Karl Frank Lagler Papers,   1937-1984, and undated
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Contents List

   Container / Location    Title
 
Charles W. Lentz Papers [series]:
Box   1 F   1
Biographical Materials, 1982, 2003, and undated
Box   1 F   2
Articles by: "Discovering old farm silos," in Midland Log, Fall 1994
Box   1 F   3
Articles by: "Discovering old farm silos," Slide Presentation Fliers, undated
Box   1 F   4
Articles by: "In search of old farm silos," in Michigan History Magazine, March-April 1998
Box   1 F   5
Farm Silos, Correspondence, Re: Articles Lentz Wrote or Submitted [for Publication], 1988, 1998 (Scattered), and undated
Box   1 F   6
Farm Silos, Correspondence, Re: Requests for Research Materials, 1988
Box   1 F   7
Farm Silos, Correspondence, Re: Related Materials, Photographs, and Clippings (copies), 1974, 1999 (scattered), and undated
Box   1 F   8
Farm Silos, Correspondence, Re: Related Materials, Photographs, and Clippings (copies), 2000-2003
Box   1 F   9
Farm Silos, Literature, Research (Mostly Copies), 1980, 2000, and undated
Box   1 F   10
Farm Silos, Negatives, undated
Box   1 F   11
Farm Silos, Photographs, 1982, 1994
Box   1 F   12
Farm Silos, Photographs, undated
Box   2 F   1
Farm Silos, Photographs with Negatives, 2001
Box   2 F   2
Farm Silos, Slides, 1980, 1993
Box   2 F   3
Farm Silos, Slides, 1983, 1993
Box   2 F   4
First Silo in Michigan Information, undated
Box   2 F   5
Michigan Silos, Speech Notes, 1993, 2003
Box   2 F   6
Michigan Silos, Speech Notes (Accompanies Slides), 2003
Box   2 F   7
Michigan Silos, Slides (on CDs, black and white, and colored), 2003
Box   2 F   8
Old Farm Silos by Charles W. Lentz Scrapbook, undated
Box   2 F   9
Photographs and Negatives from Album, 1982, 1988, and undated
Box   2 F   10
Some Silos and their History Scrapbook, undated
Box   2 F   11
Webster's Dictionary Definition of Silage, undated
Box   2 F   12
Old Farm Silos, CD, June 2008
Folder   1  
Oversized Photograph measuring 13 inches x 16.5 inches black and white photograph of silos, undated: Poured Concrete Silo with Bell Roof and Flared Eaves, Maker: Built for D. H. Day, Date: Early 1900s, Location: Leelanau County near the Sleeping Bear Sand Dunes. This barn has been designated “one of the most significant structures in Michigan” by the Michigan Society of Architects, calling it “the epitome and symbol of what the architecture of a farm stands for.”, early 1900s
Folder   2  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Glazed Tile Silo, Location: Eastman Road, on the McKay Farm Site, Midland County. This silo is the only structure remaining on what was known as the McKay Farm, owned by Dr. Kenneth McKay, a veterinarian. Typical in the first half of the 20th Century, veterinarians in agricultural communities often owned and lived on farms. [Note: McKay is spelled two ways in the original description by Lentz for this image.], early 1900s
Folder   3  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Harvestone silo, made by the A. O. Smith Co. of Wisconsin, combines the experiences farmers had with earlier silos coupled with modern technology from the industrial world. The glass coated steel panels are safe from corrosion by the acidic juices of silage, and the airtight construction preserves the winter feed. Additionally, the silage is mechanically unloaded from the bottom, eliminated the need to climb into the silo to pitch silage down a chute., undated
Folder   4  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Modern concrete silos are, at least, twice as high and twice the diameter of the early silos. Their increased capacity is eight times greater than those that were built during the evolutionary phase of silo building during the first half of this century. Note the presence of a permanent filling tube on these sealed giant cylinders., early 1900s
Folder   5  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Silo located south of Traverse City, Michigan, on Highway 113, between Highway 37 and Kingsley., undated
Folder   6  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Stark Silo, Midland Township, Michigan., undated
Folder   7  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Terra Cotta Tile Silo, Maker: Berne Silo County, Berne, Indiana, Location: Patterson Road, Midland County, Michigan, (Terra Cotta meaning cooked earth, a semi-fired waterproof ceramic clay). , undated
Folder   8  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Wood-Stave Silo, Location: Five Mile Road, about three-quarters of Mile North of M-20, Midland County. Philip Stark moved this silo in 1953 from the farm of his childhood to the present location on Five Mile Road. The original location, on the Leonard Stark Farm, was near what is now the intersection of Sugnet and Saginaw roads (see the 1897 Plat Map of Midland County for its original location.) , undated
Folder   9  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Metal Silo, Location: M-115, south of Lake Cadillac. Metal silos could be purchased as kits and assembled by the farmer. The metal had to be coated on the inside to prevent corrosion by acids from the silage and kept painted on the outside to prevent rusting., undated
Folder   10  
Oversized Photograph measuring 12 inches x 16 inches color, matted photographs of silos, undated: Rectangular Wood Silo, Maker: Probably a local carpenter, Location: Genesee County; on Cummings Road, south of Davison Road. Although rectangular structures were easy to build, they were not satisfactory as silos because the coarse silage did not fill the corners. Consequently, silage in these areas became moldy and unpalatable., undated