Promptorium parvulorum sive clericorum, dictionarius anglo-latinus princeps, auctore fratre Galfrido grammatico dicto, ex ordine fratrum Predicatorum, northfolciensi, circa A. D. M.CCCC.XL. Olim ex officina Pynsoniana editum, nunc ab integro, commentariolis subjectis, ad Fidem codicum recensuit Albertus Way, A. M.
Galfridus, Anglicus, active 1440., Way, Albert, 1805-1874, ed., British Library. Manuscript. Harley 221.
  • A-BACKE, or backwarde. Retro, retrorsum.
  • A-BASCHYD, or a-ferde. Territus, perterritus,
  • A-BASCHEMENT, or a-fer. Terror, pavor, formido.
  • A-BATYN. Subtraho.
  • A-BATEMENT, or wythdrawynge of wyghte, 1. [Wyghte, King's MS. weyte, P. The Harl. MS. reads mete.] or mesure, or other thyngys. Subtractio, defalca∣tio.
  • ABBEYE. Abbacia.
  • ABBESSE. Abbatissa.
  • A-BYDYNNE. Expecto, prestolor.
  • ABYDYNGE. Expectacio.
  • ABYTE, i. clothynge. Habitus.
  • ABLE, or abulle, or abylle. Ha∣bilis, idoneus.
  • ABLYN, or to make able. Habi∣lito.
  • A-BOCCHEMENT, or a-bocchynge. 2. [Augmentum, adaugma, a-bocchement. MED. GR. MS. PHILL.]Augmentum, CATH. Amplifica∣mentum, CATH.
  • ABHOMINABLE. Abhominabilis.
  • ABHOMINACYON. Abhominacio.
  • ABBOTT. Abbas.
  • ABOVE. Supra, superius.
  • ABOWTE. Circum, circa.
  • ABREGGYN. Abbrevio.
  • ABBROCHYN or attamyn a vesselle of drynke. 3. ["Thilke tonne, that I shal abroche." CHAUC. Wif of Bathes Prol.]Attamino, CATH. depleo.
  • ABSENCE, or beynge a-way. Ab∣sentia.
  • ABSENT, not here, (or a-way, K.) Absens.
  • ABSTEYNYN. Abstineo.
  • ABSTYNENCE. Abstinentia.
  • ABSTYNENT, or absteynynge, or he that dothe abstynence. Ab∣stinens.
  • ABULLE, supra in able. Habilis, idoneus.
  • ABULNESSE. Habilitas, aptitudo, idoneitas.
  • ABUNDANCE, or grete plente. Abundancia.
  • ABUNDYN, or haue plente. Abundo.
  • ACENT, or assent, or grawntynge. Assensus.
  • ACENTYN, (assentinge, P.) or grawntyn. Assencio.
  • A-CETHEN for trespas (acethe, K. aceth, P.). 4. ["And if it suffice not for asseth." P. PLOUHM. See Jamieson, under Assyth, and Spelman.]Satisfactio.
  • Page  6ACHE, an erbe. 1. [Ache, or hoppe, ORT. VOC. Skinner gives ache, for smallage, from Fr. l'ache parsley. See Cotgr.]Apium.
  • A-CHETYN. Confiscor.
  • ACHWYN, or fleyn. Vito, devito.
  • ACHUYNGE, or beynge ware (ache∣wynge, K. achue, P.) Precavens, vitans.
  • A-CYDE, or a-cydenandys, or a-slet, or a-slonte (acydnande, K. acyd∣enam, P.) Oblique, vel a latere.
  • A-CYNEN, or ordeyn. Assigno.
  • A-CLOYED. 2. ["To acloye with a nayle as an yuell smythe dothe an horse foote, enclouer. Ac∣loyed as a horses foot, encloué." PALSG. The more usual sense of the word is as Horman uses it, "My stomake is accloyed, fastidiosus, nauseabundus." Florio renders inchiodare, "to clow, or pricke a horse with a naile."]Acclaudicatus, incla∣vatus.
  • ACLOYȜEN, (acloyin, K.) Acclau∣dico, acclavo, inclavo.
  • A-COLDE. Frigidus, algidus, frigorosus.
  • (ACOLYTE. Acolytus, P.)
  • A-COMELYD for coulde, or a∣clommyde (acomyrd, P. acom∣bred, W.) 3. ["Jo ay la mayn si estoniye, so acomeled." GAUT. DE BIBELESW. Arunde MS. 220. Acomlyt. MS. Phill. In the later Wycliffite version, Isaiah XXXV. 3, is read, "Coumfort ȝe clumsid, ether comelid hondis, and make ȝe strong feble knees." MS. Cott. Claud. E. II. In the earlier version the passage is rendered, "Coumforteth the hondes loosid atwynne," MS. Douce. In the Latin, "manus dissolutas."]Eviratus, enervatus.
  • A-COMERYD,

    4. "I am accombered with corrupt humours, obruor pituita. The snoffe acombreth the matche, that he can nat burn clere, fungi elychnium obsident." HORM. Piers Ploughman uses the word in the sense of to overcome, or destroy.

    "And let his shepe acomber in the mire."

    CHAUC.

    See Depos. of Ric. II. published by the Camden Society, pp. 29, 30.

    (acombred, W. acoū∣tyrd, P.) Vexatus.
  • A-COMERYNGE, or a-comerment, (acombrynge or a-combrement, W. a-comyrment, P.) Vexacio.
  • A-CORDYD, or of on a-corde. Concors.
  • (ACORDYD, or made at one, Concordatus, P.)
  • A-CORDYN. Concordo.
  • (ACORDYNG. Concordancia, K. P.)
  • A-CORDYNGE, or beynge fytte or mete. Convenio.
  • ACCORNE, or archarde, frute of the oke. 5. [Glans, an acharne, Vocab. Harl. MS. 1002. Accharne, okecorne, ORT. V. A. S. aecern. In the curious inventory of the effects of Sir Simon Burley, who was be∣headed 1388, are enumerated, "deux pairs des pater nosters de aumbre blanc, l'un coun∣trefait de Atchernes, l'autre rounde." MS. in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillipps.]Glans.
  • ACCUSYD. Accusatus.
  • (ACCUSYN. Accuso, H. P.)
  • ACCUSYNGE (accusacyon, P.) Ac∣cusacio.
  • ADAM, propyr name. Adam.
  • ADAMANT, precyowse stone. 6. ["Lapis ferrum attrahens, an adamounde stone, magnes." WHITINTON GRAMM. Aymant. PALSG.]Adamas.
  • ADDYCYON, or puttynge to for encrese. (addyng or puttynge to, P.) Addicio.
  • ADMYTYN, or grawntyn. Admitto.
  • Page  7A-DO, or grete bysynesse. Sollici∣tudo.
  • A-DEWE, or farewelle (adwe or far wel, P.) Vale.
  • AFFODYLLE herbe (affadylle, K. P.) 1. ["Affadyll, a yelowe floure, affrodille." PALSG.]Affodillus, albucea. (Affa∣dilla, K.)
  • AFFECCYON, or hertyly wellwyll∣ynge. Affectio.
  • AFFECTE, or welwyllynge. Affec∣tus, CATH.
  • A-FENCE, or offence. Offensa.
  • AFENDYD, or offendyd. Offensus.
  • A-FERRE, not nye (afer, P.) Procul.
  • A-FERDE (or trobelid, K. H. P.)

    2. Forby, in enumerating among the provincialisms of Norfolk the word afeard, noticed that formerly it was-not, as at present, synonymous with afraid.

    "This wif was not aferde ne affraide."

    CHAUC.

    The Harl. MS. indeed, renders both aferde and afrayed by territus, but the reading of the King's MS. agreeing with the printed editions, seems preferable. Aferde or tro∣belid, turbatus, perturbatus. Compare ABASCHYD or aferde. A. S. afered, territus.

    Territus, perterritus (turbatus, perturbatus, K. P.)
  • AFFERMYD, or grawntyd be worde. Affirmatus.
  • AFFYRMYN, or grawntyn. Affirmo, assero.
  • AFFERMYNGE. Affirmacio.
  • AFFYNYTE, or alyaunce. Affinitas.3. [After AFFYNYTE, the Harl. MS. has the word A-FOYSTE, lirida. See under the letter F.]
  • A-FORNE (afore, P.) 4. [Aforen, aforne, afore. CHAUC. A. S. aet foran.]Ante, coram,
  • A-FORNANDE (aformande, H. P. afromhand, J. aforehande, W.) Antea.
  • A-FRAY. Pavor, terror, formido.
  • AFFRAYED, supra. Territus, pa∣vore percussus.
  • AFTYR. Post.
  • AFTYR PARTE of a beste, or the hyndyr (parte, P.), or the crowpe. Clunis.
  • AFTYR PARTE, or hynder parte of the schyppe. Puppis, CATH.
  • AFTYRWARD. Postea, postmodum.
  • AGAS. 5. [The Harl. MS. gives AGAS twice, first without any corresponding Latin word, but probably it is the same as HAGAS puddynge, tucetum.]
  • AGAS, propyr name. Agatha.
  • A-GASTE, supra in a-ferde.
  • AGE. Etas, senium, senectus, senecta.
  • THE vij AGYS. Prima, infancia, quae continet vij annos; se∣cunda, puericia, usque ad quar∣tumdecimum annum; tercia adolescentia, usque ad xxixm. annum; quarta juventus, usque ad quinquagesimum annum; quinta gravitas, usqui ad lxxm. annum; sexta senectus, que nullo terminatur termino (non terminatur certo numero, P.); senium est ultima parts senec∣tutis. Septima erit in resur∣rectione finali. CATH.
  • A-GAYNE, or a-ȝeyne (ayen, P.). Iterum, adhuc.
  • A-GEYNE, or a-gaynewarde. Retro.
  • A-GAYNBYER, or a raumsomere. Redemptor.
  • (AGEYN BYINGE. Redemptio, K. H. P.)
  • Page  8AGYD. Antiquatus, senectus, ve∣teranus, veteratus.
  • AGYN, or growyn agyd. Seneo, senesco.
  • AGGLOT, or an aglet to lace wyth alle. 1. ["Agglet of a lace or poynt, fer. To agglet a poynt, or set on an agglet vpon a poynt or lace, ferrer. PALSG. Wyll you set none agglettes vpon your poyntes? en∣ferrer voz esguylettes." This word denotes properly the tag, but is often used to signify the lace to which it was attahced. "Myn aglet, mon lasset, a point, la ferrure d'un lasset." R. PYNSON, Good boke to lerne to speke French.]Acus, aculus, (acu∣la, P.)
  • AGGREGGYN, or to greue more. Aggravo.2. ["Agregier, supporter avec peine." ROQUEF. LACOMBE.]
  • AGGROGGYD, or aggreuyd. Ag∣gravatus.
  • AGGRUGGYNGE, or a-greuynge. Aggravacio, aggravamen.
  • AGGREUAUNS. Gravamen, no∣cumentum, tedium.
  • AGREUYD. Gravatus, ut supra.
  • AGRIMONY, or egrimony, herbe. Agrimonia.
  • AGROTONE wyth mete or drynke (agrotonyn, K.). Ingurgito.
  • AGROTONYD, or sorporryd wyth mete or drynke. 3. [Agroted, CHAUCER, Legend of G. W. is explained cloyed, surfeited.]Ingurgitatus.
  • AGROTONYNGE, or sorporrynge. Ingurgitacio.
  • AGWE, sekenes (ague, W.). Acuta, querquera. C. F. CATH.
  • A-HA. Evax.
  • AKE, or ache, or akynge. Dolor.
  • AKYN. Doleo, CATH.
  • AKYR of londe. Acra.
  • AKYR of the see flowynge (aker, P.)

    4. This word is still of local use to denote the commotion caused in some tidal rivers, at the flow of the tide. In the Ouse, near Downham bridge, above Lynn, the name is eager, as also in the Nene, between Wisbeach and Peterborough, and the Ouse near York, and other rivers. Camden calls the meeting of the Avon and Severn, higre. Compare Skinner, under the word eager. In Craven Dial. acker is a ripple on the water. Aker seems, however, to have had a more extended meaning, as applied to some turbulent currents, or commotions of the deep. The MS. Poem entitled Of Knyghthode and Batayle, Cott. MS. Titus A. XXIII. f. 49, commending the skill of mariners in judging of the signs of weather, makes the following allusion to the aker.

    Wel know they the remue yf it a-ryse,
    An aker is it clept, I vnderstonde,
    Whos myght there may no shippe or wynd wyt stonde.
    This remue in th'occian of propre kynde
    Wyt oute wynde hathe his commotioun;
    The maryneer therof may not be blynde,
    But when and where in euery regioun
    It regnethe, he moste haue inspectioun,
    For in viage it may bothe haste and tary,
    And vnavised thereof, al mys cary.

    Aker seems to be derived from A. S. ae, water, and cer, a turn; sae-cir signifies the ebb of the sea. CAEDM. See Nares, under Higre.

    Impetus maris.
  • ALLE, or euery dele. Totus.
  • ALLE, or ylke. Omnis, quilibet.
  • ALABASTER, a stone. Alabas∣trum, Parium, C. F.
  • Page  9ALLABOWTE. Undique, circum∣quaque.
  • A-LAYDE. Temperatus, remissus, permixtus.
  • A-LANGE, or straunge (alyande, P.) Extraneus, exoticus.
  • A-LANGELY, or straungely (aly∣aundly, J.) Extranee.
  • A-LANGENESSE, or strawngenesse (alyaundnesse, J.) Extraneitas.
  • ALAS. Euge, euge, prodolor.
  • ABLASTE (alblast, P.) Balista.
  • ALBLASTERE. Alblastarius, (ba∣listarius, K. P.)
  • ALBEREY, vel alebrey (albry, P.) 1. ["Alebery for a sicke man, chaudeau," PALSG.; which Cotgrave renders, caudle, warm broth.]Alebrodium, fictum est.
  • ALKAMYE metalle (alcamyn, P.) 2. [Alcamyne, arquemie, PALSG. A mixed metal, supposed to be produced by alchymy, and which received thence the name. See Nares.]Alkamia.
  • ALDYR TRE, or oryelle tre. Al∣nus, C. F.
  • ALDYRBESTE. Optimus.
  • ALDYRKYR (alderkerre, K. alder∣kar, P.) 3. [Carre, a wood of alder, or other trees in a moist boggy place, RAY. See Forby and Moore.Ducange gives kaheir, kaeyum, salictum.]Alnetum, viz. locus ubi alni et tales arbores crescunt, C. F.
  • ALDYRLESTE. Minimus.

    4. Aller, the gen. plur. ealra, A. S. is used by Chaucer, both by itself, and compounded:

    "Shall have a souper at your aller cost."

    Prol. Cant. Tales.

    There occur also, alderfirst, alderlast, alderlevest, that is dearest of all, and alderfastest.

  • ALDYRMANN. Aldirmannus, se∣nior.
  • ALDYRMOSTE. Maximus.
  • ALDYRNEXTE. Propinquissimus.
  • ALE. Cervisia, C. F. cervisia quasi Cereris vis in aqua, hec Ceres, i. Dea frumenti; (et hic nota bene quod est potus Anglo∣rum, P.)
  • ALE whyle hys (it is, K.) newe. 5. [Compare GYYLDE or GILE, new ale. Celia, Orosius informs us, was the name of a Spanish drink made of wheat, and here seems to signify the sweet and unhopped wort.]Celia, C. F. COMM.
  • ALLEGYANCE, or softynge of dys∣ese. Alleviacio.
  • ALEGGYN, or to softe, or relese peyne. Allevio, mitigo.
  • ALLEGYAUNCE of auctoryte (of auctours, P.) Allegacio.
  • ALEGGYN awtowrs. Allego.
  • ALEY yn gardeyne. Peribolus, CATH. C. F. perambulatorium et periobolum, UG. (peram∣bulum, DICC. P.)
  • ALEYNE, propyr name. Alanus.
  • ALLEFEYNTE, or feynte. Segnis.
  • ALLEFEYNTELYE (alfeynly, K.) Segniter.
  • ALLEFULLY. Totaliter, complete.
  • ALGATYS, or allewey. 6. ["Wyll you algates do it? le voulez vous faire tout à force?" PALSG. "I damned thee, thou must algates be dead." CHAUC. Sompnour's Tale. A. S. Alȝeats, omnino.]Omnino, omnimode, penitus.
  • ALLEHOLE fro brekynge. Integer.
  • ALLEHOLE, or alleheyle. Sanus, incolumis.
  • ALLEHOOLY (all holy, P.) In∣tegre, integraliter, totaliter.
  • Page  10ALYAUNCE, or affynyte. Affinitas.
  • ALYSAUNDER, herbe, or stan∣marche. 1. [Gerarde gives the name alexanders to the great or horse parsley, hipposelinum.]Macedonia.
  • ALYSAUNDER, propyr name. A∣lexander.
  • A-LYKE, or euyn lyke. Equalis.
  • ALLELYKELY, or euynly (a lyke wyse or euynly, K. P.) Equal∣iter.
  • A-LYKE, or lyke yn lykenes. Si∣milis.
  • A-LYTYLLE. Modicum, parum.
  • A-LYVE. Vivus.
  • ALYEN, straunger. Extraneus, alienus.
  • ALYEN, straunger of an other londe. Altellus, altella, UG. C. F.
  • ALYE. Affinis.
  • ALY, or alyaunce. Affinitas.
  • ALKENKENGY, herbe morub. Mo∣rella rubea.
  • ALKENET herbe. Alkanea, (vlicus, eklicus, P.)
  • ALMAUNDE frute (almon, P.) Amigdalum.
  • (ALMAUND TRE, K. almon tre, P. Amigdals, amigdalus, CATH.)
  • ALMARY, or almery. 2. ["Almariolum, a lytell almary or a cobborde. Scrinium, Anglice almery." ORT. VOC. "All my lytell bokes I putt in almeries, (scriniis chartophilaciis, forulis, vel armariis) all my greatter bokis I put in my lyberary." HORM. A. S. Almeriȝa, scrinium.]Almarium, C. F. almariolum, (armarium, P.).
  • ALMERY of mete kepynge, or a saue for mete. 3. ["Almery, aumbry to put meate in, unes almoires." PALSG.]Cibutum, C. F.
  • ALMESSE, or almos (elmesse, H. P.) Elimosina, roga, C. F. et dicitur elimosina ab el, quod est Deus, et moys quod est aqua, quasi aqua Dei; quia sicut aqua ex∣tinguit ignem, ita elimosina ex∣tinguit peccatum.
  • ALMESSE of mete yeuyn̄ to powre men, whan men haue ete. Mes∣telenium, COMM.
  • ALMESMANN, or woman (almesful∣man, P.). Elimosinarius, roga∣torius, rogatoria, C. F.
  • ALMESSHOWSE. Xenodochium, C. F. vel xenodocium, et xeno∣dium, orphanotrophium, pro∣seuca, CATH.
  • ALLMYȜGHTY (almyghty, P.) Omnipotens, cunctipotens.
  • ALLMYGH̄TYHEDE. Omnipotencia, cunctipotencia.
  • ALMOSTE. Fere, pene, ferme.
  • ALONE. Solus.
  • ALOWANS. Allocacio.
  • ALOWEDE. Allocatus.
  • ALLOWYN yn rekenynge (or re∣ken, P.). Alloco.
  • ALPE, a bryde. 4. ["Ficedula, a wodewale or an alpe." MED. GR. In Norfolk the bull-finch is called blood-olph, and the green grosbeak, green-olf, probably a corruption of alpe. FORBY. Ray gives alp as generally signifying the bull-finch. See Moore.]Ficedula, C. F.
  • ALLWEY. Semper, continue.
  • ALOM, or alym, lyke glasse (alum glas, P.) Alumen, CATH.
  • ALURE, or alurys of a towre or stepylle.

    5. The alure seems in its primary sense to have been the passage behind the battle∣ments, allorium, ambulacrum, in French alleure or allée: and which, serving as a channel to collect the waters that fell upon the roof, and were carried off through the gargoilles, the term alure came to be applied to the channel itself, as it is here rendered. See Ducange, under the words Alatoria, Allorium. Alure occurs in Ro∣bert of Gloucester.

    "Up the alurs of the castles the ladies then stood,
    And beheld this noble game, and which knights were good."
    The towrs to take and the torellis,
    Vautes, alouris and corneris."

    Kyng Alisaunder.
    Canal, CATH. UG. grunda, (canalis, P.)
  • Page  11AMBROSE herbe. Ambrosia, sal∣gia silvestris, CATH. 1. [Ambrose, ache champestre, PALSG. Ambrosia, herba predulcis, wylde sawge, ORT. VOC. "Ambrose, ambroisie, the herbe called oke of Cappadocia, or Jerusalem." COTGR.]
  • AMBROSE, propyr name. Am∣brosius.
  • AMENDYD. Correctus, emendatus.
  • AMENDYNGE. Correctio, emen∣dacio.
  • AMENDYNGE, or reparacyon of thyngys þat byn weryd or a-peyryd (worn,P.) Reparacio.
  • AMENDYN, or reparyn. Reparo.
  • AMENDYN. Emendo.
  • AMENDYN thyngys þat ar done fawty. Corrigo.
  • AMERCYN yn a corte, or lete. Amercio.
  • AMEREL of þe see. Amirellus, classicarius, CATH. C. F.
  • AMYE (Amy, propre name, P.) Amia.
  • AMYSSE, or wykkydly (or euyll done, P.) Male, nequiter.
  • AMYCE (amyte, H. K. P.) 2. [The amice is the first of the sacerdotal vestments: it is a piece of fine linen, of an oblong square form, which was formerly worn on the head, until the priest arrived before the altar, and then thrown back upon the shoulders. It was ornamented with a rich parure, often set with jewels, which in ancient representations appears like a standing collar round the neck of the priest. Dugdale gives an inventory in his History of St. Paul's, taken 1295, which details the costly enrichments of the amice.]Amita, amictus.
  • (AMYSE furred. Almicia, C. F. K. P.). 3. ["Ammys for a channon, aumusse." PALSG. This was the canonical vestment lined with fur, that served to cover the head and shoulders, and was perfectly distinct from the amyce. See almucium in Ducange.]
  • AMONGE, or sum tyme. Inter∣dum, quandoque.
  • AMONGE sundry thyngys. Inter.
  • A-MOWYNTYN, or sygnifyyn̄. De∣noto, significo.
  • AMSOTE, or a fole (anysot, H. P. a folt, P.) Stolidus, baburius, C. F. insons.
  • AMUCE of an hare. Almucium, habetur in horologio divine sa∣piencie.
  • ANCLE, infra in ankle.
  • ANNYS, propyr name (Anneys, H. Annyce, P.) Agnes.
  • ANEYS seede, or spyce. 4. [The King's MS. gives Aneys herbe, anisum, and Aneyssede, anetum.]Anetum, anisum.
  • ANELYD, or enelyd, infra in anoyntyd.
  • ANELYNGE, or enelynge, infra in anoyntynge.
  • ANELYN, or enelyn metalle, or other lyke. 5. [The word to anelel was used in two senses, "to aneele a sicke man, anoynt hym with holy oyle. I lefte hym so farre past, that he was houseled and aneeled, communié et en∣huyllé: and, to aneel to potte of erthe or suche lyke with a coloure, plommer." PALSG. As applied to metal it signifies to enamel, and occurs in that sense. Lacombe and Roquefort give the word néellé, émaillé.]
  • Page  12ANETHYS. 1. [In Robert of Glouc. Wiclif and Chaucer, this word is written vnnethe, vnnethis. A. Saxon Un-eaðe, vix.]Vix.
  • ANTYFENERE (antyphanere, P. an∣phenere, H.) Antiphonarius, (antiphanarium, P.)
  • ANGYLLE to take wyth fysche. 2. [A. Sax. Anȝel, hamus. In the St. Alban's Book, 1496, is a treatyse of fysshynge with an angle; Shakespeare uses the word to signify the implement of fishing. "Angle rodde, verge à pescher." PALSG. Angle twache, lumbricus, which occurs in Vocabula Stanbrigii, 1513, seems to be the worm serving for a bait. A. Sax. Anȝeltwecca. ELFR.]Piscale, fistuca, fuscina, C. F. (hamillus, P.)
  • ANGURE, or angwys (angyr, K. P.) Angor, C. F. angustia.
  • ANGUR, or wrathe (angyr or wretthe, K. H. P.) Ira, ira∣cundia.
  • ANGRYE. Iracundus, bilosus, fellitus, felleus, malencolicus.
  • ANGWYSCHE. Angustia, agonia, angaria.
  • ANYYNTYSCHYN̄, or enyntyschȳn. Exinanio.
  • ANNIUERSARY, or yereday (ȝer∣day, K. H.) Anniversarium, anniversarius.
  • ANKYL. Cavilla, verticillum.
  • ANKYR of a shyppe. Ancora.
  • ANKYR, recluse. Anachorita.
  • ANOYNTYD, or enoyntyd (anelyd, or enelyd, ut supra.). Inunctus.
  • ANOYNTYN (or enoynten, P.) Inungo, ungo.
  • ANOYNTYNGE, or enoyntynge (an∣elynge, or enelynge, ut supra). Inunctio.
  • A-NOON, or as-faste (anon, H. P.) Confestim, protinus, mox, cito, statim, illico.
  • A-NOTHYR. Alter, alius.
  • ANSWERE. Responsum, respon∣sio, antiphona.
  • AWNSWERYN. Respondeo.
  • ANTYLOPPE, beste. Tatula, C. F.
  • (ANTYM. Antiphona, K. H. P.)
  • ANTONY, propyr name. Antonius.
  • APE, a beste. Simia.
  • A-PECE (abce, P. apecy, K. 3. [Cotgrave renders Abecé, an abcee, the crosse row.]) Al∣phabetum, abecedarium, C. F.
  • A-PECE (abce, P.) lerner, or he þat lernythe þe abece. Alphabeticus, abecedarius, C. F.
  • APECHYNGE. 4. [Appeyching, accusement. PALSG. Fabyan relates that, in 1425, "many honeste men of the cytye were apeched of treason." Apescher, to impeach. KELHAM.]Appellacio.
  • A-PECHOWRE, or a-pelowre. Ap∣pellator.
  • APEYRYNGE, or apeyrement.

    5. "A litil sourdow apeyreth al the gobet." 1 Cor. V. WICL. R. Brunne uses the verb to apeire, which occurs also in Chaucer, Cant. Tales:

    "To apeiren any man, or him defame."

    "To appayre, or waxe worse, empirer." PALSG.

    Pe∣joracio, deterioracio.
  • APPEYRYN, or make wors. Pe∣joro, deterioro.
  • A-PEEL, or apelynge, supra in apechynge (apel, H.)
  • Page  13APPELYN. Appello, CATH.
  • A-PELE of belle ryngynge (apele of bellis, P.) Classicum, CATH.
  • APPERYN. Appareo, compareo.
  • A-PLEGGE (apledge, P.) Obses, CATH. vas.
  • APPLYED. Applicatus.
  • APPLYYN. Applico, oppono.
  • APPLYYNGE. Applicacio.
  • (APOSEN, or oposyn. Oppono, K. H. P.)
  • APOSTATA, he þat leuythe hys ordyr. Apostata.
  • APOSTUME (apostym, K. P.) Apostema.
  • APOSTYLLE. Apostolus.
  • APRYLE monythe (Aprel, H.) Aprile.
  • APPULLE, frute. Pomum, malum.
  • APPULLHORDE. Pomarium, CATH.
  • APPULKEPER. Pomarius, po∣milio, pomo, C. F.
  • APPULMOCE, dyschmete (appul∣mos, P.) 1. [Recipes for making this dish occur in the Form of Cury, pp. 42, 96, and other ancient books of cookery. See Harl. MS. 279, f. 16 b. Kalendare de Potages dyuers, Apple muse; and Cott. MS. Julius, D. VIII. f. 97. The following is taken from a MS. of the XV. cent. in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillipps. "Appyl mose. Take and sethe appyllys in water, or perys, or bothe togyder, and stamp heme, and strayne heme, and put heme in a dry potte, with hony, peper, safferone, and let hit haue but a boyle, and serue hit forthe as mortrewys."]Pomacium, C. F.
  • APPULLSELLER. Pomilius, Po∣milia, CATH. pomilio, C. F. UG.
  • APPULLE tree. Pomus.
  • APPULLYERDE, or gardeyne, or orcherde. Pomerium, CATH. C. F. cum e et non cum a.
  • A-QUEYNTE, or knowen. Notus, cognitus, agnitus.
  • A-QUEYNTAWNSE. Noticia, cog∣nitio, agnitio.
  • AQUEYNTYN, or to make know∣leche (make knowen, P.) Noti∣fico, notum facio.
  • AQWYTTE. Quietatus, acquie∣tatus.
  • AQWYTAWNCE (or quitaunce, P.) Acquietancia.
  • AQWYTYN, or to make qwyte and sekyr. Acquieto.
  • AQWYTYN, or qwytyn and yeldyn. Reddo.
  • ARAGE, herbe. 2. ["Atriplex domestica, Arage, or medlus." ROY. MS. 18. A. VI. f. 66 b, where its virtues are detailed. Arage, aroche. PALSG.]Attriplex (artri∣plex, P.)
  • A-RAY, or a-rayment. Orna∣tus, apparatus, ornamentum, cultus.
  • ARAYMENT. Paramentum.
  • A-RAYN, or cloþyn (arayen, P.) Induo, vestio.
  • A-RAYN, or to make honeste (ara∣yen, P.) Orno, adorno, ho∣nesto, decuso, decoro, C. F. KYLW.
  • ARAYNE, or ordeynyd (arayen or ordeyne, P.) Ordino, paro.
  • ARAYNYE, or erenye, or sonde. 3. [There seems evidently here an error of the scribe in the Harl. MS. Arayn, ac∣cording to Ray, is the name given in Nottinghamshire to the larger kind of spiders. It is used also in Yorkshire. The Latin-English Dictionary in Mr. Wilbraham's library renders aranea an arayne, arantinus, an erayn webbe: the former word is in the Me∣dulla rendered, an attercoppe. See further, under ERANYE.]Arena.
  • Page  14(ARANYE, or erayne. Aranea, K. H. P.)
  • ARBYTROWRE. Arbiter.
  • ARCHANGEL yn heuyn (arcawngel, H.). Archangelus.
  • ARCHANGEL, defe nettylle (arc∣aungell, P.) Archangelus.
  • ARS, or arce (aars, H.) Anus, culus, podex.
  • ARSWYSPE. Maniperium, DICC. anitergium.
  • ARCETER, or he þat lernethe or techethe arte (arcetyr, H. K. P.) 1. [Arcetour, arcien. PALSG. Roquefort explains arcien as etudiant en philosophie artifex, artatus.]Artista.
  • ARCH yn a walle. Archus.
  • ARCHER. Sagittarius.
  • ARCHERYE. Sagittaria, arcus. CATH.
  • A-RECHYN, or strecchyn̄ (astretch∣yn, P.) Attingo.
  • A-RENGE, or a-rewe (arowe, P.) 2. ["I shall tell the all the story a-rewe, perpetuo tenore rem explicabo." HORM. The monkish chronicler Dowglas relates of the miracles "the wiche God schowed for Seinte Thomas of Lancaster, that a blind priest dreamed that if he went to the place where the Earl had been slain he schulde have ayenne his sighte; and so he dremed iij nightes arewe." Harl. MS. 4690, f. 64 b.]Seriatim.
  • A-RESTE, or resty as flesche (arees∣tyd, K. areest or reestyed, P.) Rancidus.
  • A-RESTER, or a-tacher, or a catch∣erel, or a catchepolle. An∣garius, apparitor, CATH. C. F.
  • A-RESTE, or a-restynge. Ares∣tacio.
  • A-RESTENESSE, or a-restenesse of flesshe. 3. [Among recipes of the XIV. century in a MS. in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillipps, is one "to sauen venesone of rastichipe (or rastischipe)." See the Roll of A. D. 1381, in Forme of Cury, p. 111, "to do away Restyng of Venisone." Skinner derives resty from A. Sax. rust, rubigo.]Rancor, rancitas.
  • ARESTYN, or a-tachyn. Aresto, attachio.
  • ARGUMENTE. Argumentum.
  • (ARKAWNGELL, or archaungel. Archangelus, H. P.)
  • ARME. Brachium.
  • ARMEHOOLE. Acella, subyrcus, CATH. in brachium.
  • ARMYN. Armo.
  • ARMYS, of auncetrye. Arma.
  • ARMURE (armoure, P.) Arma, armamentum, C. F. armatura.
  • ARNESTE, or hanselle (or ernest, H. P. ansal, K. Strena, P.).
  • ARNESTE, or erneste, seryowste. Seriositas.
  • ARNESTELY, or ernestely. Seriose.
  • A-ROWME, or morevttere. 4. ["Aroume he hovyd, and withstood." Rich. C. de Lion. The word occurs in K. Alis, 3340, Chaucer, Book of Fame, B. ii. 32. See Wilbraham's Cheshire Glossary, under the word rynt.]Remote, deprope, seorsum.
  • ARTE. Ars.
  • ARTYN, or constraynyn. Arto, coarto, stringo, astringo, con∣stringo.
  • AROWE. Sagitta.
  • ARWE, or ferefulle (arwhe, K. arowe, or ferdfull, P.) 5. [A. Sax. earȝ, ignavus, earȝian, torpescere pro timore. The word arwe occurs in C. de Lion, i. 3821. "Frensche men arn arwe and feynte." In Yorkshire arfe is used in the sense of fearful. See Boucher, under the words Arew, Arf, Arghe, and Arwe; and Jamieson, under Erf, and Ergh. P. Ploughman uses the verb to arwe, to render timid.]Ti∣midus, pavidus, formidolus, formidolosus.
  • Page  15ARWYGYLL worme. 1. [This insect is called in Norfolk, erriwiggle. FORBY. In the Suffolk dialect, arra∣wiggle. MOORE. A. S. ear-wiȝȝa, vermis auricularis.]Aurealle. (aurialis, P.) UG. in auris.
  • AS. Quasi, sic, veluti.
  • A-SAYYD. Temptatus, probatus.
  • A-SAYYN. Tempto, attempto.
  • A-SAYLYD. Insultus.
  • A-SAYLYN̄. Insilio, CATH.
  • A-SAYLYNGE. Insultus.
  • A-SCHAMYD, or made a-shamyd. Verecundatus.
  • A-SHAMYD, or shamefaste. Vere∣cundus, pudorosus.
  • ASSE, a beste. Asinus.
  • ASSENEL, poyson (assenyke, py∣sone, K. H. P.) Squilla, C. F.
  • ASSENT, or acent, or a graunte. Assensus.
  • ASFASTE, or a-noon (asfast, or anone, P.) Statim, confestim, protinus, mox.
  • ASSYNGNYN, supra in acynyn̄ (asynyn or acynyn, P.)
  • ASKER. Petitor, postulator.
  • ASKYS, or aschys (aske or asche, K. H. P.) 2. [A. Sax. Axe, axsa, cinis. See Boucher, under the word Ass.]Ciner, cinis, C. F.
  • ASKYSYE (askefise, K. P. aske∣fyse, H. 3. [The reading of the Harl. MS. Askysye, is here given, although probably it is an error, by inadvertence of the scribe. The printed editions all agree with the other MSS. in giving the word Askefise. In the MS. of the Medulla Gramm. in the possession of Sir Thomas Phillips, No. 1022, ciniflo is rendered, an aske fyse; and in another, No. 1360, "ciniphlo, a fyre blowere, an yryn hetere, an askefyce." The word does not occur in several MSS. of the Medulla in the Brit. Mus., nor in the Ortus Vocabulorum, but in Mr. Wilbraham's curious Latin-English Dictionary, printed about the same time as the Promptuarium, ciniflo is explained to be one, "qui flat in cinere, vel qui preparat pulverem muliebrem. Anglice, aske fyste, a fyre blawer, or an yrne hotter." The Harl. MS. 2257, a variety of the Medulla, renders the word "a heter of blode iren, or an axe wadelle;" and it appears in Ihre's Lexic. Suiogoth. v. Aska, that askefis was applied as a term of reproach to those who remained indolently at home by the fireside, as axewaddle is used in Devonshire. See Palmer's Glossary, and Boucher under the word Axewaddle.]) Ciniflo, UG. in flo, CATH.
  • ASKYN. Peto, postulo, posco.
  • ASKYNGE. Peticio, postulacio.
  • ASCHE tre. Fraxinus.
  • ASLET, or a-slowte (asloppe, H. a slope, P.) Oblique.
  • ASOYLYN of synnys (or defautes, P.) Absolvo.
  • ASOYNYD, or refusyd. Refutatus.
  • ASOYNYN.
  • ASOYNYNGE, or refusynge. Re∣futacio.
  • ASPE tre. Tremulus.
  • A-SPYȜE (aspye, K. H. P.), or a spye. Explorator.
  • ASPYYN. Exploro.
  • ASPYYNGE. Exploracio.
  • ASPYYD (aspyed, or perceyued, perceptus, H. P.) Exploratus.
  • Page  16ASTELLE, a schyyd (astyl schyde, 1. [See SCHYYD. Astelle, estelle, copeau, éclat de bois, ROQUEF. a piece of a wooden log cleft for burning.] K. shyde, P.) Teda, C. F. as∣tula, CATH. cadia.
  • ASTYLLABYRE, instrument (as∣tyrlaby, P.) Astrolabium, C. F.
  • ASTONYED, or a-stoyned yn man∣nys wytte. Attonitus, conster∣natus, stupefactus, perculsus.
  • ASTONYD, as mannys wytte. At∣tono, CATH. UG. in tono.
  • ASTONYNGE, or a-stoynynge yn wytte. Stupefactio, conster∣natio, attonicio.
  • ASTOYNYN, or brese werkys. (astoyn, or brosyn, P.) Quatio, quasso, CATH.
  • ASTORYN, or instoryn wyth nede∣fulle thyngys. Instauro.
  • ASTRAY, or a best þat goythe astray. Palans, C. F. vagula, CATH.
  • ASTRAYLY (astray, or astrayly, P.) Palabunde, KYLW.
  • (ASTRETCHYN or arechyn. At∣tingo, P.)
  • (ASTROLOGERE. Astrologus, P.)
  • (ASTROLOGY. Astrologia, P.)
  • ASTRONOMERE. Astronomus.
  • ASTRONOMYE. Astronomia.
  • A-STRUT, or strutyngly (strowt∣ingly, P.) Turgide.
  • A-SUNDYR. Distinctus, divisus, disjunctus.
  • A-SONDYR, or brokyn. Fractus.
  • A-SUNDERLY. Disjunctim, separ∣atim, divisim.
  • ASURE. 2. ["Lazirium, i. e. incaustum, or asur colour," ORT. VOC. See Ducange, under the word Lazur; and directions "for to make fyn azure of lapis lazuli," and distinguishing lapis lazuly from "lapis almaine, of whiche men maken a blew bis azure." Sloan. MS. 73. f. 215, b.]Asura.
  • ASURYN, or insuryn̄. Assecuro, securo.
  • ATTACHYN, supra in arestyn.
  • ATHAMYD, as a wessel wyth drynke (atamed, P.) 3. [John de Garlandia says, "Precones vini clamant gula hiante vinum attaminatum in tabernis, portando vinum temptandum, fusum in cratere. which the gloss renders atamyd. Liber dictus Diccionarius, Harl. MS. 1002, f. 177, b.]Attaminatus, DICC. depletus, CATH.
  • ATTAMYN a wesselle wyth drynke, or abbrochyn. Attamino, depleo.
  • ATTHAMYNGE of a wesselle wyth drynke. Attaminacio, depletio.
  • A-TASTYN. Pregusto.
  • ATTEYNYN, supra in strechyn (astretchyn, P.)
  • ATTEYNTYN. Convinco.
  • ATTYR, fylthe. 4. [A. Sax. Atter, venenum. "This sore is full of matter, or ater; purulentum." HORM. Atter has the same sense in Norfolk at the present time, and Skinner mentions the word as commonly used in Lincolnshire. See WHYTOUWRE.]Sanies.
  • ATTYRCOPPE. 5. [A. Sax. Atter-coppa, aranea, literally a cup, or head of poison. See a curious tale of the effect of the venom of the atturcoppe at Shrewsbury, in the Preface to Lang∣toft's Chron. Hearne, i. p. cc. The Medulla renders aranea, an attercoppe, and the English Gloss. on the "Liber vocatus Equus," Harl. MS. 1002, f. 114, explains the same word as addurcop. Palsgrave gives "Addircop or Spiners web, Araignée;" and Ray says that in Cumberland the word attercob signifies the web, as it does also in York∣shire. See BOUCHER and JAMIESON. In the Legenda Aurea, spiders are called spyn∣coppes. Saynt Felyx, f. 72. In Trevisa's version of the Polychronicon, it is said that in Ireland "there ben attercoppes, bloode-soukers, and eeftes that doon none harme." Caxton, f. 63, b.]Aranea.
  • Page  17A-TYRE, or tyre of women. 1. ["Atyre for a gentilwomans heed, atour." PALSG. See hereafter under TYRE.]Re∣dimiculum, CATH. cultus, C. F.
  • A-TYRYN yn womeyns a-ray, supra in ARAYN̄. Redimio, orno, CATH.
  • ATREET (atrete, P.) Tractatim, (tractim, distincte, K.)
  • A-TWYXYN̄. (atwexyn, H. atwyxt, P.) Inter.
  • A-TURNEYE (aturne, K. H. P.) Suffectus, C. F. atturnatus, sub∣stitutus.
  • ATTE ÞE LASTE. Tandem, de∣mum, novissime.
  • A-WHYLE (avayle, K. P. awayt, W.)2. ["Auayle, prouffit." PALSG. See an enactment in Rot. Parl. VI. 203, regarding certain manors "with all proufites and avayles to the same perteyning."]Profectus, proventus, emolumentum.
  • A-VAYLYN, or profytyn̄. Valeo, prosum, CATH.
  • A-WAYTE, or waytynge (awayt∣inge, P.) Exploracio, explo∣ratus.
  • (AWAYTINGE, or takinge heede, P. Attendens.)
  • A-VAUNCEMENT. Beneficium.
  • A-VAUNCYD (avauntyd, H. avaunt∣ed, P.) Beneficiatus.
  • A-VAUNCE, or boste (avaunt, K. P.) Jactancia, arrogancia.
  • A-VAUNTYN, or boostyn. 3. ["Though you do neuer so many good dedes, you lese your mede if you auaunte you of them, se vanter." PALSG. The word occurs in another sense in Elyot's Librarie, "Vendito, to sell often, to auaunt, venditatio, an auaunt."]Jacto, arrogo, ostento.
  • A-VANTAGE (auauntage, P.) Pro∣ventus, CATH. emolumentum, avauntagium, (prerogativa, P.)
  • AWBE (awlbe, P.) Alba, poderis, CATH.
  • AWBEL or ebelle tre (ebeltre, K. P.) 4. [It is very doubtful what tree is here intended. Forby observes that in Norfolk the asp tree, populus tremula, is called ebble, which seems to be merely a variation of abele, the name given by botanists to the populus alba. In a vocabulary in Harl. MS. 1002, viburnum is rendered "a awberne." The Promptuary gives hereafter EBAN TRE. Ebanus. In early French writers the "bois d'aubor" is often mentioned as in esteem for making bows, but its nature has not been satisfactorily explained, and pos∣sibly it may have been identical with the awbel. In German the yew tree is called eben.]Ebonus, viburnus, DICC. (ebenus, P.)
  • AWBURNE coloure. Citrinus.
  • AWE or drede. Timor, pavor, ter∣ror, formido.
  • A-WEY, or nott here. Absens.
  • AUELONGE (awelonge, H. awey∣longe, P.) 5. [This word occurs again hereafter, WARPYN, or wex wronge or avelonge as vesselle, oblongo. In Harl. MS. 1002, f. 119, oblongo is rendered to make auelonge; and in the editor's MS. of the Medulla, oblongus is rendered auelonge. A. S. Awoh, oblique. Moore gives the word avellong, used in Suffolk, when the irregular shape of a field interferes with the equal distribution of the work.]Oblongus.
  • AVENCE herbe. 6. [Avens, caryophillata. SKINNER. The virtues attributed, at the time the Promp∣torium was compiled, to auaunce, by some called harefoot, which it resembles, may be found in Roy. MS. 18 A. VI. f. 67, b. It was used in cookery; see the Forme of Cury, p. 13. By modern botanists it is known as the geum.]Avancia, sana∣munda.
  • Page  18AVENE of corn (awene, K. awne, P.) 1. ["Arista, spica, an awne of corne, an ere, or a glene." DICT. WILBR.]Arista, CATH.
  • AVENERE. 2. [The avenere was an officer of the household who had the charge of supplying pro∣vender for the horses. A curious account of his duties occurs in MS. Sloane, 1986, f. 38, b. quoted in Boucher's Glossary. See Abatis in Ducange and Spelman. The Clerk Avenar occurs in the Household Book of the Earl of Northumberland, 1511, his duties were "for breving daily of horssemete and liuereis of fewell." Ant. Repert. iv. 233.]Abatis, duorum ge∣nerum, CATH.
  • A-VENTURE. Fortuna.
  • A-WERE, or dowte (awe, K. P.) 3. ["I stand in a wer, whether I may go or turne agayne, hesito." HORM.]Dubium, ambiguum, per∣plexus.
  • AWFYN of þe chekar. 4. [The awfyn or alphyn was anciently the name of the bishop in the game of chess. Hyde derives it from the Arabic, al-fil, an elephant. The piece was called by the French fol, at an early period, and subsequently aufin. The third chap. of the seconde trac∣tate of Caxton's game of the Chesse, 1474, "tretethe of the Alphyns, her office ande maners. The Alphyns oughte to be made ande formede in manere of Juges syttynge in a chayer withe a book open to fore their eyen. Theyr offyce is for to counceylle the Kynge." "Alfyn, a man of the chesse borde, avlfin." PALSG. See Ducange, Douce's Remarks on the European names of Chessmen, Archaeol, xi. p. 400, and Sir. F. Madden's remarks on the chess-men found in Lewis, Archaeol. xxiv. p. 225. Horman, speaking of chess, says, "We shulde have 2 kyngis, and 2 quyens, 4 alfyns, 4 knyghtis, 4 rokis, and 16 paunis." f. 282. b.]Alfinus.
  • AWGRYM. 5. ["Augrym, algorisme. To counte, reken by cyfers of agryme, enchifrer. To cast an accomptes in aulgorisme with a penne, enchifrer. To caste an accomptes with counters, after the aulgorisme maner, calculer. To case an accomptes after the comen maner, with counters, compter par iect. I shall reken it syxe times by aulgorisme, or you can caste it ones by counters." PALSG. It would hence appear that towards the commencement of the XVIth century the use of the Arabic numerals had in some degree superseded the ancient mode of calculating by the abacus, and counters, which, at the period when the Promptorium was compiled, were generally used. Hereafter we find the word COUNTINGE BORDE as an evidence. They were not indeed wholly dis∣used at a time long subsequent: an allusion to calculation by counters occurs in Shake∣speare, and later authors prove that they had not been entirely discarded. Algorithm or algorism, a term universally used in the XIVth and XVth centuries to denote the science of calculation by 9 figures and zero, is of Arabic derivation.]Algarismus.
  • AVYSEMENT. Indicie, deliberacio.
  • AVYSYD. Provisus, avisatus.
  • A-VYSYN. Delibero.
  • AWKE, or angry. 6. ["Aukwarde frowarde, peruers. Aukwar leftehanded, gauche, Auke stroke, reuers." PALSG.]Contrarius, bilosus, perversus.
  • AWKE, or wronge. Sinister.
  • (AWKLY, or wrongly, K. Sinistre.)
  • AWKELY, or wrawely. Perverse, contrarie, bilose.
  • AWMBRERE, or awemenere (awm∣nere, K. awmener or amner, P.) 7. ["Saynt Johan the Elemosner was mercyfull in suche wyse that he was called al∣mosner, or amener." LEG. AUR. f. 83. At the inthronization of Abp. Warham, 1504, to each of the tables was appointed an almner, with sewer, panter, and other officers. LEL. COLL. vi. 18. Of the duties of the "aumenere" at the table of a great lord, see a curious English poem, of the times of Henry VI. appended to the "Boke of Cur∣tasye." Sloan. MS. 1986, f. 43. De officiariis in curiis Dominorum.]Elemosinator, rogatorius, C. F.
  • AWMEBRY, or awmery. Elemosi∣narium, rogatorium.
  • Page  19AWMBLARE, as a horse (awmilere, K. H. aumlinge horse, P.) 1. ["Amblyng horse, hacquenée." PALSG.]Gra∣darius, C. F. ambulator, ambu∣larius.
  • AWMYR, or ambyr (awmbyr, K. H. P.) Ambra, C. F.
  • (AUMENERE, H. awmener or am∣nere, P. Elemosinarius.)
  • AWNCETYR. Progenitor.
  • AWNCETRYE. Progenitura, pro∣sapia, herilitas.
  • AWNDERNE (awndyryn, K. awn∣dyrn, P.) 2. [Among "thingis that ben vsed after the hous." in Caxton's Boke for Travellers, "upon the herthe belongeth woode or turues, two andyrons of yron (brandeurs), a tonge, a gredyron." "Awndyrene, andena." Vocab. Roy. MS. "Aundyern, chenet." PALSG. "I lacke a fyre pan and andyars to bere up the fuel. Alaribus vel ypopyrgiis." HORM. It appears that andyrons and dogs were not identical, as generally is understood, for in the Inventory of Sir Henry Unton's effects, 1596, printed by the Berkshire Ash∣molean Society, the two are enumerated as occurring together, and both occur also singly. Cotgrave renders "chenets, and landiers, andirons; harpon de fer pour retenir et arrester un poultre, dogge of iron."]Andena, ipoporgium, C. F.
  • AWNGEL. Angelus.
  • AWNSCHENYD (auncenyd, P.) Antiquatus, veteranus.
  • AWNTE, moderys systyr. Ma∣teria, CATH. Tia, C. F.
  • AWNTE, faderys systyr. Amita, CATH. (aunta, P.)
  • AWNTYR or happe (aunter, P.) 3. ["Aunter, adventure." PALSG. "He bosteth his dedes of aunters." HORM.]Fortuna, fortuitus.
  • AWNTRŌN (awntryn, K. aventryn, P.) 4. ["To aunter, put a thyng in daunger, or aduenture, aduenturer." PALSG.]Fortuno, CATH.
  • AWNTEROWS, or dowtefulle. For∣tunalis, fortuitus.
  • AWNTEROWSLY. Forte, fortasse, forsan.
  • A-VOYDAWNCE. Evacuacio.
  • A-VOYDYD. Evacuatus.
  • A-VOYDEN̄. 5. ["To auoyde as water dothe that ronneth by a gutter or synke, se vuyder. To blede, or auoyde bloode." PALSG.]Evacuo, devacuo.
  • A-VOWE. 6. ["Auowe, veu." PALSG. This word occurs in R. de Brunne, Wiclif, and Chaucer. The phrase "perfourmed his auowe" occurs in the Legenda Aurea, f. 47.]Votum.
  • A-WOWYN, or to make a-wowe. (auowen, or make auowe, P.) 7. ["I have auowed my pylgrymage unto our lady of Walsyngham, j'ai aduoue." PALSG. In the same book the word is used in a sense somewhat different. "To auowe, warrant, or make good or upholde, as in marchaundyse or such like. Take this clothe of my worde, I auowe it for good, je le pleuuys."]Voveo.
  • A-VOWYN, or stonde by the for∣sayde worde or dede. Advoco, CATH. 8. ["But I wol not avowen that I say." CHAUC.]
  • A-VOWTERE (avoutrere, H. P. avow∣terere, K.) Adulter, adultera.
  • A-VOWTRYE. Adulterium.
  • Page  20AWTERE. Altare, ara.
  • AWTERSTONE. Superaltare.
  • AWTORYTE (auctorite, P.) Auc∣toritas.
  • AWTOWRE. Auctor.
  • AXYLTRE, or exyltre. Axis.
  • (AXE, or exe to hewe, P. Securis, dolabra.)
  • A-ȜENE (ayen, P.) Iterum, adhuc, rursum, rursus.
  • A-ȜENS, or a-gens (ayens or ageyne, P.) Contra, adversus.
  • A-ȜENWARDE (ayenwarde, P.) E contrario, e converso.
  • A-ȜEN WYLLE (ayen wyll, P.) In∣vite.