Catholicon is as above given: the term signified a shaggy garment, used in the arena, 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉. Compare FALDYNGE, supra, p. 147.] CATH. birrus, amphi∣balus, sarabarra,2. [Sarabarsa, MS. The Winchester MS. gives Sarabarra, UG. V. in Rua. "Sarabula, villate vestes." ORTUS. See Ducange.] UG. V.
  • ROWDYONYS, blaste, or qwyrlwynd (rowdyows, S. whirlewind, K. rowdyons, P.) Turbo.
  • Page  438ROWE, or reenge. Series, linea.
  • ROWEL, of a spore. Stimulus, KYLW.
  • ROWHE, or reyhe, fysche (rowe∣fysshe, K. rowghe, P.) Ragadies.
  • (ROWHYN̄', or cowghyn, supra in hostyn̄'. Rewyn, S.)
  • ROWYN̄', yn wqatyr. Navigo.
  • ROWYN̄', wythe orys. Remigo.
  • ROW to lond, or lede a boote or a shyppe to londe (ledyn a boote or schyppyn, S.) Subduco, in∣duco.
  • ROWYNGE. Remigacio.
  • ROWYNGE SETE yn a schyppe. Transtrum, CATH. C. F.
  • ROWM, space (or rymthe, supra.) Spacium.
  • ROWNDE, as balle. Rotundus.
  • ROWNDE, as a spere or a staffe (a shaft, S.) Teres.
  • ROWNDE, for fetnesse. Obesus, UG. in edo.
  • ROWNDE GOBET, of what so hyt be. Globus, UG.
  • ROWNDEL. Rotundale.
  • ROWNDENESSE, of a balle or oþer lyke. Rotunditas.
  • ROWNDENESSE, of a spere or a staffe. Teritudo.
  • ROWNE, of a fysche. Liqua∣men.
  • ROWNYN̄' to-geder.

    1. "To rowne, susurrare. A rownere, susurro." CATH. ANG. In Pynson's "Boke to lerne French," is the admonition,—"and loke thou rowne nat in non eris—et garde toy d'escouter en nullez orailles." Plasgrave gives the verbs to "rounde in counsaylle," dire en secret, and to "rounde one in the eare," suroreiller. In a sermon at Paul's Cross by R. Wimbledon, given by Fox, it is said,—"It is good that euerye ruler of cominalties that they be not lad by follyes ne by none other eare rowner." Acts nad Mon. Anno 1389. Ang.-Sax. Runian, mussitare.

    "Yiff that youre lorde also yee se drynkynge,
    Looke that ye be in rihte stable sylence,
    Withe oute lowde lauhtre or jangelynge,
    Rovnynge, japynge or other insolence."

    Treatise of Curtesy, Harl, MS. 5086, fol. 87, vo.

    Susurro, CATH.
  • ROWYNYNGE (sic) to-gedyr. Su∣surrium, CATH.
  • ROWTARE, yn slepe. Stertor, stertrix.
  • ROWTYN̄, yn slepe (rowtyn or snoryn, P.) Sterto, CATH.
  • ROWTYNGE, yn slepe. Ster∣tura.
  • RODYR, of a schyppe (rothir, K. royther, H. royer, S.) Am∣plustre, C. F. temo, CATH. plec∣trum, clavus.
  • (ROTHYR, or maschel, supra, or maschscherel. Remulus, pal∣mula, mixtorium.)
  • RUBBYN̄', or chafyn̄'. Frico.
  • RUBBYNGE. Confricacio.
  • RUDDY, sum what reede. Rufus, fulvus, CATH. flavus, C. F.
  • RUDDOK, reed breest (roddok, birde, P.) Viridarius, rubellus, frigella.
  • RUDDŌN', idem quod rubbyn̄', supra.2. [Mr. Halliwell gives to "Rud, to rub, to polish, Devon," overlooked by the West Country Glossarists.]
  • RUWE, herbe (rwe, K. P.) Ruta.
  • RUFFE, fysche. Sparrus.
  • Page  439RUFFE, candel.1. [A Ruffie or Roughie, according to Jamieson, signifies in Eskdale a torch used in fishing with the lister by night; probably, as he supposes, from the rough material of which it is formed. A wick clogged with tallow is termed a Ruffy. Roughie in N. Britain signifies also brushwood or heather. Funalia were torches formed of ropes twisted together and dipped in pitch.]Hirsepa, funale, CATH. C. F. et UG. in fos.
  • RUFFLYD, or snarlyd. Innodatus, illaqueatus.
  • RUFFELYN̄, or snarlyn̄ (swarlyn, S.)2. ["I ruffle clothe or sylke, I bring them out of their playne foldynge; je plionne, je froisse. See how this lawne is shruffylled." (sic.) PALSG.]Innodo (illaqueo, S.)
  • RUFFELYN̄', or debatyn̄' (or dis∣cordyn, K. P.) Discordo.
  • RUFFLYNGE, or snarlynge. Illa∣queacio, innodacio.
  • RUFFLYNGE, or debate. Discencio, discordia.
  • (RUFFE of an hows, supra in rofe, P.)
  • RUFF TREE of an howse (rufters, Harl. MS. 2274.) Festum, CATH.
  • RUFUL, or ful of ruthe and pyte. Pieticus, CATH. compassivus.
  • RUFULLE, and fulle of peyne and desese, Anglice, a caytyf (or pytyous, supra.) Dolorosus, penosus, calamitosus, C. F.
  • ROGGYD, or rowghe (ruggyd or rowe, K. S.) Hispidus, hirsutus.
  • RULLIŌN'.3. [This word occurs amongst the verbs, in the Harl. MS. without any Latin equivalent.]
  • RUWYN̄', or for-thynkyn̄'. Pe∣niteo, vel penitet, impersonale.
  • RUWYN̄', or haue pyte (rwyn, or to han pyty, K.) Compatior.
  • RUYNGE, for a thynge (rvyn, or forthynkynge, K. S. P. Peni∣tudo, penitencia.
  • RUKKUN, or cowre down̄' (curyn doun, K. crowdyn downe, S. ruckyn, or cowryn downe, P.)4. [This is placed amongst the verbs, after RUBBYN̄, (as if written Ruckun). The word is used by Chaucer. (Nonnes Pr. Tale) speaking of the fox—"false morderour rucking in thy den." So also in Conf. Am. 72. Forby gives "to ruck, to squat or shrink down."]Incurvo.
  • RUKKYNGE (rukklyng, Harl. MS. 2274.) Incurvacio.
  • RULY, idem quod ruful supra. (rvly or pytowus, K. ruly or py∣teowsly or pytows, P.)5. [This word occurs in the Paston Letters, vol. iii. p. 44. "Ye chaungewas a rewly chaunge, for ye towne was undo þerby, and in ye werse by an c. li."]
  • (RUMMAUNCE, supra in ryme, P.)
  • RUMMUELŌN, (sic) or prively mys∣trōn'. Mussito.
  • (RUMMELYN, K. H. rumlyn, P. Rumino.)
  • RUMLYNGE. Ruminacio, P.)
  • RUMNEYE, wyne.
  • RUSSHE, idem quod rysche supra. (ruschen̄, supra in ryschyn̄, Harl. MS. 2274.)
  • RUMPE, tayle. Cauda.
  • RUN, or bryyn̄', supra in B. (brine of salt, idem quod brine, S.)
  • RUSSET. Gresius, (sic), elbus, CATH. russetus, KYLW. elbidus.
  • RUST. Rubigo.
  • RUSTY. Rubiginosus.
  • RUSTŌN'. Rubigino.
  • RUTHE. Compassio.
  • RUTHE, pyte, idem quod pyte, supra.
  • RUTTON̄', o(r) throwyn̄' (rwtyn or castyn, K. rowtyn or throwyn, Page  440idem quod castyn, S. ruttyn' or throwyn' or castyn, P.) Pro∣jicio, idem quod castyn̄', supra in C. (jacto, P.)
  • SABLE, coloure. Sabellinum, DICC.
  • SABRACE. Sabracia, COMM.1. [The directions given in the Sloane MS. 73, f. 211, date late XV. cent., for making "cheverel lether of perchemyne," may serve to throw light on this obscure word. The leather was to be "basked to and fro" in a hot solution of rock alum, "aftir take zelkis of eyren and breke hem smale in a disch as thou woldist make therof a caudel, and put these to thyn alome water, and chaufe it to a moderate hete; thanne take it doun from the fier and put it in thi cornetrey; thanne tak thi lether and basche it wel in this sabras, to it be wel dronken up into the lether." A little flour is then to be added, the mixture again heated, and the parchment well "basked therein, and that that saberas be wel drunken up into the lether; and, if it enters not well into the lether, lay it abroad in a good long vessel that be scheld, the fleschside upward, and poure this sabrace al aboven the lether, and rubbe it wel yn." It is also recommended "to late the lether ligge so still al a nyzt in his owen sabras." In the Ancren Riwle, edited for the Camden Society by the Rev. J. Morton, p. 364, it is said that a sick man who is wise uses abstinence, and drinks bitter sabras to recover his health: in the Latin MS. Oxon. "potat amara." It may be from the Arabic, "Shabra, a drink." See Notes and Queries, vol. ii. pp. 70, 204. Mr. Halliwell, in his Archaic Glossary, gives—"Sabras, salve, plaster," which does not accord with the use of the term as above given; it has not, however, been found in any other dictionary.]
  • SACRAMENT. Sacramentum.2. [Compare Oost, sacrament, Hostia, supra.]
  • SACRYN̄, or halwyn̄. Consecro, sacro.
  • (SACRYN in the messe, P. Consecro.)
  • SACRYNGE of the masse. Conse∣cracio.
  • SACRYNGE BELLE. Tintinabulum.
  • SACRYFYCE. Sacrificum, victima, CATH.
  • SACRIFYYN, or make sacrifyce. Sacrifico, inmolo, libo.
  • SAD, or hard. Solidus.
  • SAD, or sobyr, idem est, et maturus (maturatus, S.)
  • SAD, or sobyrwythe owte lawh'ynge (nowt lawhyng, K.) Agelaster, CATH., vel agalaster, UG. in Aug'.
  • SADDYN, or make sadde. Solido, consolido.
  • SADELYN̄' HORS, Sterno, CATH., sello.
  • SADYL. Sella.
  • SADLARE. Sellarius, UG. in sedeo.
  • SADLY. Solide, mature.
  • SADNESSE. Soliditas, maturitas.
  • SADNESSE, yn porte and chere (porte or berynge, K.) idem est.
  • SAAF, and sekyr. Salvus.
  • SAAF CUNDYTE. Salvus conductus, vel salvus conventus.
  • SAPHYRE, precyowse stone (safyre, K.) Saphirus.
  • SAAFNESSE, or salvacyon. Salvacio.
  • SAFRUN. Crocum, CATH. C. F.
  • SAGGYN̄', or sallyn̄3. [Sic, probably erroneously so written for—Satlyn̄, as in K. The archaism—to sag,—to saddle, is preserved in the Herefordshire dialect.] (satelyn, P. stytlyn, S.) Basso.
  • SAGGYNGE, or satlynge. Bassa∣cio, bassatura, CATH.
  • SAY, clothe. Sagum, C. F.
  • (SALADE, H. P.)
  • SALARY, hyre. Salarium, stipen∣dium.
  • SALE, or sellynge. Vendicio.
  • SALE, or pryce. Precium.
  • SALER. Salinum, CATH.
  • Page  441 SALE WORTHY. Vendibilis.
  • SALYARE. Saltator, saltatrix.
  • SALYYN̄'. Salio, (Salto, P.)
  • SALYYNGE. Saltacio.
  • SALME. Psalmus.
  • SALT. Sal.
  • SALT, or salti (as flesch or oder lyke, S.) Salsus.
  • SALTARE, or wellare of salt. Sali∣nator, CATH.
  • SALT COTE. Salina, CATH.
  • SALT FYSCHE. Fungia.
  • SALTYN̄' wythe salte. Salio, CATH. et UG.
  • SALT WATER, or see water. Nereis, CATH. UG. in nubo.
  • SALUE (salve, K.) Saliva.
  • SALWHE, of colowre (salowe, P.) Croceus.
  • SALWHE, tree. Salix.
  • SAMOWNE, fysche. C. F. UG. in salio.
  • SANDEL, or sandelynge, fysche. Anguilla arenalis.
  • SANGUINARYE, herbe, or myllfolye hesp.1. [Sic in Harl. MS., possibly erroneously so written for herbe, which is the reading in MS. S.]Sanguinaria, millefolium.
  • SANGWYNE, coloure. Sanguineus.
  • SANOP (sanap, K.)2. [A Sanop, sometimes written Savenappe—a napkin. See Sir F. Madden's edition of Syr Gawayn; also Sir Degrevant, V. 1387; Awntyrs of Arthure, V. 437; and the list of linen in the Prior's chamber, Christ Church, Canterbury, Galba E. IV. f. 36.]Manupia∣rium, gausape, fimbriatum, KYLW. (manutergium, mantile, P.)
  • SAAPPE, of a tree. Caries, CATH. C. F. turio, KYLW. UG. in tundo, carea, UG. in careo.
  • SAAP, of the ere. Pedora, CATH.
  • SAPY, or fulle of sap. Cariosus, C. F.
  • SAARCE, instrument.
  • SAARCYN̄'. Colo, secatio, CATH.
  • SARRY, or savery. Sapidus.
  • SATYNE, clothe of sylke. Satinum.
  • SATYRDAY. Sabatum.
  • (SATLYN, supra in SAGGYN, P.)
  • SATLYNGE, idem quod SAGGYNGE.
  • SAWCE. Salsamentum, CATH., sal∣mentum, salsa, C. F. in sinapium.
  • SAWCE, made wythe water and salt. Muria, NECC.
  • SAWCELYNE (sawcelyme, S.)3. [Possibly the herb called "Sauce-alone, alliaria, q. d. unicum ciborum condimentum, &c." SKINNER. It is the Erysimum alliaria.]
  • SAWCER. Salsarium, acetabulum, UG. in acuo.
  • SAWCYN̄'. Salmento, CATH.
  • SAWCYN̄', wythe powder, idem quod POWDERYN̄', supra. (Condio, K.P.)
  • SAWCYSTER, lynke.4. [A sausage; compare "Hilla, a tripe or a sawcister." ORTUS. "A saucestour, a saucige," &c. Harl. MS. 2257. "A salsister, hirna." CATH. ANG. See the note on LYNKE, supra, p. 306.]Hirna, hilla, salsucia, CATH. (salcia, P.)
  • SAWE, instrument. Serra.
  • SAWE, or proverbe. Proverbium, problema.
  • SAVEYNE, tree. Savina, C. F.
  • SAVEREY, herbe. Satureia.
  • SAVERY, as mete and drynke (or SARRY, supra.) Sapidus.
  • SAVERYN̄. Sapio.
  • SAWGE, herbe. Saligia, salvia, CATH. C. F.
  • SAWGER. Salgetum.
  • SAVYN̄'. Salvo.
  • SAVYOWRE. Salvator, Messias, salutaris.
  • SAWYN̄'. Serro.
  • SAVOWRE, or tast. Sapor.
  • Page  442SAVOWRE, or smel (or dowre, S.) Odor.
  • SAWTER. Psalterium.
  • SAWTRYE. Psalterium.
  • SAXIFRAGE, herbe. Saxifragium, saxifragia, C. F.
  • SCABBARD, or he þat ys scabbyd. Scabidus, scabida, CATH.
  • SCABBE. Scabies.
  • SCABBYD. Scabiosus, (scabidus, K.)
  • SCABBYD SCHEPE. Apica, NECC UG. in agnus.
  • SCABYOWSE, herbe. Scabiosa, jacia alba, et nigra dicitur matfelōn (vel couwede, supra).1. [See the note on MATFELŌN, supra, p. 329.]
  • SCADDE. Cadaver.2. [Mr. Halliwell gives, in his Archaic Glossary, "SCAD, a carcase, a dead body."]
  • SCAFOLD, stage. Fala, CATH., machinis, CATH.
  • SCALLARDE (scallar, S.) Glabrio, CATH.
  • SCALDYN'. Estuo, CATH. excatu∣risat, UG. V. in S.
  • SCALDYNGE (scaldynge of hete, P.) Estus, CATH.
  • SCALE, of a fysche. Squama.
  • SCALE, of an heste3. [Sic, but probably for hefte. In K. and H., and also in Pynson's edition, we find the following distinction: Scale of an hefte (in K. capula manubrii is the Latin equi∣valent); and Scale of a leddyr, scalare. Compare the note on LEDDYR stafe, supra, p. 293. In the translation of Vegetius, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII., "scales of ladders" are mentioned, lib. 14, c. 2. "Scale of a ladder, eschellon." PALSG. "Eschelle, a ladder or skale. eschelllette, a little ladder or skale, a small step or greece." COTG.] (hefte, K. P. of a beeste, S.), or of a leddur. Scalare.
  • SCALYN FYSCHE. Exquamo, squa∣mo, CATH.
  • SCALE WALLYS. Scalo.
  • SCALLE. Glabra.
  • SCALLYD (or pyllyd, supra.) Gla∣brosus.
  • SCALOP, fysche.
  • SCALT. Estuatus, CATH.
  • SCAMONY, spyce. Scamonia.
  • SCANNE VERSE (scannyn versis, P.) Scando, CATH.
  • SCANNYNGE, of verse. Scansio.
  • SCANT. Parcus.
  • SCANTLYON, or scanklyone (skank∣lyone, S. P. or met, supra.) Equissium, mensura.
  • SCANTNESSE. Parcitas, parci∣monia.
  • SCAPYNGE. Evasio.
  • SCAPLORY (scapelary, S. scapelar, P.) Scapulare.
  • SCARBOT, flye. Scabo, COMM. (scrabo, K. P. scarbo, S. J. W.)
  • SCARCE. Parcus.
  • SCARSLY (or scantly, P.) Parce.
  • SCARSNESSE, idem quod SCANTE∣NESSE.4. [Compare also CHYNCERY or scar(s)nesse, supra, p. 75. In the Legenda Aurea, f. 87, b., it is recorded of St. Pawlyne that she gave to the sick largely such food as they asked, "but to herself she was harde in her sekenes and skarse." Gower treats at length of "scarnesse," parcimonia. "Scarse, nygarde or nat suffycient, eschars: scante or scarse, escars." PALSG.]
  • SCARSYN, or make lesse (or scanten, P.) Minoro.
  • SCARRE, or brekynge, or ryvynge. Rima, rimula, priscus, CATH (riscus, P.)
  • SCARLETT. Scarletum, luteus, KYLW. et UG. in luo.
  • SCARLET, colowre. Lutus, UG.
  • Page  44SCATE, fysche. Ragadies (scabies, S.)
  • SCATERYN̄'. Spergo, dissipo.
  • SCATERYNGE (or sparplynge, infra). Spercio.
  • SCAWBERT, or chethe1. [Chethē, MS. The terminal contraction is probably an error. Compare SCHEDE, or schethe, infra.] (scawberk, S. scauberd, K. P.) Vagina.
  • SCAYE,2. [Sic. Probably for Scaþe, as also the verb, which follows,—SCAYINE for Scaþine; in Add. MS. 22,556, Scathin. "Damnum, harme or scathe." ORTUS.] (scathe, K. P.) Damp∣num, dispendium, (prejudicium, S.)
  • SCAYINE, or harmyn̄' (scathen, K. scathyn, S.) Dampnifico.
  • SCHADOWE. Umbra.
  • (SCHADOWEN, P.)3. [In Pynson's edition the verbs which commence with SCH are printed SH; the nouns are printed SCH, as in the Harl. MS.]Obumbro, umbro.
  • SCHADWYNGE. Obumbracio.
  • SCHADWYNGE place.4. [Compare LEVECEL, supra, p. 300.]Umbracu∣lum, C. F. estiva, CATH.
  • SCHAFTE, of a spere or oþer lyke. Hastile.
  • SCHAGGYNGE, schoggynge, or wav∣erynge. Vacillacio.
  • SCHAYLARE.5. ["To schayle, degradi, et degredi." CATH. ANG. "Schayler that gothe a wrie with his fete, boyteux. I shayle, as a man or horse dothe that gothe croked with his legges, Je vas eschays. I shayle with the fete, Jentretaille des pieds," &c. PALSG. Compare Cotgrave, v. Gavar, Goibier, Tortipé, Esgrailler, &c. The personal name Schayler still occurs in Oxfordshire and Sussex.]
  • SCHAYLYN̄', or scheylyn̄.' (Dis∣gredior, S.)
  • SCHAYLYNGE (or scheylynge, S. H. P. Loripedacio, S.)
  • SCHAKARE. Excussor.
  • SCHAKERE, or gettare. Lascivus.
  • SCHAKARE, or craker, or booste maker. Jactator, philocompus, C. F.
  • SCHAKKYL, or schakle. Murella, C.F. numella, C.F. UG. V. (murenula, K.)
  • SCHAKKLYD. Numellatus.
  • SCHAKLYN̄'. Numello, UG. V. in N.
  • SCHAKYN̄' A WEY (schaylyn a way, S.) Excucio.
  • SCHAKYN̄ or mevyn̄. Agito, moveo.
  • SCHAKYN̄' or waveryn̄'. Vacillo.
  • SCHAKYN̄' or qwakyn̄'. (whakyn, K.) Tremo, CATH. contremo.
  • SCHAKYNGE A-WEY. Excussio.
  • SCHAKYNGE, or mevynge. Exagi∣tacio, mocio.
  • SCHAKYNGE, or quakynge. Tremor.
  • SCHAKYNGE, or waverynge. Vacil∣lacio.
  • SCHALE, of a not, or oþer lyke. Testula.
  • SCHALE NOTYS, and oþer schelle frute (schalyn or schille frute, K. scalyn or shillyn nottis, P.) Enuclio.6. [Copare PYLLN̄', or schalyn̄ nottys, supra, p. 399.]
  • SCHALMUSE, pype.7. ["Schalmesse, a pype, chalemeau." PALSG. The shalm is figured in Musurgia, by Ott. Luscinius, &c.; Comenius, Vis. World, 1659; Northumberland Household Book, &c.]Sambuca.
  • SCHAME. Verecundia, pudor, rubor.
  • SCHAME, or schenshepe. Igno∣minia.
  • SCHAMEFAST. Verecundus, vere∣cundiosus, pudorosus, CATH.
  • SCHAMEFASTNESSE, idem quod SCHAME.
  • SCHAMYN̄'. Verecundor, CATH.
  • Page  444SCHAMELES, or he þat ys not a-schamyd of wykkydnesse. Effrons, inpudens, inverecun∣dus.
  • SCHAMELES, þat chaungythe no chere (that chaunchyth no colowrene chere, S. that chaungeth neyther chere nor colour, P.) Cromaticus, C. F. frontosus, C. F.
  • SCHANKE. Crus, CATH.
  • SCHAP, of forme. Forma, plas∣matura.
  • SCHAPARE. Aptator, formator.
  • (SCHAPER, of nought. Creator, P. J.)
  • SCHAAPYN̄'. Apto.
  • SCHAPYNGE. Aptura, formacio.
  • SCHAPYNGE KNYFE. Scaplprum, CATH. scalpellum.
  • SCHAPYNGE KNYFE, of sowtarys. Ansorium, DICC.
  • SCHARE, of a plowe. Vomer, C. F.
  • SCHARMAN, or scherman̄. Tonsor, attonsor, tonsarius, KYLW.
  • SCHARPE, of egge. Acutus.
  • SCHARP, or delyver.1. [Compare DELYVERE, supra, p .118.]Asper, velox.
  • SCHARPE, or egyr. Acer.
  • SCHARPYN̄', thynge þat ys dul of egge. Acuo, exacuo.
  • SCHARPYN̄', or steryn̄' to hasty∣nesse. Exaspero.
  • SCHARPLY, or redyly. Velociter, acute.
  • SCHARPLY, or egyrly. Acriter, aspere.
  • SCHARPNESSE, of egge. Acucies.
  • SCHARPNESSE, or egyrnesse. Acri∣tudo, acritas, CATH.
  • SCHARPNESSE, or swyftenesse. Velocitas.
  • SCHAVE, or schavynge knyfe. Scalpellum, C. F. scalprum, CATH.
  • SCHAVELDOWRE.2. [This word is used by Wickliffe in his treatise, "Why poor priests have no Benefice," App. to Life by Lewis, No. XIX. 293; "Many times their Patrens, and other getters of country, and idle shaveldours willen look to be feasted of such Curates."]Discursor, vaca∣bundus, C.F. CATH. vagus, vagulus.
  • SCHAVYN. Rado.
  • SCHAVYN̄', or scrapyn̄' a-wey. Abrado.
  • SCHAVYNGE, of a barbowre (as barbure, S. schauynge or bar∣borye, P.) Rasura.
  • SCHAVYNGE, or scrapynge (scrap∣ynge away, P.) Abrasio.
  • SCHAVYNGYS, of boordys or treys. Rasure, ramentum, C. F. et UG.
  • SCHAVYNGE HOWSE,3. [Compare BARBORERY, supra, p. 24; and RASTYR HOWSE, p. 424.]supra in B. item in R.
  • SCHEDARE, or schethare. Vagina∣rius, CATH.
  • SCHEDE, or schethe. Vagina.
  • SCHEDYD, or schethyd. Vaginatus.
  • SCHEDYN̄', or chethyn knyfys (put∣tyn in schede, K.) Vagino.
  • SCHEDYN̄', or spyllyn̄'. Effundo.
  • SCHEDYN̄', or lesyn̄g. Confundo.
  • (SCHEDYNGE, P. Vaginatio.)
  • SCHEDYNGE, or spyllynge. Effusio.
  • SCHEFFE, or scheef (schefe or schofe, S. schof, K.) Garba, gelima, CATH. merges, UG.
  • SCHEY, or skey, as hors, or styȝtyl (schytyl, S. styrtyll, P.)4. [Compare STYRTYL, or hasty, infra, and SCHYTYLLE, p. 447.]
  • SCHEYLERE, idem quod schaylare.
  • SCHEELDE. Scutum, clipeus.
  • SCHELDRAKE, byrde. Testa.
  • (SCHELLE, H. P. schel, K. Testa, P.)5. [In the Harl. MS., and also in the Winchester MS., the word SCHELLE is omitted, Testa being given as the Latin for SCHELDRAKE. There can be little doubt that the readings of the MSS. H. K., and Pynson's text, give the correction of this clerical error.]
  • Page  445SCHELFE. Epiaster, epilocarium, ar∣marium, C. F., repositorium, COMM.
  • SCHELTRŌN, of a batayl. Acies.
  • SCHE(N)DYN̄' (sheendyn, S. shendyn, P.) or lesyn̄'. Confundo.
  • SCHENDYN̄', or blamyn̄', Culpo.
  • SCHENDYNGE, or blamynge. Cul∣pacio, reprehencio, vituperacio.
  • SCHENDYNGE, or fulle (foul, H. fowle, P.) vndoynge. Confusio.
  • (SCHENKARE, or bryllare of drynke, supra, Propinator.)
  • SCHENKYN̄' DKYNKE.1. [Dryngke, MS. Compare BRYLLYN', or schenk drynke, supra, p. 51. Chaucer, Mar∣chantes Tale, says of Bacchus, "the wyn hem skinketh al aboute." See also Rob. Glouc. p. 119; K. Alis. v. 7581; Geste of Kyng Horn, v. 374. "To skink, affundo. A skinker, pincerna, a poculis; vide Tapster." GOULDM. A. S. scencan, propinare.]Propino.
  • SCHENSCHEPE, or schame. Igno∣minia.
  • SCHENT, or blamyd. Culpatus, vituperatus.
  • SCHENT, ful lost (al fully lost, P.) Confusus, destructus.
  • SCHEEP, beest. Ovis.
  • SCHEPCOTE. Caula, CATH. bercare.
  • SCHEPHERD. Opilio, C. F. pastor, mandra, CATH. Archimandrita, ovilio, maloncinus, C. F. (malo∣nomus, S.)
  • SCHEPEERDYS CROKE. Pedum. UG. in pedos, agolus, CATH. bulus, C. F. (rullus, S.)
  • SCHEPERDYS DOGGE. Gregarius, CATH.
  • SCHEPERDYS LOGGE, or cory2. [Compare CORY, schepherdys howse, supra, p. 93.] (curry, S.) Magalis, mapale, CATH. vel magale, C. F.
  • SCHEPERDYS PYPE. Barbita, C. F. CATH. (calamaula, S.)
  • SCHEPERDYS CRYPPE (scryppe, A. scrip, P.) Manticula, CATH.
  • SCHEPYS LOWCE. Pego, C. F., as∣karida, KYLW. UG. V.
  • SCHEPYS PYLETT (pylot, A.) Moles∣tra, C. F. CATH.
  • SCHERDE, or schoord, of a broke vesselle (schourde of broken vessel, P.) Testula, testa, C. F.
  • SCHERE to clyppe wythe (scherys, H. P.) Forfex.
  • SCHERYN̄', or cuttyn̄'. Scindo.
  • SCHERYN̄', or schere cloth'e. At∣tondo.
  • SCHERYN̄', or repe corne. Meto.
  • SCHERYNGE, or repynge of cornys. Messura, messio.
  • SCHERYNGE of clothe. Tonsio, tonsura.
  • (SCHERYNGE of wule. S. Tonsus.)
  • (SCHERYNGE of byrdys. S. Capi∣tonsus.)
  • SCHERMANN, idem quod SCHARMAN, supra.
  • SCHETARE, or archare. Sagittarius.
  • SCHETE. Lintheamen, lintheum, C. F.
  • (SCHETELYS, or gote, supra. Aqua∣gium.)
  • SCHETYN̄' yn a bowe (shotyn with bowes, P.) Sagitto.
  • SCHYTTYN̄', or speyryn'. Claudo.
  • SCHETTE wythe lokkys, or barrys, or othyr lyke (schetyn or schettyn lockys, K.) Sero, obsero.
  • SCHETYNGE wythe bowys. Sagit∣tacio, sagittaria, (sagittura. P.)
  • SCHETYNGE, or schettynge, or spe∣rynge. Clausura.
  • SCHETYNGE, or lokkynge wythe lokkys. Seracio.
  • SCHETTYNGE IN. Inclusio.
  • SCHETTYNGE OWTE. Exclusio.
  • Page  446SCHEWE, or schewynge. Monstra∣cio, ostencio, demonstracio, ma∣nifestacio.
  • SCHEWYN̄'. Monstro, revelo, pando, indico, ostendo, promo.
  • SCHEWE FORTHE, or put forthe. Extendo, profero.
  • SCHEWEN̄, and make knowe to the peple (makyn opyn, S.) Divulgo.
  • SCHYYD, or astelle (schyd of a astel, S. schyde wode, K.)1. [Compare ASTELLE, supra, p. 16. "Schyde of wode, buche, moule de buches." PALSG. "Les hasteles (þe chides) fetez alumer." G. de Bibelesworth, Arund. MS. 220. A. S. scide, scindula.]Teda, C. F. assula, C. F. astula, CATH.
  • (SCHYDERE, or flytere, supra in CUKSTOKE.)
  • SCHYFTYN̄', or part a-sundyr (de∣parten adunder, P.) Sepero, disgrego.
  • SCHYFTYN̄', or partyn̄', or delyn̄'. Divido, partior.
  • SCHYFTYN̄', idem quod CHANGYN̄', supra.
  • SCHYFTYNGE, or chaūngynge. Mu∣taio, commutacio, permutacio.
  • SCHYFTYNGE, or removynge. Amo∣cio.
  • SCHYGGE clothys or oþer thyngys. Excucio.
  • SCHYGGYNGE. Excussio.
  • SCHYLLE, and scharpe (schille, lowde, K.) Acutus, sonorus.
  • SCHYLLY, and scharply (or loudly, P. J.) Acute, aspere, sonore.
  • SCHYLLYN̄' OWTE, of coddys. Ex∣si(li)quo.
  • SCHYLLYN̄' OWTE, or cullyn owte fro sundyr. Segrego.
  • SCHYLLYN̄', or schylle notys. Enu∣clio, CATH.
  • SCHYLLYN̄' oysterys, and thyngys closyd yn schellys. Excortico, KYLW.
  • SCHYLLYNGE, of money. Solidus.
  • SCHYLLYNGE, or owten cullynge. Separacio, segregacio.
  • SCHYLLYNGE, of notys (or oþer lyke, S.) Excorticacio, enuclli∣acio, CATH.
  • SCHYLLYNGE, of coddyd cornys, as benys, peson, and oþer lyke. Exsiliquacio.
  • SCHYMMID, as hors.2. [Forby, in his Norfolk dialect, gives "Shim, a narrow stripe of white on a horse's face."]Scutilatus.
  • SCHYNNE, of a legge. Crus.
  • SCHYNGYL, or chyngyl, hyllynge of howsys. Scindula.
  • SCHYNYN̄'. Splendeo, mico, luceo, fulgeo.
  • SCHYNYN̄', or glyderyn̄' (glaren, P.) as bryghte thyngys. Niteo, rutilo.
  • SCHYNYNGE, or bryghte. Splen∣didus, lucidus, fulgidus.
  • SCHYNYNGE, or glary(n)ge, or starynge. Nitidus.
  • SCHYNYNGE, or bryyȝtenesse. Splendor, jubar, fulgor.
  • SCHYYPE, of þe see. Navis.
  • SCHYPPE, bot (schyp bote, or bote of a schyp, P.) Barca, C. F. carabus.
  • SCHYPPBREKYNGE. Naufragium, C. F.
  • SCHYPBROKE. Naufragus, C. F.
  • SCHYPPE, vesselle to put yn rychel (richellys, A. schyp for rychyll or incence, P.) Acerra, CATH. et DICC. et UG. in acuo.
  • SCHYPHYRE. Naulum, C. F. nabu∣lum, CATH.
  • Page  447SCHYPPYN̄', or take schyppe. Na∣vicapio. (naviculo, P.)
  • SCHYPPYNGE. Navigium, C. F.
  • SCHYPLORD, or owere (owner, K. S. P.) of a schyp. Navarchus, CATH. navargus, C. F.
  • SCHYPMAYSTER. Nauclerus, CATH. C. F. navargus, C. F. et CATH.
  • SCHYPMANNE. Nauta.
  • SCHYPMANN̄YS STONE. Calamita, C. F.
  • SCHYPWRYTE. Naupicus, C. F. (nau∣cupus, S.)
  • SCHYPPE WERRE. Naumachia, C. F. navale, C. F. et UG. in nonas.
  • SCHYRE, cuntre. Comitatus.
  • SCHYRE, as water and oþer lycure. Perspicuus, clarus.
  • SCHYREVE (schreve, S.) Vi(ce)|comes.
  • SCHYRT. Camisia, interula, C. F.
  • SCHYTYLLE, styrtyl, or hasty1. [Compare SCHEY, as hors; supra, p. 444. Margaret Paston, writing to her husband, says, "I am aferd that Jon of Sp'h'm is so schyttyl wyttyd that he wyl sett hys gode to morgage." Paston Letters, vol. iv. p. 58.] (schityl, on stabyl, K.) Preceps.
  • SCHYTLE, chyldys game. Sagit∣tella, CATH.
  • (SCYTYL, webstarys instrument, infra in SPOLE.)
  • SCHYTTYL, or (of, P.) sperynge.2. [Compare ONDOYNGE of schettellys, supra, p. 365, A. S. Scyttel, a bar, bolt, or lock.]Pessulum, vel pessellum, CATH.
  • SCHYTYN'. Merdo, egero, stercoro.
  • SCHYTYNGE. Stercorizacio.
  • SCHYYTYNGE, or kukkynge vesselle (cuckynge, H.P.) Lassarium, C. F.
  • SCHYERE, of brede or oþer lyke (schyve, K. S. P.) Lesca, scinda.
  • SCHYVYR. Fissula, abscindula, KYLW.
  • SCHYVERYN̄', or ryvyn̄ a-sundyr. Crepo, CATH.
  • SCHOO, mannys fote hyllynge. So∣tularis, calceus, C. F.
  • SCHOO, for buschopys. Sanda∣lium, COMM.
  • SCHOO, for hors. Ferrus, babba∣tum, DICC.
  • SCHOO, clowt. Lanipedium, vel linipedium, UG. V. in P.
  • SCHOD, as men, Calceatus.
  • SCHOD, as hors. Ferratus, bab∣batus.
  • SCHODYNGE, or departynge. Se∣paracio, divisio, segregacio.
  • SCHODYNGE, of the heede (schey∣dynge, S.) Discrinen, DICC.
  • SCHOOF or scheef, idem quod SCHEEF supra.
  • SCHOOGGYN̄', or roggyn'.3. [See ROGGYN̄, or mevyn̄, and ROGGYN, or waveryn', supra, p. 435. Forby gives the verb to Shug, signifying to shake, in the Norfolk dialect. "I shake or shogge upon one, je sache." PALSG.]Agito.
  • SCHOGGYN̄, schakyn̄', or waveryn̄. Vacillo.
  • SCHOOGGYNGE, idem quodROG∣GYNGE, supra. Agitacio.
  • SCHOYN̄, or dōn on schōn. Calceo, CATH.
  • SCHOYN̄' HORS. Ferro, UG.
  • SCHOYNGE, of menn. Calcea∣cio.
  • SCHOYNGE, of hors. Ferracio.
  • SCHOYNGE HORNE. Parcopollex, CATH.
  • SCHOKKE, of corne. Congelima, KYLW. tassis, C. F.
  • SCHOKKYN̄ schovys, or oþer lyke. Tasso, C. F. congelimo, KYLW.
  • SCHOLD, or schalowe, noȝte depe, Page  448 as water or oþer lyke.1. [Compare FLEWE, or scholde, as vessell, &c. supra p. 167. "Sholde, or full of shal∣lowe places that a man may passe over on foote, vadosus." Huloet, 1572.]Bassa (bassus, P.)
  • SCHOPPE. Opella, CATH. propala, miropolum, CATH. selda, KYLW.
  • (SCHORDE, supra in sherde, K.)
  • SCHORE, privy parte of a mann. Pubes.
  • SCHORE, undur settynge of a thynge þat wolde falle (to under sete wythe a thynge þat wule falle, S.) Suppositorium.
  • SCHORNE, as clothe. Attonsus.
  • SCHORYN̄', or repyd. Messus.
  • (SCHORN, or mowyn, K. Falca∣tus.)
  • SCHORNYNN̄', or a-chewyn̄'. Vito, KYLW.
  • SCHORT. Curtus, brevis.
  • SCHORT or stukkyd garment.2. [See infra STUCK, short; STUCK or schort garment, &c., and also SCUT, garment, nep∣ticula.]Nepticula, C. F.
  • SCHORTYN̄'. Brevio, curto.
  • SCHORTLY. Breviter, curte.
  • SCHORTNESSE. Brevitas.
  • SHORT NESYD, man or woman. Simus, UG.
  • SCHOTERE, lytylle boothe (scho∣tererour, lytyl botte, H. bote, S. schorteȝ or lityl bote, P. J. W.)3. [Schoutes are mentioned in the fleet which conveyed the army of Coeur de Lion to the Holy Land. See also Piers of Fulham; Parl. Rolls, vol. iv. p. 345, &c.]Liburna, C. F. portemia, C. F. lembus, C. F. (simba, P.)
  • SCHOTE, or crykke. Tetanus, C. F.
  • SCHOVELERD, or popler, byrd (scho∣veler, or popelere, K., scholarde or poplerd, S. schoues bec, or popler byrd, P.) Populus.
  • SCHOVELER, werkere wythe a wes∣selle (a shovyl, S. P.) Tribula∣rius, tribularia.
  • SCHOVEL, instrument. Tribula, NECC. et UG. V.
  • SCHOVELYN̄' wythe a schowelle. Tribulo, CATH. arapago, CATH.
  • SCHOVELYNGE. Tribulatus.
  • (SCHOWHE, supra in COO, byrde.)4. [See p. 84, supra, also CADAW, p. 57, and Koo, p. 280.]
  • SCHOWWYN̄', or puttyn̄'. Inpello, trudo, C. F. pello.
  • SCHOWYNGE (or puttynge, supra.)5. [Forby gives, in the Norfolk Dialect, Showing (pronounced like—ow in cow), signfy∣ing pushing with force, not the same as shoving. See PUTTYN̄, PUTTYNGE, supra, pp. 417, 418.]Impulsio, propulsio.
  • SCHOWRE, of reyne. Nimbus, CATH. UG. imber, CATH. crepulum, C. F.
  • SCHOWTE, or grete crye. Tumul∣tus, C. F. vociferacio.
  • SCHOWTYN̄'. Vocifero.
  • (SCHRAGGE trees, infra in SCHRE∣DYN̄'.)6. ["To shrag, castro, vide to lop." GOULDM. "To shrag trees, arbores putare." BARET. In Holland's Pliny, B. xix. c. 6, it is said that in transplanting leeks the uppermost leaves should be lightly "shrigged off."]
  • SCHREDE, or lyyste. Forago, C. F (ligamen, P.)
  • SCHREDE, or clyppyng of clothe or oþer thynge. Scissura, preseg∣men, C. F.
  • SCHREDYN̄', or schragge trees. Sarculo, C. F. sarmento, UG.
  • SCHREDYN' wortys, or oþer herbys. Detirso.
  • SCHREDYNGE, of trees and oþer lyke. Sarmentacio, sarculacio.
  • Page  449SCHREDYNGE, or schrub (schrub∣bynge, S.) Putamen, C. F. sar∣mentum.
  • SCHREGGARE. Sarculator, sar∣mentarius.
  • SCHREGGYNGE, idem quod SCHREDYNGE, supra.
  • SCHREWE. Pravus.
  • SCHREWYD. Pravatus, depravatus.
  • SCHREWYD HERTYD. Pravicors, BRIT.
  • SCHREWDENESSE. Pravitas.
  • SCHREWYN̄', Pravo.
  • SCHRYFTE (schryftnesse, S.) Con∣fessio.
  • SCHRYFTE FADYR. Confessor.
  • SCHRYKYN̄' (or cryen, K. or shulyn,1. [Sic, probably for shutyn, as printed by J. Notary; shouten, by W. de Worde.] P.) Vagio, vagito, CATH.
  • SCHRYKYNGE (schrykynge shrylle, S.)
  • SCHRYLLE.
  • SCHRYMP, fysche. Stingus.
  • SCHRYNE.2. [SCHRYVE, in MS., doubtless an error for schryne, as in K. S. P.]Scrinium, UG. V. (lip∣sana, mausoleum, K.)
  • SCHRYNYN̄', or lyyn̄' (leyn, K. P.) yn schryne. Scrinio.
  • SCHRYNKYN̄.' Rigeo, C. F.
  • SCHRYNKYNGE. Rigiditas, UG.
  • SCHRYVYN̄', or ben a-knowe synnys yn schryfte (ben a knowen of synnes, P.) Confiteor.
  • SCHRYVYN̄', or here schryftys. Au∣dire confessiones, nichil aliud in∣veni per grammaticam. (Scapu∣lagito, secundum Levsay, S.)
  • SCHRUGGYN̄'. Frigulo.
  • SCHUDDE, lytylle howse. Teges, C. F. gurgustium, CATH.
  • SCHUDDE, or to-falle (schud or pentys, P.) Appendix, vel ap∣pendiculum, CATH.
  • SCHUDDE, hovel, or swyne kote, or howse of sympyl hyllynge to kepe yn beestys. Catabulum, C. F (hara, P.)
  • (SCHULDERE, supra in COOLDER. Petrosa.)
  • SCHULDYR, of a mann. Humerus, scapula.
  • SCHULDYR, of a beest. Armus, CATH.
  • SCHULDYR BŌN. Homoplata, DICC. homoplatum, KYLW.
  • SKYRWYT, herbe (scyrwyȝth, S.) Pastinaca, C. F. cum c. non t.
  • SKYRT. Lacinia, C. F.
  • SKYTT, idem quod FLYX, supra (scqwyrt, S.)
  • SKLAT, or slat stone (sclate or flat stone, H. P.) Latericia, ymbrex, C. F. (umbrex, S.)
  • SKLAWNDYR. Scandalum.
  • SCOTCHYNE (scochone, K. P.) Scu∣tellum, CATH. (scutulum, P.)
  • SCOLDE, chydare. Contentrix, li∣(ti)gatrix.
  • SCOLE, of clerkys. Scola.
  • SCOLE, to wey wythe (scole, ba∣lawnce, K. P.) Libra, balanx, vel bilanx, CATH. lanx, UG. in lateo.
  • SCOLE, of pleyynge gamys, or werre, or other lyke (gavdys werre or odyr lyk þynkys. S.) Gignasium, C. F.
  • SCOLE HYRE. Scolagium.
  • SCOLARE. Scolaris.
  • SCOME, or scum of fletynge.4. [Compare FLETYNGE of lycoure, spumacio, supra, p. 167.]Spuma, CATH.3. [This word seems to have the signification of rubbish, such as broken stones, broken straw, &c. Compare ROBOWS, supra, p. 435.]
  • Page  450SCUMMYN̄' lycurys. Despumo.
  • SCOMOWRE, cokys instrument. Despumarium.
  • SCONCE. Sconsa, vel absconsa, lanternula.
  • SCOPE, instrument. Vatila, CATH. alveolus.
  • SCORE, nowmere (noumbre, P.) Scoria, vicenarium.
  • SCOREL, or squerel, beest. Esperio∣lus, COMM. experiolus, C. F. NECC. scurellus, NECC. cirogrillus, C. F. et CATH. dicunt cirogrillum ani∣mal spinosum, yrchon.
  • SCORGE. Flagellum, scutica, C. F.
  • (SCORGYNGE wythe a baleys, infra in STRYPE.)
  • SCORYN̄' talyys. Tallio, C. F. dico, CATH. C. F.
  • SCORKLYD. Ustillatus.
  • SCORKELYN̄'. Ustulo, CATH. ustillo.
  • SCORKLYNGE. Ustillacio, ustu∣lacio, CATH.
  • SCORNARE. Derisor, irrisor, deri∣satrix, irrisatrix.
  • SCORNE, or dysdeyne. Indignacio, derisio, irrisio, dedignacio.
  • SCORNYN̄'. Derideo, ludifico, CATH. irrideo.
  • SCORPYONE, wyrme. Scorpio.
  • SCOTLOND. Scocia.
  • SCOT, mann. Scotus, Scota, Scot∣icus.
  • SCOWLE, wythe eyne. Oboculo, KYLW.
  • SCOWLYD. Radiatus.
  • SCOWRYN̄' a-wey ruste (scoryn, P.) Erugino, erubigino.
  • SCOWRYN̄'1. [Sic. This word seems to be synonymous with scourging. Compare STRYPE, or schorynge with a baleys, infra, where the reading in MS. S. is scorgynge; also WALE, or strype after scornynge, infra. A Baleys is a rod or whip, virga, supra, p. 22, and is so explained as a Norfolk word by Wats, Gloss. to M. Paris,—"ex pluribus longioribus viminibus; qualibus utuntur poedagogi severiores in scholis." Compare ȝerde, baleys, infra.] wythe a baleys (scoryn, P.) Verbero, disciplino, scopo, UG.
  • SCOW(R)YNGE. Pernitidacio, per∣lucidacio.
  • SCRAPYN̄', or schavyn̄ a-wey (shrapyn awey, P.) Abrado.
  • SCRAPYN̄', a(s) bestys (schrapyn, S.) Scalpo, CATH, et UG. V. scalpito.
  • SCRAPYN̄', as hennys. Ruspor, CATH.
  • SCRAPYNGE, or schawynge. Rasura, abrasio.
  • SCRAPYNGE, of hennys (and fowlys, K.) or oþer lyke. Ruspatus, C. F.
  • SCRAPYNGE KNYFE. Scalpellum, CATH.
  • SCRATTYN̄', or scratchyn̄' (cratchyn, P.) Scrato, CATH. in scalpo, grado, C. F. in scabio.
  • SCRENE (or scu, or spere, infra) Scrinium, ventifuga.
  • SCRETE, or lethy (lyȝth, or weyke, K. ley or weyke, P.) Gracilis, lentus, C. F.
  • SCRYKYNGE, or chyldyr (screkynge or schrekynge, K.) Vagitus, C. F.
  • SCRYPPE. Pera.
  • SCRYVENER. Scriptor.
  • SCROW (or BYLET, supra.) Cedula.
  • SCU, spere in a howse, idem quod SCRENE. Scrineum, ventifuga.
  • SCULLE, of the heede. Craneum.
  • SCULLE, of a fysshe (scul of fysh, S.)2. ["There is come a scoole of fysshe, examen." HORM. "The youth in sculs flocke and runne together." Fox, Acts and Mon., Martyrdom of St. Agnes. A. S. sceol, a shoal.]Examen, CATH.
  • Page  451SCULCARE. Lurco, cleps, cleptes, C. F.
  • SCULKYNGE. Cleptura.
  • SCUMMOWRE, idem quod SCOMOWRE.
  • SCURF, of scabbys. Squama, squa∣mula.
  • SCURFE, of metel. Scorium, C. F.
  • SCUT, or schort.1. [Compare SCHORT or stukkyd garment, supra, p. 448; STUK, short, and STUK or short garment, &c. infra.]Curtus, brevis.
  • SCUT, garment. Nepticula, C. F.
  • SCUT, hare, supra in H. litera.
  • SEE, grete watyr. Mare, equor, fre∣tum, pelagus, pontus, salum, CATH.
  • SECHELLE. Saccellus.
  • SECYN̄', or levyn̄'. Cesso.
  • SECYN̄', or styntyn̄'. Desisto.
  • SECYN',2. [CECYN, MS. Compare STYNTYN̄, and SWAGYN̄, infra.] or styllyn̄', or staunchyn̄' (secyn, styllyn, or pesyn, P.) Cedo, CATH. UG.
  • SECYNGE. Cessacio, desistencia.
  • SECRETARY, manne of privyte (of priui counsel, K. P.) Secretarius.
  • SECRETARY, or place in privy councelle (place of privyte or cowncel, S.) Secretarium.
  • SECUNDE. Secundus.
  • SEED. Semen, semens, (seminum, P.)
  • SEDYN', as corne or oþer herbis. Semento, CATH.
  • SEDYR, or sydyr, drynke. Cisera.
  • SEDYR, tree. Cedrus.
  • SEEDLEP, or hopur. Satorium, supra in H. (satitolum, P.)
  • SEGE, of syttynge (sege or sete, P.) Sedile, sedes.
  • SEGE, of cyte or towne (sege aȝen a toun, castel, or cyte, K. P.) Obsidium.
  • SEGE, of a privey (sege or preuy, P.) Secessus, C. F. (latrina, P.)
  • SEGGE, of fenne, or wyld gladōn (segge of the fen, or gladone, K. sedge, P.) Accorus.
  • SEGGE, star of the fenne.3. [Compare CEGGE, supra, p. 64, and STARE, infra.]Carix.
  • SEGGE REEKE. Caretum, CATH.
  • SEYL. Velum, carbasus, C. F.
  • SEYL KEPARE, or rewlare. Preta, C. F.
  • SEYL ȜERD (seyle yard', P.) An∣tenna, CATH.
  • SEYLYN̄', yn watyr. Vellifico, CATH.
  • SEYLYN̄' OVYR. Transvellifico. (SEYLYNGE, P. Velificatio.)
  • SEYN̄'. Dico, (for, P.)
  • SEYN̄' or synge messe. Misso, CATH.
  • SEYNT, holy. Sanctus, (almus, P.)
  • SEYNT, or cors of a gyrdylle.4. [See COORS, supra, p. 94. "Seynt of a gyrdell, tissu." PALSG. "Ceinct, a girdle." COTG.]Textum, DICC.
  • SEYNTRELLE. Sanctillus, sanctilla.
  • SEK, of clothe or leþyr. Saccus.
  • SEEK, or sekenesse. Eger, infirmus, egrotus.
  • SEKETOWRE (or executowre, supra, seketour or exseketour, P.) Executor, executrix.
  • SEKYN̄'. Quero, inquiro.
  • SEEKLY, or ofte seke. Valitudi∣narius, C. F.
  • SEKENESSE. Egritudo, infirmitas.
  • SEEKENYN̄', or be seke. Infirmor, egroto.
  • SEEL. Sigillum.
  • SEEL, tyme.5. [Forby gives "Seal, time or season, as hay-seal, wheat-seal, &c." See also Ray, who mentions the word as used in Essex. So also P. Langt. p. 334: "It neghed nere metesel." A. S. Sael, opportunitas. Compare BARLYSELE, supra, p. 25, and Cele, p. 65.]Tempus.
  • Page  452SELLARE. Venditor, venditrix.
  • SELLARE,1. [SALLARE, MS. "Velar, venditor minutorum comestibilium in nundinis." ORTUS.] of dowcet metys (sellere of dowsete metys and smale thynges, K., dowcet metell and smale thynges, P.) Velaber, velabra, C. F. et CATH.
  • SELKOW, or seeldam seyne (sel∣cowthe, K.) Rarus.
  • SELCOWTNESSE. Raritas, CATH.
  • SELD, or solde. Venditus.
  • SELDŌM. Raro.
  • SELE, fysche. Porcus marinus.
  • SELE, horsys harneys.2. ["Seale, horse harnesse." PALSG. "Arquillus, an oxe bowe." ORTUS. Possibly from the French selle.]Arquillus, DICC.
  • SELLE, stodyynge howse. Cella.
  • SELERE. Cellarium.
  • SELERERRE. Cellarius, promus.
  • SELY, or happy.3. ["Felix, sely or blisful: Felicio, to make sely." MED. In a poem in Add. MS. 10053, it is said of Heaven, "There is sely endeles beyng and endeles blys." Chaucer uses selynesse, in the sense of happiness A. S. Sel, bene.]Felix, fortuna∣tus.
  • SELLYN̄'. Vendo, venundo.
  • SEELYN̄', wythe sylure. Celo.
  • SEELYNGE, of letterys. Sigillacio.
  • SELLYNGE, of chaffare. Vendicio.
  • SELWYLLY, or he þat folowythe hys owne wylle only (selwillyd, K. selfe wyly, S.)4. [Compare CELWYLLY, supra, p. 65.]Effrenatus, CATH. effrenus.
  • SEEM, of a clothe. Sutura, UG. CATH.
  • SEEM, of corne. Quarterium.
  • SEMELAWNT. Vultus.
  • SEMELY, yn sygh'te (or plesaunt, K. P.) Decens.
  • SEMELY, comely of schap (wyl∣shapyn, K.) Formosus, elegans.
  • SEMELY, or yn semely maner. De∣center.
  • SEMELY, or propyrly (goodly, P.) Eleganter.
  • SEMELYNESSE, yn syghte. Decen∣cia.
  • SEMELYNESSE, or comelynesse of schappe. Elegancia.
  • SEMY (sotil, K. semy or sotyll, P.) Subtilis.
  • SEMYLY (semely, P.) Subtiliter.
  • SEMYN̄', or be-semyn̄'. Decet.
  • SEMYNGE, or semys. Apparencia.
  • SEMLY, gaderynge to-gedyr of men (semly or congrecacion, K.) Con∣gregacio.
  • SEMLYNGE, or metynge to-geder. Concursus.
  • SEMLYNGE to-gedere yn warre. Congressio.
  • SEMLYNGE, or lykenesse. Assimi∣lacio.
  • SEMOW, bryd. Aspergo, CATH. al∣cio, C. F. alcedo.
  • SENCE, or incense. Incensum, thus.
  • SENCERE (or thoryble, infra). Tu∣ribulum, ignibulum, CATH.
  • (SENCYN̄, infra in TURRYBLON̄.)
  • SENCYNGE. Turificatio, CATH.
  • SENDEL. Sindon, CATH.
  • SENDYN̄'. Mitto.
  • SENDYNGE. Missio.
  • SEEN, to see. Video, aspicio, res∣piceo, intuor, contemplor.
  • SENE, or be-sene. Apparens, ma∣nifestus.
  • Page  453SEENE, o(f) clerkys (or cene, su∣pra). Sinodus, CATH.
  • SENGYL, nowt dobyl. Singularis.
  • SENGYL, or symple. Simplus.
  • SENGYL, or one a-lone. Singulus, solus.
  • SENGYL, nowt maryd ne weddyd. Agamus, agama, CATH. solutus, (innuptus, P.)
  • SEENGYN̄', wythe fyyr. Ustulo, CATH. ustillo.
  • SEENGYNGE (seengyd, S.) sum what brent. Ustillacio.
  • SENGT1. [SENLT, MS., doubtless an error of transcript; the reading of MS. K. is as above—Sengt.] wythe fyre (seynkt, H. P. sengyd wythe fyre, S.) Ustilla∣tus, ustulatus.
  • (SENGRENE, herbe, supra in HOWS∣LEKE.)
  • SENY, or to-kene.2. [SEMY, MS., doubtless an error for seny, as the word reads in K. S. P. Compare CENY, supra, p. 66.]Signum.
  • SENY, of a boke. Indula.
  • SENYE, of an inne or ostrye. Texera, CATH. et UG. in taxo, tessera, C. F.
  • SENOWRYE (senery, K.) Senatus.
  • SENTENCE. Sentencia.
  • SENTENCYOWSE, or full of sentence. Sentenciosus.
  • (SENVYNE, herbe, supra in MUS∣TARD.)
  • SEPTEMBYR, monythe. September.
  • SEPTER, mace. Septrum, clava, CATH.
  • SEPULTURE, or beryynge. Sepul∣tura.
  • SEERE, or dry, as treys or herbys. Aridus.
  • SERCLE (or vyrne, infra.) Circu∣lus, girus, C. F.
  • SERCLYD. Circulatus.
  • SERKLYN̄', or make a sercle. Cir∣culo.
  • SERCLYNGE. Circulacio.
  • SEERGYN̄', or serchyn̄'. Scrutor, lustro, perlustro.
  • SEERGYNGE (serchynge, S.) Scru∣tinium, perscrutacio, scrutacio.
  • SE(R)IAWNT, of maner place. As∣secla, KYLW. CATH.
  • SERIAWNT, undyr a domys mann, for to a-rest menn, or a catche∣pol (or baly, supra.) Apparitor, C. F. et CATH. satelles, C. F. an∣garius, CATH.
  • SERIOWRE, or serchowre. Scru∣tator perscrutator.
  • SERYOWS, sad and feythefulle. Seriosus.
  • (SERIOWSTE, H. P. Seriositas.)
  • SEERYN̄', or dryyn̄ (or welkyn̄, in∣fra dryynup, K.) Areo, aresco.
  • SEERNESSE, or up-dryynge3. [Up-drynkynge, MS. Doubtless an error of transcript for updryynge, as in MS. S., Vpdriynge. P.] of treys or herbis (sernesse or drying of trees, K.) Ariditas, marcor.
  • SERTEYNE, or sekyr. Securus.
  • SERTEYNE, wythe owt fayle. Certus.
  • SERTEYNLY (or sertys, K.) Certe.
  • SERTYS, idem est. (Procertis, adv. P.)
  • SERVAGE, or bondage. Servitus.
  • SERVAWNT, mann. Servus, famu∣lus, vernaculus.
  • SERVAWNT, womann. Serva, &c.
  • SERVAWNT, þat folowythe hys mayster or maystresse. Assecla, CATH. pedissequa.
  • SERVYOWSE, or servyable (servy∣cyows, Page  454 or servicyable, S. servys∣able, P.) Obsequiosus, servici∣osus, (servilis, P.)
  • SERVYCE, of a servawn̄t, Ser∣vicium, obsequium, ministerium, famulatus.
  • SERVYCE, don for dede menn and women (or diryge, P.) Exequie.
  • SERVYCE, done yn holychyrche. Officium, servicium.
  • SERVYN̄', a servaunte1. [Sic. Possibly written by the first hand "SERVYN̄, as servaunte."] (or ser∣vandys, S.) Servio, famulor, ministro.
  • SESSYONS. Possessiones (sessio, K. P.)
  • SESONYD, yn lond and oþer goodys (sesoned in gode, P.) Sesinatus.
  • (SESONYD, as mete. K. H. S. P. Temperatus.)
  • SESYN̄', or ȝeue2. [SESYN̄ aȝeue (azene?) MS. This reading seems to be an error, which may be corrected by that of MS. S. "or ȝeve sesyn." "I wyll sease hym in his landes, je le says∣iray en ses terres." PALSG.] sesun in lond or oþer godys (sesyn in londys, K.) Sesino.
  • SESYN̄', METYS, or oþer lyke. Tem∣pero.
  • SESTERNE, or cysterne þat re∣ceyvythe water and oþer lycure. Cisterna.
  • SESUN,3. [CESUN, MS.] tyme. Tempus (tempo∣raneum, K.)
  • SESUN, yn good taky(n)ge. Sesina, usucapcio, C. F.
  • SETT, or putt. Positus, collocatus.
  • SEETE. Sedes, sedile.
  • SETE, for worthy menn. Orcestra, UG. vel orcistra, C. F.
  • SETHYNGE of mete. Coctura, coctio.
  • SETUALE, or seduale, herbe (setwale, K. setwaly, P.) Zedoarium.
  • SETTYN̄', yn ese and rest. Quieto.
  • SETTYN̄', and plantyn̄. Planto.
  • SETTYN̄', and ordeynyn̄. Statuo.
  • SETTYN̄', puttyn̄, or leyyn̄'. Pono, colloco.
  • SETTYN̄' AT NOWȜTE, or dyspysyn̄'. Vilipendo, floccipendo, parvi∣pendo, nichilipendo.
  • SETTYNGE, or puttynge. Depo∣sicio, collocacio.
  • SETTYNGE, or plantynge. Plantacio.
  • SEWARE, at mete. Depositor, da∣pifer, sepulator.
  • SEW. Cepulatum, KYLW.
  • SEVENE. Septem.
  • SEVENTENE. Septem decem, vel decem et septem, secundum correc∣cionem fratrum predicatorum, etc. supra in C.
  • SEVENTY, P. Septuaginta.)
  • SEVENTY TYMYS. Septuagesies.
  • SEVĒNNYȜHTE. Septimana.
  • (SEVEN HUNDRYD, K. Septingenti.)
  • SEWYN̄', at mete, or sette mete. Ferculo, sepulo.
  • SEWSTARE, or sowstare (soware S.) Sutrix.
  • SETHYN̄', or sethe mete (seyine, or sethyne, S.) Coquo.
  • SETHYN̄', only yn water. Lixo, CATH. elixo.
  • SEXE. Sex. Vide supra in C.
  • (SEXT, P. Sextus.)
  • SEXTENE. Sexdecem.
  • (SEXTY, P. Sexaginta.
  • (SEXHUNDRED, P. Sexcenti.)
  • (SEXTEYNE, H. P. Sacrista.)
  • (SEXTRYE, K. P. Sacristia.) Omnia alia que videntur hic esse ponenda sub S litera quere supra in C litera.
  • Page  455SYBBE, or of kynne. Consangui∣neus, contribulis.
  • SYBYLE, propyr name (Sibbe, K. Sybbly, P.) Sibilla.
  • SYBREDE (or bane, P.)1. [Compare CYBREDE, supra, p. 77. Ray gives Sibberidge or Sibbered, signifying in Suffolk the banns of matrimony, and Sir T. Browne includes Sibrit amongst Norfolk words; see also Forby, under Sybbrit. It has been derived from A. S. Syb, cognatio, and byrht, manifestus. It has also the signification of affinity. "Affinis, viri et uxoris cognati, alyaunce or sybberid." Whitint. Gramm. "Consanguinitas, i. affinitas, sybrade." Wilbr. Dict. "A sybredyne, consanguinitas." CATH. ANG.]Banna, CATH.
  • SYCOMOWRE, frute. Sicomorum.
  • SYCOMOWRE, tree. Sicomorus, celsa, CATH.
  • SYDEBYNCHE (syde benche, P.) Subsellium, CATH. et UG.
  • SYDE BORDE, or tabyl. Assidella, KYLW.
  • SYYD, as clothys.2. [See the note on CYYD, supra, p. 77. In the Paston Letters it is stated that Clement Paston had, when at College in 1457, "a chort blew gowne yt was reysyd, and mad of a syd gowne." Vol. i. p. 145. "Syde as a hode, prolixus, prolixitas; Syde as a gowne, Defluxus, talaris." CATH. ANG. "Robon, a side cassocke reaching below the knees." COTG. Bishop Kennett remarks that, in Lincolnshire and in the North, the following expressions were in use,—a "side" field, i. e. long; a "side" house or mountain, i. e. high; and, by metaphor, a haughty person was called "side." In the description of Coveitise, P. Ploughm. Vis. v. 2,857, his lolling cheeks are said to be "wel sidder than his chyn and chyveled for elde;" and, in the Mayster of the Game, a light deer and swift in running is contrasted with such as have "side bely and flankes," that is loose or hanging down, so as to hinder his speed. A. S. Side, longus.]Talaris.
  • SYDE, of a beeste, or oþer thynge, what so hyt be. Latus.
  • SYDYR, drynke. Cisera.
  • SYDNANDYS, or a-syde (or on syd, S. or a-sleet, infra.) Oblique.
  • (SYDENEDDE of a roof, vide infra in stepnesse. Elevacio.)
  • SIFTYN̄'. Cribro.
  • SYFTYNGE. Cribracio.
  • SYGHTE. Visus.
  • SYGH'TY. Visibils.
  • SYGH'TY, or glarynge, or glyder∣ynge (sity or staring, K. clarynge or glytherynge, S. staringe or glaringe, P.) Rutilans.
  • SYGNYFYYN̄',3. [This word occurs amongst the verbs, between SYMENTYN̄ and SYNGYN̄; possibly as having been written by the first hand SYNGNYFYYN̄.] or to be tokenyn̄'. Significo, denoto.
  • SYYNGE DOWNE, or swonynge. Sincopacio.
  • SYYNGE, or clensynge (syftynge, S. siffinge, P.) Colacio, colatura.
  • SYHGHYN̄', for mornynge (syhyn, K. sighen, P.) Suspiro.
  • SYȜHYNGE,4. [SYȜBYNGE, MS. Doubtless an error; the word (occurring here between Syy, and Syk,) having probably been written Syhȝhynge by the first hand. Compare Syȝhynge, infra.] (syhynge, K. syȝynge, S. sighynge, P.) Suspirium.
  • SYKYL. Falcillus, falcicula, DICC. et CATH. (falx, P.)
  • SYKYR (or serteyne, supra.) Se∣curus, tutus.
  • SYKERYN̄', or make sykyr (make sure, P.) Securo, assecuro.
  • SYKYRLY. Secure, tute.
  • SYKYRNESSE. Securitas.
  • SILLABLE. Sillaba.
  • SYLENCE. Silencium.
  • SYLKE. Sericum.
  • Page  456SYLKE WYRME. Bombix, CATH.
  • SYLLE, of an howse. Silla, soliva, KYLW. (cilla, P.)
  • SYLOGYSME. Silogismus.
  • SYLVERYN̄'. Argento, (deargento, P.)
  • SYLURE, of valle, or a nother thynge (sylure of a walle, S.) Celatura, celamen, CATH.
  • SYLURYD. Celatus.
  • SYMBALE.1. [Compare CHYMME BELLE, supra, p. 75.]Simbalum, C. F.
  • SYMENTYN̄'. Simento.
  • SYMNEL, brede.2. [Compare BREDE twyys bakyn, &c., supra, p. 48. In the Assisa Panis, which regu∣lated the weight of bread of various kinds, it is said, "Panis vero de siminello ponderabit minus de wastello de duobus solidis, quia bis coctus est." Stat. of Realm. "Simnell, bredde, siminiau." PALSG. "Artocopus, panis cum labore factus. Placenta, a wastelle or a symnelle." MED. Boorde, in the Breviary of Health, in regimen for the stone, says, "I refuse cakebreade, saffron breade, rye bread, leven bread, cracknels, simnels, and all manner of crustes." &c. "Eschaudé, a kind of wigg or symnell." COTG.]Artocopus, C. F.
  • SYMPYLLE. Simplex.
  • SYMPYLNESSE, or lytylle of valew. Exilitas.
  • SYMPYLNESSE. Simplicitas.
  • SYMPUL, or lytylle worthe. Exilis.
  • SYMPYLLE, or sengyll, noȝt dobyl. Simplus, C. F.
  • SYMOND, propyr name. Simon.
  • SYNCHONE, herbe (synyon, S. syn∣thon, P.) Senecion, camadreos.
  • SYNDYR, of smythys colys. Casma, C. F.
  • SYNE (or tokyn, K.) idem quod SENY, supra.
  • (SYNE of an ostry, P. of an in, K. supra in SENY.)
  • SYNNE. Peccatum, piaculum, vi∣cium, facinus, crimen.
  • SYNEWE. Nervus.
  • SYNFULLE. Criminosus, viciosus.
  • SYNFULLY. Criminose, viciose.
  • SYNFULNESSE. Peccabilitas, vi∣ciositas.
  • SYNGGARE. Cantor, cantator, can∣tatrix.
  • SYNGYN̄', Canto, psallo, CATH. cano, pango, CATH.
  • SYNGE MASSE. Misso, CATH. et UG.
  • SYNGE SWETELY. Modulor.
  • SYNGYNGE, of songe. Cantacio, modulacio.
  • SYNGYNGE, of messys. Celebracio.
  • SY(N)GYNGE ȜYFTE, or reward for syngynge. Syparium, CATH.
  • SYNYN̄', or a-signyn̄' (ordeyne or assynyn, K. P.) Signo, assigno.
  • SYNKE, for water receyvynge (synke or receyte of water, P.) Ex∣ceptorium, C. F.
  • SYNKE, of a lampe (holdinge the risshe, P.) Mergulus, CATH.
  • SYNKYNGE. Submersio.
  • SYNNYN̄', or do syn̄'. Pecco.
  • SYNOPYR, colowre. Sinopis, C. F. et UG. in sinzurus.
  • SYYNTYR, or mason̄rye (sintyr of masonry, K. syyntir of masunry, P.) Sinctorium, (cingatorium, P.)
  • SYPPYN̄', nowȝt fully drynke. Po∣tisso, subbibo, CATH.
  • SYPPYNGE, lytyl drynkynge. Po∣tissacio, CATH. subbibitura.
  • SYPREES, tree. Cipressus, cipa∣rissus, C. F.
  • SYRCUMSYCYON. Circumsisio.
  • SYR, or lord. Dominus, herus, kirius.
  • SYSE, or a-syse, dome of lond.
  • SYSE, for bokys lymynynge (sise colour, K. P.)
  • SYSMATYK. Scismaticus.
  • SYSOWRE, schere. Forpex.
  • Page  457SYSTERNE, idem quod SESTERNE, supra.
  • SYSTER, only by þe fader ys syyde. Soror, CATH. et UG. in sereno.
  • SYSTER, only be the moder ys syde. Germana, CATH. et UG. ibid.
  • SYSTER YN LAWE, broders wyyf. Fratrissa, CATH. et C. F.
  • SYSTER YN LAWE, as howsolde syster, or wyfys syster (as hus∣bandys syster, or wyues syster, S. P.) Glos, C. F.
  • SYTTARE. Sessor, sestrix.
  • SYTTARE, at mete. Conviva.
  • SYTE. Urbs, civitas.
  • (SYTHȜ, H. Visus.)
  • SYTHY, H. Visibilis.)
  • (SYTHY, or staring, or glaryng, H. Rutilans.)
  • SYTHETHYN̄' (siyin̄, K. sythyn, S. sythen, P.)1. ["Diutinus, longe sythen." ORTUS. A. S. Syddan, deinde, postea.]Postmodum, postea, deinde, deinceps.
  • SYTTYN̄', on a sete. Sedeo.
  • SYTTYN̄', at mete. Recumbo, dis∣cumbo.
  • SYTTYNGE. Sessio.
  • SYTTYNGE CLOTHE, or streythe. Strigium, KYLW.
  • SYTTYNGE PLACE. Sedile, C. F.
  • SYVE, for to syfte wythe (syffe, P.) Cribrum, cribellum.
  • (SIVE, infra in TEMȜE. Setarium, CATH.)
  • SYVEDYS, or brynne, or palyys.2. [Compare BREN, or bryn, or paley, supra, p. 49, and PALY or brynne, p. 379.]Furfur.
  • SYVYȜERE, or maker of syvys (siveyer, seve makere, K. syuyer', P.) Cribrarius.
  • SYVYS, herbe (or cyvys, supra in C. Nasturcium, S.)
  • SYVN, of a tree. Vitulamen, CATH. surculus.
  • (SITHE, K. Vicis.)
  • SYTHE, instrument of mowynge (sithe to mowyn corne, K.) Falx.
  • SYTHYN̄', or clensyn̄' lycurys (syffyn, S. syuyn, P.) Colo.
  • SYȜHYNGE (syynge, S.) Suspiracio. Si que alia sunt habencia sonum Sy in prima sillaba, quere supra in Cy, in C. litera.
  • SKEY, as hors (or schey, supra.) Umbraticus, UG.
  • SKEYMOWSE, or sweymows (skey∣mows or queymows. Abhomi∣nativus, S.)
  • SKEYNE, or threde. Filipulum, versofilum, C. F. in gyrgyllum.
  • SKEPPE. Sporta, corbes.
  • SKEPPE MAKERE. Corbio, CATH.
  • SKEREL. Larva, UG. et C. F.
  • SKERYN̄' A-WEY. Abigo, CATH.
  • SKERYNGE A-WEY. Abjectio.
  • SKYE.

    3. "Nubes, a skye." MED. Thus in Lydgate's Minor Poems,

    "This somerys day is nevir or seelden seyn
    With som cleer hayr, but that ther is som skye."

    Compare CLOWDE, supra, p. 84, where the reading in MSS. K. H. is Clowde or skye; Clowdy, or fulle of skyys; see also HOVYN̄ yn̄ þe eyre, as skyis, &c., p. 251. A. S. Skua, umbra.

    Nubes, nebula, nubicula, (nubila, P.)
  • SKYL. Racio.
  • SKYLFULLE. Racionabilis.
  • SKYLFULNESSE. Racionabilitas.
  • SKYNNE. Pellis, cutis.
  • SKYNNARE. Pelliparius, CATH. pel∣lifex, C. F. in mureligus.
  • Page  458SKYP (or lawnche, supra.) Saltus, UG.
  • SKYPPARE. Saltator, saltatrix.
  • SKYPPYN̄'. Salto.
  • SKYRT, of a garment. Trames, C. F. syrina, CATH.
  • SKYRWYT, herbe or rote (skerwyth, S.) Pastinaca, C. F. bancia, C. F.
  • SKYTTE, or flyx (flux, S.) Fluxus, lienteria, dissenteria, (dyaria, P.)
  • SKYVEYNE, of a gylde (skywen, S.)
  • (SKOCHON, supra in scochun, S.)
  • SKOMYN̄'. Supra in Sco; et cetera alia sillaba.
  • SLABBARDE (slabbar, J.) Morosus, tardus.
  • SLAK. Laxus.
  • SLAG, or fowle wey (slak as fowle wey, K.) Lubricus, lutosus, li∣mosus.
  • SLAY, webstarys loome. Lana∣rium, radius, CATH. et C. F.
  • SLAKYN̄'. Laxo, CATH.
  • SLAKYNGE. Laxacio.
  • SLAKNESSE. Laxatura.
  • SLAT stone, idem quod SCLAT. Ymbrex.
  • SLAW, yn mewynge. Tardus, piger, torpidus, morosus.
  • SLAW, or dul of egge (dulle of wyt, K.) Ebes, obtusus.
  • SLAVEYNE, garment (slaueyn, clothe, K.) Saraballum, sarra∣barrum, COMM. et DICC. birrus. C. F. endromades, CATH. et UG. vel endroma, (endromis, C. F., P.)
  • SLAVYR. Orexis, UG. V. in L. et KYLW.
  • SLAVERYNGE. Orexacio, orexia, UG. V.
  • SLAVERŌN. Orexo, CATH.
  • SLAWLY. Tepide, pigre, tarde.
  • SLAUNDER, or sclaunder. Scanda∣lum, calumpnia, C. F.
  • SLAUNDERYD. Calumpniatus, scandalizatus.
  • SLAWNDERŌN. Scandalizo, ca∣lumpnior, CATH.
  • SLAWNESSE, of mewynge. Morosi∣tas, tarditas, pigritia, (moritas, K.)
  • SLAWNESSE, or dulnesse of egge. Ebetudo, obtusitas.
  • SLAWTHE (supra in slawnesse, P.) Pigricia, accidia.
  • SLAWTYR, of beestys. Mactacio.
  • SLEDE (instrument, K. P.) to draw wythe.1. [See HAROWE, supra, p. 228.]Tha, trava, C. F. traha, UG.
  • SLEYTHE (or quentyse, supra, or slynesse or wyle, infra, sleight, P.) Astucia, cautela.
  • SLEYTHE, of falsehed (or wyle, infra, sleyth, or falnesse, S.) Versucia, dolositas, calliditas, meander, C. F.
  • SLEKYSTŌN (sleken stone, K. H.)

    2. "Amiathon, a slyke stone (al. a sclykstone)." MED. "Linatorium, a sleke stone. Lucibricimictium, a sleyght stone." ORTUS. "A sleght stone, lamina, licinitorium, luci∣bricunculum." CATH. ANG. "Slyckestone, lisse à papier, lice." PALSG. "Sleeke stone, pierre calendrine." SHERW. In former times polished stones, implements in form of a muller, were used to smooth linen, paper, and the like, and likewise for the operation termed calendering. Gautier de Bibelesworth says,

    "Et priez la dame qe ta koyfe luche (slike)
    De sa luchiere (slikingston) sur la huche."

    In directions for making buckram, &c., and for starching cloth, Sloane MS. 3548, f. 102, the finishing process is as follows: "cum lapide slycstone levifica." Slick-stones occur in the Tables of Custom-house Rates on Imports, 2 James I.; and about that period large stones inscribed with texts of Scripture were occasionally thus used. See Whitaker, Hist. Craven, p. 401, n. There was a specimen in the Leverian Museum. Bishop Kennett, in his Glossarial Collections, v. Slade, alludes to the use of such an appliance,—"to sleek clothes with a sleek-stone."

    Page  459Linitorium, lucibriunculum, lici∣nitorium, DICC.
  • SLEKYN̄'. Licibricinnulo, (?) KYLW.
  • SLEKKYN̄' (sleckyn or whechyn, K.) Extinguo.
  • SLEKKYNGE, or qwenchynge. Ex∣tinctio.
  • SLEEN̄', or slee bestys (slene or killyn bestis, P.) Occido, tru∣cido, interficio, interimo.
  • SLEN̄, or kyllyn̄ beestys as bocherys. Macto.
  • SLENDYR. Gracilis.
  • SLEPE. Somnus, sopor, dormicio.
  • SLEPARE. Dormitor, somniosus.
  • SLEPY, or hevy of slepe. Sompno∣lentus.
  • SLEPYN̄'. Dormio, soporo.
  • SLEET, or a-sleet. Oblique.
  • SLEET, of snowe. Nicula, CATH.
  • SLEVE. Manica.
  • SLEVE garmentys (slevyn or settyn on sleuys, K.) Manico, CATH.
  • SLEWTH'E, idem quod SLAWNESSE, supra.
  • SLEWTHYN̄', or sluggön'. Torpeo, torpesco.
  • SLY. Cautus, astutus, callidus.
  • SLY, and false to-gedyr. Subdolus, dolosus, versutus, versipellis, C. F.
  • SLYCE, instrument. Spata, spatula, DICC.
  • SLYDERYN̄' (slidyn, K.) Labo, vel labor, CATH.
  • SLYDYNGE. Lapsus.
  • SLYDYR (or swypyr as a wey, in∣fra.) Lubricus.
  • SLYDYRNESSE. Labilitas.
  • SLYKE, or smothe, Lenis, cum n. non v.
  • SLYKESTŌN, idem quod SLEKESTŌN.
  • SLYLY (or warely, infra.) Astute, caute (callide, P.)
  • SLYMANNE, and doggyd. Ardulio, C. F.
  • SLYME (or slype, infra.) Limus, uligo, C. F. et UG. in ulva.
  • (SLYMOWS, or lymows, P. Limosus.)
  • SLYNESSE, idem quod SLEYTHE, supra.
  • SLYNGARE. Fundibularius, C. F.
  • SLYNGE. Funda, balea, C. F. et CATH.
  • SLYNGYN̄'. Fundo, CATH. fundi∣balo, C. F.
  • SLYP, or skyrte. Lascinia; glossa Merarii.
  • SLYP, (slype, S. slypp, P.) idem quod slyme.
  • SLYTYN̄', or weryn̄. Attero, vetero, CATH. invetero.
  • SLYTYN̄, or weryd. Veteratus, CATH. vetustus, vetustate consumptus.
  • SLYTYNGE. Veteracio, consumpcio.
  • SLYVYN̄' A-SUNDYR (or ryvyn, P.) Findo, effisso, KYLW.
  • SLYVYNGE, cuttynge a-wey. Avul∣sio, abscisio.
  • SLYVYNGE, of a tre or oþer lyke. Fissula.
  • SLO, frute. Prunum, vel spinum, C. F. et KYLW. prunellum.
  • (SLOO tree, P. Prunus.)
  • SLOBUR, or slobere. Feces im∣munde.
  • SLOBUR, or blobur of fysshe and oþer lyke. Burbulium, UG. in burgo.
  • SLOFFYNGE, or on-gentyll etynge (onkyndely etynge, K.) Voracio, devoracio, lurcacitas.
  • SLOKNYN̄', idem quod SLEKNYN̄, supra (slokkyn supra in slekkyn, P.)
  • Page  460SLOKNYNGE, or qwenchynge (sloke∣nynge or whenchinge, K.) Ex∣tinctio.
  • (SLOMERYNG, K.) Dormitacio.
  • SLOMERON̄'. Dormito, nictitor, KYLW.
  • SLOPPE, garment (slop, clothe, K. P.) Mutatorium, C. F.
  • SLOOR, or sowr (slory or sowre, K. slore or soore or cley, S. H. P.)1. [Compare GORE, or slory, supra, p. 203. "To slorry or make foul, sordido." GOULDM. "Souillè, soiled, slurried, smutched, &c.; Souiller, to soyle, slurrie; Ordi, fouled, slurried, slubbered." COTG.]Cenum, limus.
  • SLORYYD. Cenosus, cenolentus, lutulentus, C. F.
  • SLOOT, or schytyl of sperynge (slot or shetil, P.) Pessulum.
  • SLOT, or schytyl of a dore. Vero∣lium, COMM.
  • SLOTHE, where fowle water ston∣dythe (or poyel, supra.) Lacuna, CATH.
  • SLOTHE, where swyne or oþer bestys han dwellyd (sloughe, W. ye hoggys welwyn, K. han well∣ywyd, S. where hoggys walowen, P.) Volutabrum, CATH.
  • SLOTHE, where water stondythe aftyr reyne. Colluvium, collu∣vies, vel colluvio, UG. in luo.
  • SLOTURBURGGE (slotyrbugge, K. S. P.) Cenulentus, maurus, CATH. obcenus, UG. V. in L. putibundus, C. F.
  • SLOTERON̄', or defowlyn' (sloteryn or done fowly, P.) Maculo, de∣turpo.
  • SLUGGE. Deses, segnis.
  • SLUGGY. Desidiosus, torpidus, ig∣navus, CATH.
  • SLUGGYDNESSE (slugnes, K.) Tor∣por, segnicies, ignavia.
  • SLUGGYN̄'. Desidio, torpeo, pigri∣tor, CATH.
  • SLUMMERARE. Dormitator, dor∣mitatrix.
  • SLUTTE. Cenosus, cenosa.
  • SLUTTY. Cenulentus, CATH.
  • SLUTTYLY (slutly, K. sluttysshly, P.) Cenulente.
  • (SLUTHNES, K. Cenositas.)
  • SMAK, or taste. Gustus.
  • SMAKYN̄', or smellyn̄. Odoro.
  • SMALYN̄', or make lesse. Minoro.
  • SMALLE, as a wande. Gracilis.
  • SMALLE, or lytylle. Parvus, mo∣dicus.
  • SMAL WYNE. Villum.
  • SMEKE, or smoke. Fumus.
  • SMEKYN̄', or smokyn̄'. Fumo, fu∣migo.
  • SMEKYN̄', or smokyn̄' as hote ly∣cure. Vaporo.
  • (SMEKYNGE, or mevyn̄ wythe ple∣saunte tokenys, infra in STYRYN̄'.)
  • SMEL. Odor, vel odos.
  • SMEL, of rostyd mete. Nidor, C. F.
  • SMELLYN̄, idem quod SMAKYN̄', supra, et olfo, C. F.
  • SMELLYN̄' SWETE. Fragro.
  • SMELLYNGE. Odoracio, olfactus.
  • SMELTE, fysche. (Stingus, P.)
  • SMERT. Ustio.2. [Vistio, MS. Ustio, MSS. S. P., is doubtless the true reading.]
  • SMERTYN̄'. Uro.
  • SMET, or smytyn̄'. Percussus.
  • SMETHE, or smothe (smethenes, K.)3. [Forby gives Smeath, signifying in Norfolk an open level of considerable extent, for instance Markan Smeath (pronounced Smee,) famed in the sports of the Swaffham coursing meeting. An extensive level tract near Lynn, formerly fen, is called the Smeeth; and to the south-west of Lynn there is a very fertile plain, celebrated as pasture for sheep, called Tylney Smeeth. A. S. Smaeth, planicies.]Planicies.
  • Page  461SMYLYN̄'. Subrideo.
  • SMYLYNGE. Subrisus.
  • SMYTHE. Faber, ferrarius, CATH.
  • SMYTYN̄'. Ferio, percutio.
  • SMYTE FYYR. Fugillo, CATH.
  • SMYTYNGE. Percussio, percus∣sura.
  • SMYTHY. Fabricia (fabrateria, S. P.)
  • SMYTHYS CHYMNEY, or herthe. Fa∣brica, C. F. (epicastorium, P.)
  • SMYTHYS HAMYR. Marcus, CATH.
  • SMYTHYS TONGGE (tongys, K.) Te∣nella, CATH.
  • SMOK, schyrt. Camisia, interula, instita, UG. V. (subocula, vel sub∣uncula, P.)
  • SMOKE, reke, idem quod REKE.
  • SMOKY. Fumosus.
  • SMORE, wythe smeke. Fumigo.
  • SMORYD. Fumigatus.
  • SMORYNGE. Fumigacio.
  • SMOTHE, pleyne. Planus.
  • SMOTHE, or softe. Lenis, cum n. non v.
  • SNAYLE, crepare. Limax, limata, CATH.
  • (SNAYLE, as of pentys, supra in CERCLE. Spira.)1. ["Testudo, a snayle, curva camera templi, curvatura, lacunar, a voute." MED.]
  • SNAKE, wyrme. Anguis, CATH. in anguilla.
  • SNARE. Laqueus, pedica, CATH. tendicula.
  • SNARYD, or snarlyd (or marlyd, supra.) Illaqueatus, laqueatus.
  • SNARYN̄', or snarlyn̄'.2. [Compare INTRYKYN̄, supra, p. 262, MARLYN̄, p. 327, and RUFFELYN̄, p. 439. Pals∣grave gives the verb "I snarle, I strangle in a halter, or corde, Je estrangle: My gray∣hounde had almost snarled hym selfe to night in his own leesse." See Forby's Norfolk dialect, v. "Snarl, to twist, entangle, and knot together as a skein." Cotgrave gives "Grippets, the rufflings or snarles of ouer-twisted thread."]Illaqueo.
  • SNARYNGE, or snarlynge (or ruf∣flynge, supra.) Illaqueacio.
  • (SNARLID, K. Illaqueatus.)
  • SNATTYD, or schor(t) nosyd.3. ["All mooris and men of Ynde be snatte nosed, as be gotis, apis, &c." HORM. In K. Alis. v. 6447, "fuatted nose" should doubtless be read snatted.]Si∣mus, C. F.
  • SNEKKE, or latche. Clitorium, pessulum, KYLW. pessum, NECC.
  • SNEKE, or the poose (pose, K. H. S.) Catarrus, C. F. corisa, rupea.
  • SNYBBYN̄, or vndur-takyn̄. Re∣prehendo, deprehendo.
  • SNYBBYNGE, or vndyrtakynge. De∣prehencio, redargucio, (repre∣hencio, K.)
  • SNYPE, or snyte, byrde. Ibex.
  • SNYVELARD, or he þat spekythe yn the nose. Nasitus, KYLW.
  • SNYTYN' a nese or a candyl. Emun∣go, mungo.
  • SNYTYNGE, of a nose or candyl. Munctura, CATH. emunctura.
  • SNYTYNGE,

    4. "Instrument" ought here probably to be supplied, according to the readings K. P. "Emunctorium, ferrum cum quo candela emundatur, a snuffyng yron." ORTUS. The following description of a pair of snuffers, about 1450, is found in the curious poem on the officers of a household and their duties, appended to the Boke of Curtasye, Sloane MS. 1986, f. 46, b. where, after describing various kinds of candles made by the "Chandeler," we read that that official—

    "The snof of hom dose a-way
    Wyth close sesours, as I ȝow say,
    The sesours ben schort and rownde y close,
    Wyth plate of irne vp on bose."
    of a candel (snytele, Page  462 S. snytinge instrument, K. P.) Munctorium, emunctorium, CATH.
  • (SNUFFE, of a candel, S. Muco.)
  • (SNOKE, K. P. Mustilacio.)
  • (SNOKYN, or smellyn, K. P. Nicto.)1. ["Nicto, to snoke as houndes dooth when following game." ORTUS. "Indago, to snook, to seek or search, to vent, to seek out as a hound doth." GOULDM. Compare BAFFYN̄, and baffynge, supra, p. 20, and WAPPYN̄, infra.]
  • SNOKYNGE. Olfactus.
  • SNORARE. Stertor, (stertens, S.)
  • SNORYN̄', yn sleep. Sterto.
  • SNORYNGE. Stertura.
  • SNOTHE, fylthe of the nose (snotte, S.) Polipus, CATH. (pus, mucus, P.)
  • SNOW. Nix.
  • SNOWYN̄'. Ningit.
  • SNOWTE, or bylle. Rostrum, C. F. promussida, C. F.
  • SNVRTYN̄', or frowne2. [Srowne, MS. Compare FROWNYN̄ wythe the nose, supra, p. 181, where Nasio is the reading of the Latin word, here correctly written. "Nario, i. subsannare, nares fricare, &c. to scorne or mocke." ORTUS.] wythe þe nese for scorne or schrewde∣nesse. Nario, CATH.
  • Soo, or cowl, vessel. Tina, CATH.
  • So, or on thys wyse (so or that wyse, P.) Sic, siccine, taliter.
  • SOBBYN̄'. Singulto, UG.
  • SOBBYNGE. Singultus, (singulcio, K.)
  • SOBUR. Modestus, sobrius.
  • SOBERYN̄', or make sobyr. Sobrio.
  • SOBURNESSE. Sobrietas, modestia.
  • SOCKE.3. [Compare PYNSONE, sokke, supra, p. 400. "Socke for ones fote, chausson." PALSG. "Cernu, a socke without sole." MED. "Linipedium, a hose or a socke of lynnen cloth." ORTUS. A satirical writer, t. Edw. II., says of the monks that this is the penance they do for our Lord's love,—"Hii weren sockes in here shon, and felted botes above." Polit. Songs, p. 330.]Soccus, CATH. et UG. in sagio (peda, K. pedana, P.)
  • SOCOWRE. Refugium, confugium, tutela, (refrigerium, P.)
  • SOCOWRYD. Defensus, supporta∣tus, contutatus, (refugitus, P.)
  • SOCOWRYN̄', yn helpynge or de∣fendyn̄. Tuor, contutor, CATH. succurro.
  • SOCŌN, or soke mylke. Lacteo, lallo, sugio, CATH.
  • SODARY, or sudary. Sudarium.
  • SODEYNE. Subitaneus, repentinus.
  • SODENLY. Subito, repentine.
  • SODEYNTE.4. [Compare HASTE, yn sodente, impetus, supra, p. 228.]Subitaneum.
  • SODEKENE, or subdekene. Sub∣diaconus, nathineus, CATH.
  • SOFYME. Sophisma.
  • SOFYSTER. Sophysta.
  • SOFYSYN̄'. Sufficio.
  • SOFTE, yn felynge or towchynge. Mollis.
  • SOFTE, or myyld (meke, S.) Pius, mansuetus, suavis.
  • SOFTE, or esy wythe owte grete dene (dynne, S.) Tranquillus.
  • SOFTE, in mevynge. Lentus.
  • SOFTE and smothe. Lenis, pla∣nus.
  • SOFTYN̄', or make softe. Mollio, CATH.
  • Page  463SOFTYN̄, or esyn̄ of peyne (softyn wit resone, K.) Mitigo, alle∣vio.
  • SOFTYN̄', or comfortyn yn sorowe and mornynge. Delinio.
  • SOFTENESSE, yn towehynge. Mol∣licies, mollicia, CATH.
  • SOFTENESSE, or myldenesse. Man∣suetudo, benignitas.
  • SOFTENESSE, or smothenesse. Le∣nitas, cum n. non cum v.
  • (SOGGON̄', infra in water soggon̄'. Aquosus.)
  • (SOHOWE, hown̄tynge crye, supra in H.)
  • (SOYLE, infra in sule, et supra in moold.)
  • SOIOWRYN̄',1. [Sic, probably for Soiowrnyn̄. Palsgrave gives—"I sejourne, I boorde in another mannes house for a tyme, or I tarye in a place for a season, Je sejourne. I sojourne," &c. id. "Convivo, to feeste or to geste, vel simul vivere, to lyue togyder." ORTUS.] or go to boorde (soiw∣ryn, K.) Convivor, UG. perpen∣dino, C. F. (prehendino, S.)
  • SOIURNAUT (soioraūt, P.) Com∣mensalis, mansionarius, convi∣vator, convivatrix, UG. in vivo, mansionaria.
  • SOKERE, or he þat sokythe. Su∣gens, (lactens, P.)
  • SOKARE of mylke, or sokerel that longe sokythe. Mammotrepus, CATH. et C. F.
  • SOKELYNGE, herbe (or suklynge, infra.) Locusta.
  • SOKELYNGE, or he þat sokythe. Sububer, UG. vel sububis, UG. V. in L.
  • SOKET, of a candylstykke or oþer lyke. Alorica, vel alarica, KYLW. et UG. V.
  • SOKYN̄' yn lycure (as thyng, K.) to be made softe, or other cawsys ellys (as thinge to be soft, P.) Infundo; et istud habetur a physicis medicinalibus (as ly∣cowris, S.)
  • SOKYN̄' YN̄, as lycure yn dyuerse þyngys, or drynkyn yn' (sokyn in diuers þyngys, S.) Inbibo.
  • SOKYNGE, or longe lyynge in ly∣cure. Infusio, inbibitura.
  • SOKYNGE, of a pappe or tete. Lac∣tacio, succio.
  • SOKYNGE GRYCE. Nefrendus, CATH.
  • SOKYNGE GROWNDE, as sondy grownde and other lyke (soking in as a sondy grownd, K.) Bi∣bulus, CATH. (et Boetius, S.)
  • (SOKYNGLY, idem quod esyly.)
  • SOOKNE, or custome of hauntynge (soken or custome, P. custome or hawntynge, S.) Frequent∣acio, concursus.
  • SOLACE (or spoort, infra.) So∣lacium, solamen.
  • SOOLE, beestys teyynge2. [" Sole, a bowe about a beestes necke." PALSG. "Restis, a sole to tie beasts." GOULDM. A. S. Sol, Sole, a wooden band to put round the neck of an oxe or a cow when tied up in a stall. The word is still in use in certain local dialects, as in Hereford∣shire and Cheshire.] (teyinge, K. teiynge, P.) Trimembrale, KYLW. muligo, KYLW. ligaculum, KYLW. boia, CATH.
  • SOLE, fysche. Solia, CATH.
  • SOLE, of a foot. Planta.
  • SOLE, of a schoo. Solea, CATH.
  • SOLEYNE, or a mees of mete for on a-lone (soleyne or a mele of mete of one alone, P.) Solinum.
  • SOLEYNE, of maners, or he þat lo∣vythe no cumpany. Solitarius, Page  464 aceronicus, CATH. vel acheroni∣cus, C. F.
  • SOLEMNE (solenne, S.) Solemp∣nis.
  • SOLEMPNE, or feestfulle (solenne, K. S.) Festivus, celeber.
  • SOLEMPNYTE (solennite, S.) So∣lempnitas.
  • SOLEMPNYTE, of a feest. Festivi∣tas.
  • SOLERE, or lofte.1. ["Sollar a chambre, solier. Soller a lofte, garnier." PALSG. "Hecteca, dicitur solarium dependens de parietibus cenaculi. Menianum, solarium, dictum a menibus, i. muris, quia muris solent addi." ORTUS. In the Boke for Travellers, the hostess says of persons arriving at an inn—"Jenette, lyghte the candell and lede them ther aboue in the solere to fore." Compare GARYTTE, hey solere, supra, p. 187.]Solarium, hec∣theca, C. F. menianum, COMM.
  • SOLFON̄'. Solfo.
  • SOLFYNGE. Solfacio (soluacio, P.)
  • (SOLVYN, supra in onbyyndyn.)
  • SOLWYD (solowed, P.) Macula∣tus, deturpatus, sordidatus.
  • SOLWYN̄', or fowlyn̄ (solowyn, P.) Maculo, deturpo, (sordido, P.)
  • SOLWYNGE (solowynge, P.)2. [Compare SOWLYNGE, infra.]De∣turpacio, sordidacio, (macula∣cio, P.)
  • SOMENOWRE. Citator.
  • SO MEKYL (so moch, P.) Tantum. (tantummodo, P.)
  • SOMER hors.3. [Compare MALE HORSE, gerulus, somarius, supra, p. 323. "Sompter horse, sommier." PALSG.]Gerulus, CATH. et COMM. somarius, CATH. summa∣rius, COMM. (bajulus, sellio, P.)
  • SOMER tyme. Estas.
  • SOMYR CASTELL.4. [Compare TOWRE made oonly of tymbyr, fala, infra. "Fala, Angl. a toure of tree." ORTUS. "Sommer castell of a shyppe." PALSG. In the translation of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 8 A. XII., mention occurs of "somer castell or bastyle" brought against the walls by an enemy, f. 103; and of "somercastelles, bastelles, and piles," to protect the supplies of pro∣visions, f. 68 b.]Fala, C. F.
  • SOMYR LAYLOND. Novale.
  • (SOMYR GAME, supra in play.)
  • SOMORŌN, or a-bydyn' yn' somyr.5. [This verb occurs in the MS. between SOPOSYN̄ and SORWYN̄.]Estivo, C. F.
  • SOMOWNYN̄'. Cito.
  • SONNARE, or rathere. Cicius.
  • SOND. Sabulum, CATH.
  • SOND, or gravel. Arena.
  • SOND HYLLE, or pytte. Sorica, CATH.
  • SOND, or sendynge. Missio.
  • SOND, or ȝyfte sent (ȝeft y-send, S.) Eccennium (encennium, xennium, S.)
  • SONE. Filius.
  • SONE IN LAWE. Gener, C. F.
  • SONE, not longe a-bydynge. Cito.
  • SONGE. Cantus, canticum.
  • SONGE, yn halle or chambyr. Can∣tilena.
  • SONGE, of a manne a-lone. Mo∣nodia, KYLW. vel monoci(ni)um.
  • SONGE, of twey menne. Bicinium, KYLW.
  • SONGE, of thre menn. Tricinium, KYLW.
  • SONGE, of many menn. Sincin∣nium, KYLW. Nota eciam tetra∣ci(ni)um et pentaci(ni)um de aliis.
  • SONYON̄', idem quod SOYNYN̄ (soynyn or assonyyn, P.)
  • Page  465SOPARE, marchaūnt (or chapman, P.) Saponarius, KYLW.
  • SOOPE. Smigma, C. F. sapo.
  • SOPPE. Offa, offula, (offella, P.)
  • (SOPPE, yn watyr, K. Ypa.)
  • (SOPPE, in wyne, K. H. Vipa.)
  • (SOPER, K. Cena.)
  • (SOPHYM, supra in sofym, K.)
  • SOPOSYN̄'. Suppono, estimo, sus∣picor.
  • (SOPOSYNGE, infra in supposynge.)
  • SOORE, wonde or botche, Morbus.
  • SOORE, or grevows and dyshesyd for sorenesse. Morbosus, mor∣bidus.
  • SORE, or grevowsnesse. Gravamen.
  • SOORE, fylthe or sovr (sowre, filthe, S. P.) Limus, cenum, lutum.
  • SORCERY, wyche crafte. Sortile∣gium.
  • SOREL, herbe. Surella, C. F. ac∣cidula, C. F. acetosa, solatrum, DICC.
  • SORY, and hevy yn herte. Tristis, mestus, molestus.
  • SORYLY. Triste, moleste.
  • SOORY, or defowlyd yn sowr or fylthe (sowry or defiled in soure, P.) Cenosus, cenulentus, lutu∣lentus, (limosus, lutuosus, P.)
  • SORYNESSE, or hevynesse. Tris∣ticia, luctus, molestia, mesticia.
  • SORYP, Sorypus, C. F. et COMM.
  • SOORT (sort or lotte, H. S. P.) Sors.
  • SOROWE. Dolor, meror, tristicia, gemitus.
  • SOROW, for lost of gudde (for losse of godes, S.) Dividia, (?) glossa Merarii.
  • SOROW for syn, wylfully takyn̄'. Contricio.
  • SOROW for syn, take for drede of peyne more than for drede of Godde (more than for disple∣sawnce of God, K.) Attricio.
  • SOROWFULLE, or fulle of sorow. Merens, lugubris, C. F. tristis, gemibundus.
  • SORWYN̄'. Doleo, gemo, lugeo, ejulo.
  • (SORWYNGE, supra in sorowe, H.)
  • (SORPORRYD, wythe mete or drynke, supra in agrotonyd.)
  • SOORTYN̄', or settyn̄ yn a soorte. Sortior.
  • SOS, how(nd)ysmete1. [Howysmete, MS. This appears doubtless an error which may be corrected by the other MSS. and Pynson's text, "houndis mete." Palsgrave gives "Sosse, or a rewarde for houndes whan they have taken their game, hvuee." Forby gives Soss or Suss, a mixed mess of food, a term always used in contempt, in East Anglian dialect.] (soos, howndys mete, H. S.) Canta∣brum, CATH. et UG. in Canaan.
  • SOOT, of reke or smoke. Fuligo.
  • SOTTE, idem quod FOLTE or folett, supra.2. [Compare also AMOSTE, or a fole, supra, p. 11.]Fatuellus, stolidus.
  • SOTHE, or trewe (trowthe, K.) Verus, veridicus.
  • SOTHE mete. Bulcibarium (dul∣cibarium, S.)
  • SOTHEFAST mann or womann. Verax.
  • SOTHEFASTYLY. Veraciter.
  • SOTHEFASTENESSE (or sothenesse, P.) Veracitas, veritas.
  • SOTHLY. Vere, veraciter.
  • SOTY, or fowlyd wythe soot. Fuli∣ginosus; glossa Merarii.
  • SOTYLE (or subtyll, P.) Subtilis.
  • SOTYLY. Subtiliter.
  • SOTYLE, and wytty. Ingeniosus.
  • SOTYLE, and crafty. Artificiosus.
  • SOTYLTE. Subtilitas.
  • Page  466SOTYLTE, of crafte. Artificiositas.
  • SOTYLTE, of wytte. Ingeniositas.
  • SOO TRE, or cowl tre. Falanga, KYLW. (vectatorium, CATH., K.)
  • SOWCE, mete. Succidium, KYLW.
  • SOWCYN̄'. Succido, C. F. et KYLW.
  • SOWD, mede or rewarde of hyre. Stipendium salarium (munici∣pium, P.)
  • SOWDE, metel. Consolidum, so∣lidarium (soudarium, P.)
  • SOWDYOWRE. Stipendarius, mu∣niceps, tribunus, C. F.
  • SOWDŌN. Soldanus.
  • SOWE, swyne. Sus, porca, scrofa, CATH.
  • SOVEREYNE, yn wyrschyppe. Su∣perior.
  • SOVERENTE. Superioritas.
  • SOWYN̄' corne or oþer sedys. Se∣mino, sero, CATH.
  • SOWE clothys or oþer thyngys. Suo.
  • SOWYNGE, of corne and oþer sedys. Sacio, CATH. et C. F. seminacio.
  • SOWYNGE, of clothys and oþer thyngys. Sutura.
  • SOWLE. Anima.
  • SOWLYNGE, or dyynge. Obitus, vel exalacio.
  • SOWLYNGE, or solwynge (solwynge or makynge of folwe,1. [Sic. probably for fowle. See SOLWYN̄, SOLWYNGE, &c., supra.] K.) Macu∣lacio, deturpacio, sordidacio.
  • SOWNDE, or dyne. Sonitus, sonus.
  • SOUNDE, of a fysche (sown, K.) Ventigina.
  • SOW(N)DON̄' (sowndyn, K.) Sono.
  • (SOWNDYN', as newe ale and other lycure, infra in SWOWYN̄.)
  • SOU(N)DYNGE. Sonatus.
  • (SOWNDYN̄ A-ZENE, supra in RE∣BOWNDYN̄.)
  • SOUNDYNGE A-ZENE (or rebownd∣ynge, supra.) Resonatus, rebo∣acio, CATH.
  • SOWPONE, or sowpe. Sorbeo, ab∣sorbeo.
  • SOWPYNGE. Sorbicio.
  • SUPPYNGE AL VP, or al owte. Ab∣sorbicio.
  • SOWPYNGE METE, or drynke (sow∣pinge fode, K. P.) Sorbile, sor∣biciuncula, C. F.
  • (SOWRE, filthe, K. or soore, supra. Cenum, lutum.)
  • (SOWRY, or defowlyd wythe fylthe, K. Limosus, cenosus, lutosus.)
  • SOWRE, as frute or oþer lyke. Acidus, acer, acerbus.
  • SOWRE, as dowe. Fermentatus.
  • SOWRE CHERE. Acrimonia, C. F.
  • SOWRE DOKKE (herbe, K.) idem quod SOREL, supra.
  • SOWRE DOWE. Fermentum.
  • SOWRE MYLKE. Occigulum.
  • SOWRENESSE. Acredo, C. F. acri∣tudo, acritas.
  • SOWRYN̄, or wax sowre (make sowre, S.) Aceo, CATH. acesco.
  • SOWYR DOWYN̄', or menge paste wythe sowyr dowe. Fermento.
  • SOWSTARE, idem quod SEWSTARE, supra.
  • SOWTARE, or cordewaner (cordy∣nare, S.) Sutor, alutarius.
  • SOWTARYS LEST (last, P.) Formu∣a, formella, calopodium, CATH. calopodia, C. F. (formipodium, P.)
  • SOWTHE. Auster.
  • SOWTHE EEST. Euroauster.
  • SOWTHELY, or sum what be sowth'e. Australis.
  • SOWTHYSTYLLE, or thowthystylle, (herbe, P.) Rostrum porcinum.
  • Page  467SOWTHEWEST. Favonius, C. F.
  • SOWTHERNE, idem quod Sowthely.
  • SOWTHERNE WOODE, herbe (sother∣wode, S.) Abrotonum.
  • SOTHEN̄ (sodyn, P.) Coctus.
  • SOTHYN, yn water only. Elixus.
  • SPACE. Spacium.
  • SPADE. Vanga, fossorium (de∣fossorium, K.)
  • SPAYNE, lond. Hispania.
  • SPAKLE (spakkyl, S. spackyll, P.) Scutula, CATH.
  • SPAKLYD. Scutulatus, CATH.
  • SPALLE, or chyppe (spolle, K.) Quisquilia, assula, C. F.
  • SPANNE, mesure of the hand. Palmus, CATH. palmata, KYLW.
  • SPANGELE, or losangle (spangyll, losange, H. P.)1. [Compare LOSANGE, supra, p. 313.]Lorale, KYLW.
  • SPAYNYEL, hownde. Odorinsecus, quia aurem sequens, venaticus.
  • SPANYN̄', or wene chylder (wenyn chyldryn, K.) Ablacto, elacto, CATH.
  • SPANYNGE, or wenynge of chylder. Ablactacio.
  • SPARARE, or he þat sparythe. Parcus, parca.
  • SPARRE, of a roof (of an howus, K.) Tignum, CATH.
  • SPARGETTYN̄', or pargette wallys (sparchyn or pargetyn, S. A.) Gipso, limo.
  • SPARGETTYNGE, or pargettynge (of wallis, P.) Litura, gipsura.
  • SPARYN̄', or to spare. Parco.
  • SPARYNGE. Parcimonia.
  • SPARKLE, of fyyr (sparke, K.) Scintilla, favilla, CATH.
  • SPARKLYN̄' (sparkyn, S.) Scintillo.
  • SPARTLYNGE. Scintillacio.
  • SPARPLYN̄ (spartelyn, K.)2. [Compare DYSPARPLYN̄', supra, p. 122. "To sparpylle, spergere, dividere, obstipare." CATH. ANG. "I sparkyll a broode, I sprede thynges asonder, Je disparse and je espars. Whan the sowdiers of a capitayne be sparkylled a brode, what can he do in tyme of nede." PALSG. In the Legenda Aurea it is said of Calvary, "many sculles of hedes were there sparteled all openly."]Spergo, dispergo.
  • SPLARPLYNGE,3. [SPLARPLYNGE, MS. The L after SP, is a correction added over the line.] or scaterynge (spartelynge, sundrynge, K. sparkelyng, S.) Dissipacio.
  • SPARTHE, wepne. Bipennis, CATH.
  • SPAROWE, (byrde, K.) Passer.
  • SPATYL, instrument to clense wythe soorys. Pessaria, C. F. tasta, (siringga, P.) Et hic nota quod si∣ringa est fistula quam medicina mittitur in vesicam; hec C. F.
  • SPAWDE. Spatula, armus, CATH.
  • SPAVEYNE, horsys maledy (sore, K. P.)
  • SPAWNYN̄, as fyschys (spanyn, K.) Pisciculo, KYLW.
  • SPAWNYNGE, of fysche. Pissicu∣lacio, vel pisciculatus.
  • SPECE, or kende. Species.
  • SPECHE. Loquela, sermocinacio.
  • SPECHE, feyny(d) be-twene man and best (fayned, P.) Labisca, C. F. (libistica, K. P. libista, S.)4. ["Libistita, fabula, fatera," occurs in a glossary cited in Ducange. If we derive Libistica from 〈 in non-Latin alphabet 〉, Libyan, this term may have reference to some African writer of fables, as Apuleius, whose Metamorphoseon was familiar to the mediaeval scholar. "Fabuae aut Aesopicae (sunt) aut Libysticae. Aesopicae sunt, cum animalia muta inter se sermocinasse finguntur, vel quae animam non habent, ut urbes, &c. Libysticae autem, dum hominum cum bestiis aut bestiarum cum hominibus fingitur vocis esse commercium." Isidor. Orig. lib. 1. c. 39.]
  • Page  468SPECYALLE, or princypalle. Prin∣cipalis, specialis.
  • SPECYAL, concubyne, the manne. Amasius, et idem quod LEMANN (leefman, S.)
  • SPECYAL, concubyne, þe womann. (speciall or leman, P.) Concu∣bina, amasia.
  • SPED. Expeditus.
  • SPEED, or spedynge. Expedicio.
  • SPEDYN̄'. Expedio.
  • SPEDYN̄' WELE. Prosperor.
  • SPEYR, of a garment (speyer of a clothe, K.)1. ["Cluniculum, an hole or a spayre of a womans smoke or kyrtell." ORTUS. "Sparre of a gowne, fente de la robe." PALSG. In the curious chapter De Vestibus, in Vocab. Roy. MS. 17 C. XVII. occur, "Manicipium, spayere; apertura, spayere; transmearium, spare∣bokylle," the latter being probably a brooch which closed the vent or fent of a dress. Compare FENTE, fibulatorium, supra, p. 156. "Lacenema, a speyre; Urla, a speyre∣hole." The term may have designated the openings in the dress, either at the neck, or at the sides, like pocket-holes, as seen in mediaeval costume. The Cathol. Abbrev. 1497, thus explains "cluniculum,—le pertuis qui est es vestemens des femmes iouste le coste." Skelton gives a lament of the nun for her favourite bird—"wont to repayre and go in at my spayre," or creep in "at my gor of my goune before." Philip Sparow.]Cluniculum, CATH. manubium, KYLW. et NECC. ma∣nulia, KYLW.
  • SPEKKE, clowte. Pictacium.
  • SPEKYN̄'. Loquor, for, sermocinor.
  • SPEKYN̄ OWTE. Exprimo.
  • SPEKYNGE. Locucio, sermocina∣cio.
  • SPEKETACLE. Spectaculum.
  • SPELLARE. Sillabicator.
  • SPELLYN̄' (letters, S.) Sillabico.
  • SPELLYNGE. Sillabicacio.
  • SPELKE. Fissula.
  • SPELTE,2. [Amongst the Verbs. Sic MS. The noun SPELLYNGE may possibly be an error, cor∣rected by other readings. Compare, however, "Spels, or broken pieces of stones coming of hewing or graving, Assuloe, micae, segmina, secamenta." GOULDM. See also SPALLE or chyppe, assuloe, supra. In Will, and Werwolf, we find Spelde, with the same signifi∣cation as Spalle. See Brockett.] broke bonys or oþer þyngys (spelke, A. spelkyn, K. P.)
  • SPELLYNGE, broke bonys or oþer thyngys. (spelkynge, K. spel∣kyn, P.) Fissulatus.
  • SPENCE, or expence. Expense, im∣pense.
  • SPENCE, botery or celere. Cella∣rium, promptuarium, C. F. dis∣pensatorium, COMM.
  • SPENCERE. Cellerarius, pincerna, promus.
  • SPENDARE. Dispensator.
  • SPENDARE in waast. Prodigus; nota alia in WASTOWRE.
  • SPENDYN̄'. Expendo, dispenso.
  • SPENDYNGE. Dispensacio, expen∣dicio.
  • SPENDYNGE yn wast. Prodiga∣litas.
  • SPENT. Expensus, dispensatus.
  • SPERE, or fres (freshe or brityl, K. britill or brekyll, P.)3. [Compare BEROKDOL, supra, p. 53.]Fra∣gilis.
  • SPERE, or scuw (schw, K. screne, S.) Scrineum, ventifuga.
  • SPERE, of the fyrmament. (Spera, K. P.)
  • SPERE, instrument of werre. Lan∣cea, hasta.
  • SPEREHAWKE (sparhawke, P.) Ni∣sus, C. F. alietus, CATH.
  • Page  469SPEREL, of a boke (speryng of a boke, K.) Offendix,1. ["Offendix, nodus quo liber ligatur, Angl. a knotte or clospe of a boke." ORTUS. Com∣pare CLOSPE. supra, p. 83, and ONDOYNGE, or opynynge of schettillys, or sperellys, p. 365.] UG. in fendo, signaculum.
  • SPEREL, or closel yn schetynge (closynge, K.) Firmaculum.
  • SPERYN̄', or schettyn̄. Claudo.
  • SPERYN̄', and close wythe in (or closyn in, K.) Includo.
  • SPERYN̄', and schette wythe lokkys. Sero, obsero.
  • SPERYN̄', or aske after a þynge. Scissitor, percunctor, inquiro.
  • SPEREWORTE, herbe. Flammula.
  • SPYCE, or spycery. Species.
  • SPYCERE. Apot(h)ecarius, DICC.
  • SPY, or watare (waytere, S.) Ex∣plorator, COMM.
  • SPYYN̄', or a-spyyn̄'.2. [This word occurs amongst the verbs, seemingly misplaced, between SPYTE mete, and SPYTTYN̄.]Exploro, C. F. (percunctor, S.)
  • SPYGOT. Clipsidra, ducillus, CATH. ductileum.
  • SPYK, or fet flesche (spike of fleshe, K.) Popa, C. F.
  • SPYKENARDE. Spica narda, C. F. nardostacium.
  • SPYKYNGE nayle(spylynge nayle, S.)
  • SPYLKOK, or whyrlegygge, chyl∣derys pley (or prylle, supra.) Giraculum, C. F.
  • SPYLLYN̄, or puttyn̄ owte (pow∣ryn owte, K.) Effundo.
  • SPYLLYN̄', or lesyn, or dystroyyn̄. Confundo.
  • SPYLLYNGE, or owt powryn̄ge. Effusio.
  • SPYLLYNGE, or lesynge or schen∣dynge. Confusio, deperdicio.
  • SPYNNARE, or erany (arreyne, P.)3. [Compare ARAYNYE, p. 14, and ERANYE, p. 140, supra. "Spynner or spider, herigne." PALSG. See, in Trevisa's version of Bartholom. de propr. rerum, a long account of the various kinds of "Spinners"; lib. 18, c. iii.]Aranea.
  • SPYNNARE (of wolle or other lyke, K.) or spynstare. Filatrix, fila∣cista, CATH.
  • (SPINNAR WEBBE, K. Tela ara∣nee.)
  • SPYNDYL. Fusus, (fusillus, P.)
  • SPYNNYN̄'. Neo, filo.
  • SPYNNYNGE. Filatura, C. F. netura, neccio.
  • SPYRE, of corne or herbe. Hastula.
  • SPYRYN̄', as corne and oþer lyke. Spico, CATH.
  • SPYRYTE, (or gooste, P.) Spiritus.
  • SPYRLYNGE. Epimera.
  • SPYT, or spotle. Sputum, screa, saliva.
  • SPYYTE, repref or schame (spite, repreve or schame, K.) Obpro∣brium.
  • SPYTEFULLE. Obprobriosus.
  • SPYTE, for rostynge (spete, P.) Veru, (verutum, P.)
  • SPYTE mete (or done, P.) on a spete. Veruo.
  • SPYTYLLE howse. Leprosorium.
  • SPYTTYN̄'. Screo, spuo, exspuo.
  • SPLENE, or mylte (or mylche, su∣pra.) Splen.
  • SPLENTE.4. [No Latin word is here given. Palsgrave has "Splent for an house, Laite; Splent, harnesse for the arme, Garde de bras." Laite, however, signifies the milt or soft roe of a fish.]
  • SPOKOKE5. [Sic, probably an error for SPOKE.] of a whele (spok, K. S. P.) Radius, C. F.
  • Page  470SPOLE, or scytyl, webstarys instru∣ment (schetyl, S.) Spolia, pa∣nulea, UG. spoliare, navicula, KYLW. et CATH.
  • SPOYLYD, or spolyyd. Spoliatus.
  • SPOYLYN̄', or spolyon̄' (spolyyn or spoylyn, P.) Spolio, dispolio.
  • SPYLYN̄', or dymembryn̄1. [Sic. The correct reading should probably be SPOYLYN̄, or dysmembryn̄. Compare DYSMEMBRYN', supra, p. 122. "I was in great danger to be spoiled by a great fierce mastiff." Life of Adam Martindale, Chetham Soc. p. 180.] as menn don̄ caponys or other fowlys (dysmembryn, S.) Artuo, C. F. et UG. V. in L litera.
  • SPOYLYNGE, or spolyynge. Spoli∣acio, depredacio.
  • SPONE. Coclear.
  • SPONGE. Spongia, vel spungia, CATH. et C. F.
  • SPORE. Calcar.
  • SPORYARE (sporyȝere, H. sporer, P.) Calcarius.
  • SPORGE, herbe. Catapucia, esula, anabulla, C. F.
  • SPORGYN̄' (or bermyn, supra.) Spumo, UG. blict(ri)o,2. ["Blictrum, id est (yest) unde—Vinum bibulit, aqua ebulit, cervisia blictrit." ORTUS.] (blutrio, KYLW. S. P.)
  • SPORGYNGE, of ale or wyne. Spu∣macio, blictricatus (latricatus, S.)
  • SPORNYNGE, or spurnynge. Cal∣citracio.
  • SPOORT, or solas. Solacium.
  • (SPOT, P.) Macula, labes.
  • SPOTTYD. Maculatus.
  • SPOTTŌN'. Maculo.
  • SPOWSE, mann. Sponsus.
  • SPOWSE, womann. Sponsa.
  • SPOWSYN̄'. Desponso; quere alia infra in WEDDYN̄'.
  • SPOWTE. Fistula, CATH. in doma.
  • (SPOTLE, idem quod SPYT, supra.)
  • SP(R)AWLYN̄'.3. [The reading of the other MSS. and of Pynson's text is "sprawlyn." "I spralle, as a yonge thing doth that can nat well styrre, Je crosle. He spraulleth lyke a yonge padocke (grenouille). I spraule with my legges, struggell, Je me debats." PALSG.]Palpito, CATH.
  • SPRAWLYNGE. Palpitacio.
  • SPREDYN̄'. Dilato, expando, pando.
  • SPREDYNGE. Dilatacio, extencio.
  • (SPREDYNGE, or streykynge owte, infra. Extenci, protencio.)
  • SPRENKELYN̄', or strenkelyn̄'. As∣pergo, conspergo, expergo.
  • SPRENKELYNGE, or strenkelynge. Aspercio, conspercio.
  • SPRETE, or qvante (spret or quant, P.)4. [Forby gives Sprit, a pole to push a boat forward. A. S. Spreot, contus. In some localities the reed, juncus articulatus, is called the Spret. "Sprette, for water men, Picq." PALSG. "Contus est quoddam instrumentum longum quo piscatores pisces scrutantur in aquis, et est genus teli quod ferrum non habet sed acutum cuspidem longum; pertica preacuta quam portant rustici loco haste,—a poll or a potte stycke." ORTUS. Compare QUANTE, supra, p. 418, and WHANTE, infra.]Contus, CATH. Conta, C. F. contum, C. F.
  • SPRYNGE, of a tre or plante (springe or yonge tre, P.) Planta, plan∣tula.
  • SPRYNGE, of a welle (of vessell, W.) Scaturigo, scatebra, CATH. et COMM.
  • SPRYNGYN̄', or growyn̄'. Cresco.
  • SPRYNGYN̄', as a welle, Scaturio, scateo, CATH. scaturiso.
  • SPRYNGYNGE, or growynge (or waxynge, supra,) or what so hyt be. Crescencia.
  • Page  471SPRYNGYNGE, of a welle or oþer waxynge watyr. Scaturacio (scatebra, P.)
  • (SPRYTE, or spirite, K. H. P. Spi∣ritus.)
  • SPROUTYN̄', or burionyn̄' (sprun∣tone or burione, H. P.) Pululo.
  • SPUDDE. Cultellus vilis.
  • SPWYN̄', or brakyn̄' (or castyn̄', supra.) Vomo, evomo, CATH.
  • SPWYNGE, or brakynge (or parbra∣kynge, supra) Vomitus, evomitus.
  • SPURNYN̄' (or wyncyn, P.) Cal∣citro (recalcitro, pedito, P.)
  • (SPURNYNGE, K. H. P. supra in SPORNYNGE.)
  • SQWALTERYN̄', for hete or oþer cawsys (squaltryn or swaltryn, P.) Sincopo, exalo.
  • SQWARE. Quadrus.
  • SQWARED. Quadratus.
  • SQWARE STŌN. Tessera, tessella.
  • SQUARYN̄'. Quadro.
  • SQUARYNGE. Quadracio, conqua∣dracio.
  • SQWYAR, gentylmann (sqwyer man, K. P. sqvyȝer, H.) Armiger, scu∣tifer.
  • SQVYER, rewle (sqvyȝer, H. sqvyyre, S.) Amussis, COMM. et UG. V. in M.
  • SQWYLLE, herbe. Cepa maris, bulbus, C. F. (cepanuris, P.)
  • SQWYLLARE, dysche wescheare. Lixa, C. F.
  • SQWYNACYE, sekenesse (sqwynsy, P.) Squ(in)ancia, gutturna.
  • SQWYRTYL, or swyrtyl. Sifons, C. F. sifon, UG. in sibilo.
  • STABBE, or wownde of smytynge. Stigma.
  • STABLE, or stedefast. Stabilis, firmus.
  • STABLE, and a-bydyng yn malyce. Pervicax, pertinax.
  • STABULNESSE, or stedefastnesse. Stabilitas, firmitas.
  • STABULNESSE, yn a-bydynge wythe owte secynge (stabilnesse in abidinge in werke, P.) Per∣severancia.
  • STABUL, for hors. Stabulum.
  • STABUL, KEPAR, or hors kepar. Stabularius.
  • S(T)ABELYN̄', or make stable and stede (stable and stedfaste, S. P.) Stabilio, solido.
  • STABLYN̄ HORS. Stabulo.
  • STABYLY a-bydyn̄', wythe owte changynge (stabelyn, K. stablyn and bydyng, S.) Persevero.
  • STACKE. Acervus, arconius.
  • STACKE, or heep. Agger.
  • STACYŌN. Stacio.
  • STACYONERE, or he þat sellythe bokys. Stacionarius, bibliopola, C. F.
  • STAFFE. Baculus, fustis.
  • STAFFESLYNGE. Balea, KYLW. fun∣dibalista, KYLW.
  • STAGE, or stondynge vp ōn (stage to stond on, S. A.) Fala, MERAR. machinalis, CATH. machinis, UG. V. in M.
  • STAKE (or stulpe, infra). Sudes, C. F. palus, CATH. paxillus, BRIT.
  • (STAKERYN, or stotyn, K. H. Ti∣tubo.)
  • STAKERYN̄' or waueryn̄' (stakelyn. P.) Vacillo.
  • STAKERYNGE, yn speche (or stam∣erynge, infra.) Titubacio.1. [Tutubcio, MS. Compare STOTYNGE, infra.]
  • STAKERYNGE, in mevynge. Vacil∣lacio.
  • (STAKKYN, S. A.) Arconiso.
  • Page  472STALLE, be-forne a schoppe (stal a-forne, K.) Stallus, ferculum, Lib. equivocorum.
  • (STAL of a qwere, K. P. Stallus.)
  • STALLE, of beestys stondynge Boscar, C. F. presepe, presepium, bucetum, UG. V. in V.
  • STALE, of fowlynge or byrdys takynge. Stacionaria, C. F.
  • STALE, as drynke. Defecatus, C. F. merax, CATH.
  • STALYN̄', or make stale drynke. Defeco.
  • STALYONE, hors. Emissarius, CATH.
  • STALKE. Calamus.
  • STALKYN̄' (or gon softe, K. softely, S. A.)1. [In the MS. Arconizo occurs here; probably an error, and properly belonging to STAKKYN, (see that verb, supra,) accidentally omitted by the second hand.]Serpo, CATH. C. F. et UG. cla(m)culo, et clanculo, KYLW.
  • STALLYN̄' PRELATYS. Intronizo, C. F.2. [Here follows, in the Winchester MS., "Hec statela, þe standard." Palsgrave gives "I stalke, I go softly and make great strides, Je vas a grans pas; He stalketh lyke a crane."]
  • STALKYNGE, or soft and sly goynge. Serptura, CATH.
  • STAWURTHY (stalworthy, S. H. A. P.) idem quod STRONGE, infra.
  • STAMERYNGE, yn speche, idem quod STAKERYNGE, supra.
  • (STAMERYNGE, in goyng, idem quod stakerynge, K. waveryng, H.)
  • STAMYN, clothe. Stamina, DICC. linistema, CATH. et UG. in lenio.
  • STAMPYN̄'. Tero, pindo, CATH. pilo.
  • STAMPYNGE. Tritura.
  • STANMARCHE, herbe (stammarche, P.) Macedonia, Alexandria.
  • STAPYLLE of a schyttynge (stapul, K.) Stapellum, KYLW.
  • STARE, or segge (or cegge, supra.) Carix, C. F.
  • STARCHE, for kyrcheys. Stibium, CATH. gersa.3. [Sersa, MS. Gersa, K. S. P. See the Catholicon, and Ducange, v. Gersa, explained in the Ortus as signifying "Blatea, bleche." Palsgrave gives "Starche for lawne, follé fleur." In Sloane MS. 3548, f. 102, is the following recipe, "Ad faciendum starching,—R. quan∣titatem furfuris et bullias in aqua munda et stet per iii. dies vel plus donec sit aqua amara vel acetosa; tune exprime aquam de furfure et in claro ejus immerge tuum pannum, S. sindonem, bokeram, vel carde, aut aliud quod vis, et postea sicca et cum lapide lenifica," that is, polish the surface with a slekystone. See that word, supra, p. 458.]
  • STARYN̄', wythe brode eyne (iyen, P.) Patentibus oculis respicere.
  • STARYN̄', or schynyn̄',4. [Schydyn̄, MS. In the other MSS. and in Pynson's text,—Schynyn.] and gly∣deryn̄'. Niteo, rutilo.
  • STARYNGE, brode lokynge. Pa∣tentacio oculorum.
  • STARYNGE, or schynynge, as gaye thyngys. Rutilans, rutilus, C. F. nitidus.
  • STARK (or styffe, infra.) Rigidus, C. F. et UG. in rigeo, artus.
  • STARKENESSE (or styfnesse, infra.) Rigor, rigiditas, artitudo.
  • STERLYNGE, bryd. Sturnus.
  • STATE. Status.
  • STATURE of heythe. Statura.
  • STATUTE. Statutum.
  • STAUNCHEGREYNE, for wrytarys.5. [Palsgrave gives "Staunche greyne, an herbe," but the substance here intended seems to have been a composition used by the mediaeval seribe, possibly like pounce, in pre∣paring the smoothed surface of parchment. It was thus made: "To make stounchegrey.—Take kyddys blode and calke and medle hem to-gedyr, and make ballys therof and bake hem in a novyn, and sel a pece for iiij. d." Sloane MS. 3548, f. 18b. The following is from another MS. in the same collection, 2584, f. 10: "For to make staunchegreine.—Take quycke lyme and floure of whete, of iche eliche moche, and the thride part of rosyn, and tempere hem to gidre with the white of an ey or with gote mylke, or elles with cowe mylke, and make it ryȝt thicke, and tempere it to gidere til it be soft as past, and then make smalle balles therof and drie hem atte the sonne, and when it is dried hit wele serve."]Planula, NECC.
  • STAUNCHE bloode. Stanno, C. F. (stangno, S. A. P.)
  • Page  473STAUNCHE wrethe, and make pees. Pacifico, sedo.
  • STAUNCHYNGE, or secynge (sessinge, P. lessinge, J.) Cessacio.
  • STAUNCHYNGE of blode. Cedacio, stagnacio, C. F.
  • STAUNCHON, to set yn an ynke horne. Forulus.1. ["Forulus, i. e. bursa scriptorum." ORTUS. "Calamarium, an ynkhorne or a staunchere." MED. MS. CANT. "Staunchon, a proppe, estancon." PALSG.]
  • STATHE,2. [STACHE, MS. and S. staye, K. stathe, H. A. P. At Lynn are quays called "Common Staith," "King's Staith," &c.; the name occurs frequently in Norfolk. A. S. Staeth, littus.] waterys syde. Stacio, CATH.
  • STEDE, place. Situs.
  • STEEDE, hors. Dextrarius, gra∣darius, sonipes, CATH. et UG.
  • STEDFASTE (or stable.) Stabilis, firmus.
  • STEDEFASTNESSE (or stabylnesse, K.) Stabilitas, firmitas.
  • STEDEFASTNESSE, wythe owte any chaungynge or secynge. Per∣severancia.
  • STEDEFASTNESSE, or stylle stond∣ynge yn wyckydnes, wythe owte wylle of chaungynge. Obsti∣nacia, induracio.
  • (STEDULLE, of wevynge, infra in STODUL. Telarium.)
  • STEPFADYR.3. [This word was evidently written STEFFADYR, by the first hand.]Victricus, C. F. (vel vitricus, A.) patriaster, UG.
  • STEYYN̄' VP. Scando, ascendo.
  • STEYYN̄' or steppyn̄ of gate (stop∣pyn, K. H. P. styntyn or cesyn of gate, S. A.) Restito, C. F. obsto (resto, S. P.)
  • STEYLE, or steyynge vp (of steying up, K.) Ascensus, scansile.
  • (STEYLE, or steyre, P. Gradus.)
  • STEYKE. Carbonela, frixa, UG. assa.
  • STEYYNGE (up, K. P.) Scansio, ascensus.
  • STEYNYD. Polimitus.
  • STEYNYN̄', or stenyyn̄', as clothe þat lesythe hys colowre. Fuco, proprie intertia persona tantum, COMM.
  • STEYNYN̄', as steynyowrys. Polo, CATH.
  • STEYNYNGE. Polimitacio.
  • STENYOWRE. Polimitarius, CATH.
  • STENEYYNGE, lesynge of colowre (steynynge, K. P.) Fucacio, CATH. in fuco.
  • STEEL, metel. Calibs, CATH.
  • STELE, or stert of a vesselle. Ansa.
  • STELYN̄'. Furor, latrocinor.
  • STELYNGE, or stelthe (thefte, S.) Furtum, latrocinium.
  • STELYNGLY, or theefly (theftely, S.) Furtive, latrocinaliter.
  • STEEM, or lowe of fyre. Flamma.
  • STEEM, of hothe lycure. Vapor.
  • STEMYN̄', or lowyn̄ vp. Flammo.
  • Page  474STEMYNGE, or leemynge of fyyr. Flammacio.
  • STEMYNE, or stodul, or stothe yn a webbyshonde (stemyne of clothe, K. P. in a webbys eend, S.) 1. [Compare LYYST of clothe, supra, p. 307; and SCHREDE, p. 448. "Forago, a lyste of a webbe." ORTUS. "Stamyne, estamine." PALSG.]Forago, C. F. (Versus, fodder forago, lyst dicitur esse farago, S.)
  • STENTE, or certeyne of valwe, or drede, and oþer lyke (of value or dette, S.) Taxacio.
  • STENTYD. Taxatus.
  • STEPPE, of a fote. Vestigium.
  • STEEPE, nowt lowe. Elevatus, ascendens.
  • STEPBROTHYR (of the fadyrs syde, S. Victrigenus.)
  • (STEPBRODER, on the moderys syd, S. Novercatus.)
  • STEPSYSTYR. (Victrigena, S. A.)
  • (STEPSYSTER, on the modyrs syde, S. Novercata.)
  • STEPSONE. Prevignus, C. F. et UG. in pridem, et neos, filiaster, C. F.
  • STEPDOWTER. Prevignia, C. F. et UG. filiastra.
  • STEPFADYR, idem quod STEFFADYR, supra.
  • STEPMODYR. Noverca, matertera, CATH.
  • STEPYD (or stept, P. J.) in watyr or lycure. Infusus, illiquatus.
  • STEPYN̄', yn water or oþer lycure. Infundo, illiqueo, CATH.
  • STEPYNGE, yn lycure. Infusio, illiqueacio.
  • STEPNESSE, or sydenesse 2. [SYDENEDDE, MS. or sydeuedde (?). The true reading is, however, probably found in the other MSS.—Sydnesse, S. A. In the note on SYYD. p. 45, it has been stated that, as Bishop Kennett observes, in some dialects "Side" signifies high, as a house or a hill, and, metaphorically, a haughty person is said to be "side."] of a roof (stopnesse, P.) Elevacio.
  • STEPPYN̄' ovyr a thynge. Clunico.
  • STEPULLE. Campanile.
  • STEP, where a mast stant yn a schyppe. Parastica, C. F.
  • STERRE. 3. [STERERE, MS.]Stella, sidus.
  • STERRE slyme.

    4. "Sterre slyme, lymas." PALSG. "Assub. Angl. slyme vel quedam terra." ORTUS. "Asub, i. e. galaxia, Senderung der Stern. Galaxia, Sternenferbung oder Reinigung." Rulandus, Lexicon Alchemiae. Lat. Germ. The singular jelly frequently found after rain is doubtless here intended; the Tremella nostoc, popularly called star-shot or star-jelly, and supposed to be the recrement of the meteors called fallen stars. See Morton, Nat. Hist. Northants, pp. 353, 356; Dr. Merret's Pinax, p. 219; Pennant, Zool. vol ii. p. 453; Brand, Pop. Antiqu. under "Will with a wisp." This "Spittle of the Starres" may be allunded to in the following lines:

    "The speris craketh swithe thikke,
    So doth on hegge sterre stike."

    K. Alis. 4437.
    Assub, C. F.
  • STERYNGE. Mocio, motus, com∣mocio.
  • STERYSMANN, of a schyppe. Remex.
  • STERNE, of a schyppe. Puppis, C. F.
  • STERNE, or dredeful in syghte. Terribilis, horribilis.
  • STERNE, or stoburne (or styburne, infra.) Austerus, ferox.
  • STERT, of an appull or oþer frute. Pediculus, C. F. et CATH.
  • STERT, of a handylle of a vessle. Ansa, C. F.
  • STERT, of a plowe (or plowstert, supra.) Stina, C. F.
  • STERUYN̄', idem quod DEYYN̄', supra.
  • Page  475STERVYNGE, or deyynge. Mors, expiracio.
  • STEVENE, propyrname. Stephanus.
  • STY, by pathe. Semita, callis, CATH. orbita, trames, UG. in traho.
  • STY, swynce cote (swynys howus, K. swyn cote, S. styy, swynnen cote, A.) Ara, CATH. porcarium.
  • STYANYE (or a perle, S.) yn the eye. 1. [Comapre PEERLE yn the eye, glaucoma, supra, p. 394.]Egilopa, UG. in egle (Egilopam curat quisquis com∣mescitat illam, S.)
  • STYBURNE, or stoburne (or sterne, supra.) Austerus, ferox.
  • STYBURNESSE. Austeritas, fero∣citas.
  • STYCHE, peyn̄e on þe syde. Telum, UG. V. in T.
  • STYFFE, or starke. Rigidus, C. F.
  • STYFFE, or stronge. Fortis, ro∣bustus.
  • STYFLY, or strongly. Fortiter, robuste.
  • STYFNESSE, or starkenesse. Ri∣giditas, rigor.
  • (STYFNES, or strenthe, K. H. S. A. Fortitudo, robur.)
  • STYKKE. Ligniculum.
  • (STIKKYD VP, P. Succinctus.)
  • STYKELYNGE, fysche. 2. [Flythe, MS., fyche, A. "Silurus, a lytell fysshe." ORTUS.]Silurus, (stingus, K. gamarus, S.)
  • STYKYN̄', or festyn̄' a thynge to a walle or a noþer þynge, wha so hyt be. Figo, affigo, glutino.
  • STYKYN̄', or slen̄. Jugulo.
  • STYKKYN̄', or tukkyn̄' vp cloþys (stichynup clotys, K.) Suffar∣cino, CATH. in farcino, succingo.
  • STYKKYNGE, or tukkynge vp of clothys. 3. [Sir Amis having lost his horse was obliged to go on foot;—"ful careful was that knight,—he stiked vp his lappes," and trudged off on his journey. Amis and Amil. v. 988.]Suffarcinatio, CATH. (succincio, P.)
  • STYKYNGE, or festynge to (styke∣nynge of festnynge, P.) Confixio, fixura.
  • STYKYNGE in beestes (or beests, K. P. or beestys sleynge, S.) Ju∣gulacio.
  • STYLLATORY. Stillatorium.
  • STYLE, where men gōn over. Scan∣sillum, scansile, scanillum, KYLW.
  • STYLE, forme of indytynge, or spekynge or wrytynge. Stilus.
  • STYLLE, nott spekynge. Silens, tacitus.
  • STYLLE, in pes and reste. Quietus.
  • STYLLE, wythe-owte mevynge. Tranquillus.
  • STYLLYN̄', or pseyn̄'. Pacifico, mitigo.
  • STYLLYN̄', or stylle waterys. Stillo, instillo, CATH. (constillo, P.)
  • STYLNESSE, nowt spekynge (with owtyn speche, K.) Taciturnitas, silencium.
  • STYLNESSE, in pees. Quies, quie∣tudo, K.
  • STYLNESSE, wytheowt mevynge. Tranquillitas.
  • STYLTE. Calepodium, lignipodium.
  • STYNGYN̄'. Stimulo, pungo.
  • STYNK. Fetor, oletum, CATH.
  • STYNKE, of fowle feet. Pedor.
  • STYNKKYN̄'. Feteo, oleo, puteo, CATH.
  • STYNKYNGE, or full of stynk. Feti∣dus, putridus, putibundus.
  • STYNTYN̄' 4. [STYNTYN or werkynge, MS. The true reading seems to be—"of"—as MS. S.] of werkynge or mevynge. Pauso, desisto, subsisto.
  • Page  476STYNTYN̄' or make a thynge to secyn̄' of hys werke or mevynge. Obsto, C. F.
  • STYNTYNGE, or lesynge 1. [Sic. Possibly an error for sesynge, as appears by the other MSS. and P.] (styntyn∣ggys or cesyng, A. sesyng, K. sesinge, P.) Pausacio, descis∣tencia.
  • ST(Y)RYN̄' or mevyn̄'. Moveo.
  • STYRYN̄', to goode or badde. Ex∣cito, incito, sollicito.
  • STYRYN̄' or mevyn̄' wythe ple∣saunte tokenys, þat ys clepyd smekynge (mevyn with ple∣sawnce, K. S. H. P.) Blandior.
  • STYRYNGE. Motus, commocio, mo∣cio.
  • STYRK, neet (or hecfer, P.) Ju∣venca.
  • STYROP. Strepa, scansile, CATH. et KYLW.
  • STYRT, or lytyl whyle (lytyl qwyle, A.) Momentum.
  • STYRTE, or skyppe. Saltus.
  • STYRTE, of sodeyne mevynge.As∣sultus.
  • STRTYL, or hasty. Preceps.2. [Presepe, MS. which signifies a manger or crib, and is probably an error for preceps, the reading in MS. S. preseps, A. Compare SCHYTTYLLE or hasty, preceps, p. 447.]
  • STYRTYN̄', or sodenly mevyn̄'. Im∣peto.
  • STYRTYN̄', or skyppyn̄'. Salto.
  • STYRTYN̄', or brunton̄', or soden̄ly comyn' a-ȝen a enmy (stirtyn sodeynly in an enmy, K., or make abreyde or a saute on a man, P.)Insilio, irruo, CATH.
  • STYTHE, smythys instrument. In∣cus, CATH.
  • STYWARD. Senescallus.
  • STOBUL, or holme (halme, K. S. A. P.) Stipula.
  • (STOBURNE, or sterne, idem quod STYBURNE.)
  • STODYYN̄'. Studeo, CATH.
  • STOTHE, of a clothe (stode of cloth, K. P.) Forago, C. F. et UG. in foris.
  • STODUL, or stedulle, of wevynge. Telarium.
  • STONYYN̄', 3. [This and the following word, which occur in the verbs between STODYYN̄ and STOKKYN̄, may have been written by the first hand STOYNYN̄. Compare ASTOYNYN, supra, p. 16; also a-stoyned and a-stoynynge, ibid. STONYYNGE will be found infra in its true place in alphabetical arrangement.] or stoynyn̄' mannys wytte. Attono, CATH. in tono, stupefacio, percello, CATH.
  • STONYYN̄, or brese werkys. Briso, CATH. quatio.
  • STOKKE. Truncus, stipes.
  • STOKKE DOWE. Palumba, palum∣bes, C. F. et COMM. palumbis, UG.
  • STOKFYSCHE. Strimulus, [?] ypo∣fungia, (fungus, P.)
  • STOKKYD, yn stokkys. Cip(p)atus.
  • STOKKYN̄', or settyn̄ in stokkys. Cippo.
  • STOKKYS, of prisōnment. Cippus, CATH. nervus, CATH.
  • STOOL.Scabellum.
  • STOLE. Stola.
  • STOMAK. Stomachus.
  • STOMELARE. Cespitator.
  • STOMELYN̄'. Cespito.
  • STOMELYNGE. Cespitacio.
  • STONE. Petra, lapis.
  • STONE, yn a mannys bleddyr. Cal∣culus, et inde calculosus qui pa∣titur calculum.
  • (STON, in mannys pryui membre, K. Testiculus.)
  • Page  477STONARE, or he þat stonythe (stonard, K.) Lapidator.
  • STŌNBOWE. Arcuba(li)sta, KYLW.
  • STŌNCROPPE, herbe. Crassula minor, et de hoc nota supra in ORPYN̄'.
  • STONDE vessel (ston vessel, K. stoonde vessel, A.) 1. ["Stonde a vessell, they have none" (namely the French). PALSG. "Cisternula, a stande." ORTUS "Tine, tinne, a stand, open tub, or soe, most in use during the time of vintage, and holding about foure or five paile-fulls, and commonly borne, by a stang, between two." COTG. "A stand (for Ale), Tine." SHERW.]Futula, cumula (cunula, A. cisternula, CATH. futis, P.)
  • STONDYN̄'. Sto.
  • STONDYN̄' stedfastly in wykkyd∣nesse. Obstino, CATH.
  • STONDYNGE, noþer syttynge ne walkynge. Status, CATH.
  • STONDYNGE PLACE, where men stondyn. Stacio, CATH.
  • STONY, or ful of stonys.Lapi∣dosus, petrosus.
  • STONYN̄', or made of stone. Lapi∣deus.
  • STONYN̄' pott or oþer wessel. La∣pista, CATH. et UG. in laos.
  • STONYN̄'. Lapido.
  • STONYNGE. Lapidacio.
  • STONYYNGE, or stoynynge of mannys wytte. Attonitus, pre∣cellencia.
  • STOPPE, boket. Situla, CATH. haustrum (mergus, CATH. A. P.)
  • STOPPE, vessel for mylkynge (for to mylke yn, S.) Multra, CATH. multrale, multrum.
  • STOPPELL, of a bottel or oþer like. Ducillus, CATH. in ductilis, do∣cillus, ductileus, C. F.
  • STOPPYD. Obstructus.
  • STOPPYN̄' a pytte or an hole.Opilo, obstruo, obturo.
  • STOPPYN̄', or wythe stondynge a beest of goynge or rennynge. 2. [Compare GEYNECOWPYN̄, supra, p. 189.]Sisto, CATH. obsto, UG. (obsisto, P.)
  • STOPPYNG. Obstruccio.
  • STOOR, or purvyaunce (store, P.)Staurum.
  • STOOR, or hard or boystows (store, K.) 3. [Compare BOYSTOWS, and boystows garment, &c. supra, p. 42. "Stournesse, Estour∣disseure; Stowre of conversacyon, Estourdy; I make sture or rude, Jarudys; this rubbynge of your gowne agaynst the walle wyll make it sture to the syght, larudyra, &c." PALSG. In Arund. MS 42, f. 25, bitter almonds are called "stoure—stowre almandes;" and mention is made of the "stowrhede" of mulberries, ibid. f. 64 b.]Austerus, rigidus.
  • STOBLARE, or troblare (stroblare, K. A.) 4. [See also STURBELARE, STURBELYN̄, &c., infra. This word may have been here written STORBLARE by the first hand.]Perturbator.
  • STORY. Historia.
  • STORK, byrd or fowle. Ciconia.
  • STORM, wedyr. Nimbus, C. F. pro∣cella, altanus, C. F.
  • STORM, yn the see. Turbo.
  • STORME, or schowre of reyne. Nimbus, CATH.
  • STORVUN, or dede (storvyn, K. H. P. storvun or deed, A.) Mortuus.
  • STOT, hors. Caballus.
  • STOTARE. Tituballus, CATH. blesus, CATH. balbus, C. F.
  • (STOTHE yn a webbyshonde, supra in STEMYNE. Forago, C. F.)
  • STOTYN̄' (or stameryn, P.) Titubo, blatero, CATH. opico, CATH. et C. F. (balbucio, CATH. A. P.)
  • Page  478STOTYNGE. 1. [Compare STAKERYNGE yn speche, supra, p. 471.]Titubatus, titubacio, (balbutacio, C. F., P.)
  • STOWE, streythe passage be-twyx ij. wallys or hedgys (stowwe, streyt passage, &c. A.) Inter∣capedo, CATH.
  • STOWYN̄', or cowche to-gedyr (clowchyn, S. chowche, A.) Loco, colloco.
  • STOWYN̄', or charyn̄ ageyne cowpyn, idem quod STOPPYN̄' (or gayne cowpyn, S. or with stond, H. stowen chasyn ageyne or geyn∣cowpyn, P.)
  • STOWYN̄', or waryn̄', or besettyn̄, as men dōn moneye or chaffer (bewaryn, P.) Commuto (ex∣spendo, committo, S. P.)
  • STOWYNGE, or yn dede puttynge (in stede puttinge, K. S. A. P.) Locacio, collocacio.
  • S(T)OWWYNGE, or a-geyne cow∣pynge or chargynge (charynge, S. A. stowynge or ageyne chasinge, P.) Obsistencia, resistencia.
  • STOWPYN̄' (or bowen, P.) Inclino, incurvo.
  • STOWPYNGE. Inclinacio.
  • STOWT, or stronge. Robustus.
  • STOWTE, sturdy or vnbuxum. Re∣bellis.
  • STOWTNESSE, or streng(t)he. Robur.
  • STOWTNESSE, or vnbuxumnesse. Rebellio.
  • STOYE, 2. [Sic. Probably written STOÞE by the first hand, as MS. A. A. S. Styth, stuth, a post, pillar.] of a howse (stoye, postis, K. stothe or post, H. P. stoþe, A.) Posticulus, postulus, CATH. stipatum, COMM.
  • STRAGYN̄'. Patento, strigio, KYLW.
  • ST(R)AGYNG. 3. [STRAGYNGE in the other MSS. and in P. Compare STRYDYNGE, infra.]Patentacio.
  • STRAY, or a-stray. Vagacio, pa∣lacio, CATH.
  • STRAY beest þat goethe a-stray. Vagula, CATH.
  • STRAYYN̄', or gōn a-stray. Palo, CATH. vagor, C. F.
  • STRAYLE, bed clothe. 4. [Lacombe gives the old French "Stragule, sorte d'habit dont on se couvroit le jour et la nuit, du mot latin, stragulum, couverturc de nuit, housse, courte-pointe." In the Ex∣posicio verborum difficilium, MS. formerly in Chalmers's Library, we find also "Tragulus, i. parvum tragum quo utuntur monachi in loco camisie et lintheaminum, Anglice, strayles." Stragula, however, whence this term seems derived, usually occur amongst bed-coverings. In the Compotus on the death of William Excetre, abbot of Bury, 1429, preserved in the Register of William Curteys his successor, there occur under Camera, Garderoba, &c. "Bankeris,—linth',—hedschet,'—item iv. paria de strayles; item ij. paria de straylis cum signo scaccarii." The Medulla explains "stragula, burelle, ray clothe, mottely; stragu∣lum, id. or a strayle."]Stamina, DICC. stragula.
  • (STRAMAGE or STROWYNGE, infra, P.)
  • STRANGELYN̄'. Suffoco, strangulo, prefoco, C. F.
  • STRAPLE, of a brenche (strappyl, K.) 5. ["þe strapils of Breke, tribraca, femeralia." CATH. ANG. Probably a kind of braces for nether garments.]Femorale, CATH. feminale, C. F.
  • STRAWE, or stree. Stramen.
  • STRAWBERY. Fragum.
  • STRAWBERY WYSE, (strawberytre, K. strawbe wyse, H. strawbyry vyse, S.) 6. ["Fragus, a strabery tre." ORTUS. "A straberi wythe, fragus." CATH. ANG. In Arundel MS. 272, f. 48, we find the following account of the strawberry plant:—"Fragra is calde strobery wyse or freycer, hit is comyne ynoghe. The vertu therof is to hele blerede eyene and webbys in eyene and hit is gude to hele woundys. It growythe in wodys and cleuys." Amongst ingredients for making a Drink of Antioch, Sloane MS. 100, f. 21 b. occurs "streberiwise." A. S. Wisan, plantaria. A dish of Frasae cost 4d. in 1265, according to an item in the Household Book of the Countess of Leicester, edited for the Roxb. Club.]Fragus.
  • Page  479STRAUNGE. Extraneus.
  • STRAWNGENESSE. Extraneitas.
  • STRAUNGERE. Extraneus, extra∣nea, advena, alienigena.
  • ST(R)AWNGERE, of a-noþer lond. Altellus, C. F.
  • (STRE, supra in STRAWE, P.)
  • STREYKYN̄' OWTE. Protendo, ex∣tendo.
  • STREYKYNGE, or spredynge owute (or beykynge, supra; strekyng, K. strikynge oute, P.) Extencio, protencio.
  • STREYMYN', 1. [Sic. There appears to be an error here by the second hand, and also in the word fol∣lowing; these words should probably read—STREYNYN. "I strayne with the hand, je estrayngs; I strayne as a hauke doth, or any syche lyke fowle or beest in theyr clawes.—Were a good glove I reede you, for your hauke strayneth harde, grippe fort; I strayne courteysie, as one doeth that is nyce—faire trop le courtois." PALSG.] (streynyn, K. S. P.) Stringo, astringo, constringo.
  • STREYMYN̄', or stresse gretely (streynyn, K. S. P.) Distringo.
  • STREYNYNGE, or constreynynge (stryvynge or constreynynge, S.) Constriccio, astriccio.
  • STREYTHE (streyt, A. streight, P.) Strictus, angustus, artus.
  • STREYTENESSE. Strictura, con∣striccio, artitudo.
  • STREYTYN', or make streyte. Arto.
  • (STREYTYNGE, or stresse, infra. Constriccio.)
  • STREKE, or longe drawthe (draught, P.) Protractio.
  • STREK, or poynt be-twyx ij. clau∣sys yn a boke (poyntinge of ij. clauses, S. W.) Liminiscus, C. F.
  • STREK, of a mesure as of a buschel or other lyke. Hostorium, C. F. vel hostiorium, CATH. et COMM.
  • STREEK, of flax. (Linipulus, KYLW. A. P.)
  • STREKYN' or make pleyne. Com∣plano (plano, levigo, P.)
  • ST(R)EKYN', or streke mesure, as buschellys and oþer lyke (make playne by mesure, as busshell, &c. P.) Hostio, CATH. UG. et C. F.
  • STREKYN̄', as menn do cattys, or hors or howndys (strekin or stro∣kin, P.) Palmito, KYLW.
  • STREKYN̄', or cancellyn̄' a thynge wrytyn̄' (cancellen a fals wri∣tinge, P.) Cancello, CATH. obelo.
  • STRYKYN̄', or SMYTYN̄', supra.
  • STREEME, of watur. Decursus, fluentum, C. F. fluxus, rivus.
  • STREMERE, of fane (stremer or fane, S. A. P.) 2. ["Cherucus, the fane of the mast, or of a vayle (? sayle), quia secundum ventum move∣tur." ORTUS. "Stremar, a baner, Estandart." PALSG.]Cherucus, CATH.
  • STRENYOWRE (streynour, P.) Co∣latorium, colatus, (constricto∣rium, P.)
  • STRENKYL, halywater styk. Asper∣sorium, isopus.
  • STRENKELYD, or sprenkelyd (stren∣kled, P.) Aspersus.
  • (STRENKELYN, or sprenkelyn, K. H. S. Aspergo.)
  • STRENKELYNGE, or sprenkelynge. Aspersio.
  • STRENGTHE (strenthe, K. stren∣kyth, Page  480 S.) Fortitudo, vigor, robur, (potencia, A. P.)
  • STRENGTHYN̄', or make stronge (strenthyn, K.) Fortifico, ro∣boro, vigoro.
  • STRESSE, or streytynge. Constric∣cio, constrictura.
  • STRESSE, or wed take be strengthe and vyolence. Vadimonium.
  • STRETE. Vicus, strata, C. F. et KYLW. (platea, P.)
  • STREETE catchepol bok to gader by mercymentys. 1. [Compare CACCHEPOLLE or pety-seriawnte, angarius, p. 58, and MERCYMENT, multa, p. 333. Some street directory or roll of inhabitants seems to be here intended, whereby the mediaeval police might collect amerciaments, and which may have been familiarly desig∣nated, "The Street Catchpoll." This word is not found in MS. K. In S. we read—Strete cacchpolle boke to gedyr by mercymentys. In MS. A.—Streete catchepollys book to gadir by mercymentys (no Latin.)—vacat in cop'—marginal note.]
  • STRYDE. Clunicatus, KYLW. (ol∣mucatus, S.)
  • STRYDYN̄' (or steppyn̄ ovyr a thynge, supra.) Clunico, KYLW. patento, strigio, KYLW. (Vide supra in stragyn, K. P.)
  • STRYDYNGE. Patentacio, stragia∣tus, pantagium, KYLW.
  • STRYFE (or stryuynge, P.) Conten∣cio, lis, rixa, jurgium, litigium.
  • STRYNGE. Cordula, instita, funi∣culus (corda, P.)
  • STRYPE, or schorynge wythe a ba∣leys (or wale, infra; scorgynge, S.) Vibex, CATH.
  • STRYPYN̄', or streppyn̄, or make nakyd. Nudo, denudo.
  • STRYPPYNGE, or makynge [na∣kyd?] (strypynge or nakynge, K. S. A. P.) Denudacio.
  • STRYVAR. Litigator, rixator, con∣tentor, jurgator, contentrix.
  • STRYVYN̄'. Contendo, litigo, rixor, jurgor.
  • STRYVYN̄', in pletynge. Discepto.
  • (STRYUYNGE, supra in strife, P.)
  • STRYKYN̄' heedys. Affulo, UG. et C. F.
  • STROGOLYN̄' (strobelyn, K. or tog∣gyn̄, infra.) Colluctor.
  • STROGELYNGE (strokelynge, H. P.) Colluctacio.
  • STROY, or dystroyare (stroye, K. A. P.) Destructor, dissipator, dissipatrix.
  • STROKE. Ictus, percussura (per∣cussio, P.)
  • STRONDE, or see banke. Litus.
  • STRONGE (or stalwarthy, or styffe, supra.) Fortis, potens, robustus, validus.
  • STROWYN̄' HOWSYS, or florys. Sterno.
  • STROWYN̄' A-BRODE, or scateryn̄'. Spergo.
  • STROWYN̄', or lyteryn̄'. Stramino, KYLW.
  • STROWYNGE, or mater to strowe wythe (to be strowyd, K. strow∣ynge or stramage, H. P.) Stra∣mentum, CATH. (stramagium, P.)
  • STROWYNGE, or dede of strowynge. Sternicio.
  • STROWPE, of the throte. 2. [In Norfolk, according to Forby, the gullet or windpipe is still called the Stroop. Isl. strapa, guttur. "Epiglotum, a throte boll." ORTUS.]Epiglo∣tus, C. F.
  • STROWTYN̄', or bocyn̄ owte (bow∣tyn, S.) Turgeo, CATH.
  • ST(R)OWTYNGE, nominaliter. Tur∣gor, CATH. turgi(di)tas, CATH.
  • STROWTYNGE, adjective. Turgidus.
  • STROWTYNGLY, or asturt (strow∣tynge or strowte, a-strowt, A. astrut, P.) Turgide.
  • Page  481STRUMPET. Lupa, meretrix, scorta, lena, pelex, C. F.
  • (STUBBYLL, K. H. P. or stobul, or holme, supra. Stipula.)
  • (STUDDUL, H. studdyll, P. or stodul, or stedulle, supra. Telarium.)
  • STWE, fysche ponde (stewe, H.) Vivarium, CATH.
  • STWE, bathe. Stupha, terme, UG.
  • STUFFE, or stuffure. Staurum, CATH. instauracio.
  • STUFFYD wythe stoore. Instauratus.
  • STUFFYD, or fylt 1. [In MS.—sylt, which seems to be an error by the second hand; stoppyd also should pos∣sibly be read—stoffyd.] and fulle stoppyd (fyllyd or ful stoppyd, S. A.) Re∣fertus, farcitus, CATH. farcinatus.
  • STUFFYN̄, or fyllyn̄'. Repleo, de∣fercio, (instauro, P.)
  • STUGGE, hoggys trowghe. Sili∣quarium, porcorium, vel alveus porcorum.
  • STUK, short (stug, stukkid, schort, K.) Curtus, brevis.
  • STUK, or schort garment (stukkyd clothe K.) 2. [Compare SCUT, garment, nepticula; also SCHORT or stukkyd garment, supra.]Nepticula, C. F. (nep∣tula, S.)
  • STUKNESSE. Brevitas, curtitas.
  • STULPE, or stake. 3. [Compare PALE for wynys, Paxillus. In Norfolk, according to Forby, a low cost put down to mark a boundary or give support to something is called a Stulp. SU.-GOTH. Stolpe, caudex. Fabyan states, in his account of Cade's rebellion, that he drew the citi∣zens back from "the Stulpes" In Southwark, or Bridge's foot, to the drawbridge, &c. Hall, under 4 Hen. VI. mentions likewise the "Stulpes" at London Bridge next South∣wark, where there was a chain by which the way might be barred.]Paxillus, C. F.
  • STUMLERE (or stomelare, supra.) Cespitator.
  • STUMMELYN̄'. Cespito.
  • STUMMELYN', or hurtelyn̄' a-ȝen a stole, or clogge, or oþ lyke aȝen a stoke, S.) Impingo, CATH.
  • STUMLYNGE. Cespitacio.
  • STUMPE, of a tree hewyn dōn. Surcus, CATH.
  • STUWYN̄' METE (stuyn, K.)Stupho.
  • STUWYN MENN̄', or bathyn̄' (stuyn in a stw, K.)Balneo.
  • STURBELARE, or turbelare (or stro∣blare, supra, sturblar or trow∣blar, P.) Turbator, turbatrix.
  • STURBELYN̄', or turbelyn̄' (troblyn, P.) Conturbo, turbo, perturbo.
  • (STURBELYNGE, or turbelynge, K. sturblinge or troublynge, P. Tur∣bacio, perturbacio.)
  • STURDY, vnbuxum. Rebellis, con∣tumax, inobediens.
  • STURDYNESSE. Rebellio, inobe∣diencia, contumacia.
  • STURIONE, or sturiowne, fysche (sturgyn, K. sturiowne or sto∣ryon, S.) Rumbus, C. F. et KYLW.
  • SWAGYN̄', or sum what secyn̄'. Mitigo, levio, laxo, mulceo.
  • SWAGYNGE, or secynge. Laxacio.
  • SWAGYNGE of blood. Stagnacio.
  • SWABLYNGE, or swaggynge (swab∣byng, A.)
  • SWALE (or shadowe, P.) Umbra, umbraculum, estiva, CATH. um∣brosum, C. F.
  • SWALTERYN' for hete, or febyl∣nesse, or other cawsys (or swo∣wnyn, P.) Exalo, C. F. sinco∣pizo.
  • SWALTERYNGE, or swownynge.Sincopa (vel extasis, S.)
  • SWALOWE, bryde. Irundo.
  • SWANNE, bryd. Cignus, olor, C. F. et UG. in olon.
  • Page  482SWAP, or stroke (or sweype, infra.) Ictus.
  • SWARDE, or sworde of flesche (swad or swarde, S.) 1. [Forby gives Sward-pork, bacon cured in large flitches. A. S. Swaerd, cutis porcina.]Coriana.
  • (SWARDE of e erþe, infra in TURFE.)
  • SWARME (of ben, K. been, S. P.) Examen.
  • SWARMYN̄', as beēn'. Examino.
  • SWARMYNGE. Examinatus.
  • SWARTE, of colowre. Sinopidus, secundum phisicos, fuscus, niger.
  • SWARTNESSE. Fuscedo.
  • SWATHE, of mowynge (swathe of corne, H. P.) Falcidium.
  • SWATHYN' chyldyr. Fascio, CATH. UG.
  • SWATHYNGE of chyldyr. Fasci∣natio, vel fasciacio, CATH.
  • SUBSTAUNCE. Substantia.
  • SUBPRIOWRE. Subprior, vel Sup∣prior.
  • SUBURBE, of a cyte or wallyd towne (suburb or sowthbarbys of cyte, K.) Suburbium, suburbanum.
  • SUKLYNGE, herbe (suklinge or so∣kynge, H. or suckinge herbe, P.) Locusta.
  • SUDARYE (or sodary, H. P.) Suda∣rium.
  • (SWEYMOWS, or skeymowse, su∣pra. Abhominativus.) 2. [Compare Swamous, Craven dialect.]
  • SWEYNE. Armiger.
  • SWEYPE, or swappe (or strok, su∣pra, swype, S.) Alapa.
  • SWEYPE, for a top, or scoorge. Flagellum.
  • (SWEPYNGE of an howse, S. Sco∣pilia.)
  • SWELLYNGE, or bolnynge. Tumor.
  • SWELNYN̄', 3. [This may possibly be read SWELUYN̄. q. d. Swelwyn̄, or it may be only an error by the second hand for Swellyn̄. See BOLNYN', supra, p. 43.] or bolnyn̄' (swellyn, K. S. P.) Tumeo, intumeo, intumesco.
  • (SWELTRYNGE, or swalterynge, su∣pra, H. P. or swownynge, infra. Sincopa.)
  • SWELWHE, of a water or of a grownde (swelwe, K. swelth, S. swelowe, P.) Vorago, C. F.
  • SWELWYN̄' (swellyn, K. swolowyn, P.) Glucio, deglucio, voro.
  • SWELWYN̄' ALLE IN. Absorbeo.
  • SWELWYN̄', wythe owte chowynge, as tothles menne. Ligurio, C. F. et CATH.
  • SWELWYYNGE of mete (swellynge of mete and drynke, K. P.) De∣cluticio, (deglucio, P.)
  • SWEEM, of mornynge (swemynge, or mornynge, S. A.) 4. ["Sweam or swaim, subita aegrotatio." GOULDM. Comapre SWEYMOWSE, supra.]Tristicia, molestia, meror.
  • (SWEMYN, K. H. P. Molestor, mereo.)
  • SWENGYL, of a fleyle or oþer lyke. 5. [See Forby, v. swingel. Compare FLEYLE, swyngyl, supra, p. 155. "Feritorium, a battynge staffe, a batyll dur, or a betyll." ORTUS.]Feritorium, KYLW. tribulum, COMM. et CATH. etUG. V. in T.
  • SWENGYL, for flax or hempe. Ex∣cudium, DICC.
  • SWENGYN̄', or schakyn̄', as menne done clothys and oþer lyke. (Excucio, A.)
  • SWENGYN̄', and waweryn̄', infra in WAVERYN̄.
  • SWENGYNGE. Excussio.
  • SWEPARE. Scopator, scopatrix.
  • SWEPYN̄'. Scopo, CATH.
  • SWEPYNGE. Scopacio.
  • SWERARE. Jurator, juratrix.
  • Page  483SWERARE, þat ofte ys forswore. Labro, C. F.
  • SWERYN̄'. Juro.
  • SWERYNGE. Juracio.
  • SWERDE. 1. [Compare BRYGHTE SWERDE, Splendona, supra, p. 52, See also Roquefort, v. Lampian.]Gladius, rumphea, splendona, CATH. ensis.
  • SWERD BERARE. Ensifer, CATH. spatarius, Gregorius in dialogis.
  • SWERDE MAN, or he þat vsythe a swerde. Gladiator, CATH.
  • SWERYN̄'. Juro.
  • SWERYNGE. Juracio.
  • SWETE, of mannys body for hete or trauayle. Sudor.
  • SWETE, for hete and oþer cawsys (hete or travayle, K.) Sudo, UG. in sub, desudo, C. F.
  • SWETE, yn taste and delycyowse. Dulcis.
  • SWETYN̄', or make a thynge swete to mannys taste. Dulcoro.
  • SWETYNGE, appulle. Malomellum, C. F.
  • SWETYNGE, of sweete. Sudacio, desudacio.
  • SWETNESSE, yn tastynge. Dulce∣do, dulcor.
  • SWETENESSE, yn smellynge. Fra∣grancia.
  • SWETE SOWND (swete songe, S.) Melos, CATH.
  • SWETE SOUNDYNGE, or 2. [—of ful of, MS.] ful of swete sownd. Melosus, CATH. (melus, P.)
  • SWETE, of flesche or fysche or oþer lyke (suet, due sillabe, P.) Li∣quamen, sumen, C. F. et KYLW.
  • SWEVENE, or dreme. Sompnium.
  • SWEUENE, or slepe (swene or slep, K.) Sompnus.
  • SUFFYRABYL. Tollerabilis, passi∣bilis, suffera(bi)lis.
  • SUFFERAUNCE. Sufferencia, tolle∣rancia, paciencia.
  • SUFFYCYENCE, or ynow havynge (suffisaunce, P.) Sufficiencia.
  • SUFFYCYENT, or y-now (inowe, K. inowugh, P.) Sufficiens.
  • SUFFYR WOO or peyne. Pacior, tollero, fero.
  • SUFFERYN̄', yn abydynge. Sino, CATH. suffero, sustineo.
  • SUFFYZYN̄', or ben̄ inowe (at nede, K. H. ben inoughe, P.) Sufficio.
  • SUFFRAGANN. Suffraganus.
  • (SUFFRAGE, or helpe, K. P. Suf∣fragium.)
  • SUGGE, bryd. Curuca, CATH. linosa.
  • SWYFTE. Agilis, velox, alacer.
  • SWYFTELY. Alacriter, velociter, agiliter.
  • SWYFTENESSE. Velocitas, agilitas.
  • SWYCHE (swyhche, H. suche, P.) Talis.
  • SWYYNE. Porcus, kirius, CATH. et C. F.
  • SWYYNE KOTE, howse for swyyn (swinysty, K. or sty, supra.) Ara, CATH.
  • SWYYNE HERD (swynshyrd, K.) Subulcus, porcarius.
  • SVYN̄, or pursvyn̄' (or folwyn, K.) Persequor, insequor.
  • SVYN̄', or folwyn̄'. Sequor.
  • SUWYNGE, of folowynge of steppys (or sute, infra.) Sequela.
  • SUWYNGE, or folowynge 3. [—fowlynge, MS. folwynge, K. S. folowinge, P.] yn maners and condycyons.Imitacio.
  • SVYNGE, or folwynge a sundry tymys (folwyng of tyme, K. fol∣wyng of sundry tymes, A. suynge of tyme, P.) Successus.
  • SWYMMYN̄' yn water. Nato.
  • Page  484SWYNSY, infirmyte. Inguinaria, gutturna.
  • SWYPYR, or delyvyr. Agilis.
  • SWYPYR, and slydyr, as a wey (slypyr as a wey, S.) Labilis.
  • SUKYR. Zucura, DICC. vel sucura.
  • SUKYR PLATE. Sucura crustalis.
  • SUKYR CANDY. Sucura de Candia (candida, S.)
  • SUKLYNGE, herbe, idem quod SOKE∣LYNGE, supra. Locusta.
  • SULE erthe (or soyle, K. soylle erþe, A.) Solum, tellus.
  • SUMDELE. Aliquantus, aliquan∣tulus.
  • SUMME, þe fulle of a nowmbyr (ful nowmbyr, K. P.) Summa.
  • SUM, or sumwhat, or a part of a nowmyr or a noþer thynge (sume party of a nowmyr, K.) Aliquis.
  • SUMNOWRE. Citator.
  • SUM TYME. Interdum, olim, ali∣quando, quandoque, quondam.
  • SUMTYME a-monge. Vicissim, alter∣natim.
  • SUM WHAT. Aliquid.
  • SUNDAY. Dominica.
  • SUNDRY, or dyuerce. Varius, sin∣gulus.
  • SUNNE, planete. Sol, Febus, C. F. vel Phoebus secundum alios, C. F.
  • SUNNE BEEM. Radius.
  • SUNNE RYSE, or rysynge of þe sunne (sunne ryst or rysing of of þe sunne, A.) Ortus, febella, C. F.
  • SUNNE SETTYNGE, or sunne gate downe. Occasus.
  • SOWNGE, smal and long (or gawnte, supra.) Gracilis.
  • SWORDE, idem quod SWARDE, supra.
  • SWORE BROTHYR (swyre brodyr, S. sworne brother, P.) Confede∣ratus, CATH. confedustus, CATH.
  • SWORYN̄, or chargyd be othe. Ju∣ratus, adjuratus.
  • SWOWYN̄' or sowndyn', as newe ale and other lycure (swownyn, K.) Bulbio1. [Sic, but ? more correctly Bilbio, or "bilbo—bibendo sinitum facere." ORTUS.] (bilbio, A. billiso, P.)
  • SOWWYNGE, or sowndynge, as newe ale, wyne, or oþer lycure (swowyng of lycour, or sun∣drynge as ale and wyne, K. swoynge, &c. of newe ale, S. soundinge of ale or wyne, P.) Bilbicio (billucio, P.)
  • SWOWNYN̄', or owmawtyn̄. Sin∣copo, sincopiso, C. F.
  • SWOWNYNGE (or swalterynge, su∣pra.) Sincopis, C. F.
  • SUPPŌN'. Ceno.
  • SUPPYNGE. Cenacio, cenatus.
  • SUPPLE, or plyant. Supplex, flexibilis, plicabilis.
  • SUPPLUN, or make supple (softe, K.)
  • (SUPPOSYN, or soposyn, K. H.)
  • SUPPOSYNGE, or soposynge. Sup∣posicio, estimacio.
  • SURFET, or excesse. Excessus.
  • SURFETYN̄' yn mete and drynke. Crapulor.
  • SURFETYN̄', or forfetyn̄' yn trespace. Forefacio, delinquo.
  • (SURGERAUNT, K. H. sugyner, or a comynere, S.) Commensalis, conviva.2. [These two Latin words occur in the MS. and in MS. A. after Excessus, under SURFET, being probably misplaced by the second hand, with the omission of the English terms to which they relate, which are found in the other MSS. Compare SOIURNAUNT (soioraunt, P.) commensalis, supra, p. 463; and SOIOWRYN̄, or go to boorde.]
  • Page  485SURGERYE. Cirurgia, CATH.
  • SURION, or surgen (surgyn leche, P.) Cirurgicus, C. F. UG. in cilleo, cirīgicus, vel cirugicus, UG. V. in M. aliptes, C. F.
  • SURE MYLKE. Occigulum.
  • SURNAME. Cognomen (agnomen, P.)
  • SURPLYCE. Superpellicium.
  • SURVYOWRE. Supervisor.
  • SUSPECTE. Suspectus.
  • SUSPYCYON. Suspicio.
  • SUSPYCYOWSE. Suspiciosus.
  • SUSPYRAL, of a cundyte. Spira∣culum, CATH. vel suspiraculum.
  • (SUSTEYNYN, A. as mete, P. Sus∣tento, sustineo.)
  • SUSTEYNYN, or supportyn and vp beryn̄'. Supporto.
  • SUTE, or pursute (pursuynge, P.) Insecucio, persecucio.
  • SUTE, or suynge, or folowynge. Sequela.
  • SUTE, or suynge yn maters and cawsys.Prosecucio.
  • TABBARD. Collobium, CATH. et C. F.
  • TABERNACLE. Tabernaculum.
  • TABLE. Tabula, tabella, mensa; (mensa est pauperum et tabula divitum, K.)
  • TABLE, mete boord that ys borne a-wey whān' mete ys doōn. Cillaba, CATH. et C. F.
  • (TABYLL, to counte on, K. H. P. Trapicetum.)
  • TABLER, 1. [From the French; Lacombe gives "Tablier, table de jeu de dames, ou damier." "Pyrgus, Anglice, a payre of tables or a checker." ORTUS. In the Liber vocatus Equus, by Joh. de Garlandia, Harl. MS. 1002, f. 114 b., the following line occurs, with English glosses,—"Pertica, scaccarium (checure) alea (tabelere) decius (dyce) quoque talus." Richard Bridesall of York bequeathed, in 1392, "unum tabeler cum le menyhe." Test. Ebor.] or table of pley or game. Pirgus, CATH. et UG. V. in P.
  • TABOWRE. Timpanum.
  • TABOWRE, for fowlarys. 2. [A small drum used in fowling to rouse the game. See TYMBYR, lytyl tabowre, infra.]Terri∣ficium, COMM.
  • TABOWRY(N). Timpaniso.
  • TACHYN̄', or a-tachyn̄' and a-restyn̄'. Aresto.
  • TACHYNGE, or a-restynge (reestyng, A.) Arestacio.
  • TACLE, or wepene. Armamentum.
  • TAYLE. Cauda, dica.
  • TAYLE, infra in TALY. 3. [Tytaly, MS.]
  • TAYLYD, as bestys. Caudatus.
  • TAYLYN̄', or TALYYN̄', infra.
  • TAKYN̄', or receyvyn̄'. Accipio, sumo, capio, apprehendo, tollo, prendo, UG. suscipio.
  • TAKYN̄' A-WEY. Aufero.
  • TAKYN̄' A-WEY by strengthe and vyolence. Extorqueo.
  • TAKE HEED, or neme kepe. Ascul∣to, attendo, considero, intendo.
  • TAKYN̄' on hande. Manucapio.
  • TAKYN̄', or delyueryn̄ a thynge to a-nother. Trado.
  • TAKYN̄', or betakyn̄' a thynge to a-nother. Committo.
  • TAKYN̄' on hande. Manuteneo.
  • TAKYNGE, or receyuynge. Accep∣cio, captura, suscepcio (capcio, P.)
  • TAKKE (or botun, H. P.) Fibula, fixula, KYLW. nascula, C. F.
  • TAKKYN̄', or some what sowyn' to-gedur. Sutulo, consutulo, consuo.
  • TAKKYN̄', or festyn̄' to-gedur. Affixulo.
  • Page  486TAL, or semely. Decens, elegans.
  • TALE, of mannys spekynge. Nar∣racio.
  • TALENT, or lyste (lust, K. S. P.) 1. [Master Langfranc of Meleyn directs centory to be "sethed wele in stale ale, and stamped; and the juce mixed with hony, whereof iij. sponfulle eten every day fasting shall do away the glet fro the herte, and cause good talent to mete." Palsgrave gives "Talent or lust, talent." See Lacombe and Roquefort, v. Talant.]Appetitus, delectacio.
  • TALY, or talye (taly or tayle, A. tayle of talinge, P.) 2. [Compare SCORYN̄ talyys, supra, p. 450. "Tayle of woode, taille de boys. Slytte this sticke in twayne, and make a payre of tayles." PALSG. In th Northumberland Household Book it is directed to deliver to the baker "the stoke of the taill," and the "swache" or "swatche" to the pantler. So likewise in regard to beer, one part to be given to the brewer, the other to the butler.]Talia, tallia, C. F. dica, UG. V. in A. et CATH. apoca, UG. V. in A. anti∣copa, CATH. (indica, S. K.)
  • TALYAGE (or taske, infra.) 3. [Compare TOL, or custome, infra.]Gui∣dagia, C. F. petagium.
  • TALYYD. Talliatus, dicatus, anti∣copatus.
  • TALYYN̄, or scoryn' on taly. 4. [Scoryn or taly, MS. An error doubtless by the second hand, corrected by the other MSS.—scoryn on tayle, K., on a taly, S. P.]Tallio, dico, CATH.
  • TALYYNGE. Talliacio, anticopa∣cio, anticopatus.
  • TALYOWRE. Scissor.
  • TALKYN̄'. Fabulor, colloquor, con∣fabulor, sermocinor.
  • TALKYNGE. Confabulacio, collo∣cucio, colloquium.
  • TALLY, or semely and in semely wyse. Decenter, eleganter.
  • TALWHE (talowe, P.) Cepum.
  • TALWY. Ceposus.
  • TALWYD. Cepatus.
  • (TALWYN, A. talowyn, P. Sepo.)
  • TAME. Domesticus, CATH.
  • TAMYD, or made tame. Domitus, CATH. domesticatus.
  • TAMYD,or a-tamyd as a vessel of drynke. Attaminatus, DICC.
  • TAMYN̄', or make tame. Domo, CATH. domito, KYLW.
  • TAME, or attame vessellys wythe drynke or oþer lykurys (tamyn or emptyn vessel with licour, K.) Attamino, DICC. depleo.
  • TAMYNGE fro wyyldenesse. Do∣mesticacio.
  • TAMYNGE, or a-brochynge of a vessel of drynke (temynge, P.) Attaminacio, deplecio.
  • TANNARE, idem quod BARKARE, supra in B.
  • TANGGYL, or froward and angry. Bilosus, C. F. felleus.
  • TANNY colowre (tawny, P.)
  • TANKARD. Amphora.
  • TANNYN̄', or barkyn̄'. Frunio, C. F.
  • TANZE, herbe (tansy, K. P.) Tana∣setum domesticum, quia tana∣zetum silvestre dicitur gosys gresse, vel cameroche.
  • TAPPE, of a vessel. Ductillus, clipsidra (ducillus, K.)
  • TAPECER (tapesere, K.) Tape∣tarius.
  • TAPET. Tapetum.
  • TAPSTARE. 5. [It may deserve notice that in olden times the retailers of beer, and for the most part the brewers also, appear to have been females. In the note on Cukstoke, supra, p. 107, it has been stated that the trebuchetum was the punishment for the dishonest braciatrix. The Browstar (supra, p. 54,) was usually a female. In the Vision of Piers Ploughman we have a tale of the tippling at the house of "Beton the Brewesterre;" and Skelton gives a curious picture of the disorderly habits of the pandoxatrix and her customers, at a sub∣sequent period, in his Elinour Rumming.]Ducillaria, propi∣naria, clipsidraria, UG. in capio Page  487 et in clipeo, baucaria, UG. in capio (ganearia, S.)
  • TARGE, or chartyr. Carta, UG.
  • TA(R)GET, or defence. Targea, DICC. scutum, ancile.
  • TAARTE, bake mete (tart pasty, K. P.) Tarta, DICC. tartra, COMM.
  • TASSE, of corne, or oþer lyke. Tassis, C. F.
  • TASSEL. Tassellus.
  • TASYL. Carduus, vel cardo fullo∣nis, paliurus, CATH.
  • TASKE, or talyage. Taliagium, taxa, taxacio, capiticensus, CATH.
  • TAXYD (taskyd, K. tasked, P.) Taxatus, capiticensus, CATH.
  • TASPYN̄'. Palpo, UG. V. palpito.
  • TASPYNGE (tappynge, K. P.) Pal∣pacio, palpitacio.
  • TAAST, Gustus.
  • TAAST, or savowre. Sapor.
  • TAASTYN̄'. Gusto, libo, prelibo.
  • TAASTYNGE. Gustacio.
  • TAASTOWRE. Gustator, ambro, UG. in ambrosia.
  • TATERYN̄', or iaueryn̄, or speke wythe owte resone (or iangelyn', supra, chateryn, K. iaberyn, P.) 1. [Forby gives the verb to Tatter, to stir actively and laboriously.]Garrio, CATH. blatero, C. F.
  • TATERYNGE, or iauerynge (iape∣rynge, S. iaberinge, P.) Gar∣ritus, CATH.
  • TAVERNE. Taberna, caupona, C. F.
  • TAVERNERE. Tabernarius, caupo, tabernaria, caupona, C. F.
  • (TAXYN, A. P. Taxo.)
  • TAYNGE, of lond (taþing, A. ta∣thynge, K. H. P.) 2. [An error doubtless, by the second hand, for TAÞYNGE or TAÞINGE. See Spelman's remarks, in v. on a peculiar manorial right in Norfolk and Suffolk called Tath; and also Forby, v. Tathe, to manure land with fresh dung by turning cattle upon it.]Ruderacio, CATH. stercorizacio (stercora∣cio, S. A.)
  • TAYIN londe wythe schepys donge (taþin, K. A. tathyn, S. H. P.) Ru∣dero, CATH. in rudus, stercoro, C. F., pastino, BRIT. (stercoriso, P.)
  • TECHYN̄'. Doceo, instruo, imbuo, informo.
  • TECHYNGE. Doctrina, instruccio, informacio.
  • TETCH'E, or maner of condycyone, (tecche, K. teche, S. tetche ma∣ner or condicion, P.) 3. [Horman says, "A chyldis tatches in playe shewe playnlye what they meane (mores pueri inter ludendum)." "Offritiae, crafty and deceytfull taches." ELYOT. See, in the Master of Game, Sloane MS. 3501. c. xi., "Of the maners, tacches, and condyciouns of houndes." See also P. Ploughm. Vis. 5470.]Mos, con∣dicio.
  • TEYE, of a cofyr or forcer. Teca, thecarium, KYLW.
  • TEYYN̄' wythe bondys (teyyn or byndyn, K.) Ligo, vincio (vin∣culo, P.)
  • TEK, or lytylle towche (tekk or lytl strock, K.) Tactulus.
  • TELE, bryd. Turcella, turbella, KYLW.
  • TELLE talys. Narro, enarro.
  • Page  488TELLE a tale forthe to a-noþer. Refero.
  • TELLE a-nother, or schewe be word or tokne. Intimo, denun∣cio, CATH. (dimonstro, S.)
  • TELLYN̄', or nowmeryn̄'. Numero.
  • TELLYNGE, of talys, or spekynge. Narracio.
  • TELLYNGE, or nowmerynge. Nu∣meracio.
  • (TELLYNGE, or grochynge, K. Murmuracio.)
  • TELTE, or tente. Tentorium.
  • TELTE, hayyr (telt, hayre, H. A. P.)Gauda,1. [Sic, but? Ganda, gandatus, as P. Compare HAYYR, supra; Cilicium, p. 221.] Egidius super rhethori∣cam Aristotelis (cauda, A.)
  • TELTYD.Gaudatus (caudatus, A.)
  • (TELTINGE, P. Gaudacio.)
  • TELWYN̄', or thwytyn̄' (twhytyn, H. twytyn, S. P.) Abseco, reseco.
  • TELWYNGE, or twhytyne (tel∣whynge or whytynge, K. wy∣tynge, S. tweynge or theytinge, P.) Scissulatus.
  • TEME, of a sermone. Thema.
  • TEMYN̄', or maken empty (or tamyn, supra;; tenyn, H.) Vacuo, evacuo.
  • TEMPERAUNCE of maners and con∣dycyons (to-gedyr, S.) Tempe∣rancia, CATH. moderacio.
  • TEMPERYN̄', or menge to-gedur (myngyn togedyr, K.) Com∣misceo, misceo.
  • TEMPORYN̄', or sette yn mesure. Tempero, UG.
  • TEMPERYNGE, or mesurynge of sundry thyngys to-gedyr. Tem∣peracio, CATH. temperancia, tem∣peramentum, UG. in tepeo.
  • TEMPEST. Tempestas, procella.
  • TEMPLE, holy place (tempyll, churche, P.) Templum.
  • TEMPLE, of mannys heede. 2. [Compare THUN WONGE, infra.]Tem∣pus, non timpus, secundum CATH.
  • TEMPRE, or tempyr (tempyr or tymper, P.) Temperamentum.
  • TEMPTYN̄'. Tempto.
  • TEMZE, sive (temse, syue, K. P. temeze, S.) Setarium, CATH. et UG. in suo.
  • TEMZE, water at Londōn (Temeze, se at London', S.) Tamesia.
  • TEMZYN̄' wythe a tymze (temsyn with a tenze, S.) 3. ["Taratantariso, to empse or syfte. Taratantare, a tempse." ORTUS. "Setarium, a temsyue, i. cribrum. Cervida, lignum quod portat cribrum, a temsynge staffe." MED. In the Boke for Travellers, by Caxton, we read as follows "Ghyselin themande maker (corbillier) hath solde his vannes, his mandes or corffes, his temmesis to clense with (tammis)." In French, "Tamis, a searce orboulter," &c. COTG.]Setatio, CATH. attamino, setario, UG. in suo.
  • TENNE, nowmyr. Decem.
  • TENAWNTE. Tenens.
  • TEN TYMYS. Decies.
  • TENCHE, fysch'e. Tencha, COMM.
  • TENDYR. Tener.
  • TENDYRLY. Tenere.
  • TENDYRNESSE. Teneritudo.
  • TENDRONE, of a vyne (of vvynys, K.) Botrio, CATH.
  • TENE, or angyr, or dyshese. 4. [Thus, in the Norfolk dialect, "Teen, trouble, vexation; to Teen," &c. FORBY. "Tenne, peine, fatigue." LACOMBE. A. S. Teona, molestia.]An∣gustia, angaria, C. F. tribulacio.
  • TENEYS, pley. Teniludus (manu∣pilatus, tenisia, P.)
  • TENEYS PLEYARE. Teniludius.
  • Page  489TENEL, vessel. Tenella.
  • TENEL, or crele. Cartallus.
  • TENEMENT, or rentere (sic A. tene∣ment place, K. tenement or rent place, P.) Tenementum.
  • TENYN, or wrethyn̄', or ertyn̄' (wro∣thyn, P.) Irrito, media producta; (irrito, media correpta, Anglice to make empty, S.): versus,—Irri∣tat evacuat, irritat provocat iras.
  • TENOWN, knyttynge of a balke or oþer lyke yn tymbyr (tenowre, S, tenon cuttinge in a barke or other like, P.) Tenaculum, gum∣fus, C. F.
  • (TENOUR, K. A. P.) Tenor.
  • TENTE, hyllynge made of clothe. Tentorium, CATH. scena, CATH. papilio, C. F.
  • TENTE, of a wownde or a soore. Tenta, (magadalis, K. P.)
  • TENTE CLOTHE. Extendo, lacinio, UG. V. in L.
  • TENTURE, for clothe, (tentowre, S.) Tensoirum, extensiroum, UG. V. in V. tentura (constrictorium, P.)
  • TEERE, of flowre. 1. ["Pollis, vel pollen, est idem in tritico quod flos in siligine, the tere of floure." Whitinton, Gramm. 1521.]Amolum, C. F.
  • TERRE, or pyk, or pyche.Pissai∣gra,CATH. colofonia, C. F.
  • TERAGE, erthe. 2. [In Archaeol. XXXI. 336, theterm "tarage" occurs, signifying the base or groundwork of an object. Cotgrave gives Terrage in a different sense, signifying field rent. See Halli∣well's Glossary, v. Terrage; eeaerth or mould.]Humus, solum, terragium.
  • TERAWNTE. Tirannus.
  • TERAWNTRYE (tyranture, S.) Ti∣rannia.
  • TERCEL, hawke. Tercillus, KYLW.
  • TEERE, of wepynge. Lacrima.
  • TERRERE, hownde (terryare, S. A.) Terrarius.
  • TERYARE, or ertate. Irritator.
  • TERYAR, or longe lytare (sic A. teriar or longe bidar, P.) 3. [Compare LYTYN̄, or longe taryyn̄, and LYTYNGE, supra, p. 308.]Morosus.
  • TERYN̄', or weryn̄', as clothys or other thyngys. Vetero, CATH. attero.
  • TERYN̄', or hylle wythe erþe. Terriculo (terreno, K. P.)
  • TERYYN̄' or longe a-bydyn̄'. Moror, pigritor.
  • (TERYYN, or ertyn, supra in TE∣NYN, K. H. P.)
  • TERRYN̄', wythe terre. Colofoniso, pissaigro, CATH.
  • TERYYNGE, or ertynge. Irritacio.
  • TERYYNGE, or longe a-bydynge. Mora, pigricia.
  • TERYNGE, or werynge, or slytynge (slintinge, P.) Veteracio, CATH. inveteracio, consumpcio.
  • TEERME. Terminus.
  • TERNYD, in pley or oþer thyngys (teernyt in pley or other lyk, S.) Ternatus.
  • TERNYN̄', yn gamys pleyynge. Terno.
  • TERNYNGE. Ternatus, tern(a)cio (ternacio, A. P.)
  • TERWYD. Lassatus, fatigatus.
  • TERWYN̄', or make wery (or we∣ryyn̄, infra.) Lasso, fatigo.
  • TERWYNGE. Lassitudo, fatigacio
  • TESTAMENT. Testamentum.
  • TEESTER, or tethtere of a bed. Capitellum.
  • TETE. Uber.
  • TEW, or tewynge of lethyr. Fru∣nicio.
  • Page  490TEW, of fyschynge. Piscalia, in plurali, reciaria, CATH. reciacula.
  • TEWARE. Corridiator.
  • TEVWYD. Frunitus.
  • TEWYN̄' LETHYR. Frunio, corrodio, KYLW.
  • (TEWYNGE, of lethyr, supra in TEW.)
  • THAK, for howsys. Sartatectum, C. F. sartategmen, CATH.
  • THAKKYN̄' HOWSYS. Sartatego, CATH. sarcitego, CATH.
  • THAKKYNGE. Sartatectum, UG. in sarcio, tecmentum.
  • THAKSTARE. Sartitector, CATH. et UG. tecto(r), C. F. (tector, A.)
  • THANKE. Grates, graciarum accio, gratulamen.
  • THANKYN̄'. Regracior.
  • THAARME (or gutte, supra.) Su∣men, viscus.
  • THEDAM (or thryfte, infra.) Vigen∣cia.
  • THEDE, bruarys instrument. Qua∣lus, C. F. vel calus, CATH. 1. ["Calus, vas vimineum vel de salice per quod musta colantur." CATH. "Thede, a brewars instrument." PALSG. Forby gives "Thead, the wicker strainer placed in the mash-tub over the hole in the bottom, that the wort may run off clear;" more commonly called in Norfolk a "Fead."]
  • THEEF. Latro, fur, vespilio, CATH.
  • THEEN̄, or thryvyn̄'. Vigeo, CATH.
  • THEFTE. Furtum, latrocinium.
  • (THENDE, infra in TYDY, S.)
  • THENKARE. Cogitator, pensator.
  • THENKYN̄'. Cogito, meditor.
  • THENKYN̄' cheryawntly (thynkyn charyawnly, S. chargeawntly, K. charyteabylly, H. chariawntly, A. chyritably, P.) Penso.
  • THENKYNGE. Cogitacio, pensacio.
  • THERF, wythe owte sowre dowe (not sowryd, H. P.) Azimus.
  • THERKE, or dyrk (or myrke, supra.) Tenebrosus, caliginosus.
  • T(H)ERKNESSE, or derkenesse. Te∣nebre, caligo.
  • THETHORNE, tre (thevethorntre, K.) 2. [Compare WHYTHE THORNE, infra. IN Heber MS. 8336, at Middle Hill,is the fol∣lowing recipe, xiv. cent.: "Anothur mete that hatte espyne. Nym the floures of theoue∣thorn clenlichee i-gedered and mak grinden in an morter al to poudre and soththen; stempre with milke of alemauns othur of corn, and soththen; do to bred othur of amydon vor to lyen, and of ayren, and lye wel wyth speces and of leues of thethorne, and stey throu floures, and soththen dresece." In the Wicl. Version, Judges IX. 14 is thus rendered: "And all trees seiden to the ramne (ether theue thorn) come thou and be lord on us." Ang. S. þefe-þorn, Christ's thorn, rhamnus, vel rosa canina.]Ramnus.
  • THEVE, brusch (there brush, S.) 3. [Brushwood, brambles; compare Ang. Sax. þefe-þorn, ut supra. In Accounts of Works at the Royal Castles, t. Hen. IV., Misc. Records of the Qu. Rem., are payments for re∣pairing a "gurgit'—flakes and herdles, &c.—et in iij. carect' de teuet—pro flakis et aliis necessaris ibidem faciendis,—spinas et teuette pro sepe," &c.]
  • THEWE, or pylory. Collistrigium.
  • THEWE, maner or condycyon (thewe or manerys, K.) 4. [Compare GOUERNYN̄ and mesuryn̄ in manerys and thewys, supra, p. 206, and MANER of theve, p. 324. Ang. S. Theaw, mos.]Mos.
  • THY, lymme of a beeste. Femur.
  • THYGGYNGE, or beggynge. 5. [A word retained in N. Country Dialect. Ang. S. þigan, accipere cibum. "He haueth me do mi mete to thigge." Havelok, v. 1373. See Jamieson.]Men∣dicacio.
  • THYKKE, as lycure. Spissus.
  • THYKKE, as wodys, gresse, or corne, or other lyke. Densus.
  • THYKKE CLOTHE. Pannidensus, MER.
  • Page  491THYKKENESSE, as oflycure.Spis∣situdo.
  • THYKKENESSE, as of wodys, gresse, corne, or other lyke. Densi∣tas.
  • THYKKYN̄', or make thykke, as wodys, cornys, and oþer lyke. Condenso.
  • THYKKYN̄', or make thykke, as ly∣curys. Spisso, inspisso.
  • THYLLE, of a carte. Temo, CATH. et UG. in telon.
  • THYLLE HORSE. Veredus, C. F. (veredarius, P.)
  • THYMBYL. Theca, DICCC. digita, NECC.
  • THYNNE, as lycure. Tenuis.
  • THYNNE, as gresse, corne, wodys, and oþer lyke. Rarus.
  • THYNNE CLOTHE, that ys clepyd a rylle. Ralla, UG. V. in S.
  • THYNNESSE, or thynhede of licurys, as ale, water, and oþer lyke. Tenuitas.
  • THYNNESSE, of wodys, cornys, and oþer lyke. Raritas.
  • THYNGE. Res.
  • THYNNYN̄', or make thynne, as wodys, cornys, gresse, and oþer lyke. Rareo.
  • THYNNYN̄', or make thynne, as ly∣curys.Tenuo, CATH.
  • THYRCE, wykkyd spyryte 1. ["Dusius, i. demon, a thrusse, þe powke. Ravus, a thrusse, a gobelyne." MED. GR. "Hobb Trusse, hic prepes, hic negocius." CATH. ANG. "Lutin, a goblin, Robin Good-fellow, Hob-thrush, a spirit which playes reakes in mens houses antights.Loup-garou, a mankind wolf, &c.; also a Hobgoblin, Hob-thrush, Robin Good-fellow." COTG. See also Esprit follet, Gobelin, and Luiton. Bp. Kennett, in his Gloss. Coll. Lansd. MS. 1033, gives "A thurse, an apparition, a goblin. Lanc. A Thurs-house or Thurse-hole, a hollow vault in a rock or stony hill that serves for a dwelling-house to a poor family, of which there is one at Alveton and another near Wetton Mill, co. Staff. These were looked on as en∣chanted holes, &c." See also Hob-thrust, in Brockett's N. Country Glossary. Ang. S. þyrs, spectrum, ignis fatuus, orcus. In the earlier Wicliffite version, Isai. xxxiv. 15 is thus rendered: "There shal lyn lamya, that is a thirs (thrisse in other MSS.), or a beste havende the body lic a womman and horse feet." The word is retained in various parts of England in local dialect, and may possibly be traced in names of places, as Thursfield, Thursley, &c.] (thirse, goste, K. tyrce, S. A.) Ducius, CATH. et UG. in duco.
  • (THYRKE, supra in THERKE, K.)
  • THYRLYN̄', or peercyn̄' (thryllyn, S.) Penetro, terebro, perforo.
  • THYRSTE. or thryste. Sitis.
  • THRYSTY. Sitiens, sitibundus.
  • THRYSTYN̄', or pressyn̄'. Premo, comprimo.
  • THRYSTYN̄', or thrystyn̄' aftyr drynke. Sitio, CATH.
  • THYSTYLLE. Cardo, carduus.
  • THYHT, hool fro brekynge, not brokyn̄' (thythe or hole, H. P.) Integer (solidus, P.)
  • THYHT, not hool wythe-in (sic A. thythe or hole, P.) Solidus.
  • THYHTYN̄', or make thyht. Inte∣gro, consolido, solido, CATH.
  • THYXYL, instrument (twybyle, S. thyxill, P. 2. ["Celtes, a cheselle or a thyxelle. Ascia, a thyxelle, or a brode axe, or a twybylle." MED. MS. CANT. "Celtes, a chyselle or a tixil." MED. Harl. MS. 2270. A. S. þixl, temo.]) Ascia.
  • THOKE, as onsadde fysche. 3. [This term occurs in Stat. 22 Edw. IV. c. 2, in which it is enacted thta fish with broken bellies are not to be mixed with tale fish. "Thokes (fish with broken bellies), Een op gesneden visch." SEWEL. Compare Thokish, in Forby's Norfolk Glossary, and Sir T. Brown's Works, iv. 195. As a personal name we find also, in East Anglia, "Pau∣linus Thoke," in an extent of the vill of Marham; it is sometimes written "Toke." In the Winchester MS. of the Promptorium, under the letter C., occurs "Cowerde, herteles, long thoke; Vecors, &c."]Hu∣morosus, CATH. et UG. insolidus.
  • Page  492THOLLE, carte pynne (or tolpyn, in∣fra.) Cavilla, DICC. C. F. et NECC.
  • THONGE of lethyr (or ladde, supra.) Corrigia (ligula, CATH. et C. F., P.)
  • THORNE. Spina, sentis, sentix, CATH.
  • THORNEBAK, fysche. Uranus, C. F. uranoscopus, ragadies.
  • THO(R)PE, or thrope, lytylle towne (throp, litell towne or thorough∣fare, K. P.) Oppidum, C. F.
  • THOWE, or snowe, or yclys or yce. Resolucio, liquefaccio, degelacio.
  • THOWYN̄', or meltyn̄', as snowe and other lyke. Resolvo.
  • THOWYN̄', as yce and oþer lyke (or ykelys, S.) Degelat, resolvit, CATH.
  • THOWMBE. Pollex.
  • THOWNGE, or lanere (thonge or laynere, K.) Corrigia, ligula, C. F. (lingula, DICC., P.)
  • THOSTE (or toord, infra.) Stercus.
  • THOWHTE, or thynkynge. Cogi∣tacio, meditacio.
  • THOWHTE, or hevynesse yn herte. Mesticia, molestia, tristicia.
  • THOWHTE, yn hertyly besynesse (yn wordly besynesse, S. A.) So∣licitudo.
  • THOWTHYSTYLLE, herbe (or sow∣thystylle, supra.) Rostrum por∣cinum.
  • THOWTYN̄', or seyn̄ thow to a mann (thowyn or sey þu, A.) 1. [See ZEETYN̄, infra.]Tuo.
  • THRAL, bonde. Servus.
  • THRALDAM. Servitus.
  • THRE, nowmyr. Tres.
  • THRE CORNERYD. Trigonus, tri∣angularis.
  • THREFOOLD. Triplex.
  • THRE FOTYD, as stolys, or tres∣tyllys, or trevetys, or other lyke. Tripos, CATH. trisilis, C. F.
  • THRE HALPWORTHE. Trissis, CATH.
  • THRE HUNDRYD. Trecenti.
  • THRE MANNYS SONGE. Tricinnium, KYLW.
  • THRE SCHAPTYD CLOTHE (thre schaftyd, A.). 2. [Compare TOSCHAPPYD CLOTHE, infra; bilix; p. 497. Ang. Sax. sceápan, formare.]Trilix, C. F. (triplex, S.)
  • THREDE. Filum.
  • THREDEBARE. Invillosus, devil∣losus.
  • THRESCHARE. Triturator, flagel∣lator, KYLW.
  • THRESCHYN̄'. Trituro, flagello.
  • THRESCHYNGE. Trituracio.
  • THRESCHWOLDE. Limen (cardo, P.)
  • THRETARE. Minator.
  • THRETYN̄'. Minor, comminor.
  • THRETYNGE. Mine, comminacio.
  • THRETTY (thyrty, P.) Triginta.
  • THRYD (thyrde, P.) Tercius.
  • THRYFTE, idem quod THEDAM, supra.
  • THRYFTY. Vigens.
  • (THRYSTE, supra in THYRSTE.)
  • (THRISTYN, supra in PRESSYN, K.)
  • (THRYWYN̄', supra in THEEN̄'.)
  • THRONGE, or grete prees. Pres∣sura, compressio.
  • (THROPE, idem quod THO(R)PE, supra. Oppidum.)
  • THROTE. Guttur.
  • Page  493THROTE GOLLE. 1. ["Throte gole or throte bole, neu de la gorge, gosier." PALSG. "Epiglotum, a throte bolle. Frumen, the ouer parte of the throte, or the throte bolle of a man." ORTUS. "Taurus (governeth) the necke and the throte boll" (le noeud de dessoulz la gorge, orig.) Shepherd's Calendar. "A throte bolle, frumen hominis est, rumen animalis est; ipoglot∣tum." CATH. ANG.]Epiglotum, fru∣men, C. F.
  • THROWE, a lytyl wyle. Momentum, morula.
  • THROWE, womannys pronge (seke∣nes, K.) Erumpna.
  • THROWYN̄', or castyn̄'. Jacto, ja∣cio, projicio.
  • THROWE DOWNE, yn to a pytte or a valeye (pytte or odyr place, S.) Precipito.
  • THROWYN̄', or turne vessel of a tre. Torno, CATH. et C. F.
  • THROWYNGE, or castynge. Jac∣tura, jactus.
  • THROWYNGE DOWNE, fro hey place (throwynge downe to lowe place, K. P.) Precipicium.
  • THROWYNGE, or turnynge of vesselle. Tornacio, scutellacio, tornatura.
  • THRVMM, of a clothe. Filamen, KYLW. villus, fractillus, UG. in frango.
  • THRUSTYLLE, bryd (thrusshill or thrustyll, P.) Merula, DICC.
  • (THYWTYN̄', or TELWYN̄', supra, H. K. twytyn, supra in tewyn, S.)
  • THWYTYNGE, or telwynde. Sectula∣tus, abscidula, abscindula, KYLW.
  • THUNDYR. Tonitruum.
  • THUNDYR CLAPPE. Fulgur, fulmen.
  • THUNDERYN̄'. Tonat.
  • THUN WONGE, of mannys heede. 2. [Compare Gaut. de Bibelesworth,—"mon haterel (nol) oue les temples (þonewonggen)." "A thunwange, tempus." CATH. ANG. A. Sax. þun-wang, tempora capitis.]Tempus, UG. in tepeo.
  • THURROK, of a schyppe. Sentina, CATH. et C. F. et UG. in sentio.
  • THURGHE, a thynge or place. Per, intra.
  • THURWHESTONE, of a grave (thwrwe ston of a byryinge, K. throwe or thorw ston of a beryynge, H. throwe or throwstone, &c. P.) Sarcofagus, CATH. et C. F.
  • THURGHFARE. Oppidum, CATH.
  • THUS. Sic.
  • THUS MANY. Tot.
  • THUS MEKYL. Tantum.
  • TYCYN̄', or intycyn̄'. Instigo, allicio.
  • TYCYN̄', or prouokyn̄'. Provoco.
  • TYCYNGE, or intycynge. Incitacio, instigacio, C. F.
  • TYYDE, or tyme. Tempus.
  • TYDY, or on-thende 3. [Sic, ? an error for thende, as in MSS. S. A. This word may be from THEEN̄, vigeo. Compare ON-THENDE, invalidus; and ON-THENDE, fowl, and owt cast, supra, p. 367. Halli∣well gives "Unthende, abject." "Tydy, merry, hearty." Bp. Kennett.] (thende, S. tydy or theende, A.) Probus.
  • TYDYN̄', idem quod happyn̄' (tydyn or betydyn, S. tydyn or thryuen, supra in then, P.)
  • TYDYNGYS. Rumor.
  • TYDYNGYS BERARE. Rumigerulus, UG. in ruo.
  • TYFFYN̄', werke ydylly, idem quod TYMERYN̄', infra.
  • TYFFLYNGE, or vnprofytabylle werkynge (tyffynge, S. A. P.)
  • TYKE, wyrm. Ascarabia, ascarida, UG. V. in V. et C. F.
  • TYKYL. Titillosus.
  • YKELYN̄'. Titillo.
  • TYKYLLYNGE. Titillacio.
  • Page  494TYLARE. Tegulator.
  • TYLLARE, or tylmann. Colonus, agricola, ruricolus.
  • TYLYN̄' howsys. Tegulo.
  • TYLYNGE, of howsys. Tegulacio, tegulatus.
  • TYLESTONE (tyle, K. P. tyilstone, A.) Tegula, later.
  • TYLLYN̄', or tylle londe. Colo.
  • TYLLYNGE, of londe (tilthe, K. P.) Cultura.
  • TYMBYR, of trees (tymber or tymmer of trese, P.) Meremium.
  • TYMBYR, lytyl tabowre. Timpa∣nillum.
  • TYME, idem quod TYYDE (tyme, whyle, P. Tempus.)
  • TYME, herbe. Tima, timum, C. F. et UG.
  • TYME, flowre. Timus, UG. V. in T.
  • TYMERYN̄', idem quod TYFFYN̄', supra.
  • TYMYN̄, or make in tyme (and) in sesōn. Temporo, (tempero, P.)
  • TYNNE, metal. Stannum.
  • TYYNDE, prekyl (tynde, pryke, K.) Carnica.
  • TYNYD, wythe a tyne (tyndyt with tyndys, K.) Carnicatus.
  • TYNYD, or hedgydde (tyndyd, P.) Septus.
  • TYNNYD wythe tynne. Stannatus, CATH.
  • TYNYN̄', or make a tynynge. 1. [TYMYN̄, or make a tymynge, MS. The MSS. H. S. A. and Pynson's printed text, read Tynyn, tynynge. Tinny, a hedge, is still used in the North, and in the West of England.]Se∣pio, UG.
  • TYNNYN' wythe tynne. Stanno, CATH.
  • TYNYNBE, drye hedge. Sepes.
  • TYNNYNGE wythe tynne. Stannacio.
  • TYNKARE (tynnare, S.) Tintina∣rius; et capit nomen a sono artis, ut tintinabulum, sus, et multa alia, per onomotopeiam.
  • TYNTE, mesure. 2. [Compare EYZTYNDELE, Satum; supra, p. 137; and HALF a buschel (or tynt, K.) p. 222.]Satum, CATH.
  • TYPPE, of a gyrdylle. Mordacu∣lum.
  • TYPPE, or lappe of the ere. Pin∣nula, C. F.
  • TYP, of the nese. Pirula, CATH. et C. F.
  • TYPETT. Liripipium.
  • TYRDYL, schepys donge. Rudus, CATH. ruder, UG. in ruo.
  • TYRE, or a-tyre of wemmene. Mundum muliebris, (sic) C. F. in mundanus, redimiculum,CATH.
  • TYRE WYNE, or wyne T(y)re 3. [Sic MS. The first hand may have written—or wyne of Tyre. "Tyer drinke, amer bruuaige." PALSG. "Capricke, Aligant, Tire," occur in Andrew Boorde's Breviary of Health, c. 381.] (or wyne Tyre, K. A.)
  • TYRREMENT, or intyrrement. Fu∣nerale (funebria, P.)
  • TYRF, or tyrvynge vp on an hoode or sleue (tyrfe or turnynge vp azen, K. tyrwynge of an hood, S. tyrvyng of an hood, &c. A. tyrfte or turnynge vp agayne, P.) 4. ["Turfe of a cappe or suche lyke, rebras." PALSG.]Re∣solucio (revolucio, H. S.)
  • TYSANE, drynke. Ptisana, CATH. et C. F.
  • TYSYK, sekenesse. Tisis.
  • TYTE TUST, or tusmose of flowrys or othyr herbys (tytctuste or tussemose, S.) 5. [Bishop Kennett gives "Tuttie, a posie or nosegay, in Hampshire. Tussy Mussy, a nosegay." Lansd. MS. 1033. "A Tuttie, nosegay, posie or tuzziemuzzie, Fasciculus, sertum olfactorium." GOULDM. See Tosty in Jennings' W. Country Glossary; and also "Teesty-tosty, the blossoms of cowslips collected together, tied in a globular form, and used to toss to and fro for an amusement called teesty-tosty. It is sometimes called simply a tosty." Donne, Hist. of the Septuagint, speaks of "a girdle of flowers and tussies of all fruits intertyed," &c.]Olfactorium.
  • TYTEMOSE, bryd. Frondator, KYLW.
  • TYTYLLE. Titulus, apex, CATH.
  • Page  495TYTYMALLE, or faytowrys grees (tytuvalle or fautorys gresse, S.) 1. [Compare FAYTOWRYS gresse, and see the note on FAYTOWRE, supra, p. 146. The various species of Spurge (euphorbia, or the tithymalus of the old botanists) were much in esteem amongst empiries, and extraordinary effects supposed to be thereby produced, such as to make teeth fall out, hair or warts fall off, to cure leprosy, &c to kill or stupefy fish when mixed with bait. See the old Herbals, and especially Langham's Garden of Health, under Spurge and Tythimal.]Titimallus, lacteria, C. F.
  • TYTHE. Decima.
  • TYTHYN̄', or paye tythe. Decimo.
  • TOO, of a foot. Articulus.
  • TO, or tweyne (to, nowmere, K.) Duo.
  • TO BLAME, or blame worthy. Cul∣pabilis, culpandus, increpandus.
  • TO CUMME. Futurus, venturus.
  • TOD, or toyid 2. [Sic, doubtless for toþid. Compare TOTHYD, infra.] (tod or tothid, K. toþid, A.) Dentatus.
  • TODAY. Hodie.
  • TOODE, fowle wyrme. 3. [Compare FROGGE, or frugge, tode, supra, P. 180, and PADDOK, p. 376.]Bufo.
  • TODELYNGE. Bufonulus, vel bufo∣nillus.
  • TO-FALLE, schudde. 4. [A penthouse. See Brockett, N. Country Glossary, v. Tee-fall, and To-fall; and Jamieson. Wyntown uses the term "to-falls" in his account of the burning of St. An∣drews' Cathedral, in 1378, denoting, as supposed, the porches of the church.]Appendicium, C. F. appendix, teges, CATH.
  • TOFT. Campus.
  • TO-GEDYR. Simul, insimul, pari∣ter, una, mutuo.
  • TOGGYN̄', idem quod STROGELYN̄', supra (toggyn, or strubbelyn, K.)
  • TOGGYN̄', or drawyn̄' (drattyn, S.) Tractulo.
  • TOGGYNGE (or, A.) drawynge. At∣tractulus.
  • TOGGYNGE, or strogelynge (to∣gedyr, K. P.) Colluctacio.
  • TODYSHATTE (or muscherōn, su∣pra.) 5. [In Arund. MS. 42, f. 3, may be seen the virtues attributed to Agaric growing "by the grounde of the fir—lewede folkys callyn it tode hat." In Norfolk, according to Forby, a fungus is called a Toad's-cap.]Tuber, C. F.
  • TO HAND SWERD. Spata, CATH. cluniculum, CATH.
  • TOKNE. Signum.
  • TOKNE, wythe eye or wythe the hand. Nutus, CATH.
  • TOKNE, of a thynge ot cumme or cummynge. Pronosticum.
  • TOKNE, or sygne of ane in, idem quod SENY, supra (signe of an ostry, P.)
  • (TOKYN, or syne where a boke faylyt, K. where a boke lakkyth, S. A. P. Asteriscus.)
  • TOKNYN̄', or make tokene. 6. [—made tokene, MS. make tokyn, K. S. A. P. Palsgrave gives "I token, I signyrye, &c. I token, I signe with the sygne of the corsse: I wyll token me with the crosse from their companye: je me croyseray," &c.]Signo.
  • TOL, or custome. 7. [Compare TALYAGE, supra, p. 486.]Guidagia, C. F. pe∣tagium, toloneum, CATH. vectigal.
  • Page  496TOL, ofmyllarys. Multa, CATH. in molo; et alia infra in TOLLYNGE.
  • TOOL, instrument. Instrumentum.
  • TOLLARE, or takare of tol. Telone∣arius.
  • TOLHOWSE. Teloneum, DICC.
  • TOLLARE or styrare 1. [—stryare, MS. styrer, A. sterrere, S.] to do goode or badde. Excitator, instiga∣tor.
  • TOLLYN̄', or make tolle (take tolle, K. P.) Guido, multo, C. F.
  • TOLLYN̄', or mevyn̄', or steryn̄' to doon̄ (to done a dede, K.) In∣cito, provoco, excito.
  • TOLYON̄', or motyn̄' (tolyyn, K. taylyon, S. tollyn or motyn, P.) Discepto, placito.
  • (TOLYYNGE, supra in MOTYNGE.)
  • TOLLYNGE, styrynge, or mevynge to good or badde. Instigacio, excitacio.
  • TOLLYNGE, of myllarys. 2. [Compare TOL, of myllarys, multa. Bp. Kennett, Glossary in Par. Ant. v. Molitura, says that the term signified the toll taken for grinding; molitura libera was exemption from such toll, a privilege generally reserved by the lord to his own family. Palsgrave gives "I tolle, as a myller doth; je preus le tollyn." The lord in some cases demanded toll from his tenants for grinding at his mill. See Ducange, v. Molta.]Multura, vel molitura.
  • TOLPYN, idem quod THOLLE, supra.
  • TO MEKYL. Nimis, nimius.
  • TOOM, or rymthe (sic A. toome or rȳnyth, S.) 3. [In N. country dialect to teem signifies to pour out; the participle teem or teum sig∣nifies empty—"a toom purse makes a blate merchant."—N. C. Prov. See Ray, Brockett, &c. The noun, signifying space, leisure, appears to be thus used in the Sevyn Sages—"I sal yow tel, if I haue tome, of the Seuen Sages of Rome," v. 4. Danish, Tom, empty, Tōmmer, to make void. Compare TAME, supra, p. 486, and TEMYN̄, or maken empty, p. 488. The reading of MS. s. may be (in extenso) toome or rymnyth.]Spacium, tempus, oportunitas.
  • TOOM, or voyde. Vacuus.
  • TONEL, to take byrdys. Obvolu∣torium, COMM.
  • TOMEREL, donge cart, supra in D.
  • TONGGE, of a bee. Aculeus.
  • TONGGE, of a knyfe. 4. ["Pyrasamus, Anglice, a tongue." ORTUS. Possibly the part of a knife technically termed the tang, to which the haft is affixed.]Pirasmus.
  • TONGGE, fyyr instrument (tongys to fyyr longynge, K.) Forceps.
  • TONGGE, or scharpnesse of lycure yn tastynge. 5. [Forby gives "Tang, a strong flavour, generally, but not always an unpleasant one." Fuller says of the best oil, "it hath no tast, that is no tang, but the natural gust of oyl." Skinner derives the word, now written commonly twang, from the Dutch Tanghe, acer.]Acumen.
  • TONYCLE. Levitonarium, CATH. dalmatica, COMM. (levitorium, S.)
  • TONOWRE, or fonel. 6. [TONOWRE, of fonel, MS.—or fonel, S. A. See TONEL, supra, p. 170. In Norfolk, ac∣cording to Forby, the term in common use is Tunnel, a funnel; A.-Sax. taenel, canistrum. "Infusorium est quoddam vasculum per quod liquor infunditur in aliud vas, &c. An∣glice a tonell-dysshe." ORTUS.]Infusorium, C. F. suffusorium, CATH. futile (futis, P.)
  • TOP, or fortop (top of the hed, K. P.) Aqualium, CATH.
  • TOP, or cop of an hey thynge. Ca∣cumen.
  • TOP, of a maste. Carchesia, CATH. et C. F.
  • TOP, of chylderys pley. Trochus, C.F.
  • TOPPYN̄', or fechte be the nekke Page  497 (feytyn, H. fyȝth, S. fythe, A. feigh∣tyn by the nek, P.) Colluctor.
  • TORBELARE, 1. [TORKELARE, MS. torbelar, K. H. P.] or he þat makythe debate. Turbator, jurgator, jurgosus, perturbator, jurgatrix.
  • TORBLE, or torblynge (torbelynge or distrubbelynge, K. turble or trublynge, S. distorblyng, P.) Turbacio, jurgium, perturbacio, disturbium.
  • (TORBELON̄', idem quod TROBLON̄, infra.) 2. [Compare also DRVBBLYN̄, or torblyn̄ watur, supra, p. 133, and DYSTURBELYN, &c. p. 123.]
  • TORCHE. Cereus.
  • TOORD, or thost. Stercus.
  • TORET, lytylle towre. Turricula, CATH.
  • THORYBLE, or sensure (or turrible, infra.) Thuribulum, ignibulum, CATH. (igniculum, S.)
  • TORMENT, or turment. Tormentum, supplicium.
  • TORNEAMENT. Torneamentum.
  • TORTUCE, beest (torcute, P.) Tor∣tuca, C. F.
  • TOSARE, of wulle or other lyke. Carptrix.
  • TOSCHAPPYD CLOTHE (tooschaptyd cloth, S.) 3. [Compare THRE SCHAPTYD clothe, supra, p. 492. "Bilix—est pannus duobus filis stamineis contextus—a clothe with .ij. thredes." ORTUS. ANG.-Sax. sceápan, formare.]Bilix, C. F.
  • TOSCHE, longe tothe (toyssh, P.) 4. [In Norfolk Tosh signifies, according to Forby, a tusk, a long curved tooth, a toshnail is a nail driven aslant.]Colomellus, culmus, C. F.
  • TOSCHYD, or tuskyd (toysshyd, P.) Colomellatus.
  • TOSYNGE, of wulle or oþer thyngys. Carptura.
  • TOSON̄' wulle or other lyke (tosyn or tose wul, S.)

    5. "I toose wolle, or cotton, or suche lyke; je force de laine, and je charpie de la laine: It is a great craft to tose wolle wel." PALSG. "Tosing, carptura; to tose wool or lyne, carpo, carmino." GOULDM. This word is used by Gower—

    "What schepe that is ful lof wulle,
    Upon his backe they tose and pulle."

    —Conf. Am. Prol.
    Carpo.
  • TOOST, of brede (toosty of breed, A.) Tostus, tosta, UG. in torqueo.
  • TOOSTE brede, or oþer lyke. Tor∣reo, CATH. et UG.
  • TOSTYNGE. Tostura.
  • TOTTE, supra in FOLTE (or folett, or foppe, supra.)
  • TOTEHYLLE. 6. ["A Tute hylle, arvisium, montarium, specula." CATH. ANG. "Specularis, Anglice a tutynge hylle (al. totynge). Arvisium, a tutynge hylle." ORTUS. "Speculare, a totynge hylle and a bekyne. Conspisillum est locus ad conspiciendum totus, a tote hulle." MED. GR. "Totehyll, montaignette." PALSG. This term, of such frequent occurrence in local names in many parts of England, has been derived from Ang.-Sax. "Totian, eminere tanquam cornu in fronte." See Dr. Bosworth's A. Saxon Dict. We find, however, the verb to Tote inseveral old writers, signifying to look out, to watch, to inspect narrowly, to look in a mirror, &c. See P. Ploughman, Spenser, Skelton, Tusser, &c. Thus in Havelok, 2105, "He stod, and totede in at a bord;" Grafton, 577, describes a "totyng hole" in a tower, through which the Earl of Salisbury, looking out, was slain by shot from a "goon," at the siege of Orleans in 1427. Gouldman gives the verb "to toot," as synonymous with to look. Mr. Hartshorne, in his Salopia Antiqua, enumerates everal of the nume∣rous instances of the name Toothill, Castle Tute, Fairy Toote,&c. and the list might be largely extended. The term seems to denote a look-out or watch tower. In the version of Vegecius, Roy. MS. 18 A. XII. f. 106, we read that "Agger is a Toothulle made of longe poles pighte vp righte and wounde about with twigges as an hegge, and fillede vp with erthe and stones, on whiche men mowe stonde and shete and caste to the walls." In the earlier Wicl. version, 2 Kings, V. v. 7 is thus rendered; "Forsothe Dauid toke the tote hil Syon (arcem Sion) that is, the citee of Dauid;" and v. 9, "Dauid dwellide in the tote hill" (in arce) in the later version "Tour of Syon." Again, Isai. XXI. 8, "And he criede as a leoun vp on the toothil (speculam) of the Lord I am stondende contynuelly by day, and vp on my warde I am stondende alle nyȝtus;" in the later version, "on the totyng place of the Lord." Sir John Maundevile gives a curious account of the gardens and pleasaunce of the king of an Island of India, and of "a litylle Toothille with toures," &c. where he was wont to take the air and disport. Travels, p. 378.]Specula, CATH. et C. F. Page  498 (amphitheatrum, K. teatrum, P.)
  • TOTEHYLLE, or hey place of lokynge Conspicillum, CATH. et UG. in spicio, theatrum, CATH. amphi∣theatrum, CATH.
  • TOTELARE. Susurro.
  • TOTELŌN' TALYS (totelyn, K. P. to∣tylyn tale in onys ere, S.) Su∣surro, CATH.
  • TOTELYNGE. Susurrium, CATH.
  • TOTERŌN', or waveron̄'. Vacillo.
  • TOTERYNGE, or waverynge. Vacil∣lacio.
  • TOOTHE. Dens.
  • TOOTHE DRAWARE. Edentator, den∣traculus.
  • TOOTHELES, for age. Edentatus.
  • TOOTHELES, for ȝungthe (for ȝunthe, K. yoȝghe, S. youth, P.) Edentulus.
  • TOTYR, or myry totyr, chylderys game (mery totyr, H. S. P. mery toþir, A.) 1. [See MYRY TOTYR, supra, p. 338, and WAWYN̄, or waueryn yn a myry totyr, infra. "Oscil∣lum, genus ludi, cum funis suspenditur a trabe in quo pueri et puelle sedentes impelluntur huc et illuc,—a totoure. Petaurus, quidam ludus, a totre." MED. GR. "Tytter-totter, a play for childre, balenchoeres." PALSG. Forby gives Titter-cum-totter, in Norfolk dialect, to ride on the ends of a balanced plank. "Bransle, a totter, swing, or swidge, &c. Jouer à la hausse qui baisse, to play at titter totter, or at totter arse, to ride the wild mare. Baccoler, to play at titter toter or at totterarse, as children who sitting upon both ends of a long pole or timber log, supported only in the middle, lift one another up and down." COTG. See Craven Glossary, v. Merry-totter.]Oscillum, CATH.
  • TOWHHE, not tendyr (tow, A. tough, P.) Tenax.
  • TOOW, of a rok, or a roket (or of a reel, K. A. towe of hempe, or flax, or othyr like, K.) Pensum, C. F.
  • TOWAYL, or towaly (twaly or towel, S. towayle or tavayle, H. tuayl or tualy, A.) Manitergium, togilla, facitergium, gausape, C. F.
  • TOWCHON̄. Tango (contracto, P.)
  • TOWNE. Villa.
  • TOWGHENESSE (townesse, K. A. toughnes, P.) Tenacitas.
  • TOWNE WALLYS. Menie.
  • TOWRE. Turris.
  • TOWRE, made oonly of tymbyr. 2. [Comapre SOMYR CASTELL, Fala, supra, p. 464.]Fala, CATH. C. F. et UG. V. in A.
  • TOWRYD. Turritus.
  • TOWRYNGE. Turrificacio.
  • TOTHYD, or tod wythe teethe (toyid, or todd, S. toþid or tod, A.) 3. [See TOD, or toyid, supra, p. 495.]Dentatus.
  • TOTHERE, or the tothere (toþir or the other, K. P. toyere or toder, S.) Alter, reliquus, alius.
  • TRACE, of a wey over a felde. Trames, CATH. et UG. in traho.
  • Page  499TRACYN̄, or draw strykys. Pro∣traho.
  • TRACYNDGE, or drawynge for to make an ymage or an other thynge (to make a pycture or gravyne, K.) Protractio.
  • TRAYCE, horsys ha(r)neys. Tenda, C. F. traxux, restis, BRIT. trahale.
  • TRAYLE, or trayne of a clothe. Si∣rina, CATH. lacinia, C. F. tramis, CATH. vel trames, UG. V. in T. et F. segmentum, CATH.
  • TRAYLYN̄, a(s) cloþys. Segmento, CATH. sirino, CATH.
  • TRAYNYN̄, or tranyyn̄, or longe taryyn̄' (traylyn or teryyn, K. traynyn or terryyn, H. P. or a∣bydyn, S.) Moror, differo.
  • TRAYNE, or dysseyte. Prodicio, fraus (deceptio, P.)
  • TRAMAYLE, grete nette for fysch∣ynge (tramely, K. tramaly, H. P.) 1. [Compare FLWE, nette, Tragum, supra, p. 168. "Tramell to catche fysshe or byrdes, Trameau." PALSG. Tremaille, treble mailed, whence alier tremaillé, a trammell net or treble net for partridges, &c. Trameau, a kind of drag net or draw net for fish; also a trammell net for fowle." COTG.]Tragum.
  • TRAMALY, of a mylle, idem quod HOPUR; supra; et faricapsia.
  • TRAMPLYD. Tritus.
  • TRAMPELYN̄ (trampyn, S.) Tero.
  • TRAMPELYNGE. Tritura.
  • TRANCYTE, where menn walke. 2. [Compare TRESAWNTE in a howse, Transitus, infra. In the Gesta Rom. 277, the adulterous mother confined in a dungeon thus addresses her child—"O my swete sone, a grete cause have I to sorow, and thou also, for above our hede there is a transite of men, and there the sonne shynethe in his clarté, and alle solace is there!" The Emperor's steward walking overhead hears her moan, and intercedes for her.]Transitus.
  • TRANYYNGE, or longe a-bydynge (trancyynge, S.) Dilacio, mora.
  • TRAPPE, for myce and oþer vermyne. Muscipula, decipula.
  • TRAPPE, to take wythe beestys, as berys, borys, and oþer lyke. Tenabulum, venabulum, UG.
  • TRAPERE, or trapur (trapowre, P.) Falera, CATH. fallare, C. F.
  • TRAPPYD, wythe trapure. Falera∣tus.
  • TRAPPYD, or be-trappyd and gylyd (trappyd or deceyuyd, K. or be∣gylyd, S.) Deceptus, illaqueatus, decipulatus.
  • TRAPPYN̄' HORS. Falero, CATH.
  • TRAPPYN̄' A-BOWTYN̄', or closyn̄' (or inclosyn, K. P. or include, S. tra∣pyn a-bowte of includyn, A.) Vallo, circumdo.
  • (TRAPPURE, supra in TRAPPERE, K.)
  • TRAVAYLE (or labour, A. or robour, S.) Labor.
  • TRAVAYLYN̄', or laboryn̄'. Laboro.
  • TRAVAYLOWRE. Laborator, -trix.
  • TRAUAS. 3. [A travas or travers is explained by Sir H. Nicolas in his Glossarial Index, Privy P. Exp. of Eliz. of York, p. 259, as a kind of screen with curtains for privacy, used in cha∣pels, halls, and other large chambers; he cites several instances of the use of the term in household accounts and other documents, to which the following may be added. In the inventory of effects of henry V. in 1423, we find "j. travers du satin vermaille, pris viij. li. ovec ij. quisshons de velvet vermaill," &c. probably for the king's chapel; also a "tra∣vers" for a bed: see Rot. Parl. vol. iv. pp. 227, 230. Chaucer, in the Marchantes Tale, it will be remembered, thus uses the term in the narrative of the nuptial festivity—"Men dranken, and the Travers drawe anon." In a Survey of the manor of Hawsted, in 1581, it is stated that Sir William Drury possessed "Scitum manerii, &c. uno le mote circum∣jacente, uno le traves ante portam messuagii predicti, et unam magnam curiam undique bene edificatam." Cullum's Hawsted, p. 142. Sir T. More was so greatly in favor during 20 years of his life at the court of Henry VIII. that, as Roper says, "a good part thearof used the kinge uppon holie daies, when he had donne his owne devotions, to sende for him into his traverse, and theare, sometimes in matters of Astronomy, Geometry, Divi∣nity, and suche other faculties, and sometimes of his worldly affaires, to sit and converse with him." In this and other instances a traverse seems to have been a kind of state pew, or closet. So likewise we read that when Queen Elizabeth visited Cambridge in 1564, on the south side of the chapel at King's College was hung a rich Travas of crimson velvet for the queen's majesty; and when she entered the chapel, desiring to pray privately, she "went into her Travys, under a canopy." Le Keux, Mem. of Camb. vol. ii. King's Coll. pp. 20, 21. Thus also Fabyan relates that the king coming to St. Paul's "kneled in a trauers purueyed for hym" near the altar. Chron. 9 Hen. VI. A Traverse is explained in the Glossary of Architecture as having been a screen with curtains, in a hall, chapel, or large chamber.]Transversum.
  • Page  500TRAWE, of a smythe (trough of a smythy, P.) 1. ["A trave for to scho horse in, Ferratorium." CATH. ANG. This term, it will be remem∣bered, is used by Chaucer, in his description of the Miller's young wife, where he says—"she sprong as a colt in a traue" (rhyming to save). Miller's Tale. This is doubtless the frame used for confining an unruly horse whilst being shod. According to Forby, a smith's shoeing shed is called in Norfolk a Traverse. Edm. Heyward, of Little Walsing∣ham, blacksmith, bequeaths to his wife, in 1517, "my place wich is called the house at the travesse," a term which may probably have been connected with that occurring above. Norfolk Archaeology, vol. i. p. 266. Palsgrave gives only "Trough for smythes, Auge à marichal."]Ypodromus, CATH. et C. F. ergasterium, trave, COMM.
  • TRE, whyle hyt waxythe. Arbor.
  • TRE, hew downe, or not growynge (hewyd downe and not waxynge, P.) Lignum.
  • TREACLE (halyvey, or bote a-ȝēn sekenesse, supra.2. [Antitodum, MS. and S. P. The composition of various kinds of Theriaca, an antidote for bites of serpents and venomous animals, is given by Pliny and other writers. Scribonius Lar∣gus speaks of it as made of the flesh of vipers. In the Middle Ages it was highly esteemed against poison, venom of serpents, and certain diseases; the nature of the nostrum may be learned from ancient medicinal treatises, such as Nic. de Hostresham's Antidotarium, Sloane MS. 341. The Treacle of Genoa appears to have been in very high repute; its virtues are thus extolled by Andrew Borde, physician to Henry VII. "Whan they do make theyr treacle a man wyll take and eate poysen and than he wyl swel redy to borst and to dye, and as sone as he hath takyn trakle he is hole agene." Boke of the Introd. of Knowledge, 1542. Thus also says Caxton, in the Book for Travellers, " of bestes, venemous serpentes, lizarts, scorpions, flies, wormes, who of thise wormes shall be byten he must haue triacle, yf not that he shall deye!" We cannot marvel that costly appliances were often provided wherein to carry so precious an antidote, so as to be constantly at hand, such as the "pixis argenti ad tiriacam," Close Roll 9 Joh.; the "Triacle box du pere apelle une Hakette, garniz d'or," among the precious effects of Henry V.; the Godet, holding treacle, the gift of John de Kellawe, found with relics and offerings to the shrine of St. Cuthbert at Durham, in 1383; and the "Tracleere argenteum et deauratum cum costis de birall," bequeathed by Henry, lord Scrope in 1415 to his sister. A curious illus∣tration of the great esteem in which Treacle of Genoa was held, and of the difficulty of obtaining it unadulterated, occurs in the Paston Letters, vol. iv. p. 264; and in 1479, during the great sickness in England, John Paston entreats his brother Sir John to send him speedily "11 pottys of tryacle of Jenne, they shall coste xvj.d.—the pepyll dyeth sore in Norwiche;" vol. v. pp. 260, 264. In Miles Coverdale's translation of Wermu∣lierus' Precious Pearle, it is said that " the Phisitian in making of his Triacle occupieth serpents and adders and such like poison, to driue out one poyson with another." The term occasionally occurs to designate remedies differing greatly from the true theriaca. In Arund. MS. 42, f. 15 b. we read that juice of garlic " fordoþ venym and poyson myȝtily, and þat is þe skyle why it is called Triacle of vppelond, or ellys homly folkys Triacle."]Tiriaca, antidotum, C. F. (treacha, P.)
  • Page  501TREBELYN', or make threfolde (tre∣belyn or threfoldyn, S.) Triplico.
  • TREBLE, or threfolde. Triplex, triplus.
  • TREBLESONGE (treble of orgene songe, K. trebyl songe, S.) Pre∣centus, KYLW.
  • (TREBYL SYNGARE, A.)
  • TREBGOT, sly instrument to take brydys or beestys (trepgette, S.) 1. [Palsgrave gives "Pitfall for byrdes, Trebouchet." The term which originally designated a warlike engine for slinging stones, and also, owing to a certain similarity in construc∣tion, the apparatus used in the punishment of the cucking stool (see p. 107, supra), signi∣fied also a trap or gin for birds and vermin. Ducange remarks, v. Trebuchetum, Trepget, &c. "appellatio mansit apud Gallos instrumentis aut machinuli9s suspensis et lapsilibus ad captandas aviculas."]Tendicule, plur. UG. tendula, CATH. venabulum, excipulum, UG. in capio (tripulum, UG. V., S. A.)
  • TREBGET, for werre (trepgette, S.) Trabucetum, COMM. et DICC.
  • TREDYN̄'. Tero (calco, K.)
  • TREDYN̄ VNDYR FOTE. Pessundo, CATH. et UG. in do (intercalco, P.)
  • TREDYNGYS, wythe the foote. Tri∣tura.
  • TREDYL, or grece. 2. [See GRECE, or tredy, supra, p.209. In MSS. S. A. the reading is Tredyl of grece, which, if grece is taken here as signifying a staircase, may be more correct. See Nares, v. Grice.]Gradus, pe∣dalis, CATH.
  • TREGETTYN̄'. Prestigior, pancra∣cio, UG.
  • TREGETTYNGE. Mimatus, presti∣gium, CATH. pancracium, CATH. joculatus (preclautus, S.)
  • TREGETTOWRE. 3. [Compare IOGULOWRE, supra, p. 263. In the later Wicliffite version 2 Chron. c. 33, v. 6, is thus rendered, "Enchaunteris (ether tregetours) that disseyuen mennis wittis." Chaucer uses the word, and also Treget, in allusion to marvellous tricks resembling those still practised in India. See Frankelein's Tale, and Tyrwhitt's note on line 11,453. Horman says, in his Vulgaria, "a iugler with his troget castis (vaframentis) deceueth mens syght;—the trogettars (praestigiatores) behynd a clothe shew forth popettȝ that chatre, chyde, iuste and fyghte together." Fr. Tresgier, magic, Tresgetteres, magicians, according to Roquefort.]Mimus, panto∣mimus, joculator, C. F. et CATH.
  • TRETCHERYE (tretcherye or tre∣terye, H. P.) Dolus, fraus, do∣lositas, subdolositas (subdolus, P.)
  • TRECHEROWSE (or disseyvabyl, H.) Dolosus, versipellis, C. F. fraudu∣lentus.
  • TRELYS, of a wyndow, or oþer lyke (or grate, supra.) Cancellus, C. F. et CATH. (sedicula, H. P.)
  • TREMELYN̄'. Tremo, contremo.
  • TREMELYNGE, or qwakynge. Tre∣mor, trepidacio.
  • TRE(N)CHAUNT, or playunt (tren∣chaunt, K. S. P.) Plicabilis, versatilis, versabilis.
  • TRENCHOWRE. Scissorium.
  • TRENCHOWRE, knyfe. 4. [Probably a knife for carving; such appliances were usually in pairs:—"Item, iij. paria de Trencheours." Invent. of Ric. de Ravensere, Archd. of Lincoln, 1385.]Mensaculus, DICC.
  • Page  502TRENDELYN̄' a rownd thynge (trendlyn as with a roon thynge, S. as with a rownde thynge, A.) Trocleo, volvo.
  • TRENDYL. Troclea.
  • TRENKET, sowtarys knyfe. 1. ["A Trenket, ansorium, sardocopium," CATH. ANG. "Trenket, an instrument for a cordwayner, Batton atourner soulies." PALSG. "Trenchet de cordouannier, a shoomaker's cutting knife." COTG. In a Nominale by Nich. de Munshull, Harl. MS. 1002, under "pertinentia allutarii," occur "Anserium, a schavyng knyfe; Galla idem est, Trynket;—Pertinentia rustico.—Sarculum, a wede-hoke; Sarpa, idem est, Trynket."]Anx∣orium, KYLW. (axorium, A. an∣sorium, P.)
  • TRENTEL. Tricenalis, (trentale, K.)
  • TRESAWNCE, in a howse (tresauns, H. P.) 2. [Compare TRANCYTE, where menn walke, supra, p. 499. Horman says, in his Vulgaria, "I met hym in a Tresawne (deambulatorio) where one of the bothe must go backe." A leaf of some early elementary book, found in the Lambeth Library, printed possibly by W. de Worde, contains part of a Nominale in hexameters. "Pergula (a galery), transcenna (a tresens), podium, cum coclea (a wyndyng steyr), gradus (a grece)." W. of Wyrcestre uses the term "le Tresance," p. 288, signifying a passage leading to a hall, &c. Pals∣grave gives only "Tresens that is drawen ouer an estates chambre, Ciel."]Transitus, transcencia, KYLW.
  • TRESSE, of heere. Trica, C. F.
  • TRESSYN̄' HEERE. Trico, UG. V.
  • TRESOWRE. Thesaurus, CATH.
  • TRESOWRERE. Thesaurarius.
  • (TRESOWRYE, K.) Erarium, gaso∣philacium; et est an hoordhowse similiter.
  • TRESPAS. Offensa, delictum, culpa, forefactio.
  • TRESPACYN̄'. Offendo, delinquo.
  • TRESPASOWRE. Forefactor, delic∣tor, malefactor.
  • TRESUN. Traditio, prodicio.
  • TRETABLE. Tractabilis.
  • (TRETYD, P. Tractatus.)
  • TRETE (tretye or tretyce, H. P. tretyng, A.) Tractatus.
  • TRETŌN'. Tracto, pertracto.
  • TRETOWRE (traytowre, S.) Tra∣ditor, proditor.
  • TRIBUTARYE. Tributarius.
  • TRYBUTE. Tributum, multa, CATH.
  • TRYFELARE (tyfflare, S.) Trufator, nugax, gerro, UG. in gero, nu∣gaculus, CATH.
  • TRYFLE. Trufa.
  • TRYFLON̄, 3. [TRYFLOM, MS. which seems doubtless an error, corrected by the other MSS. and by Pynson's printed text. See IAPYN̄, supra, p, 257.] or iapyn̄' (trifelyn, K. tryflone, A. tryfflyn, P.) Trufo, ludifico, (nugo, K.)
  • TRYFOLYE, herbe (tryfole, S.) Tri∣folium, CATH.
  • TRYYD. Preelectus, probatus, ex∣aminatus, (electus, P.)
  • TRYIN̄' (tryyn, K. S. H. P. tryin, A.) 4. [Possibly written TRYM̄, erroneously, as TRYFLOM̄, supra.]Eligo, preeligo.
  • TRYYN̄' a trowthe be dome. Dis∣cerno, CATH.
  • TRYYNGE. Eleccio, preeleccio, ex∣aminacio.
  • TRYLLYN̄', or trollyn̄'. 5. [Chaucer uses the word to Trill, to turn or twist, in the Squire's Tale, and speaks of tears trilling or rolling down the cheeks. In the translation of Vegecius, attributed to Trevisa, it is said of the "Somer castell or bastile,—thies toures must have crafty wheles made to trille hem lightly to the walles." B. IV. C. 17. "I tryll a whirlygyg rounde aboute, Je pirouette. I tryll, Je jecte." PALSG. See TROLLYNGE, infra.]Volvo, CATH.
  • TRYPE (or pawncheclowt, supra, or Page  503 wamclowte, infra.) Scrutum, CATH. tripa, CATH. et C. F. mag∣mentum, CATH. azimum, C. F.
  • TRYPET. 1. [Possibly a trippet, which, according to Mr. Halliwell's Prov. Dict., is the same as trip, a ball of wood, &c. used in the game of trip, in the North of England, as described by Mr. Hunter in his Hallamshire Glossary. The ball is struck with a trip-stick. Tritura is rendered in the Ortus merely in its ordinary sense of threshing.]Tripula, trita, C. F. (tri∣tura, K. P.)
  • TRYPPYN̄', or stoomelyn̄'. Cespito.
  • TRYYST, merke. Limes, C. F. meta.
  • TRYYSTE, wyndas (tryys, K.) Ma∣china, carchesia, CATH. troclea, C. F.
  • (TROBLARE, idem quod ST(R)O∣BLARE, supra.)
  • TROBLON̄', idem quod TORBELON̄, supra (trobelyn, K.)
  • TROLLYN̄', idem quod TRYLLYN̄', supra.
  • TROLLYNGE, or rollynge. Volucio.
  • TRONE. Tronus.
  • TROPERE (or ympner, H. or an hymnar, P.) Troparius (hymna∣rius, P.)
  • TROSTE. Confidencia, fiducia.
  • TROSTY, sekyr. Fidus, fidelis, (perfidus, P.)
  • TROSTYLE. Tristellus, KYLW. et DICC. tripos, COMM.
  • TROSTLY, or sekyrly. Confidenter, fiducialiter.
  • TROSTY MANN, havynge oþer menys goode in kepynge (trostman, K.) Fiduciarius, C. F.
  • TROSTON̄'. Confido.
  • TROTTARE, horse. Succursarius, COMM. trottator, sucussator, CATH.
  • TROTTON̄', as hors. Succurso, C. F.
  • TROTTYNGE. Succursus, sucus∣satura, CATH.
  • (TREWAST, S. A. 2. [Scrutarius signifies a dealer in old clothes, or a bookbinder. See Ducange.]Scrutarius.)
  • TROWAUNT. 3. [The repetition of this word here, in the Harl. MS. only, may be an error of transcript. Forby gives, as the pronunciation in Norfolk, Troant, pronounced as a monosyllable, a truant; and to Troant, play truant. "A trowane, discolus, trutannus. To be Trowane, trutannizare." CATH. ANG.]Trutannus, infra.
  • TROWAGE. Vectigali.
  • TROWEL, Trulla, CATH.
  • THROWHE, vessel (trow, K S. trough, P.) Alveus, C. F. alveolus, KYLW.
  • TROWGHE, of a mylle (trow, K. S. trough, P.) Farricapsa, KYLW.
  • TROWAWNT (trowent, K. trowande, P.) Trutannus, discolus.
  • TROWANTYSE (trowentyze, K. trow∣antysy, S. trowanderye, P.) Tru∣tannia, CATH. discolatus (trutan∣nizatio, P.)
  • TROVWONTON̄' (trownton', S. trow∣antyn, P.) Trutannizo, CATH.
  • TROWTHE. Veritas.
  • TROWTHE, or feythefulnesse (trowth and lewte, K. leaute, P.) Fide∣litas.
  • TROWTE, fysche. Truta, tructa, C. F.
  • TRUBBLYN̄, idem quod TROBELYN̄, supra.
  • TRWE. Verus.
  • TRUWELY. Vere; veraciter.
  • TRUWE MANN, or woman. Verax.
  • TRUWYS, or truce of pees (trwys, K.) Treuge, UG. in trepido.
  • TRVWE, in belevynge. Catholicus.
  • TRUKKON̄, roryn̄, or chaungyn̄'. Cambio, campso, CATH.
  • TRUMPE. Tuba, buccina, tibia.
  • Page  504TRUMPET, or a lytylle trumpe, that clepythe to mete, or men to∣gedur. Sistrum, C. F. (scrutum, S.)
  • TRUMPON̄'. Buccino, clango, CATH.
  • TRUMPOWRE. Buccinator, tibicen.
  • TRUNCHYNE, staffe (trunchone, K.) Fustis, trunculus, KYLW.
  • TRONCHŌN, or wardere (trunchyn or wardrere, S. A.) 1. [Porticulus is explained in the Catholicon to be "baculus parvus ad portandum habilis, et porticulus vel portusculus malleolus in navi cum quo gubernator dat signum remiganti∣bus in una vel in gemina percussione." Palsgrave gives "Warder, a staffe." Compare WARDER, infra.]Porticulus, CATH.
  • TRUNCHŌN, wyrme. 2. ["Lumbricus—vermis intestinorum et terre, quasi lubricus, quia labitur, vel quia in lumbis sit." CATH. The following remedy is given "for tronchonys. Take salt, peper, and comyn, evenly, and make yt on powder, and ȝef it hym or here in hote water to drynke; or take the juse of rewe and ȝif it hym to drynke in leuke ale iij. tymes." Ma∣nuale P. Leke, MS. xv. cent. Another occurs in a MS. version of Macer, under the virtues of Cerfoile. "Solue cerfoile with violet and vyneger, and this y-dronkyne wole sle wormis in the bely and the trenchis" (sic).]Lumbricus, hoc tamen est falsum, per C. F. et CATH. (tarinus, secundum Levesey, S.)
  • TRUNKE, for kepynge of fysche. Gurgustium, C. F. et CATH. nassa.
  • TRUTHEPLYTYN̄' (truplytyn, K. S. trouthplityn, P.) 3. [This word occurs between TRUMPON̄, amongst the verbs, possibly as hav∣ing been originally written TRUPLYTYN̄.]Affido, C. F.
  • TRUSSE, or fardelle. Fardellus, sarcina, CATH. et C. F. (clitella, P.)
  • TRUSSELLE. 4. [In provincial dialect, in some localities, Trussel signifies a stand for a cask. Mr. Wright, in his useful Dictionary of Obsolete English, states that the word signifies also a bundle, the diminutive doubtless of truss, and, in Norfolk, a trestle, a use of the term which Forby has overlooked. Moor gives, in his Suffolk Words, Tressels or Trussels, to bear up tables, scaffolds, &c. "Trussulla, a trussell." ORTUS. This word also designated the punch used in coining. "Trousseau, a trussell, the upper yron or mould that's used in the stamping of coyne." COTG.]Trussula, KYLW. (CATH. S.)
  • (TRUSSYD, of fardel, K. trussyd or fardellyd, H. P. Fardellatus, sarcinatus.)
  • TRUSSYD VP, and bowndyn̄ (trus∣sed vp or bounde, P.) Fasciatus.
  • TRUSSYN̄', or make a trusse. Sar∣cino, fardello.
  • TRUSSYN̄, and byndyn̄', as menn done soore lymys. Fascio.
  • TRUSSYNGE VP. Fasciatura, vel fasciatus.
  • TRUSSYNGE COFUR. Clitella, COMM. C. F. et UG. in T.
  • TUBBE, vessel. Cuvula,5. [Cumula, or cuuuila (?) MS. possibly for cuvvila. Compare covella, cuvellus, cupa minor. DUC. French, cuve, cuvellette, a tub.]vel parva cuva.
  • TUKKYN̄ VP, or stykkyn̄' vp (tuckyn or stychynup clothis K. trukkyn vp or stakkyn up, H. trukkyn vp or stackyn vp clothes, P.) Suffarcino, CATH.
  • TUKKYNGE VP (of clothys, or styk∣kynge, supra.) Suffarci(naci)o.
  • TWEYNE, idem quod TOO, supra.
  • TWELWE. Duodecim.
  • TWELVETYMYS. Duodecies.
  • TWENTY. Viginti.
  • TWENTY TYMYS. vigesies.
  • TWEST, or twyste, of þe eye (tweeste of the iye, H. P.) Hirquus, CATH. c. F. et UG.
  • Page  505TUSTE, or croppe (trest or corfe, S. A.) 1. [Compare TYTE TUST, supra, p. 494. Palsgrave gives "Tuske of heer, Moneeau de cheueulx: Tufte of heer," (the same). According to Mr. Halliwell's Archaic Glossary, Tuste has the same signification. See CROPPE, of an erbe or tree, supra, p. 104. "A twyste, frons; to twyste, defrondare; a twyster of trees, defrondator." CATH. ANG.]Coma.
  • TRUT, or ptrot, skornefulle word (thprut, S. A.) 2. [Compare FY, supra, p. 159.]Vath.
  • TUGURRY, schudde. 3. [Cotgrave gives in French, "Tugure, a cottage, a shepheard's coat, shed or bullie."]Tugurrium.
  • (TWHYTYNGE, supra in TEL∣WYNGE.)
  • TWYBYL, wryhtys instrument (a wrytys tool K. wryȝtys, S.) Bi∣sacuta, biceps.
  • TWYBYL, or mattoke. Marra, DICC. ligo, C. F.
  • TWYGGE. Virgula, DICC. ramus∣culus.
  • TWYE LYGHTE, be-fore the day. Diluculum, CATH.
  • TWYE LYGHTE, a-fore þe nyȝhte. Crepusculum.
  • TWYLYGHTE, be-twyx þe day and þe nyghte, or nyghte and þe day. Hesperus, CATH. hespera, UG.
  • TWYKKYN̄, or sum-what drawyn̄' (twychyn, K.) Tractulo.
  • TWYNE, threede. Filum torsum, vel filum tortum.
  • TWYNYN' THREDE, or oþer lyke. Torqueo, CATH.
  • TWYNYNGE (or wyn(d)ynge, of threde, infra.) Tortura, vel torsura.
  • TWYNKELYNGE, of the eye. Con∣niventia, CATH.
  • TWYNKYNN̄', 4. [This verb is written likewise Twynkyn, in the Winchester MS. Horman says, in the Vulgaria, "Overmoche twyngynge of the yie betokethe vnstedfastnesse.—Twynlynge, connivens," &c. Twink, in the dialect of some parts of England, is synonymous with Wink.] wythe the eye (or wynkyn̄', infra; twynkelyn, K.) Conniveo, CATH. nicito, CATH. nicto, C. F. connivo, UG. in colo, conquinisco.
  • TWYNNE, or twynlynge (twynnys or twyndelynys, K.) Gemellus, gemella, geminus, C. F.
  • TWYSTE, of the eye (or twest, supra; twest of the iye, P.) Hirquus, CATH.
  • TWYSTE, of wyne holdynge. 5. [The tendrils of a vine are here intended. "Corimbi—dicuntur anuli vitis, que proxima queque ligant et comprehendunt." CATH.]Ca∣priolus, C. F. et UG. in capio, corimbus, CATH. corimbus, UG.
  • (TWYTYN, idem quod TELWYN, su∣pra, H. P.)
  • TULY, colowre. 6. [Tuly appears to have been a deep red colour; the term occurs in Coer de Lion, "trappys of tuely sylke," v. 1516, supposed however by Weber to be toile de soie. Gawayne, pp. 23, 33, &c. Among the gifts of Adam, abbot of Peterborough, 1321, a chasuble is mentioned 'de tule samito." Sparke, 232. See also in Sloane MS. 73, f. 214, a "Resseit for to make bokerham tuly, or tuly þred, secundum Cristiane de Prake et Beme;" the color being described as "a maner of reed colour as it were of croppe mader," which by a little red vinegar was changed to a manner of redder color.]Puniceus, vel punicus, C. F. in urina.
  • TVMBE, or grave for worschyp∣ffulle menne (tvmbe of grete and worthy men, K.) Mausoleum, UG. in mauron.
  • (TVMBE, or grave, K. H. P. Tum∣ba, tumulus, sepulchrum.)
  • Page  506TUMLARE (tumblar, P.) Volutator, (volutatrix, S.)
  • TUMLYN̄'. Voluto, volvo, CATH.
  • TUMLYNGE. Volutacio.
  • TUMREL, donge carte. Fimaria, titubatorium, COMM. et cetera supra in TOMEREL, et in D.
  • TUNDYR, to take wythe fyyr. Fun∣gus, CATH. (napta, P.)
  • TUNNE, vesselle. Dolium.
  • TUNGE, of a beeste. Lingua, glossa.
  • TUNGE, of a balance or scolys. Examen, CATH. amentum, CATH. trutina, C. F.
  • TUNGE, of a bocle. Lingula, KYLW.
  • TUNHOVE, herbe (tunnowe, K. thomyhow, S. thonnhowe, A.) 1. [See the note on HOVE, or ground ivy, supra, p. 250. Skinner derives tun hove from A. S. tun, sepes, and hof, ungula, a hoof, from the form of the leaves; the name is, how∣ever, more probably as suggested by Parkinson, enumerating the various provincial appel∣lations of the plant,—"Gill creep by the ground, Catsfoote, Haymaides, and Alehoof most generally, or Tunnehoofe, because the countrey people use it much in their ale." Theater of Plants, ch. 93.]Edera terrestris.
  • TUNNON̄, or put drynke or other thynge yn a tunne, or oþer ves∣selle. Indolio.
  • TUNNOWRE, idem quod TONOWRE, supra.2. [Compare FONEL, or tonowre, supra, p. 170.] (Infusorium, CATH. P.)
  • (TURBELARE, supra in STURBE∣LARE.)
  • TURBYTE, spyce, S. A.) 3. [The mineral Turbith, a yellow sulphate of mercury, may be here intended. The word is found in the Winchester and Add. MSS. only. The term Turpethum, however, is ex∣plained by Rulandus in his Lexicon Alchemioe, as derived from Arabic, and used to de∣signate some bark or root of a plant, which may have been the spice with which the compiler of the Promptorium was familiar.]
  • TURBUT, fysche. Turtur, turbo, C. F.
  • TURFE, of the fen. Gleba, gle∣bella, KYLW.
  • TURFE, of flagge, swarde of þe erþe (turfe flag, or sward of erth, S.) 4. [See FLAGGE, supra, pp. 163, 164, and SWARDE, p. 482. "Turfe of the fenne, Tourbe de terre. Turfe flagge sworde, Tourbe." PALSG. "A Turfe, cespes, gleba. A Turfe grafte, turbarium." CATH. ANG. The distinction above intended seems to be retained in East Anglian dialect, according to Forby, who gives the following explanation'—"Turf, s. peat; fuel dug from boggy ground. The dictionaries interpret the word as meaning only the surface of the ground pared off. These we call flags, and they are cut from dry heaths as well as from bogs. The substance of the soil below these is turf. Every separate portion is a turf, and the plural is turves, which is used by Chaucer." In Somerset likewise, peat cut into fuel is called turf, and turves, according to Jennings' Glossary. In a collection of English and Latin sentences, late XV. cent. Arundel MS. 249, f. 18, compiled at Oxford for the use of schools, it is said,—"I wondre nat a litle how they that dwelle by the see syde lyvethe when ther comythe eny excellent colde, and namely in suche costys wher ther be no woodys; but, as I here, they make as great a fire of torves as we do of woode."]Cespes, C. F. et CATH. terricidium, COMM.
  • TURRIBLE (or thoryble,) idem quod SENCERE, supra.
  • TURRYBLON̄', or sencyn̄'. Thuri∣fico.
  • TURMENT (or torment, supra.) Tormentum.
  • TURMENTYLLE, herbe. Tormen∣tilla.
  • TURMENTYN̄', Torqueo, CATH. affligo, tormento, BRIT.
  • TURMENTYN̄', ordyseson̄', or vexōn. Vexo.
  • Page  507TURMENTOWRE. Tortor, satilles, C. F.
  • TURNAMENT, idem quod TORNA∣MENT, supra.
  • TURNARE, or he that turnythe a spete or other lyke. Versor.
  • TURNSEKE. 1. ["Turn seke, vertiginosus, vertigo est illa infirmitas." CATH. ANG. "Twyrlsoght, ver∣tigo." Vocab. Roy, MS. De Infirmitatibus.]Vertiginosus, C. F. et UG. in versor.
  • TURNYD VESSEL, or other thynge, what hyt be (qwat so it be, A.) Toreuma, CATH.
  • TURNYNGE A-BOWTE. Versio, giro∣versio
  • TURNYNGE AGEYNE. Reversio.
  • TURNYNGE, fro badde to goode (fro euyl to goodnes, K.) Con-versio.
  • TURNYNGE, fro goode to badde (fro goodnesse to euylnes, K.) Perversio.
  • TURNYNGE, of dyuerse weyys. Diverticulum, CATH. diversicli∣nium, CATH.
  • TURNYNGE, or throwynge of treyn vessel (turnynge of dyuerse vessel, K. throwynge of treen vessel, S. A.) 2. [Treen is retained in E. Anglian dialect as an adjective, wooden. See Moor's Suffolk Words, v. Treen. Compare THROWYN̄, and THROWYNGE or turnynge of vesselle, supra, p. 493. It may be observed that before the manufacture and common use of ear∣thenware, cups, mazers, and various turned vessels of wood were much employed, and the craft of the turner must have been in constant request. Chaucer, in the Reve's Tale, describing the skill of the Miller of Trumpington in various rural matters, says he could pipe, and fish, make nets, "and turnen cuppes, and wrastlen wel and shete."]Tornatura, CATH.
  • TURNŌN' a thynge. Verto, verso, C. F.
  • TURNŌN' A-BOWTE(turnyn abowtyn, K.) Giro.
  • TURNŌN A-ȜĒN'. Revertor, CATH.
  • TURNON̄ A-WEY. Averto.
  • TURNON̄' FORTHE, idem quod TROLLE, 3. [Compare TRYLLYN̄, supra, pp. 502, 503.]supra.
  • TURNON̄ BAKKE (turnyn abak, P.) Dorsiverso.
  • TURNE, to badnesse. Perverto.
  • TURNE, to goodenesse. Converto.
  • TURNON̄', or throwe treyne vessel (trene vessel, S.) Torno, CATH. et UG. in torqueo.
  • TURNON̄', VPSE DOWNE (vpsodoun or ouerqwelmyn, K. ouerwhelmyn, H. P.) Everto, (subverto, S.)
  • TURNŌN', or quelmān (whylmene, S.) 4. [Compare OVYR QWELMYN̄, supra, p. 374, and WHELMYN, infra.]Supino.
  • TURNOWRE. Tornator, CATH. cir∣culatorius, CATH. scutellator.
  • TURTYLBYRD, or dove (turtyl dowe, A.). Turtur.
  • TURVARE. Glebarius.
  • (TUSMOSE, of flowrys or othyr herbys, supra in TYTE TUST. 5. [Gouldman gives "a tuttie, nosegay, posie, or tuzziemuzzie; Fasciculus."]Olfactorium.)
  • TUTOWRE. Tutor.
  • V TREE (uv tre, K.) Taxus, CATH. et C. F.
  • VACACYONE. Vacacio.
  • VACAVNT, not occupyyd. Vacans.
  • VACHERYE, or dayrye. Vaccaria, armentarium, C. F.
  • VAYLYN̄', or a-vaylyn̄'. Valeo, CATH.
  • Page  508VALE, or dale. Vallis.
  • VALWE. Valva, vel valve.
  • VANYTE. Vanitas.
  • VAPOWRE. Vapor.
  • VARYAWNCE, or dyuersite. Di∣versitas, varietas.
  • VARYYN̄', or dyuersyn̄'. Vario.
  • VAMPE, of an hoose (uaumpe, K.) 1. ["Pedana, dicitur pedules novus vel de veteri panno factus quo calige veteres assuitur, Anglice a Wampay. Pedano, to Wampay. Pedula—pedules, pars caligarum que pedem capit, Wampaye." ORTUS. "Vampey of a hose, Auantpied, Vauntpe of a hose, Vantpie." PALSG. "A vampett, pedana, impedia." CATH. ANG. See the Tale of the Knight and his Grehounde, Sevyn Sages, v. 843, where, having killed the dog which had saved his child from an adder, the knight is described as leaving his home demented; he sat down in grief, drew off his shoes,—"and karf his vaumpes fot-hot," going forth barefoot into the wild forest. Here the term designates the feet of the hose or stockings; sometimes it sig∣nifies a patch or mending of foot-coverings, as Vamp does at the present time.]Pedana, UG. in pedos, pedula, C. F. pedules, CATH. et UG.
  • VAUNTAGE (or avauntage, K.) Profectus, proventus, CATH. emo∣lumentum, avantagium.
  • VAUNTON̄', or a-vaunton̄' or boos∣tōn'. 2. [VAUNTON̄, as a-vaunton̄, MS.]Jacto, ostento, CATH.
  • VBBERYN̄', or vpberyn̄'. Supporto.
  • VBBREYDYN̄, or vpbreydyn̄'. Im∣propero, exprobro, convicior (im∣probo, impero, S.)
  • VBBLY, brede to sey wythe masse (or obly, supra.) Nebula, DICC. adoria.
  • (VDDYR, of a beeste, idem quod IDDYR, supra.)
  • VSE. Usus.
  • VSE, oftyne tymys, þat ys callyd excersyse (uce of excercyse, K. vse of oftyn tyme, S.) Exercicium.
  • VEYLE. Velum.
  • VEYYNE, or ydyl. Vanus, inanis.
  • VEYNELY. Vane, inaniter.
  • VEYNE, yn a beestys body. Vena, fibra, CATH.
  • VEEL, flesche. Vitulina.
  • VELYME. Membrana.
  • VELVET, or velwet. Velvetus.
  • VENIAWNCE. Vindicta, ulcio.
  • VENIAWNCERE (veniour or vengere, K.) Vendicator, ultor, vindex.
  • VENGYN̄' (or wrekyn̄', infra.) Vin∣dico, ulciscor.
  • VENYME. Venenum, virus, CATH.
  • VENYMYN̄', or invenymyn̄' (veny∣nyn or venymyn, H.) Veneno, CATH. inveneno.
  • VENYMOWS. Venenosus, viru∣lentus, CATH.
  • VENYSONE. Ferina, CATH.
  • VEERCE (verse, K.) Versus.
  • VERSYFYYN̄'. Versificor, C. F. CATH.
  • VERSIFYOWRE (versyowre, H.) Ver∣sificator.
  • VERDYTE. Veridicum.
  • VERGE, yn a wrytys werke. Virgata.
  • VERIOWCE, sawce. Agresta.
  • VERELY. Vere, veraciter.
  • (VEREMENT, or buschement, supra in B. 3. [Compare WERYYN̄, or defendyn, infra. A. S. werian, munire.]Cuneus, C. F.)
  • VERMYLYONE. Minium, C. F. CATH. et NECC.
  • VERMYNE. Verminium, vermis.
  • VERRE, glasse. 4. [In the Wicliffite version Prov. c. 23, v. 31 is thus rendered, "Biholde you not wyin whanne it sparcliþ, whanne þe colour þer of schyneþ in a ver." In the Awntyrs of Ar∣thure, 444, we read of potations served in silver vessels, "with vernage in verrys and cowppys sa clene."]Vitrum.
  • Page  509VERNAGE, wyne. 1. [Vernage, Ital. vernaccia, is explained, Acad. della Crusca, to have been an Italian white wine, as Skinner conjectures from Verona, qu. Veronaccia. See Ducange, v. Ver∣nachia, and Garnachia; and Roquefort gives vin de Garnache. "Vernage and Crete" are mentioned as choice wines, Sir Degrevant, lin. 1408; in "Colin Blowbolle's Testament," notes to Thornton Romances, edited for Camd. Soc. by Mr. Halliwell, p. 301, we find in an ample catalogue of wines—"Vernuge, Crete, and Raspays." In the Forme of Cury, directions occur to "make a syryp of wyne Greke, ether vernage." "Regi theriacum in vino vocato le Vernage dederunt." Ang. Sac. t. ii. p. 371.]Vernagium.
  • VERNYSCHE. Vernicium.
  • VERNYSCHYN̄'. 2. [See directions for making "Vernysche," about the period when the Promptorium was compiled, Sloane MSS. 73, f. 125, b. 3548, f. 102. "Bernyx, or Vernyx, is a þynge y mad of oyle and lynne sed, and classe, with (which) peyntours colours arn mad to byndyn and to shynyn." Ar. MS. 42, f. 45, b. The Latin word above may be more correctly rcad Vernico.]Vernicio.
  • VERTE GRECE. Viride Grecum, flos eris.
  • VERTESAWCE, or vergesawce (verd sawce, P.) Viride salsamentum, KYLW.
  • VERTU. Virtus.
  • VERTUOWSE. Virtuosus.
  • VERVEYNE, herbe. Verbena, vel vervena, C. F.
  • VESSELLE. Vas, et plur. vasa.
  • VESTYARYE. Vestiaria, vel ves∣tiarium, KYLW.
  • VESTYARYCE (vestiariere, K. ves∣tyar, P.) Vestiarius.
  • VESTMENT (or vestymente, S. P.) Vestimentum.
  • VESTRYE. Vestiarium, CATH. ves∣tibulu, UG. et BRIT.
  • VEXACYON, and dysese. Vexacio.
  • VEXID. Vexatus.
  • VEXYN̄', or dysesyn̄'. Vexo.
  • VGGELY (vgly, S. vggyll, P.) Hor∣ridus, horribilis.
  • VGGELY, or vggely wyse. Horri∣biliter.
  • VGGELYNESSE. Horribilitas.
  • VGGŌNE, or haue horrowre (vggyn, K. H. ugglyn, P.) 3. [Hardyng relates that St Ebbe and the nuns in her company cut off their noses and upper lips, (which was "an hogly sight") for fear of the Danes—"to make their fooes to hoge (al. houge or vgge) sowith the sight." Chron. c. 107. "Uglysome, horryble, execra∣ble." PALSG. "To Hug, abhominari, detestari, rigere, execrari, fastidere, horrere. Hug∣some, abhominacio, &c. To Vg, abhominari, &c. ut in H. litera. Vgsome, Vgsomnes," &c. CATH ANG.]Horreo, ex∣horreo.
  • VYALETT, or vyolet, herbe. Viola.
  • VIALET, yn colowre. Violaceus, CATH.
  • VYCE, rownde grece or steyer (vice, rounde gre, K.) 4. ["Vyce, a tournyng stayre, Vis. Vyce of a cuppe, Vis. Vyce to putte in a vessel of wyne to drawe the wyne out at, Chantepleure." PALSG. Chaucer describes how suddenly waking in the still night, he paced to and fro, "till I a winding staire found—and held the vice aye in my hond," softly creeping upwards. (Chaucer's Dream). Here Vice seems to designate the newel, or central shaft of the spiral stair. In the Contract for building Fotheringhay church, 1435, is this clause,—"In the sayd stepyll shall be a Vyce tour∣nyng, serving till the said body, aisles, and qwere both beneth and abof;" the "vyce dore" of the steeple is mentioned in Churchwardens' accounts at Walden, Essex; and amongst payments for building Little Saxham Hall, 1506, occur disbursements for a vice of free∣stone, and another of brick, which last is called in the context a "staier." Gage's Suffolk, pp. 141, 142. In the earlier Wicliffite Version, Ezek. 41, v. 7, is thus rendered—"and a street was in round, and stiede upward bi a vice (cochleam), and bar in to þe soler of þe temple by cumpas; (styinge vpward by the heeȝ toure" later version.) "A vyce, ubi a turne grece." CATH. ANG. Roquefort gives "Viz.; escalier tournant en forme de vis."]Coclea, CATH. et C. F.
  • Page  510VYCE, hood sperynge. 1. [Some kind of brooch, a fastening for the hood, seems to be here intended. The capi∣tium, or chevesaille, was closed at the neck with some such ornament, to which, from cer∣tain peculiarities in its fashion, the name spira may have been properly assigned. Chaucer describes, Rom. of the R. v. 1080, that with a tasseled gold band and enameled knops "was shet the riche chevesaile" worn by Richesse.]Spira.
  • VYCE, synne or defaute. Vicium.
  • VYCYOWSE. Viciosus.
  • VYCYOWSNESSE. Viciositas.
  • VICTORYE. Victoria, trophea, palma, triumphus.
  • VYCTOWRE. Victor, triumphator.
  • VYGOROWSE. Vigorosus, ferox.
  • VIGOROWSNESSE. Vigorositas, fe∣rocitas.
  • VYCARYAGE (vikeriage, K.) Vi∣caria.
  • VYKER. Vicarius.
  • VYLANYE, Ignominia, verecundia.
  • VYOLENS (vilens, K. vylence, S.) Inp(ud)ens (impudens, P.)
  • VYNAGERE (vynagre, K. vynegyr, P) 2. [Vinarium, according to Ducange, may signify a vineyard, or a wine-vessel, poculum. The term which occurs above may, however, designate a vessel for vinegar, Vinaigrier, Fr. The cruets for wine, or burettes, for the altar, are sometimes called vinagerioe, or vina∣cherioe.]Vinarium.
  • VYNEGRE (vyne egyr, H. P.) Ace∣tum, vinum acidum, KYLW. vinum acre.
  • VYNY, or vyne. Vitis.
  • VYNY, þat bryngythe forþe grete grapys. Bumasta, CATH. et C. F.
  • VYNY LEEF. Pampinus, CATH. abestrum, C. F. et UG. V. in B.
  • VYNEȜERDE. Vinetum, vinea.
  • VYNTENERE. Vinarius.
  • VYOLENCE. Violencia.
  • VYOLENT. Violens, violentus.
  • VYOLENTLY. Violenter.
  • VIRGYNE, or maydene. Virgo.
  • (VYOLET, idem quod VYALETT.)
  • (VIOLET, coloure, K. H. P. Viola∣ceus.)
  • VYRGYNE WEX. Cera virginea.
  • VYRNE, or sercle (cerkyll, P.) 3. [This term may probably be traced to the French Vironner, to veere, turne about; Virer, to wheel about, &c. COTG. From the rotatory movement doubtless certain mediaeval machines were called Vernes, or Fearnes, as in accounts of works at Westminster Palace, t.Edw. I., where, with payments for ropes, &c. mention frequently occurs of "gynes voc' fernes;" and, in the Compotus of W. de Kellesey, clerk of the works, 1328, many pay∣ments occur for timber and iron-work, "circa facturam cujusdam Verne sive Ingenii constructi pro meremio majoris pontis aquatici Westmonasterii rupti decaso et jacente in aqua Tamisie ibidem exinde levando et guyndando." Misc. Records of the Queen's Remembrancer, 2 Edw. III. "Moulinet àbrassiéres, the barrell of a windlesse or fearne. Chevre, the engine caled by architects, &c. a Fearne." COTG.]Girus, ambitus, circulus.
  • VYRNYN̄' A-BOWTE, or closyn̄' (closyn abowtyn, K.) Vallo, circumvallo.
  • VYRNYN̄' A-BOWTE, or gon̄ a-bowte. Ambio, circumdo, CATH.
  • VYROLFE, of a knyfe (virol, K. vy∣roll, P.) 4. [The ring of metal now termed a ferrule. The Duchess of Brabant gave to her father Edw. I., as a new year's gift, "j. par cultellorum magnorum de ibano et eburn' cum viroll' arg' deaur." Lib. Gard. 34 Edw. I. In the St. Alban's Book, sign. h. j. are direc∣tions for making a fishing-rod;—"Vyrell the staffe at bothe endes with longe hopis of yren or laten in the clennest wyse, with a pyke in the nether ende, fastnyd wyth a ren∣nynge vyce to take in and oute youre croppe" (i. e. the top joint).]Spirula.
  • Page  511VYSAGE, or face. Facies.
  • VYSERE. Larva, C. F.
  • VYTALERE. Victuarius, KYLW.
  • VYTALY, or vytayl. Victuale.
  • VIUAGE, idem quod OMAGE, supra.
  • (VNBUXUM, supra in STURDY.)
  • VNCOWTHE. Extraneus, excoticus, COMM.
  • VNCOWT(H)LY. Extranee.
  • VNDERNE (vndyrne, H. vndermele, P.) 1. [Undern, the third hour of the day, Ang.-S. Undern, occurs in Chaucer, Sir Launfal, Liber Festivalis, &c. Sir John Maundevile says that in Ethiopia, and other hot coun∣tries, "the folk lyggen alle naked in ryveres and wateres from undurne of the day tille it be passed the noon (a diei hora tertia usque ad nonam)."]Submeridianum, subme∣simbria, C. F. in mesimbria.
  • VNDER, or vndernethe. Subtus, subter (sub, P.)
  • VNDER CLOTHE, of a bedde. Lodix, CATH.
  • VNDERSETTYN̄'. 2. [VNDERFETTYN̄, MS. as also the verb following. Doubtless errors of the copyist.]Suppono.
  • VNDERSETTYN̄', or vnderschoryn̄,. Fulcio, suffulcio, UG. et CATH.
  • VNDERSETTYNGE. Fulcimentum.
  • VNDER DELVYN̄. Suffodio, CATH.
  • VNDER DELUYNGE (or grubbynge, P.) Subfossura, subfossio.
  • VNDER FONGYN̄'. Suscipio.
  • VNDER FONGYNGE. Suscepcio.
  • VNDERGOYNGE. Submeatus.
  • VNDERLEYYN̄', idem quod UNDER∣PUTTYN̄'.
  • VNDERLYNGE. Subditus, infimus.
  • VNDERLOWTON̄'. Subjicio, subjecto, CATH.
  • VNDERMELE. 3. [Chaucer mentions "undermeles and morweninges," Wife of Bathes T. See Nares, Coles, &c. "An orendron, meridies; An orendrone mete, merenda; To ete orendrone mete, merendianare." CATH. ANG. "Gouber, an aunders meat, or afternoones repast." COTG.]Postmeridies, post∣mesimbria, merarium, MER.
  • VNDERMYNDYN, idem quod VNDER∣DELVYN̄', supra.
  • VNDER MYNDYNGE, (vndermyn∣ynge, P.) idem quod VNDERDEL∣UYNGE, supra.
  • VNDERNEME (vndyrnymmyn, K.) Reprehendo, deprehendo, arguo, redarguo.
  • VNDERNEMYNGE. Deprehensio, re∣prehensio, redargucio.
  • (VNDYRNETHYN, K. vndernethe, H. Subter, subtus.
  • (VNDER PUTTYN, or berynup, K. vndyr' settyn, to bere vp a thyng, H. Suffulcio, CATH. sup∣pono.)
  • VNDER PUTTYNGE (vndirput, K.) Subposicio.
  • VNDERSETTYNGE, idem quod VN∣DERPUTTYNGE.
  • VNDERSTONDYN̄'.Intelligo.
  • VNDERSTONDYNGE, yn̄ wytte. In∣telligencia, intellectus.
  • VNDERSTONDYNGE, or wytty. In∣telligens.
  • VNDERTAKYN̄', as a borowghe. Manucapio.
  • VNDERTAKE, idem quod VNDER∣NEME, (or chalengyn', or snyb∣byn̄',) supra.
  • (VNDERTAKYNGE, idem quod SNYB∣BYNGE. Deprehencio.)
  • VNYCORNE, beest. Unicornis, ri∣noceros, CATH.
  • VNYUERSYTE. Universitas.
  • VOYDE. Vacuus.
  • VOYDE, or vacaunt. Vacans.
  • VOYDAUNCE (or voydynge, infra.) Vacacio, evacuacio.
  • Page  512VOYDY, or a-voydyd (voydid, K. voydyn, S. voyded or auoyded, P.) Evacuatus.
  • VOYDYN̄', or a-woydyn̄', Vacuo, evacuo.
  • VOYDYNGE, idem quod VOYDAUNCE.
  • VOYCE. Vox.
  • VOOK, 1. [Sic MS. "Vook; vox," in MS. H. and P. after "Voys; vox;" it is not found in MS. K. Possibly an error by the second hand. VOLATYLE, wyld fowle, altile, occurs immediately after, in the other MSS. "Mi bolis and my volatilis ben slayn." Matt. C. XXII. V. 4. Wicl. Vers. Piers of Fulham complains of the luxury of his day, when few could put up with brawn, bacon, and powdered beef, but must fare on "volatile, venyson, and heronsewes." Hartshorne, Met. Tales, p. 125. See also Coer de Lion, v. 4225.]idem quod volatyle, bryddys or fowlys. Volatile.
  • (VOLATILE, wyld fowle, K. H. P. Volatile.)
  • VOLYME, booke. Volumen.
  • VOLYPERE, kerche. Teristrum, CATH. caliendrum, C. F.
  • VOMYTE, or evomyte, brakynge. Vomitus, C. F. et CATH.
  • VOW, or a-vow. Votum.
  • VOWCHESAF. Dignor.
  • VOWYN̄', or make a-vowe. Voveo.
  • VOWTE, of a howse. Testudo, la∣cunar, CATH. et C. F.
  • VOWTYD. Arculatus, testudinatus.
  • VOWTYN̄', or make a vowte. Arcuo, testudino.
  • VPBERERE. Supportator.
  • VPBERYNGE. Supportacio.
  • (VPBREYDYN, K. Impropero, con∣vicor, exprobro.)
  • VPHOLDERE, þat sellythe smal thyn∣gys. 2. ["Vpholsar, frippier." PALSG. Caxton, in the Booke for Travellers, gives "Vp∣holdsters—vieswariers.—Euerard the vpholster can well stoppe (estoupper) a mantel hooled, full agayn, carde agayn, skowre agayn a goune and alle old cloth."]Velaber, KYLW. velabra.
  • VPLONDYSCHE MANN. 3. [See, in Stat. 37 Edw. III. c. 3, de victu et vestitu, regulations regarding the price of poultry, that of a young capon not to be above 3 den., an old capon 4 den. "et que es villes a marchees de Vpland soient venduz à meindre pris," as agreed between buyer and seller. "Rude, rustycal, or vplondyssche, rusticus." Whitinton Synon. "Vplandysshe man, pay∣sant; vplandyssheness, ruralite." PALSG. Horman says—"Vplandysshe men (agricoli) lyue more at hartis eese than som of us. The monk stole away in an vplandisshe mans wede (villatico indutus panno). In as moche as marchaundis is nat lucky with me, I shall go dwell in Vplande (rus concedam)." See Riley's Gloss. Liber Albus, v. Uplaund.]Villanus, UG. in valeo.
  • VPWARD. Sursum.
  • VPSEDOWNE (vp so doun, S.) Ever∣sus, subversus, transversus.
  • VRCHONE, beest. 4. ["An Vrchone, ericius, erinacius." CATH. ANG. "Urchone, herisson. Irchen, a lytell beest full of prickes, herison." PALSG. In Italian, " Riccio, an vrchin or hedgehog." FLORIO. Horman says that "Yrchyns or hedgehoggis be full of sharpe pryckillys; Por∣pyns haue longer prykels than yrchyns." According to Sir John Maundevile, in the Isles of Prester John's dominions "there ben Urchounes als grete as wylde swyn; wee clepen hem poriz de Spyne;" p. 352.]Erinacius, eri∣cius, utraque CATH. et C. F. sine H. litera.
  • VRYNAL (or orynal, supra.) Urinale.
  • VSAGE, or vse (or osage.) Usus.
  • VSAGE, or custome. Consuetudo.
  • VSCHERE. Hostiarius.
  • VSYN̄'. Utor, fruor.
  • VSYN̄', in custome (or customyn, K.) Usito.
  • VSYN̄', or hawntyn̄'. Frequento.
  • VSYN̄', yn sacrament receyvynge. Communico, C. F.
  • Page  513VSYN̄', yn offyce. Fungor.
  • (VSTYLMENT, supra in HURDYSE. Utensile.)
  • VSURERE. Usurarius.
  • (VSURYE, K. P.) Usura, supra in OCUR, and GOWLE.
  • VTTREST, and laste of alle (vttereste, S. vttirmest, P.) Ultimus, ex∣tremus, novissimus.
  • WAD, or wode, for lystarys (lit∣stars, P.) 1. [See also WELDE, or wolde, infra, Sandix, which is rendered in the Ortus, "madyr or wode." Palsgrave gives "Wode to die with, Guedde." A. Sax. Wad, glastum.]Gando.
  • WADON̄, or wadyn̄. Vado.
  • WADYN̄' OVYR. Transvado.
  • WADYNGE, thorowghe watyr. Va∣dacio.
  • WAFEREARE, or waferere (wafurrer, K. wafyrar or wafyrer, S.) Ga∣frarius, gafraria.
  • WAFUR, or wafyr. Gafra.
  • WAGE, or hyre (wagere or hyre, P.) Stipendium, salarium.
  • WAGYN̄', or leyne a waiowre. Vador, CATH. et UG.
  • WAGYNGE, or leyynge waiowre. Vadiacio.
  • <