Henry F. Vaughan Papers: 1913-1971
Summary Information
Title: Henry F. Vaughan Papers
Creator: Vaughan, Henry Frieze, 1889-
Inclusive dates: 1913-1971
Extent: 3 linear feet
Abstract:
Commissioner of the Detroit Department of Health, later dean of the School of Public Health of the University of Michigan. Correspondence and manuscripts of articles and speeches; papers detailing his activities with the American Public Health Association, the Association of Schools of Public Health, the Detroit Department of Health, the Michigan Department of Health, and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.
Call number: 86988 Aa 2
Language: The materials are in English.
Repository: Bentley Historical Library
1150 Beal Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2113
Phone: 734-764-3482
Fax: 734-936-1333
e-mail: bentley.ref@umich.edu
Home Page: http://www.bentley.umich.edu/
Finding aid prepared by: Kathy Koehler

Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

The papers were transferred from the University of Michigan School of Public Health (donor no. 1756) in 1985.

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

To protect fragile audiovisual recordings (such as audio cassettes, film reels, and VHS tapes), the Bentley Historical Library has a policy of converting them to digital formats by a professional vendor whenever a researcher requests access. For more information, please see: http://bentley.umich.edu/research/duplication/.

Copyright:

Copyright is held by the Regents of the University of Michigan but the collection may contain third-party materials for which copyright is not held. Patrons are responsible for determining the appropriate use or reuse of materials.

Preferred Citation:

item, folder title, box no., Henry F. Vaughan Papers, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan


Biography

Henry Frieze Vaughan was born October 12, 1889, the son of Dora Taylor Vaughan and Victor C. Vaughan, longtime dean of the University of Michigan Medical School. While Henry shared his father's interest in public health issues and problems, he chose to attack those problems as a sanitary engineer and public health official rather than as a doctor. As Detroit's Health Commissioner between 1919 and 1941, Vaughan pioneered a plan of socialized public health care, which he called "medical participation." This plan, which served as a model for many public health programs and which became widely known as the Detroit Plan, involved the cooperation of private physicians in preventive medical procedures such as low-cost immunization and public health education.

Vaughan was born in Ann Arbor and attended the University of Michigan, where he earned a B.S. in 1912 and an M.S. in Engineering in 1913. He joined the Michigan Department of Health as a sanitary engineer in 1913, but transferred to the Detroit Department of Health in 1914. In 1915 he became an epidemiologist for the Department, and in 1916 was promoted to deputy commissioner. That same year he received the first Doctor of Public Health awarded by the University of Michigan. His career at the Detroit Department of Health was interrupted by World War I. From 1917 to early 1919, he served as Captain, Sanitary Corps, U.S. Army, assigned to the Pneumonia Commission as an epidemiologist. Following this period of military service, he returned to Detroit, as Commissioner of the Department of Health. Vaughan held this post for 22 years, until 1941, when the University of Michigan recruited him to be Dean of the newly reconstituted and expanded School of Public Health. Here he remained until his retirement in 1960, working successfully during his tenure as Dean to secure a strong faculty and new facilities for the School of Public Health.

Throughout his career Vaughan was involved in many professional organizations. These included the American Public Health Association, for which he served as chairman of a number of committees, most notably the Committee on Administrative Practice, and the Association of Schools of Public Health. One of his major commitments was to the board of trustees of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation; appointed in 1933, he served over 40 years. The Kellogg Foundation adapted Vaughan's ideas about medical participation for use in rural health programs, and was a major source of funding for the development of the School of Public Health during Vaughan's deanship. Also during his deanship, Vaughan co-founded the National Sanitation Foundation and served as its director from 1944 to 1967.

Vaughan married Grace Seeley in 1914; they had one son, Henry Frieze Jr., born in 1918. Grace Seeley Vaughan died in 1974, and Henry Vaughan Sr. in 1979.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Henry Frieze Vaughan papers have been divided into six series: Personal, American Public Health Association, Association of Schools of Public Health, Detroit Department of Health, Michigan Department of Health and W.K. Kellogg Foundation. There are no papers in this collection reflecting Vaughan's activities as Dean of the School of Public Health at Michigan. Such papers can be found in the records of the School of Public Health, which includes Vaughan's topical files.

Subject Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the finding aid database and catalog of The Bentley Historical Library/University of Michigan. Researchers desiring additional information about related topics should search the catalog using these headings.


  • Physicians -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Public health -- United States.
  • Public health -- Michigan.
  • Physicians -- Michigan -- Detroit.
  • American Public Health Association.
  • Association of Schools of Public Health.
  • Detroit (Mich.). Dept. of Health.
  • W. K. Kellogg Foundation.
  • Michigan. Dept. of Health.
  • University of Michigan -- Faculty.
  • University of Michigan. School of Public Health.
  • Vaughan, Henry F. (Henry Frieze), 1889-1979.
Contents List
Request materials for use in the Bentley Library
Container / Location Title
 
Personal [series]

The Personal series contains one folder of biographical material as well as correspondence, manuscript articles and offprints. The correspondence covers scattered dates and reflects a variety of concerns. One folder covering the period 1941-1943 consists of Vaughan's correspondence with Haven Emerson, a fellow public health official, APHA member, and trustee of the Kellogg Foundation. Of particular interest among Vaughan's manuscript articles is "Medical Participation in Public Health Work," written in 1932. This outlines his ideas and discusses practical implementation of the plan in Detroit.

Box   1  
Biographical Material
 
Correspondence
Box   1  
1917-1935
Box   1  
1932-1943

(with Haven Emerson)

Box   1  
1961-1969
 
Manuscript Articles, Talks, etc. 1913-1971
Box   1  
"Health and Economic Depressions," 1938
Box   1  
"Intensive Case Finding Work in Tuberculosis," 1937
Box   1  
"Local Health Services in the United States," 1971
Box   1  
"Medical Participation in Public Health Work," 1932
Box   1  
"Modern Practice in Garbage Disposal," 1913
Box   1  
"Notes on Health Education," undated
Box   1  
"Some Results of the Sterilization of Water with Hypochlorite of Lime," 1913
Box   1  
"Team Play for Health (G-Men Against Death)," 1938
Box   1  
"Use of Miniature X-Ray Films in Tuberculosis Case Finding," 1940
Box   1  
Miscellaneous 1950-1953
Box   1  
Offprints 1923-1939
 
American Public Health Association [series]

The American Public Health Association series has been divided into sub-series of the records of various committees. These records include minutes, some correspondence, reports, and memoranda. There is also a sub-series of minutes and reports of the Executive Board. Among these is a report dated September 10, 1940 which discusses the relation of public health work to national defense and states "if our democracy is to stand, we ... must put medical science to work now fully to make our men as good as our machines."

Box   1  
Committee on Administrative Practice 1932-1953
Box   1  
Executive Board 1939-1940
Box   1  
Sub-Committee on Health Conservation Contests 1940
 
Association of Schools of Public Health [series]

The series concerning the Association of Schools of Public Health consists of minutes from meetings between 1941 and 1944.

Box   1  
Minutes December 1941-March 1944
 
Detroit Department of Health [series]

The records of the Detroit Department of Health comprise by far the largest and most substantive series. It documents the development of the medical participation plan in Detroit and in particular the battle waged by the Department of Health to eradicate tuberculosis and diphtheria. Vaughan's belief that education was an integral part of preventive medicine is reflected in items like the radio scripts, dating from 1931-1939 and dealing with public health issues, and in materials concerning continuing education of those physicians cooperating with his medical participation plan, for whom he ran Graduate Conferences. Of interest are an early report, co-authored by Vaughan in 1916 when he was city epidemiologist, on housing and health in Detroit, and a report in the topical file on pollution, concerning lead exposure in the auto body shops in Detroit. The two scrapbooks contain memos and reports dealing with internal procedures, both routine and special, as well as examples of documents used in public outreach.

Box   1  
Radio Scripts 1931-1939
 
Reports, Publications, Etc.
 
"Appraisal Form for City Health Work"
Box   1  
1925
Box   1  
1936
Box   1  
City Health (serial) 1920-1939
Box   1  
"Diphtheria Prevention Program, October 1, 1936"
Box   1  
"Early Diagnosis Campaign, Detroit, Michigan," 1935
Box   1  
"Graduate Conferences for Physicians, November 1936-April 1939"
Box   1  
"Instructions to Teachers on the Health Inspection of School Children," 1924
 
"Maps Showing the Distribution of Disease in Detroit"
Box   2  
1918
Box   2  
1919
Box   2  
1920
Box   2  
1921
Box   2  
"Poliomyelitis in Detroit in 1939," 1940
Box   2  
"Preventive Medicine from the Family Physician," 1933
Box   2  
"Reference Manual: Foodhandlers Division," 1939
Box   2  
"Report to the Health Officer on Housing and Health in Detroit," 1916
Box   2  
"Routine System Employed in the Bureau of Laboratories," circa 1925
 
"Routine System Employed in the Bureau of Medical Service"
Box   2  
Division of Communicable Disease circa 1925
Box   2  
Division of Tuberculosis circa 1925
Box   2  
"Routine System Employed in Division of Medical School Inspection," circa 1925
Box   2  
"Statistical Studies on Prevalence and Mortality from Certain Causes in Detroit, 1934-1935," 1935 (2 volumes)
Box   2  
"Studies on Completeness of Diphtheria Immunization in Detroit," 1935
Box   2  
"Tuberculosis Case Finding: Medical Participation Plan, 1937-1938," 1941
 
"Weekly Health Review"
Box   2  
1924
Box   2  
1925
Box   2  
1926
Box   2  
1929
Box   2  
1930
Box   2  
1932
Box   2  
1937
Box   2  
1938
 
Scrapbooks
Box   3  
Procedures, forms, etc. 1929-1932
Box   3  
Special Orders 1922-1929
 
Topical Files
Box   3  
Diphtheria and Diphtheria treatment 1926-1935
Box   3  
Epidemiological Reports, Detroit 1913-1938
Box   3  
Food Handlers Examinations 1933-1934
Box   3  
ISR 1952-1953
Box   3  
Koch Cancer Clinic of Detroit 1925-1926
Box   3  
Medical Participation 1928-1937
Box   3  
Miscellaneous 1924-1930
Box   3  
Poliomyelitis 1939
Box   3  
Pollution (Air and Water) 1914-1937
Box   3  
Scarlet Fever 1921
Box   3  
School Health and Inspection Program 1921-1922
Box   3  
Social Security Act 1935
Box   3  
Tuberculosis and Tuberculosis Treatment 1934-1940
Box   3  
Venereal Disease and treatment 1939
 
Michigan Department of Health [series]

The Michigan Department of Health series consists of the records of State Council of Health, of which Vaughan was president from 1939-1960, and an emeritus member from 1960 till his death. The records here cover the period 1960-1963 and include minutes, memos, reports, and some correspondence, as well as Vaughan's official appointment as emeritus member by Governor G. Mennen Williams.

Box   3  
State Council of Health papers 1960-1963
 
W.K. Kellogg Foundation [series]

The series concerning the W.K. Kellogg Foundation covers the period 1936-1939, and includes several reports on rural health programs as well as various brochures.

Box   3  
Papers 1936-1939