Manuscripts Division
William L. Clements Library
University of Michigan

Finding aid for
Henry Grimes Marshall Papers, 1861-1865

James S. Schoff Civil War Collection

Finding aid created by
Rob S. Cox, March 1997

Summary Information
Title: Henry Grimes Marshall papers
Creator: Marshall, Henry Grimes, 1839-1918
Inclusive dates: 1862-1865
Extent: 212 items (0.5 linear feet)
Abstract:
The Henry Grimes Marshall papers consist of letters written by Marshall to his family while serving with the Union Army, including time spent as an officer in the 29th Connecticut Infantry Regiment (Colored). Marshall's letters describe the events taking place around him as well as his thoughts about African American regiments, women's roles in war, and his reactions to the war.
Language: The material is in English
Repository: William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan
909 S. University Ave.
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
Phone: 734-764-2347
Web Site: www.clements.umich.edu


Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

1962. M-1222.

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

Copyright:

Copyright status is unknown.

Preferred Citation:

Henry Grimes Marshall Papers, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan


Arrangement

The collection is arranged chronologically.


Biography

Marshall, Henry Grimes, 1839-1918

Rank : Sgt., 1st Lieut., Captain

Regiment : 15th Connecticut Infantry Regiment. Co. E (1862-1865)
29th Connecticut Infantry Regiment (Colored). Co. E (1864-1865)

Service : 1862 August 4-1865 November 27

Born in Milford, Conn., on January 2, 1839, Henry Grimes Marshall was the son of Samuel Andrew Marshall and Jerusha Grimes. After graduating from Milford High School in 1856, Marshall entered Yale with the class of 1860, and appears to have spent the two years after graduation working as a teacher in Newark, N.J. During the summer of 1862, however, he succumbed to a rising sense of duty, and returned home to Cromwell, Conn., to enlist in the army. Despite his youth, he was awarded an appointment as sergeant of Co. E, 15th Connecticut Infantry.

In August, the 15th Connecticut left the state to the rousing cheers of the citizens of New Haven and Milford, bound for Maryland, but after this early flush of glory, Marshall was soon brought down to earth by the daily tedium of drill. While willing, and occasionally anxious to enter into action, he admitted to having trepidations over killing or being killed, and assured his sisters that he had not been in any great peril, and that his position as sergeant kept him out of some of the worst.

After spending the fall at Fairfax Seminary, the 15th was ordered into its first true tests at Fredericksburg, and with winter mud of Falmouth. Though disheartened by the turn of these events, Marshall kept an upbeat, "patriotic" attitude and remained optimistic, even as he and his comrades became so strapped for money that they unloaded their pay vouchers to speculators. His confidence and positive nature gave him the wherewithal to feel that he could master any situation, and even when taunted by Confederate troops during the fiasco of the mud march, he asserted to his family that if it hadn't rained, they would have emerged victorious.

With Ninth Corps, the 15th Connecticut was sent to Suffolk, Va., in February, and was immediately trapped by Longstreet's forces. In Suffolk, besieged, Marshall began to entertain the possibility of taking a commission in a colored regiment. After deciding to accept the position, Marshall lost it, but remained in the pool for a new slot when it opened. After the siege lifted at Suffolk, the 15th Connecticut took part in a series of minor forays on the peninsula (including the "blackberry raid") designed to keep pressure on the Confederacy while the main scene of action had shifted northward to Pennsylvania, and then shifted to Portsmouth, where they remained in garrison for several months, taking part in a minor expedition to South Mills, N.C.

In December, 1863, Marshall renewed his application for a commission in a "colored" regiment, and was granted leave to take the officers' examination in Washington. Upon returning to camp, he found his comfortable shanty burned to the ground and his regiment departed for Plymouth, N.C. When he finally caught up with them on January 28, he was immediately sent on a raid to Windsor, N.C., where they took a few prisoners and pillaged the town. Late in February, Marshall was informed that he had been awarded a lieutenant's commission based on his examination, and he immediately accepted. Returning to a conscript camp at New Haven, he was mustered into the service as 1st Lieutenant of Co. E of the 29th Connecticut Infantry.

Reminiscent of his experience only a few months previously, Marshall basked in the admiration of the citizens of New Haven as his regiment paraded the streets, but as before, the moments of adrenaline-charged pomp dissipated rapidly into reality. Arriving at Annapolis on March 25, Marshall was met head-on by the realities of a "colored" regiment in a racist society. Although he felt no less certain of his superiority over African Americans than the average white American, he was galled by the nagging details that highlighted subordinate status -- such as the rumor that the members of his regiment, including officers, would be issued only shelter tents -- and he met such slights with an aggressive posture. More threatening were the shouts of "Nagur Nagur" that greeted them as they passed Irish and "Dutch" regiments from Pennsylvania and New York.

In April, 1864, the 29th Connecticut was ordered to the islands off the coast of South Carolina and brigaded with the 26th and 33rd U.S.C.T., formerly the 1st South Carolina, and they were finally armed. Posted on Port Royal Island, the regiment performed picket duty at the Baynard Plantation, a particularly peaceful spot that gave Marshall abundant opportunity to botanize and take in the local sights.

In August Marshall's regiment was ordered to join the 1st Brigade, 3rd Division of the 10th A.C. in Virginia. Fearing battle, he coincidentally fell ill with "remittent fever" and was sent to Chesapeake Hospital at Fortress Monroe to recuperate. This experience may have served to prick Marshall's conscience about duty and loyalty to his men. Upon hearing Sherman's scurrilous comments on colored regiments, for instance, Marshall bristled, and barked that such statements did not apply to the 29th Connecticut: "What can be said of most colored regiments will not apply to ours. They are a different class of Negros. There are but few ignorant plantation darkies in our Reg." (1864 September 6).

Rejoining his regiment in the trenches before Petersburg in mid-September, Marshall took part in the Battle of New Market Heights on September 29 (a feint on Richmond) during which Marshall served for five days as acting aide de camp on the staff of General Birney. On October 10, Marshall was appointed aide de camp on the staff of Lt. Col. Samuel Chapman Armstrong (2nd Brigade, 3rd Div., 10th A.C.). However, Armstrong soon returned to his regiment and was replaced by Ulysses Doubleday, who was in turn replaced by Elias Wright early in November, making four Brigade commanders in little over a month. Through all these changes, Marshall retained his staff position, and had little contact with his regiment.

In December, as the 3rd Division was engaged in the construction of the Dutch Gap Canal, plans to create an all-"colored" Corps were brought to fruition, and the 29th was reassigned to the 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 25th Corps. Marshall was ambivalent about segregating "colored" troops, feeling that it would "set us off & mak[e] us too exclusive," and arguing that he had reason to believe that his command "certainly will be marked & will have our reputation to make and have it all our own, not divided with white troops" (1864 November 19).

After a brief furlough in January, ostensibly to get married (he did not), Marshall accepted a return to his regiment coupled with a promotion to Captain, yet shortly thereafter he stepped back into his role as aide de camp, this time on the staff of Brig. Gen. Charles S. Russell (2.2.XXV).

After the fall of Richmond, Marshall rode in alone on the morning of April 3rd, uncontested, and witnessed the symbolic end of the war. Two days later, Lincoln arrived in the Confederate capitol, greeted by "near 10,000 people mostly darkies, full of their expressions and gesticulations of praise & joy at seeing the day" (1865 April 5). The euphoria, as Marshall predicted, evaporated quickly, and within a few days of these climactic events, the 29th Connecticut was sent to the drudgery of guard duty at Point Lookout Military Prison and in mid-June, they were ordered to Brownsville, Tex.

The 29th Connecticut was mustered out of the service in October, 1865. Reflecting back on his experiences. Marshall lived up to his wartime vow to enter the ministry, studying at Yale Seminary in 1865-66 before graduating from Andover in 1868. He was ordained in the Congregational ministry that year, accepting a pastorate at Avon, Conn., where he remained until 1872. In later years, he held pastorates at Charlemont, Mass. (1872-77), Middlebury, Conn. (1877-85), Cromwell, Conn. (1885-1904), and Hampton, Conn. (1904-1910), and he served as Chaplain of the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1911-12. He married twice: first, on August 25, 1869, to Marietta Crosby of Danbury, Conn., who died in March, 1871, and second on December 29, 1874, to Mrs. Annette L. Barton. He died at home on October 11, 1918.


Collection Scope and Content Note

Henry Marshall is among those writers whose letters provide insight into the workings of the mind, but also the workings of the heart. As a result, his surviving correspondence ranks among the outstanding collections in the Schoff Civil War Collections, providing a sensitive and deeply introspective view into the experience of a white officer in a "colored" regiment. An exquisite writer, Marshall was also among the most punctual of correspondents, rarely allowing a week to pass without sending something to his family at home. As a result of this fidelity and his meticulous eye for detail, it is possible to reconstruct nearly every day of Marshall's life under arms, the swings in his emotions, and the sudden changes in fortune that marked his career.

The high point of the collection is a remarkable series of letters written while Marshall was captain of Co. E, 29th Connecticut Infantry (Colored). Unlike the vast majority of white Americans, Marshall saw African-Americans as capable soldiers, brave and willing, and though afflicted with an unrelenting paternalism and sense of his own racial superiority, he generally refrained from swinging to the romantic extremes of many white abolitionists or the vicious extremes of his more racist compatriots. Marshall provides good accounts of daily life in camp, the inevitable rumors circulating among the soldiers, and opinions of officers. Of particular value are the ruminations on African American troops and their officers, living conditions while on duty guarding plantations in South Carolina or in the trenches before Petersburg, and the heavy labor while working at construction of the Dutch Gap Canal.

Among the military engagements described by Marshall are Fredericksburg, the sieges of Suffolk and Petersburg (particularly the battles of New Market, Darbytown Road and the Darbytown and New Market Roads), and the capture of Richmond. Furthermore, Marshall was involved in a number of minor skirmishes, many of which are exceptionally well documented. Overall, the best accounts are those for New Market Heights, where African American troops again distinguished themselves, and for a smaller, but significant skirmish during the Petersburg Campaign on October 12 and 13, 1864.

Marshall's letters are made more valuable in that his observational scope extends beyond the military, to report on such things as contraband children's schools (April 30, 1863), "shouts" and religious services (1864 July 5), and the local civilianry. An educated man with a keen interest in botany, he frequently sent home lengthy descriptions of southern flowers, often enclosing samples and seeds, and he left a rare record of the reading material available to a soldier. Marshall was also a keen observer of the religious life in his regiment, writing scathing attacks on his regiment's chaplain, whom Marshall felt was suspect of character.

Subject Terms

    Subjects:
    • African-American soldiers.
    • Brownsville (Tex.)--Description and travel.
    • Military camps.
    • Petersburg (Va.)--History--Siege, 1864-1865.
    • Soldiers--Recreation.
    • Soldiers--Religious life.
    • Suffolk (Va.)--History--Siege, 1863.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Medical care.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, African-American.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Women.
    • United States. Army. Connecticut Infantry Regiment, 15th (1862-1865)
    • United States. Army. Connecticut Infantry Regiment, 29th (1864-1865)
    • United States. Army--African-American troops.
    • United States. Army--Barracks and quarters.
    • United States. Army--Officers.
    • War--Psychological aspects.
    Contents List
    Container / Location Title
    Boxes   17-18, Schoff Civil War Collection  
    Henry Grimes Marshall papers,  1862 August 19-1865 October 9 [series]
     
     1862-1865
    Additional Descriptive Data

    Quotes from the collection

    • "It must be hard work to drill recruits, and of that class of people still worse. Then comes the thought of the dangers of the position... I should feel as if the promotion and the extra pay wouldn't pay for the increased risk. If I went it would be a self denial to go... Upon the whole I feel as if I was willing to leave it with you to do just as you think best and as you want to. As a matter of choice, I feel as if I should rather you would stay where you are. I am not anxious for promotion for you, but then you may feel differently. You enlisted in the first place to serve your country and not from ambitious motives, and you are now doing that good work and would be still doing it if you took the other position... There may be a Providence in its being opened for you now. You didn't seek it. Pray over it. May God guide you right, and save you to return again to us" (1863 May 9)

    • "Young Thompson was always "spoiling for a fight" yet never got into one, & perhaps if he had, he wouldn't have been so anxious after that. We had some such in our Reg. till the battle of Fredericksburg one year ago to day & then they miserably failed to keep up their patriotism, in the mud after the battle. I don't say he would & I don't think he would, but all that sounds different to a fellow who has been out as long as we... I thought I was patriotic when I first came out to give up the pleasant place I had at Newark & leave you all for so long a time if not for all our earthly life, yet I was then I am ten times more so to-day. Even when almost all croaked in the mud at Fredericksburg if I remember rightly I still felt the same faith in the ultimate triumph of the good cause..." (1863 December 13)

    • "I think I shall never fall in love with the service. It is not because I like it that I stay, for I prefer peaceful pursuits. The out-door life suits my health and the campaigning, the roughing it in the bush &c. I like, but for a shorter time than I am now trying it. I saw a fair faced young girl down to the Head [Hilton Head] the other day, and a good looking young lady to-day at church where there were three and the sight brought to mind very forcibly how much I lose down here and you all together enjoying yourselves. I longed to be there. I don't care to banish myself from young ladies society again if I can help it and if 'the court knows itself.' I feel I am growing old in years too but in nothing else, certainly not into a full-blooded man " (1864 August 6)

    • "I fell to thinking how our country had been purified within the last three years. A more earnest manly piety & practical Christianity pervades the Church and the masses of the people... God has come nearer to many families, by taking some member who had gone forth to fight for his country and hasn't it been good for them. And don't all those who have friends in the Army have something definite to pray for and their formality drops off. There are many & great evils about this war, but I somehow to myself seem to see great good coming therefrom" (1864 September 11)

    • "Do you remember how large we were as "grave and reverend seniors " until commencement and then what a fall to " mere alumni"? I thought when I was home that how little attention I would excite if I should come home, the same man, but with citizens clothes on. I would not be noticed amid the thing, and no one would be the wiser for my having served in the army. The present soldiers are the heroes. The men who fell in the beginning of this Great Conflict are almost forgotten, and so will it be with those of us who fall now. Three years from now so fickle are the 'oi polloi " (1865 March 1)

    • "It has been a beautiful day & oh how the men marched, the whole 7 miles almost on a run & our brigade with knapsacks... I wish I could sit down by you & describe it to you. The great fire as big as any I ever saw, the long railroad bridge across to Bell Isle is flames volumes of smoke rising, and the bursting shells, in the flames sounded like a fierce battle raging. One of the ironclads exploded while we were there not far from us, with a fearful noise and the prettiest volume of smoke & flame rolled up so prettily, then the Reg'ts came in cheering & yelling & drums playing colors flying a regular triumphal entry... Thus falls the proud city in one grand drunk and conflagration and Uncle Abe's niggers have come and occupy the land." (1865 April 3)

    • "The life in the army has, in one sense, demoralized me, and I don't feel like the same man as when I entered the service. I feel old and cold-blooded, with no animation, or youthful exuberance of feeling. I look at everything in too cool matter of fact ways. I have too much of the calculating spirit about me. I can't so paint anything to myself as to excite so much enthusiasm, as to lead me right on into it regardless of the objections. I must stop & look at them & cool all my ardor down... I have lost the simplicity of childhood & the strength of feeling. I have grown, too, to be less demonstrative. What's going to be done? I can't awaken interest in another, for they see me apparently taking no interest in them. Do you see my point?" (1865 October 9)

    • "If I go into battle my position is behind the line & I dont have to fire but look out that the rest do & see that they keep in line & dont skedaddle. I haven't fired my gun yet & have all the catridges [sic] that were furnished me at the beginning" (1862 October 22).

    • "for in war I don't see much difference in the danger. A man in the least dangerous spot may be killed & one in the most dangerous spot may not be" (1863 May 3).

    • "We don't propose to be roughed upon by any paltry officer of a white Reg. who couldn't pass an examination if he should try. If we go into the field we are willing & wish to take shelter tents, but here in a camp of instruction we expect to have the same treatment other Reg'ts have" (1864 March 26).

    • "Once & a while when a streak of ambition or desire for fame takes me or an extra amount of patriotic zeal I wish I could be up there & be doing something, be stirring, & not rusting as we seem to be here. Such fits however don't last me long for I think that I need not desire or long for the fight for I will have the chance soon enough & perhaps too soon, then too 'they also serve who only stand and wait.'…You suffer as much as I & would more, no doubt if I was up there with Grant, though in a different way. The girls can't go and fight but they can stand by & encourage the boys who do go and pray for them, and write them jolly good letters all about things at home, &c." (1864 August 3).

    • "I learned more of the movements of a large army and how it was done than I ever knew before, on horseback riding up & down through the whole 10th Corps & I heard & knew much more than if I had simply been in the Co." (1864 October 5).

    • "That sanctum sanctorum you speak of is exceedingly small in my heart and has but an item or two, for I think I am naturally very ready to tell & often tell to[o] much about myself where a little more reserve would have been better. When I take a sensible view of it, I see but little which I don't tell to some one only I find its not all to one person & so no one knows as much as I. Should I come across the one to whom I could tell all & trust implicitly to its being kept a ready sympathizer & lover, I think I would tell everything" (1865 February 22).

    • "near 10,000 people mostly darkies, full of their expressions and gesticulations of praise & joy at seeing the day" (1865 April 5).

    • "one will do much out here so far away he wouldn't have his folks at home know anything about for the world. No doubt we do much which at home would not be tolerated, or committed, which here are after all not so very much out of the way" (1865 August 7).

    Bibliography

    Thorpe, Sheldon.The History of the Fifteenth Connecticut Volunteers ... (New Haven, 1893).

    Partial Subject Index
    African-American soldiers.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 October 15
    African-Americans--Education.
    • 1863 April 3
    • 1864 May 9
    African-Americans--Religion.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 July 5
    African-Americans--South Carolina.
    • 1864 May 9
    • 1864 June 27
    • 1864 July 5
    • 1864 July 22
    African-Americans--Virginia.
    • 1863 April 3
    Alabama (Vessel)
    • 1864 July 14
    Annapolis (Md.)--Description and travel.
    • 1864 April 2
    Armstrong, Samuel Chapman, 1839-1892.
    • 1864 October 10
    • 1865 January 31
    Artillery.
    • 1863 April 30
    Bachelors.
    • 1863 September 6
    Balls (Parties)
    • 1865 August 24
    Baltimore (Md.)--Description and travel.
    • 1864 January 23
    Battlefields--Virginia.
    • 1864 August 27
    Baynard Plantation Site (S.C.)
    • 1864 July 5
    Beaufort (S.C.)--Description and travel.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 June 14
    • 1864 July 5
    • 1864 July 22
    Beer.
    • 1863 August 11
    Birney, William, 1819-1907.
    • 1864 October 2
    Birthdays.
    • 1865 January 31
    • 1865 February
    Bombardment.
    • 1864 October 5
    Botany--South Carolina.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 July 14
    Botany--Virginia.
    • 1863 May 20
    • 1863 June 21
    • 1863 June 23
    • 1863 August 7
    • 1863 August 16
    • 1863 November 13
    Brownsville (Tex.)--Description and travel.
    • 1865 July 6
    • 1865 July 23
    • 1865 August 7
    • 1865 August 13
    • 1865 August 24
    • 1865 October 9
    Butler, Benjamin F. (Benjamin Franklin), 1818-1893.
    • 1863 December 11
    • 1863 December 13
    Camden Courthouse (N.C.), Skirmish at, 1863.
    • 1863 October 18
    Camps (Military)--Confederate States of America.
    • 1863 June 21
    Camps (Military)--Connecticut.
    • 1864 March 10
    Camps (Military)--District of Columbia.
    • 1862 September 14
    • 1862 September 24
    Camps (Military)--Maryland.
    • 1864 March 26
    Camps (Military)--South Carolina.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 April 18
    • 1864 April 26
    • 1864 May 9
    • 1864 June 11
    Camps (Military)--Virginia.
    • 1862 October 26
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1863 February 5
    • 1863 February 19
    • 1863 April 10
    • 1863 May 17
    • 1863 May 25
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 July 22
    • 1863 August 2
    • 1863 August 11
    • 1863 September 19
    Cemeteries.
    • 1862 November 13
    Charity.
    • 1864 August 6
    Christmas.
    • 1862 December 25
    • 1864 December 25
    Churches--Virginia.
    • 1863 December 8
    • 1864 September 11
    Civilians--Connecticut--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1862 August 31
    • 1865 February 5
    Civilians--North Carolina--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1863 October 16
    • 1863 October 18
    Civilians--Virginia--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 August 23
    • 1863 November 24
    Clergy--Appointment, call, and election.
    • 1864 October 5
    • 1865 August 18
    Connecticut--Politics and government--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1863 March 1
    Copperhead (Nickname)--Connecticut.
    • 1863 March 1
    • 1863 November 9
    • 1864 June 27
    • 1864 September 8
    Cortina, Juan Nepomuceno, 1824-1892.
    • 1865 August 7
    Courts martial and courts of inquiry.
    • 1865 July 2
    Courtship--Connecticut.
    • 1863 March 16
    Curfew.
    • 1864 May 9
    Currency--Confederate States of America.
    • 1863 December 4
    Dance parties.
    • 1864 February 1
    Darbytown and New Market Roads, Battle of, 1864.
    • 1864 October 10
    Darbytown Road, Battle of, 1864.
    • 1864 October 15
    Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889.
    • 1865 May 18
    Death.
    • 1863 June 24
    Dengue.
    • 1865 July 19
    • 1865 August 7
    Deserters, Military.
    • 1863 November 8
    • 1863 November 9
    • 1863 November 29
    Deserters, Military--Confederate States of America.
    • 1864 May 13
    • 1864 July 27
    • 1864 October 23
    • 1863 November 25
    • 1863 December 2
    • 1864 December 21
    • 1865 February 12
    Dismal Swamp (Va.)
    • 1863 September 19
    • 1863 September 22
    Doubleday, Abner 1819-1893.
    • 1864 October 10
    Doubleday, Ulysses 1824-1893.
    • 1864 October 10
    • 1864 October 23
    • 1864 November 6
    Draft.
    • 1863 July 23
    • 1863 November 4
    Dreams.
    • 1864 January 8
    Dutch Gap Canal (Va.)
    • 1864 December 25
    • 1865 February 22
    Duty.
    • 1863 December 13
    • 1864 August 3
    Elections--Connecticut--1863.
    • 1863 March 1
    Emancipation Proclamation.
    • 1862 September 29
    Enemy--Relations.
    • 1863 January 25
    • 1864 July 27
    Executions and executioners.
    • 1863 October 23
    • 1863 November 9
    • 1865 August 7
    Family.
    • 1863 December 13
    Fandangos.
    • 1865 July 23
    • 1865 August 7
    Finance, Personal.
    • 1863 December 17
    Firearms--Accidents.
    • 1864 September 19
    Fires.
    • 1865 March 27
    Fires--Virginia--Richmond.
    • 1865 April 3
    Fishing.
    • 1864 July 17
    • 1864 August 11
    Fleas.
    • 1864 July 5
    Food.
    • 1862 September 14
    • 1862 October 19
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1862 December 25
    • 1863 July 22
    • 1863 August 2
    • 1864 September 2
    Foraging.
    • 1863 October 23
    Foraging--Virginia.
    • 1863 July 4
    • 1863 July 12
    Fords (Stream crossings)
    • 1862 November 23
    Fortification, Field.
    • 1864 September 19
    • 1864 September 22
    • 1864 October 5
    Foster, John Gray, 1823-1874.
    • 1863 July 22
    Fredericksburg Campaign, 1862.
    • 1862 December 11
    Fredericksburg, Battle of, 1862.
    • 1862 December 14
    • 1862 December 20
    Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1880.
    • 1863 November 4
    • 1864 July 14
    Gambling.
    • 1863 February 19
    • 1865 August 7
    Garnett, William F. H.
    • 1865 April 9
    Gettysburg Address, 1863.
    • 1863 December 4
    • 1863 December 11
    Grant, Ulysses S., 1822-1885.
    • 1864 July 27
    Guard duty.
    • 1862 October 26
    Guerrillas--North Carolina.
    • 1863 October 16
    • 1863 October 18
    Kimball, Col., d. 1864.
    • 1863 April 30
    Laundry.
    • 1863 August 16
    Lee, Robert E. (Robert Edward), 1807-1870.
    • 1864 October 23
    Letters.
    • 1863 September 15
    Libby Prison.
    • 1865 April 5
    Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
    • 1865 March 27
    • 1865 April 5
    Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865--Assassination.
    • 1865 May 1
    • 1865 May 18
    Love.
    • 1865 February 12
    • 1865 February 22
    Maps--Virginia--Suffolk.
    • 1863 April 16
    Marches--Texas.
    • 1865 July 6
    Marches--Virginia.
    • 1862 September 29
    • 1863 July 4
    • 1863 September 22
    • 1863 October 1
    • 1864 August 27
    Marriage.
    • 1865 February 12
    • 1865 February 22
    Matamoros (Mexico)--Description and travel.
    • 1865 August 7
    • 1865 August 24
    McClellan, George Brinton, 1826-1885.
    • 1863 April 18
    • 1863 April 20
    • 1863 September 18
    Meade, George Gordon, 1815-1872.
    • 1864 October 23
    Men--Conduct of life.
    • 1864 July 17
    Minstrels.
    • 1865 March 20
    • 1865 May 25
    Morale.
    • 1863 November 29
    Morale--Confederate States of America.
    • 1865 February 12
    Mount Holyoke College.
    • 1864 June 20
    Mud March, 1863.
    • 1863 January 25
    Mule teams.
    • 1862 September 29
    Murder.
    • 1863 July 22
    • 1863 October 23
    Nansemond River.
    • 1863 May 17
    New Bern (N.C.), Skirmish at, 1864.
    • 1864 February 5
    New Bern (N.C.)--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1864 February 5
    New Market Heights, Battle of, 1864.
    • 1864 October 2
    • 1864 October 5
    New Year.
    • 1864 January 2
    North Carolina--Description and travel.
    • 1864 January 26
    Onondagua (Warship)
    • 1865 February 22
    • 1865 March 1
    Packages from home.
    • 1862 October 13
    • 1862 November 2
    • 1862 November 8
    • 1863 January 11
    • 1863 February 19
    • 1863 March 29
    • 1863 August 23
    • 1863 December 11
    • 1864 June 21
    Parades, Military.
    • 1864 March 23
    • 1865 March 12
    Patriotism.
    • 1863 April 2
    • 1863 December 13
    Petersburg Campaign, 1864-1865.
    • 1864 September 8
    • 1864 September 19
    • 1864 September 22
    • 1864 September 26
    • 1864 October 2
    • 1864 October 5
    • 1864 October 10
    • 1864 October 15
    • 1864 December 25
    • 1865 January 31
    • 1865 February 12
    • 1865 March 1
    • 1865 March 4
    • 1865 April 3
    Pets.
    • 1865 February 8
    • 1865 February 18
    • 1865 February 22
    • 1865 March 1
    • 1865 March 4
    • 1865 March 12
    Photographs.
    • 1864 December 25
    Physical education and training.
    • 1864 June 14
    • 1864 November 19
    Picket duty--Virginia.
    • 1862 November 13
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1863 November 24
    Pictorial letterheads.
    • 1865 May 1
    Pillage--North Carolina.
    • 1864 February 1
    Pillage--Virginia.
    • 1865 April 9
    Plantations--South Carolina.
    • 1864 July 5
    Plantations--Virginia.
    • 1863 July 4
    • 1863 November 13
    Point Lookout Military Prison.
    • 1865 May 1
    Point Lookout Military Prison--Illustrations.
    • 1865 May 1
    Port Royal Island (S.C.)--Description and travel.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 June 14
    • 1864 July 5
    Portsmouth (Va.)--Description and travel.
    • 1863 August 11
    • 1863 August 30
    • 1863 November 24
    Presidents--United States--Election--1864.
    • 1864 September 8
    Prices--Texas.
    • 1865 August 13
    Prison guards.
    • 1865 May 1
    Prisoners of war.
    • 1865 March 1
    Prostitutes.
    • 1865 July 23
    • 1865 August 7
    Racism.
    • 1864 March 26
    • 1864 April 2
    • 1864 July 22
    Raids (Military Science)
    • 1863 June 30
    • 1863 July 12
    • 1864 February 1
    Rape.
    • 1865 August 7
    Refugees--North Carolina.
    • 1863 October 16
    Refugees--Virginia.
    • 1863 December 11
    Reviews, Military.
    • 1865 February 22
    • 1865 March 27
    Richmond (Va.)--Capture, 1865.
    • 1865 April 3
    Richmond (Va.)--Description and travel.
    • 1865 April 3
    • 1865 April 5
    • 1865 April 9
    Roanoke Island (N.C.)--Description and travel.
    • 1864 January 26
    • 1864 February 1
    Russell, Charles Sawyer, 1831-1866.
    • 1865 February 8
    • 1865 February 18
    Scott, Winfield 1786-1866.
    • 1862 October 26
    Scurvy.
    • 1865 July 23
    • 1865 August 7
    Sharpshooters.
    • 1863 June 27
    Slavery--Maryland--Emancipation.
    • 1864 November 6
    Smallpox.
    • 1862 October 22
    Soldiers--Alcohol use.
    • 1863 August 11
    • 1863 September 19
    • 1865 March 12
    Soldiers--Books and reading.
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 July 22
    • 1863 August 7
    • 1863 August 16
    • 1863 September 6
    • 1863 October 16
    • 1863 November 18
    • 1864 June 27
    • 1864 August 30
    • 1864 October 23
    • 1865 February 22
    Soldiers--Conduct of life.
    • 1865 August 7
    Soldiers--Costume.
    • 1863 June 12
    Soldiers--Death.
    • 1863 September 15
    • 1863 December 13
    • 1864 June 20
    • 1864 November 6
    Soldiers--Recreation.
    • 1863 February 5
    • 1863 April 10
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 August 30
    • 1863 December 31
    • 1864 January 2
    • 1864 February 1
    • 1864 December 25
    • 1865 March 20
    Soldiers--Religious life.
    • 1863 March 1
    • 1863 March 16
    • 1863 May 25
    • 1863 August 2
    • 1863 November 2
    • 1864 May 13
    Soldiers--Suffrage.
    • 1864 October 10
    South Carolina--Description and travel.
    • 1864 April 17
    • 1864 April 18
    • 1864 July 5
    South Mills (N.C.), Skirmish at, 1863.
    • 1863 October 16
    Spirit of the Times (Newspaper)
    • 1863 April 18
    • 1863 April 20
    Steamboat travel--Atlantic Ocean.
    • 1864 August 11
    • 1865 June 15
    Steamboat travel--Gulf of Mexico.
    • 1865 June 15
    • 1865 July 2
    Steamboat travel--Virginia.
    • 1863 July 22
    Stoves.
    • 1864 December 21
    Suffolk (Va.)--Description and travel.
    • 1863 March 16
    • 1863 March 29
    • 1863 April 16
    • 1863 May 11
    • 1863 May 17
    • 1863 May 25
    Suffolk (Va.)--History--Siege, 1863.
    • 1863 April 16
    • 1863 April 18
    • 1863 April 20
    • 1863 April 26
    • 1863 April 30
    • 1863 May 3
    • n.d. (H.W. Green)
    Tents.
    • 1862 September 14
    • 1862 November 4
    • 1863 May 17
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 October 23
    • 1864 April 17
    Texas--Description and travel.
    • 1865 July 6
    • 1865 August 24
    Thanksgiving Day.
    • 1863 November 26
    • 1863 August 7
    Theaters--Virginia.
    • 1864 September 14
    Thompson, Joseph Parrish, 1819-1879. The Sergeant's Memorial.
    • 1863 December 13
    Toads.
    • 1863 August 11
    Trench warfare.
    • 1864 September 19
    • 1864 October 10
    Turner, John Wesley, 1833-1899.
    • 1864 August 30
    Turret ships.
    • 1865 February 22
    • 1865 March 1
    Union sympathizers--Virginia.
    • 1865 April 9
    United States Sanitary Commission.
    • 1864 January 22
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--African-Americans.
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1863 March 29
    • 1863 April 30
    • 1863 June 12
    • 1863 July 22
    • 1863 October 1
    • 1863 December 11
    • 1863 December 13
    • 1864 January 2
    • 1864 May 9
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Hospitals.
    • 1862 October 6
    • 1864 August 27
    • 1864 August 30
    • 1864 September 2
    • 1864 September 6
    • 1864 September 8
    • 1865 May 1
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Medical care.
    • 1862 October 6
    • 1862 October 11
    • 1862 October 26
    • 1864 September 2
    • 1864 September 6
    • 1864 September 8
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, African-American.
    • 1863 April 24
    • 1863 May 3 (2)
    • 1863 May 9
    • 1863 May 25
    • 1863 June 12
    • 1863 June 27
    • 1863 December 13
    • 1864 March 26 (and passim thereafter)
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, Indian.
    • 1864 February 5
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Poetry.
    • 1863 September 18
    • n.d. (H.W. Green)
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Postal service.
    • 1863 August 7
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Prisoners and prisons.
    • 1864 August 6
    • 1865 May 1
    • 1865 May 18
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Railroads.
    • 1863 June 30
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Religious aspects.
    • 1864 September 11
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Scouts and scouting.
    • 1863 October 16
    • 1863 October 18
    • 1863 October 23
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Songs and music.
    • 1863 June 12
    • 1863 July 23
    • 1863 August 23
    • 1863 September 18
    • 1863 December 31
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Veterans.
    • 1865 March 1
    • 1865 May 1
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Women.
    • 1862 October 22
    • 1863 May 11
    • 1863 May 31
    • 1863 August 2
    • 1863 August 7
    • 1863 August 23
    • 1863 August 30
    • 1863 October 18
    • 1863 November 13
    • 1863 December 18
    • 1863 December 31
    • 1864 May 9
    • 1864 August 3
    • 1864 August 6
    • 1865 April 9
    United States. Army--African-American troops--Officers.
    • 1863 November 4
    • 1863 November 13
    • 1863 November 29
    • 1864 January 5
    • 1864 January 13
    • 1864 January 22
    • 1864 June 27
    • 1864 July 22
    • 1864 August 3
    • 1863 December 10
    United States. Army--African-American troops--Officers--Examinations.
    • 1864 January 22
    United States. Army--Barracks and quarters.
    • 1863 February 5
    • 1863 March 29
    • 1863 November 2
    • 1863 December 26
    • 1864 July 5
    • 1864 November 19
    United States. Army--Chaplains.
    • 1862 November 2
    • 1863 November 2
    • 1863 November 13
    • 1863 November 29
    United States. Army--Corrupt practices.
    • 1863 December 11
    United States. Army--Demobilization.
    • 1865 May 1
    United States. Army--Hundred days troops.
    • 1864 September 11
    • 1864 September 26
    United States. Army--Inspection.
    • 1862 October 19
    United States. Army--Leaves and furloughs.
    • 1864 October 17
    • 1865 January
    United States. Army--Military life.
    • 1863 August 2
    • 1863 November 2
    • 1864 August 6
    • 1865 February 18
    United States. Army--Non-commissioned officers.
    • 1863 August 16
    United States. Army--Officers.
    • 1863 April 30
    • 1863 May 3 (2)
    • 1863 May 9
    • 1863 May 25
    • 1863 August 16
    • 1863 November 4
    • 1864 September 6
    • 1864 October 5
    • 1864 November 19
    • 1863 December 10
    United States. Army--Officers--Alcohol use.
    • 1863 April 30
    United States. Army--Pay, allowances, etc.
    • 1863 August 7
    • 1864 July 22
    • 1864 November 19
    United States. Army--Promotions.
    • 1862 September 29
    • 1863 May 3
    • 1863 May 9
    • 1863 May 11
    • 1863 May 20
    • 1863 May 25
    • 1863 November 29
    • 1864 October 10
    • 1864 December 10
    • 1865 January 31
    United States. Army--Supplies and stores.
    • 1863 June 12
    • 1864 September 14
    United States. Army--Surgeons.
    • 1863 September 6
    • 1863 December 11
    United States. Army--Uniforms.
    • 1862 October 19
    • 1863 December 11
    Vermin.
    • 1864 June 27
    Virginia--Description and travel.
    • 1863 June 21
    • 1863 September 22
    • 1864 January 23
    Virginia--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Destruction.
    • 1863 June 12
    • 1863 July 12
    War.
    • 1864 August 3
    War bonds.
    • 1863 May 17
    War--Psychological aspects.
    • 1864 August 6
    • 1864 August 14
    • 1864 October 10
    • 1864 October 15
    • 1865 October 9
    Ward, Henry Clark, 1827-1903.
    • 1864 August 27
    • 1864 August 30
    Washington (D.C.)--Description and travel.
    • 1862 September 14
    • 1862 September 24
    • 1864 January 22
    White House (Va.), Skirmish at, 1863.
    • 1863 July 4
    William and Mary College.
    • 1863 July 12
    Windsor (N.C.), Skirmish at, 1864.
    • 1864 February 1
    Women.
    • 1864 June 14
    Women--Education.
    • 1864 June 14
    Women--Texas.
    • 1865 July 23
    • 1865 August 7
    • 1865 August 13
    Wright, Elias, 1830-1901.
    • 1864 November 6
    Yale University.
    • 1864 March 15
    Yale University--Students.
    • 1862 November 2
    Yorktown (Va.)--Description and travel.
    • 1863 June 23
    • 1863 June 27