Media Resources Center (University of Michigan) records, 1948-1987: 1948-1987
Summary Information
Title: Media Resources Center (University of Michigan) records, 1948-1987
Creator: University of Michigan. Media Resources Center.
Inclusive dates: 1948-1987
Extent: 35 linear feet
Extent: 2500 items
Location: Portions located in offsite storage; prior notification required for access.
Abstract:
The television production studio and media services unit of the University of Michigan, commonly referred to as "Michigan Media." It was formed in 1978 through the merger of the university Television Center and the university Audio-Visual Education Center. The Television Center began producing educational programs for broadcast on commercial and public stations in 1950. The Audio-Visual Education Center produced films for the university and operated a film distribution library. The Media Resources Center closed in 1986. The record group consists of administrative records including Broadcasting Committee minutes, annual reports, unit review material, correspondence, and budget material; scripts for television programs and films; press releases; telecourse outlines and study guides; and brochures and catalogs; also photographs; and films.
Call number: 851831 Bimu C473 2
Language: The material is in English
Repository: Bentley Historical Library
1150 Beal Ave.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2113
Phone: 734-764-3482
Fax: 734-936-1333
e-mail: bentley.ref@umich.edu
Home Page: http://www.bentley.umich.edu/
Finding aid created by Greg Kinney, 1990 (with assistance of Doris Attaway)

Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

The records were acquired from Michigan Media in several accessions [Donor # 4408.]. Scripts were transferred periodically, 1966-1978. Additional scripts, administrative records, and films and videotapes were transferred in July 1988 through Jo Wenk and George Williams.

Access Restrictions:

The records are open to research. Special arrangements must be made to view or duplicate some films and videotapes.

To protect fragile audiovisual recordings (such as audio cassettes, film reels, and VHS tapes), the Bentley Historical Library has a policy of converting them to digital formats by a professional vendor whenever a researcher requests access. For more information, please see: http://bentley.umich.edu/research/duplication/.

Copyright:

Copyright for films and videotapes is held by the University of Michigan unless otherwise noted in the finding aid. The collection may contain third-party materials for which copyright is not held. Patrons are responsible for determining the appropriate use or reuse of materials.

Preferred Citation:

[item], folder, box, Media Resources Center (University of Michigan) Records, Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan


Arrangement

Summary Contents List

  1. Administrative Records, 1950-1988 (Box 1-4, 27)
  2. Scripts
    • UM Television Hour (Telecourses) (Box 5)
    • Series I (Box 6-15)
    • Series B (Understanding Our World) (Box 16-19)
    • Series H, 1952-1959 (Box 20)
    • Series A (Accent) (Box 20)
    • Special Projects (Box 21-22)
    • Trigger Films (Box 22)
    • Early Television Plays (Box 22)
    • WPAG TV (Box 24-25)
    • Audio-Visual Education Center (AVEC) (Box 26)
  3. Brochures and Catalogs, ca.1951-1984 (Box 22)
  4. Press Releases (Box 22-23)
  5. Study Guides/Course Syllabi (Box 24)
  6. Newspaper Clippings, 1951-1988 (Box 27-28)
  7. Music Releases (Box 29)
  8. Photographic Prints and Negatives (Box 30-35)

History

The Media Resources Center, commonly referred to as "Michigan Media," served as the University of Michigan's television studio and media services unit. Michigan Media was created in 1978 through the merger of the university Television Center and the university Audio-Visual Education Center. The University of Michigan Television Center (TVC), founded in 1950, produced television programs for broadcast on commercial and educational television stations. Although it never operated its own on-the-air television station, the TVC developed a unique "network" by distributing film and videotape of programs for broadcast by local stations across the country.

The Audio-Visual Education Center (AVEC) was formed out of the university Extension Division's Visual Education Bureau. Originally it was primarily a film distribution unit, providing instructional films to the state's elementary and secondary schools and a variety of adult organizations. As the Visual Education Bureau's activities began to center more on serving the university campus, an autonomous Audio-Visual Education Center was created. The AVEC produced and distributed instructional films as well as promotional films for the university. It also produced films on a contract basis for non-university clients.

Michigan Media also provided closed-circuit and other television services for the university, produced films about the university, collected archival film footage of university events, and provided consultation, maintenance and technical support services for media projects in other university units. In addition to television production, Michigan Media was responsible for the AVEC film distribution library and for increased special project film production. Michigan Media was disbanded in 1987 after a unit review and its functions were eliminated or distributed to other university units.

The University of Michigan Television Center and, later, Michigan Media were widely recognized as pioneers in the development of educational television programming. Along with Johns Hopkins, Michigan was one of the first universities to produce educational programs. The TVC developed the concepts of the "telecourse" and the "trigger film." Over the years, Television Center and Michigan Media productions won numerous awards from professional organizations and film festivals.

The Television Center's first facilities were located in the Speech Department offices in Angell Hall. In 1951/52 the TVC occupied rooms in South Quad and set up a temporary closed-circuit studio in an Angell Hall classroom. The TVC's first working studio was established in the former Dolph Funeral Home building at 310 Maynard Street in Ann Arbor in January 1954. The studio and offices were moved to the Argus Building on West 4th Street in Ann Arbor in 1978.

The university's first experience with television production involved the broadcast of student dramas on WWJ-TV, Detroit on an irregularly scheduled program entitled "On Camera." The plays, written and acted by UM students and directed by faculty, were rehearsed on campus. Actors and sets were then taken to WWJ's studios for the live broadcast. Nine plays were televised between 1948 and 1953. Several UM faculty members had also participated in the WWJ produced series "University of the Air."

In the summer of 1950 officials of WWJ proposed to UM president Alexander Ruthven and a group of faculty that the university participate in production of a series of television programs to be called "The University of Michigan Hour." The station guaranteed the university one hour of air time each week on Sunday afternoon and proposed to pay participating faculty members. The station attached two conditions to the offer: that some form of college credit be awarded and that a tuition fee be charged to each registered viewer.

A special university committee considered and accepted WWJ's proposal in September 1950. Garnet Garrison was appointed to the newly created post of Director of Television. Garrison had received a master's degree in speech from UM and then worked in New York for NBC radio. He also taught radio announcing at Columbia University. In 1947 Garrison had accepted a position in the UM Department of Speech. He would be the guiding spirit of University of Michigan television for more than twenty years.

Production of UM Television Hour programs began in 1950. The first program aired November 5, 1950. In accord with WWJ's wishes, the one hour of air time was divided into three twenty minute segments: a liberal arts program running for fourteen weeks, a practical living program to run seven weeks, and a weekly "showcase for the university." The term "telecourse" was coined to describe the programs of the first two segments. Each of the telecourses was to feature a UM faculty member and was to be aimed at an adult audience. It was decided not to offer regular university credits for the telecourses but rather to provide each registering viewer with a certificate of participation. A minimal registration fee was charged and each registrant was provided a course outline and other supplementary material.

The third segment of Television Hour was named the "Teletour." It was designed to be a "weekly invitation to the people of Michigan to visit one of the many institutions of the university." The teletours were usually broadcast from the WWJ studios with a faculty or staff member using a variety of props and visual aids to describe some university institution or activity. Approximately once a month the WWJ remote truck came to Ann Arbor and the teletour was broadcast live from campus.

The telecourse programs were written by the participating professors and TVC staff. Rehearsals were conducted in the TVC facilities in Angell Hall. On Sunday morning, stars, staff, and props were transported to Detroit for the live broadcast from WWJ's studio. Because the telecourses were done live without recording equipment, no film record of the original telecourses exists. Later, several telecourses were redone and recorded on kinescope film.

Other commercial stations soon expressed an interest in broadcasting UM programs. In September 1951 stations WJIM in Lansing and WKZO in Kalamazoo began simultaneous broadcast of the live WWJ programs via a microwave relay hookup.

Station WOOD approached the Television Center with a proposal to begin broadcasting a second series of live programs from its studio in Grand Rapids. The station offered to provide one half-hour of air time on Saturday afternoon but insisted that the series consist of original productions, not rebroadcasts of WWJ programs. WOOD wanted individual programs of general interest that were not part of a "telecourse." The TVC and WOOD agreed on a format and began broadcasting a series of independent programs under the title "Understanding Our World" in March 1952. These programs were developed and rehearsed at the UM campus and then broadcast live from WOOD studios.

A third request for TVC programming came in 1953 from WPAG, the UHF station in Ann Arbor. The station requested two and three quarters hours of non-commercial programming each week. An arrangement was reached whereby the TVC provided studio facilities, equipment, and technical assistance and the UM Speech Department provided programming and student staff as part of its television production courses. The WPAG programming was intended to serve as an on the air laboratory for speech students interested in television production. Several series were broadcast including community and university news, interviews with local and university personalities, and programs aimed at elementary school children. Approximately 340 programs were broadcast from October 1953 to the spring of 1957 when WPAG went off the air. Only a few of these programs were recorded on film.

The format of the UM Television Hour was modified in the fall of 1952. The telecourse portions of the TV Hour were expanded to one half-hour each. The Teletour segment was moved to a new time slot at 5:45 Saturday evening. This program, now 15 minutes long, was renamed "Michigan Reports" (Series H). Beginning in the fall of 1955 the name was changed again to "Accent: Michigan Report." It was broadcast under that name through 1961 when the program was discontinued. Throughout, the series served as a public relations program for the university, showing the public the variety of activities taking place at the University of Michigan.

The telecourse programs were discontinued in April 1954. Declining numbers of registrants was one factor prompting the abandonment of TV programs for which certificates of participation were issued. Other universities had begun to offer television courses for full college credit under the term telecourse. Michigan did not wish to be associated with these for-credit courses and therefore stopped issuing certificates of participation and dropped the use of the designation telecourse.

Thereafter the Television Hour consisted of two half-hour programs of general interest. The first was a series of multi-part programs of from five to thirty segments. The programs generally featured university faculty discussing and presenting material on topics such as medicine and health, national and international affairs, science, history, and other academic subjects. Some 130 different programs were broadcast between 1954 and 1980.

The second portion of the TV hour was given over to the "Understanding Our World" series (Series B) originally created for station WOOD. Though there were several multi-part programs, the series generally consisted of self-contained programs. The programs often featured UM faculty but also included local, national, and even international personalities. The format of the programs included interviews, panel discussions, demonstrations, and documentaries. Over 800 individual programs were broadcast between 1954 and 1980 covering a wide variety of subjects.

The TVC developed a unique network through which UM programs were broadcast over commercial and public stations across the country. The first UM television network was the "live" hook-up of stations WJIM and WKZO to carry the programs broadcast from the WWJ-TV studios. Completion of the Maynard Street facilities on the UM campus and purchase of a kinescope camera allowed the TVC to produce and record programs in its own studio. The kinescope process recorded the "live" television signal on 16 millimeter film. Copies of the film were made and distributed through the mail to local television stations for broadcast at a time of their choosing. A two-inch videotape recording machine was acquired in 1963, permitting distribution of TVC programs in both film and videotape formats.

By the mid-1960s more than 120 television stations had broadcast TVC programs. Stations joined and left the network at various times but distribution of UM programs remained high until the mid-1970s. By that time the development of the public television system and declining demand for educational programming from commercial stations combined to weaken the market for TVC programming.

The TVC was also involved in special project programming and non-broadcast film production as well as in providing media services to other campus units. Significant special projects included re-creating and recording several telecourses for the Educational Television and Radio Center (ETRC), production of programs for the Midwest Project for Airborne Television Instruction (MPATI) and the Medical Television project.

The ETRC, a Ford Foundation sponsored center to promote development of television as an educational medium, provided funding for the TVC to re-create and record on kinescope film three of the telecourse programs and to develop several new programs. ETRC then distributed the kinescopes to educational television stations throughout the country. The TVC videotaped approximately 100 programs for MPATI, a Purdue University-based project that broadcast educational programming over a six-state area via an aircraft with on-board video broadcasting capabilities. Among TVC productions for MPATI were a 64-part series on American literary history titled "From Franklin to Frost," intended for use in high schools, and an elementary Spanish course.

The TVC cooperated with the Medical School to develop the capacity for closed-circuit broadcasting and recording of surgical and diagnostic procedures for use in Medical School courses. Similar projects were undertaken for the Law School, Zoology Department, and other university units. The TVC also produced public relations films for the university and a variety of instructional films not intended for broadcast use.

An innovative concept developed by Michigan Media was the "trigger film." These were short, open-ended dramatic vignettes designed to illustrate some problem or conflict situation and to promote discussion among the viewers. Trigger films were produced on a variety of topics including teenage driving, drug abuse, aging, and dormitory living. The trigger films were recognized with an Osella award from the 1969 Venice International Film Festival.

In 1959 the TVC began to compile what it called a "university film archives." The TVC filmed many university events including awards ceremonies, building groundbreakings and dedications, retirement banquets, graduations, athletic events and marching band performances, homecoming and other social activities, student protests, visits by dignitaries, and general footage of campus buildings and scenes. This archival film was intended in part to provide stock footage for television and film production, but was also a conscious effort to document the university through film.

When the TVC was founded in 1950 it was placed under the administrative control of the director of University Relations. A Broadcasting Committee oversaw the activities of the TVC. The TVC was headed by a director of Broadcasting, a position held by Garnet R. Garrison from 1950 to 1958. In 1958 the director's responsibilities were expanded to include management of the university radio service. Hazen Schumacher was then placed in charge of television operations as associate director of Television. Schumacher became director of Broadcasting upon Garrison's retirement in 1973.

A major reorganization of media services occurred in 1978. The Television Center was merged with the Audio-Visual Education Center to form the University of Michigan Media Resources Center, commonly referred to as Michigan Media. The AVEC developed out of the broadcasting service of the university Extension Service. It had produced filmstrips, audiotapes, and films for use both within and outside the university. Some AVEC films were made for broadcast but most were intended for use by schools, community groups, and other organizations. AVEC had also developed a large film lending library to serve the university, schools, and community organizations.

Michigan Media provided a variety of media services for the university ranging from film production to consulting, engineering services, equipment service and repair, film and tape duplication, and classroom instruction. For a short time it was also the university computer repair service.

In the early 1980s the original television production was scaled back considerably as the demand for educational programming was increasingly met by educational television stations and commercial production companies. Michigan Media also experienced a significant downsizing imposed during the university's fiscal crisis of the early 1980s.

Michigan Media underwent a university review in 1986. The review panel recommended that MM be retained but that its structure and function be significantly modified. Ultimately, however, it was decided that Michigan Media should be disbanded and its functions eliminated or distributed to other units. The television studio and other media production facilities and staff were divided between the College of Literature, Science and the Arts and the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching. The film and video library was placed under the management of the Undergraduate Library. Michigan Media formally ceased to exist on June 30, 1988.

Some Michigan Media scripts and other paper records had been transferred to the Bentley Library between 1968 and 1978. The remainder of the Michigan Media records were transferred to the Bentley in 1988.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The records of the University of Michigan Media Resources Center document the production of educational television programs and films at the University of Michigan, 1950-1988. The collection includes administrative records, scripts, press releases and program summaries, photographs, and films and videotapes. This finding aid describes in detail the paper and photograph portion of the collection and briefly describes the film and videotape. A companion finding aid entitled "University of Michigan. Michigan Media. Program Descriptions" provides detailed descriptions of the films and videotapes in the collection. The Program Description finding aid is stored at the reference desk in the reading room of the Bentley Historical Library.

Subject Terms

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the finding aid database and catalog of The Bentley Historical Library/University of Michigan. Researchers desiring additional information about related topics should search the catalog using these headings.


  • Television broadcasting -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Television in education -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Education.
  • Educational buildings -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Engineering.
  • Law.
  • Medicine.
  • Music -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Protests -- Michigan -- Ann Arbor.
  • Television industry.
  • Universities and colleges -- Michigan.
  • Motion pictures.
  • Photographs.
  • Videotapes.
  • Midwest Project for Airborne Television Instruction.
  • University of Michigan. Audio-Visual Education Center.
  • University of Michigan. Broadcasting Committee.
  • University of Michigan. Media Resources Center.
  • University of Michigan. Television Center.
  • WPAG-TV (Television station : Ann Arbor, Mich.)
  • WWJ-TV (Television station : Detroit, Mich.)
  • Garrison, Garnet R., 1911-
  • Remley, Frederick.
  • Schumacher, Hazen J.
  • University of Michigan. Audio-Visual Education Center.
  • University of Michigan. Television Center.
  • University of Michigan. Audio-Visual Education Center.
  • University of Michigan -- Buildings.
  • University of Michigan -- Faculty.
  • University of Michigan. Media Resources Center.
  • University of Michigan. Television Center.
  • University of Michigan. Audio-Visual Education Center.
  • University of Michigan. Television Center.
  • Akihito, Crown Prince, son of Hirohito, Emperor of Japan, 1933-
  • Anderson, Judith, Dame, 1898-
  • Barnard, Christiaan, 1922-2001.
  • Bernstein, Leonard, 1918-1990.
  • Chiang, May-ling Soong, 1897-2003.
  • Copland, Aaron, 1900-1990.
  • Ford, Gerald R., 1913-2006.
  • Frost, Robert, 1874-1963.
  • Graves, Robert.
  • Hart, Philip A. (Philip Aloysius), 1912-1976.
  • Hayden, Robert Earl.
  • Houseman, John.
  • Humphrey, Hubert H. (Hubert Horatio), 1911-1978.
  • Jessye, Eva, 1895-1992.
  • Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973.
  • Kuhn, Maggie.
  • Lerner, Max, 1902-1992.
  • McNamara, Robert S., 1916-2009.
  • Mansfield, Mike, 1903-2001.
  • May, Rollo.
  • Mead, Margaret, 1901-1978.
  • Miller, Arthur, 1915-2005.
  • Morse, Wayne L. (Wayne Lyman), 1900-1974.
  • Mukle, Muy.
  • Muskie, Edmund S., 1914-1996.
  • Murrow, Edward R.
  • Oppenheimer, J. Robert, 1904-1967.
  • Ormandy, Eugene, 1899-1985.
  • Paton, Alan.
  • Rand, Ayn.
  • Reuther, Walter, 1907-1970.
  • Romney, George W., 1907-1995.
  • Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1884-1962.
  • Rostow, W. W. (Walt Whitman), 1916-2003.
  • Rustin, Bayard, 1912-1987.
  • Salk, Jonas, 1914-1995.
  • Haile Selassie I., Emperor of Ethiopia, 1892-1975.
  • Shriver, Sargent, 1915-2011.
  • Snow, C. P. (Charles Percy), 1911-
  • Solomis, Alexis.
  • Stassen, Harold E. (Harold Edward), 1907-2001.
  • Thomas, Norman, 1884-1968.
  • Toynbee, Arnold Joseph, 1889-1975.
  • Williams, G. Mennen, 1911-1988.
Contents List
Request materials for use in the Bentley Library
Container / Location Title
 
Administrative Records [series]

The Administrative Records of Michigan Media and its predecessor, the University of Michigan Television Center, document management and policy aspects of television production at the university. The most significant files within the Administrative Records series are Annual Reports to the President, 1953/54-1984/85; Broadcasting Committee minutes and correspondence, 1950-1978, and Remley Files, 1980-1987; Budget Materials, 1954-1985; Merger of the TVC and the AVEC, 1978; Unit Review Material and Reports, 1986; Vice President for Academic Affairs correspondence, 1976-1986; and Yearly Production Summaries, 1950/51-1958/59.

Other administrative series include correspondence and budget material relating to various special projects undertaken by Michigan Media and several special reports and speeches, notably President Ruthven's 1950 address to the Television Broadcasting Association on "The Possibilities of Educational TV," Garnet Garrison's 1968 report on "TV in the University Community," the report of the President's Ad Hoc Communication Review Committee on "The New Teaching Technology" (1973), and a case study of the impact of university-imposed budget cuts on Michigan Media by Marcia Jablonsky, a student in the School of Business Administration and a former employee of Michigan Media (1981).

There are no administrative records for the Audio-Visual Education Center from the period before its incorporation into Michigan Media. Some information on AVEC can be found in records of the University of Michigan Extension Service, boxes 18 and 20.

 
Annual Reports to the President
Box   1  
1953/1954-1963/1964
Box   1  
1964/1965-1984/1985
Box   1  
Background Material (2 folders)
Box   1  
Monthly Reports November 1978-June 1980
Box   1  
Berentson Memorial Broadcasting Award 1968-1969 (2 folders)
 
Broadcast Committee

The Broadcasting Committee series (1 ft.) includes minutes, correspondence, and reports of the committee which oversaw radio and television broadcasting at the university. Initially this committee dealt almost exclusively with television broadcasting. Following a reorganization of broadcasting administration in 1958, the committee took on greater responsibility for supervision of radio broadcasting. The files contain information on the development of television broadcasting policy and programming, the role of the Television Center as a service unit for the university, expansion of television facilities, the founding of student radio station WCBN-FM in 1972 and the ensuing controversy with Eastern Michigan University's WEMU over frequency allocation, and the operation of WUOM and WCBN.

The series is arranged variously by calendar or academic year with minutes, correspondence, and reports interfiled in a single sequence. This series seems to have been the principle administrative file of TVC directors Garrison and Schumacher. This series is continued by the Remley, 1980-1987, series which was the main administrative file of Fred Remley, Schumacher's successor as head of Michigan Media.

Box   1  
1950, 1952
Box   1  
1953
Box   1  
1954
Box   1  
1955-1956
Box   1  
1956-1957
Box   1  
1957-1958
Box   1  
1958-1959
Box   1  
1959-1960
Box   1  
1960-1961
Box   1  
1961-1962
Box   1  
1962-1963
Box   1  
1963-1964
Box   1  
1964-1966
Box   1  
1966-1967
Box   1  
1967-1968
Box   1  
1968-1970
Box   1  
1971
Box   1  
1972
Box   1  
1972-Political Broadcasts
Box   1  
1973
Box   2  
1974
Box   2  
1975
Box   2  
1976
Box   2  
1977
Box   2  
1978
 
Remley Files
Box   27  
1980
Box   27  
1981
Box   27  
1982
Box   27  
1983
Box   27  
1984
Box   27  
1985
Box   27  
1986 (2 folders)
Box   27  
1987
Box   27  
1988
Box   27  
Articles 1961-1987
 
Budget Material

The Budget Materials (.5 ft.) include background files on budget requests and planning, 1954-1957 and 1968-1985; financial reports and audits, 1976-1985; staff and payroll records, 1950-1972; and the "Holbrook File," 1982-1985, concerning budget cuts and the downsizing of Michigan Media. The Unit Review series includes correspondence, minutes of the review committee, reports prepared by Michigan Media, the report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs (VPAA) from the Committee to Review Michigan Media and the report of the VPAA to the Budget Priorities Committee. The Vice President for Academic Affairs correspondence contains memoranda on a variety of administrative and policy matters, in particular the downsizing of Michigan Media in 1981-82 and the Unit review of 1986. Some VPAA correspondence is also filed in the Broadcasting Committee and Remley series.

Box   2  
1968
Box   2  
1979-1980
Box   2  
1980-1981
Box   2  
1981-1982
Box   2  
1981-1982

(Budget Cuts)

Box   2  
1984-1985
 
Financial Reports and Audits
Box   2  
1955, 1976-1982
Box   2  
1982-1985
Box   2  
Five Year Plans 1972-1979
Box   2  
Brinkerhoff Report 1983-1986
Box   2  
Hayes Salary Study 1972
 
Holbrook File
Box   2  
Budget Cuts 1981-1985
Box   2  
"Innovators Reports," 1980-1986
Box   2  
Staff/Payroll Records 1950-1972
 
Cable Television

Cable Television files (3 folders) contain information on university wide policies on development of cable television capabilities and the university's relation to local and statewide cable systems. The Yearly Summaries, 1950/51-1958/59, provide fairly detailed information on the production and distribution of television programs.

Box   2  
General 1968-1977
Box   2  
Committee on the Future of Educational Television 1971
Box   2  
University Ad Hoc Committee on Cable TV 1973
Box   2  
Channel 31 (Ann Arbor) 1979
Box   2  
Corporation for Public Broadcasting Reports 1985-1987
Box   3  
Correspondence, Memoranda and Reports 1953-1958
Box   3  
Faculty Stipends 1954-1979
Box   3  
Film and Video Library Transfer 1987
 
Medical Color TV
Box   3  
1955-1957
Box   3  
1958-1959
Box   3  
1962-1968
Box   3  
Merger of AVEC and TVC 1978 (3 folders)
Box   3  
Phasing Out Michigan Media 1987
Box   3  
Report for Service to Faculty 1986
Box   3  
Unit Review Materials 1986 (2 folders)
Box   3  
Unit Review Reports 1986
 
Vice President for Academic Affairs, Memos etc.
Box   3  
1976-1980

(Carolyn Davis)

Box   3  
1981-1986

(Mary Ann Swain)

Box   3  
Weekly Broadcast Schedule 1973
Box   3  
Weekly Production Reports November 1978-June 1980
 
Yearly Summaries
Box   3  
1950/1951 (2 folders)
Box   3  
1951/1952 (2 folders)
Box   3  
1952-1953
Box   3  
1953/1954-1956/1957
Box   3  
1957/1958-1958/1959
Box   4  
Special Projects
Box   4  
Advocacy Institute 1968
Box   4  
Challenge of Foreign Policy 1955
Box   4  
Children's TV Workshop Project 1980
Box   4  
Civil Defense 1959
Box   4  
Eli Lilly Grant 1958-1959
Box   4  
ETRC Project 1953-1954
Box   4  
Ford Foundation Workshop
Box   4  
Japan Society Film 1960-1961
Box   4  
LS&A Orientation 1960-1964
Box   4  
Magazine Segments 1980-1981
Box   4  
MPATI 1961-1962 (3 folders)
Box   4  
NAEB Lighting and Staging Workshop 1956
Box   4  
Occupational Health Film 1967-1968
Box   4  
Paso (MPATI Spanish course) 1963
Box   4  
Rose Bowl 1965
Box   4  
"Six Lives" (Indian education project) 1976
Box   4  
Speech Clinic 1963
Box   4  
USIA Band Project 1960
 
Speeches, Articles, and Special Reports
Box   4  
"Current and Future Trends in Audio-Visual Education in the United States," Fred Remley 1975
Box   4  
"Michigan Media Resources Center: A Case Study," Marcia Jablonski, (student paper) 1975
Box   4  
"Some Present and Future Applications of Radio and Television in the University Setting," Hazen Schumacher 1972
Box   4  
"Support for Public TV," (part of Detroit Area Study) 1959
Box   4  
"The New Teaching Technology: Opportunity for Radical Change in University Instruction," Report by the President's Ad Hoc Communications Review Committee 1973
Box   4  
"The Possibilities of Educational Television" Alexander Ruthven 1950
Box   4  
"TV in the University Community," 1968 and other articles by Garnett Garrison, 1951-1953 1951-1968
 
Scripts [series]

The Scripts series includes all extant scripts for television programs, special project films, and Audio-Visual Education Center productions. The scripts vary from the merest outlines and stage directions to fully worked out dialogue. The scripts, usually bound in volumes, are organized by series and thereunder by chronologically assigned negative number or alphabetically by title. Also included are scripts of several student dramas presented on WWJ-TV by the Speech Department.

The scripts, in order of arrangement, include:

  1. Series T, University of Michigan Telecourses broadcast on the original Television Hour, 1950/51-1953/54. Arranged chronologically. (Box 5)
  2. Series I, Independent, multi-part programs broadcast as part of the University of Michigan Television Hour, 1955-1980. Arranged alphabetically by program title. (Boxes 6-15)
  3. Series B, Individual Programs of general interest broadcast under the title "Understanding Our World" (UOW). The series was initially broadcast live over WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids, 1952-1953, and later recorded on film or tape and broadcast as part of the UM Television Hour, 1954-1982. Arranged by chronologically assigned negative number with separate sequences for WOOD and Television Hour programs. Some Series B scripts are missing. (Box 17-19)
  4. Series H, "Michigan Report" 1952-1955. This series was the successor to the "Teletour" portion of the original Television Hour. It was broadcast over WWJ-TV Saturday evenings. Arranged chronologically. (Box 20)
  5. Series A, "Accent: A Michigan Report" 1955-1961. This series is a continuation of Series H under a new name. Arranged chronologically. (Box 20)
  6. Special Projects, Scripts for televised programs that were not part of an ongoing series or films not intended for broadcast use. Arranged alphabetically by title. (Boxes 20-22)
  7. Trigger Films, Scripts and outlines for several trigger films that were not part of an ongoing series. (Box 22)
  8. Early Television Plays, Scripts of six student plays produced on WWJ-TV by UM students, 1948-1953. (Box 22)
  9. WPAG-TV, An incomplete set of scripts for several series broadcast from the UM Television Center studio over the Ann Arbor UHF channel, 1954-1957. (Box 24-25)
  10. AVEC, Scripts for films produced by the University of Michigan Audio-Visual Education Center, ca.1951-1978. Arranged alphabetically by title. (Box 25-26)
 
UM Television Hour (Telecourses) [subseries]
 
1950-1951
Box   5  
Man in His World: Human Biology, 1-14
Box   5  
Living in the Later Years, 1-7
Box   5  
Photography, 1-7
Box   5  
Lands and Peoples of the Far East, 1-14
Box   5  
Fundamentals of Interior Design, 1-7
Box   5  
Retailing and the Customer, 1-7
 
1951-1952
Box   5  
Man in His World: Human Behavior, 1-15
Box   5  
Democracy in Action: Parliamentary Procedure, 1-7
Box   5  
Understanding the Child, 1-7
Box   5  
Democracy in Action: Political Parties, 1-15
Box   5  
Understanding Numbers, 1-7
Box   5  
Exploring the Universe, 1-7
 
1952-1953
Box   5  
Man in His World: Modern Physics, 1-15
Box   5  
Understanding Our Natural Resources, 1-8
Box   5  
Understanding Music, 1-7
 
1953-1954
Box   5  
Progress of Mankind, 1-15
Box   5  
Creative Artists at Work, 1-8
Box   5  
Food and Nutrition, 1-7
Box   5  
Engineering: Building the Modern World, 1-15
Box   5  
The Growing Baby, 1-8
Box   5  
Lands and Peoples of Latin America, 1-7
Box   5  
Theater Arts, 1-7
Box   5  
American Business, 1-7
Box   5  
Fish and Fishing: In Recreation and Commerce, 1-8
Box   5  
Your Health and Medicine, 1-8
 
1954
Box   5  
The Teenager: A Study of Adolescent Behavior, 1-15
Box   5  
Our Changing earth, 1-3
Box   5  
Democracy in Action: Political Parties, 1-13 1954
Box   5  
Understanding the Child, 1-7 1954
Box   5  
Understanding Numbers, 1-7 1954
 
Series I [subseries]
Box   6  
After Eden, 1-15 1968
Box   6  
American Consumer, The, 1-10 1973
Box   6  
American Negro, The, 1-10 1964
Box   6  
American Story Classics, 1-10 1965
Box   6  
Art and the Child, 1-8 1955
Box   6  
Artist at Work, 1-15, 16-30 1973, 1975
Box   6  
Assignment, 1-10 1970
Box   6  
Bell for Freedom, A, 1-7 1956-1957
Box   6  
Black Experience, The, 1-10 1970
Box   6  
Blessings of Liberty, 1-10 1960
Box   6  
Canterbury Tales, 1-10 1967
Box   7  
Challenge of Capitalism, 1-10 1959-1960
Box   7  
Challenge of Foreign Policy, 1-13 1955
Box   7  
Changing Earth, 1-15 1963-1964
Box   7  
Childhood: Worlds to Discover, 1-10 1964
Box   7  
China After Mao, 1-10 1980
Box   7  
China: Background for Discussion, 1-5 1971
Box   7  
China: The Dragon and the Star, 1-10 1959
Box   7  
City Desk, 1-5 1976
Box   7  
City of Time, The, 1-10 1971
Box   7  
Contemporary Dance, 1-8 1971
Box   7  
Conversations With Allen Whiting, 1-5 1979
Box   7  
Creation of Art, The, 1-10 1974
Box   7  
Crime and Justice, 1-10 1973
Box   7  
Dickens World, 1-10 1973
Box   8  
Discovery of Science, The, 1-10 1972
Box   8  
Drawing with Guy Palazzola, 1-15 1970
Box   8  
Ecology: Man and the Environment, 1-15, 1970)
Box   8  
Economics: People and Resources, 1-6 1969
Box   8  
Education: Today and Tomorrow, 1-10 1967-1968
Box   8  
Everybody's Business: Challenge of Change, 1-10 1965
Box   8  
Family Living, 1-15 1968
Box   8  
From Haydn to Hi-Fi, 1-8 1956
Box   8  
Frontiers of Health, 1-30 1955-1956
Box   8  
Future Without Shock, 1-10 1975-1980
Box   8  
Genius, 1-20 1957
Box   8  
Geography of Conflict, 1-8 1956
Box   8  
Germany Today, 1-10 1966
Box   9  
Gift of Life, 1-15 1957
Box   9  
Girls and Women, 1-10 1971
Box   9  
Government of Michigan, 1-8 1957
Box   9  
Greek Tragedy on Stage, 1-10 1969
Box   9  
Her Social Security, 1-4 1977
Box   9  
Herodotus: Father of Time, 1-10 1979
Box   9  
Homeric World, 1-15 1968
Box   9  
House Botanist, 1-20 1978
Box   9  
Identity and Conflict, 1-10 1977
Box   9  
Iliad of Homer, The, 1-10 1974
Box   9  
Images of America, 1-15 1963
Box   9  
In-Out-Round About, 1-10 1968
Box   9  
In Performance, 1-4 1979
Box   9  
Inquiring Mind, The, 1-15 1963
Box   9  
Inside Music, 1-10 1978
Box   9  
Insurance, 1-7 1955-1956
Box   9  
Issue at Hand, 1-10 1976
Box   9  
Japan: The Changing Years, 1-10 1960-1961
Box   9  
Know Your Sports, 1-8 1955
Box   9  
Land to be Free, 1-8 1955
Box   10  
Legacy, 1-10 1959
Box   10  
Life, Death, and Taxes, 1-8 1962
Box   10  
Living Language, The, 1-15 1965
Box   10  
Living Past, The, 1-10 1966
Box   10  
Magic Path, The, 1-15 1957
Box   10  
Making of Music, The, 1-17 1962
Box   10  
Malaysia: Crossroads in the Ocean, 1-7 1969
Box   10  
Man and Continent VII, 1-5 1959
Box   10  
Man in the Middle, 1-10 1969
Box   10  
Man the Maker, 1-10 1969
Box   10  
Mansions of Man, 1-10 1957
Box   10  
Many Worlds of India, The, 1-10 1967
Box   10  
Maps: Horizons to Knowledge, 1-5 1980
Box   11  
Marriage, 1-15 1956
Box   11  
Meet the Masters, 5-8 1966
Box   11  
Men of Property, 1-5 1970
Box   11  
Music Shop, 1-20 1974
Box   11  
Nation of Rebels, A, 1-5 1970-1972
Box   11  
Northern Michigan, 1-7 1955
Box   11  
Nuclear Age, 1-15, 1968)
Box   11  
Nuclear Power and You, 1-5 1978-1979
Box   11  
Of Greeks and Gods, 1-5 1971
Box   11  
Of Men and Motives, 1-15 1961-1963
Box   11  
Offstage, 1-10 1976
Box   11  
On to Tomorrow, 1-6 1976
Box   11  
Our Aging Society, 1-2 1979
Box   11  
Our Changing Earth, 1-7 1954
Box   11  
Painter's Art, The, 1-10 1962
Box   11  
Painting With Guy Palazzola, 1-10 1967
Box   11  
Pike on Language, 1-5 1977
Box   11  
Planning Your Financial Future, 1-8 1954
Box   11  
Plays of Shakespeare, 1-15 1961
Box   12  
Poets Talking, 1-15 1974
Box   12  
Presidential Campaign, 1-7 1956
Box   12  
Profile of a Nation: France, 1-7 1957
Box   12  
Profile of Space, 1-10 1957
Box   12  
Progress of Man, 1-10 1959
Box   12  
Public Arts, 1-10 1959
Box   12  
Quest for Certainty, 1-20 1963
Box   12  
Quiet Furies, 1-10 1967-1969
Box   12  
Rethinking America, 1-4 1979
Box   12  
River of History, 1-10 1970
Box   12  
Russia: Faces of a Giant, 1-10 1958
Box   13  
Science, Quest and Conquest, 1-20, 1958)
Box   13  
Seekers, The, 1-15 1961
Box   13  
Silent Heritage, 1-10 1966
Box   13  
Since You Can't Take It With You, 1-6 1968
Box   13  
Singer's Art, The, 1-14 1972
Box   13  
Social Animal, The, 1-10 1973
Box   13  
Social Security, 1-5 1974
Box   13  
Some Historical Spirits, 1-10 1965
Box   13  
Sounds Into Music, 1-10 1967-1968
Box   14  
Southeast Asia, 1-10 1964
Box   14  
Speak Up, 1-15 1960-1961
Box   14  
Speaking to Others, 1-17 1955
Box   14  
Story of Italy, 1-10 1961-1962
Box   14  
Take as Directed, 1-15 1969-1970
Box   14  
Teenager, The, 1-15 1954
Box   14  
This World of Water, 1-10 1966
Box   14  
Through Children's Eyes, 1-14 1963
Box   14  
Transitions: Caught at Midlife, 1-10 1979-1980
Box   14  
Traumatic Years, 1-2
Box   14  
Twelve Caesars, 1-10 1980
Box   15  
UM 150, 1-9 1966-1967
Box   15  
Understanding Money, 1-7 1971
Box   15  
Unreasonable Men, 1-10 1963-1964
Box   15  
Western Europe, 1-10 1958-1959
Box   15  
Western Way, The, 1-15 1960
Box   15  
Worlds of Abraham Kaplan, 1-11 1971
Box   15  
Worlds of Women, 1-10 1976
Box   15  
Your Child's First Year, 1-10 1958
 
Series B (Understanding Our World) [subseries]
Box   16  
Vol. U1 Spring 1953

(1-13 Kalamazoo broadcasts)

Box   16  
Vol. U3 1952-1953

(1-3 Grand Rapids Broadcasts)

Box   16  
Vol. U4, 1-45 1954-1955
Box   16  
Vol. U5, 46-90 1955-1956
Box   16  
Vol. U6, 91-135 1955-1957
Box   16  
Vol. U7, 136-180 1957-1958
Box   16  
Vol. U8, 181-215 1958-1959
Box   16  
Vol. U9, 216-240 1958-1959
Box   17  
Vol. U10, 241-265 1959
Box   17  
Vol. U11, 266-300 1960-1961
Box   17  
Vol. U12, 301-331 1961
Box   17  
Vol. U13, 332-360 1961-1962
Box   17  
Vol. U14, 361-399 1962
Box   17  
Vol. U15, 400-430 1962-1963
Box   18  
Vol. U16, 431-460 1963-1964
Box   18  
Vol. U17, 461-485 1963-1964
Box   18  
Vol. U18, 486-516 1964-1965
Box   18  
Vol. U19, 517-540 1965-1966
Box   18  
Vol. U20, 541-557 1965-1966
Box   18  
Vol. U21, 558-582 summer 1966
Box   18  
Vol. U22, 583-616 1966-1967
Box   18  
Vol. U23, 617-662 1967-1968
Box   19  
Vol. U24, 663-707 1968-1970
Box   19  
Vol. U25, 708-752 1970-1972
Box   19  
Vol. U26, 753-796 1971-1974
Box   19  
Vol. U27, 797-822 1974-1975
Box   19  
823-839 1976
Box   19  
840-848 1977-1978
Box   19  
849-881 1979-1982
Box   19  
Unnumbered 1979
 
Series H (Michigan Report) 1952-1959 [subseries]
Box   20  
Scripts (2 volumes)
 
Series A (Accent) [subseries]
Box   20  
1-60 1955-1957
Box   20  
61-100 1957-1958
Box   20  
101-130 1958-1959
Box   20  
131-160 1959-1960
Box   20  
161-195 1960-1961
 
Special Projects [subseries]
Box   21  
Advocates, The, 1-8 1967-1968
Box   21  
Alumni Fund Film 1956
Box   21  
A.I.D.S. To You

(Alumni Information Directory System)

Box   21  
Basic French Grammar 1970
Box   21  
Basic Operation of MTS 1969
Box   21  
Building Surfaces Thermal Cost-Performance
Box   21  
Check Your Speed
Box   21  
Civil Advocacy Vignettes, 1-24 1966
Box   21  
Circus in America, 1-3
Box   21  
Concerned Generation, A
Box   21  
Conference on Aging 1970
Box   21  
Detroit Public Library 1954
Box   21  
Dorothy Coon Workshop
Box   21  
Edible Wild Plants 1978
Box   21  
Festival of Song
Box   21  
Gerontology Scenes 1962
Box   21  
Glen Forrester-Niagra Script
Box   21  
Grounds Maintenance
Box   21  
Great Lakes: No Free Lunch
Box   21  
Hagerstown 1958
Box   21  
IBM Punch Card Operation 1967
Box   21  
Idea of Michigan 1962
Box   21  
Inconceivable Commerce, An 1973
Box   21  
Intern 1967
Box   21  
International Year of the Child 1979
Box   21  
ISMR Trigger Films 1970
Box   21  
Many Lives of JQP (John Q. Public)
Box   21  
Mathematics, 1-16 1960
Box   21  
Michigan Turnpike Authority 1955
Box   21  
Michigan Week 1960
Box   21  
MPATI
Box   21  
Michigras Parade 1956
Box   21  
New Concepts in Housing for the Elderly 1978
Box   21  
Newsreels 1964-1968
Box   21  
O & W Beverage-Energy for Industry
Box   21  
Office of Civil and Defense Preparedness
Box   21  
Operation Deep Freeze (shot list for six reels of Film File film no. 249, apparently used in Series I program, Man and Continent VII)
Box   21  
Painting the Past 1959
Box   21  
Personnel Office 1971
Box   21  
Phoenix Project
Box   21  
Pre-Parole Project
Box   21  
Prime of Life, The
Box   21  
Reality Practice and You
Box   21  
Safer World on Wheels, A (HSRI Dedication)
Box   21  
Staging 1958
Box   21  
Stanley Quartet South American Tour
Box   21  
State and Community Relations
Box   21  
Studio Sampler
Box   21  
Teaching, Research, Service 1967
Box   21  
Tension Areas
Box   21  
They Teach at Michigan 1970
Box   21  
To Your Health 1974
Box   21  
United Campaign Fund Promo 1963
Box   21  
WDIV-TV Magazine Segment
Box   21  
We Are Young We Are Black
Box   22  
We Came to Ann Arbor
Box   22  
Welcome Michigan
Box   22  
Years of Glory, Years of Growth
Box   22  
Miscellaneous
 
Trigger Films [subseries]
Box   22  
General
Box   22  
Aging
Box   22  
Drugs
Box   22  
Mental Retardation
Box   22  
Teenage Driving
 
Early Television Plays [subseries]
Box   22  
"Mr. Plummerton Finds the Truth" 1948
Box   22  
"Dementia Wilcox" 1948
Box   22  
"Master Pierre Patelin" 1949
Box   22  
"Walls of Glass" 1949
Box   22  
"Arthur Savile's Crime" 1949
Box   22  
"Creatures of Impulse" 1953
 
Brochures and Catalogs [series]

The Brochures and Catalogs consist of publicity and informational material on the Television Center and individual series or programs. The catalogs are listings, with brief descriptions, of television programs and films available from the Michigan Media film and video library.

Box   22  
circa 1951-1984 (4 folders)
 
Press Releases [series]

The Press Releases series consists of news releases provided to television stations and the press at the time a program was to be broadcast. They contain brief summaries of the subject matter of the program and usually name the "stars." Arrangement of the press releases is by television series and thereunder chronologically or alphabetically, corresponding to the arrangement of the scripts.

 
Series A (Accent)
Box   22  
1-100
Box   22  
101-199
 
Series I
Box   22  
A
Box   22  
B-C
Box   22  
D-E
Box   23  
F
Box   23  
GH-I
Box   23  
J-Mag
Box   23  
Mak-Mu
Box   23  
N-O
Box   23  
P
Box   23  
Q-R
Box   23  
S
Box   23  
T-U
Box   23  
V-Z
Box   23  
Miscellaneous Programs (2 folders)
 
Series B (Understanding Our World)
Box   23  
1-100
Box   23  
101-200
Box   23  
201-300
Box   23  
301-400
Box   23  
401-500
Box   23  
501-600
Box   23  
601-700
Box   23  
701-800
Box   23  
801-849, 858-870
 
WPAG-TV 1956-1957
Box   23  
General
 
Study Guides/Course Syllabi [series]

The Study Guides/Course Outlines include the supplementary material for the Telecourse programs, 1950-1954 and for three programs in Series I, "Creation of Art," "Dickens' World" and "Music for Metrics."

Box   24  
Television Hour 1950-1954
Box   24  
Creation of Art 1975
Box   24  
Dickens' World
Box   24  
Music for Metrics 1975
 
Other scripts [series]
 
Radio Scripts
Box   24  
"Angell Hall Playhouse," 1951
Box   24  
Miscellaneous Scripts circa 1951
Box   24  
WWJ-TV "Down Storybook Lane"
 
WPAG TV
 
Women's Sports Page
Box   24  
Oct-Dec 1954
Box   24  
1955
Box   24  
1956-1957
Box   24  
Storytime
Box   25  
WPAG Scripts 1954-1956 (8 volumes)
 
Audio-Visual Education Center (AVEC) [series]
Box   26  
Filmstrip Scripts
 
Film Scripts
Box   26  
Aging: A Modern Social Achievement (1957)
Box   26  
Automyocardial Autogenous Skin Grafts
Box   26  
Basic Movement Education in England
Box   26  
Big Difference, The (1966)
Box   26  
Child Amputees (1964)
Box   26  
Children with Cleft Palate (1954 ?)
Box   26  
Decade of Achievement 1946-1956
Box   26  
Design for Independent Living
Box   26  
Digital Engineering Lab (1973)
Box   26  
Engineering Centennial-The First Hundred Years (1954)
Box   26  
First Aid for Head and Neck Injuries in Football
Box   26  
Goodbye to Captain Hook
Box   26  
Henry Ford Historical Film Collection
Box   26  
High School Band Day 1960
Box   26  
Immediate Dental Prosthesis
Box   26  
Industrial Exhaust Systems
Box   26  
Introduction to Digital Logic, parts 1 & 2
Box   26  
Knowledge, Wisdom, and the Courage to Serve (1967)
Box   26  
Locks of Sault Ste. Marie, The
Box   26  
Mechanism of Chip Formation
Box   26  
Michigan Rhapsody (1961 ?)
Box   26  
Micro-Circulation Studies
Box   26  
Old Spain on the Caribbean
Box   26  
Phoenix Project (ca. 1954)
Box   26  
Rehabilitation of a Paraplegic
Box   26  
Rice Farming in Japan (1952)
Box   26  
Rose Bowl 1972
Box   26  
School Days (1959)
Box   26  
Solar Disk (1959)
Box   26  
Story of Maple Syrup
Box   26  
SELMA/QAS (Systems Engineering Laboratory-Markhov Analysis/Que Analyzer System)
Box   26  
Telling Stories to Children
Box   26  
We'll Remember Michigan
Box   26  
Wrestling Techniques
Box   26  
Miscellaneous titles
 
Newspaper Clippings [series]

Newspaper Clippings include news and feature articles and reviews from the local, national, and trade press. The clippings are arranged in chronological and topical files.

Box   27  
1950-1951
Box   27  
1951-1952
Box   27  
1952-1953
Box   27  
1953-1954
Box   27  
1956-1959
Box   27  
1959-1961 (2 folders)
Box   28  
Awards
Box   28  
1956-1965
Box   28  
1966-1972
Box   28  
Garrison, Garnet
Box   28  
Medical Television
 
Miscellaneous
Box   28  
1950-1960
Box   28  
1954-1959 (2 folders)
Box   28  
1962-1964
Box   28  
1965-1969
Box   28  
1970-1973
Box   28  
1974-1987
Box   28  
Salk Polio Vaccine Announcement 1955
 
Series I and B Programs
Box   28  
1954-1957 (2 folders)
Box   28  
1962-1967
Box   28  
1966-1970
Box   28  
Trigger Films 1971-1974
Box   28  
WPAG TV 1954-1956
 
Music Releases [series]

Music Releases are releases from music publishers permitting use of musical pieces in programs in Series B and I. Arrangement is by program title in Series I and by program number in Series B.

Box   29  
Releases
 
Photographs / Negatives [series]

The collection contains a substantial number of Photographs, both negatives and prints. These include stills of television productions; publicity photos; portraits of faculty participants in programs; images of the TVC studios, equipment and staff; and photos of special events recorded by the TVC, including the Salk polio vaccine press conference, Lyndon Johnson's 1964 commencement address, and Martin Luther King, Jr.'s appearance at Hill Auditorium.

The photographs are arranged into several categories; by television program or series, in chronological sequence, or in topical files. Individual photographs are often not identified. If a photograph is identified by television series or program, it is sometimes possible to determine the identity of individuals by consulting the press releases.

Box   30  
Series A
 
Series B
Box   30  
Chronological (5 folders)
 
Series H
Box   30  
Alphabetical (by program title)
 
Series I
Box   31  
American Consumer-Plays of Shakespeare
Box   32  
Public Arts-Your Child's First Years
Box   32  
Chronological 1954-1958
Box   33  
Speech Dept. Labs and Dramas 1948-1951
Box   33  
Early WWJ-TV Teletours and Telecourses
Box   33  
WWJ-TV Teletour 1950-1954
Box   33  
"Contrite Spirit" TV Drama 1953
Box   33  
WPAG Television circa 1953-1955
Box   33  
TV Center Staff, Studio, and Equipment circa 1949-1970 (6 folders)
Box   33  
Awards
 
Special Events and Activities
Box   33  
President Ruthven's Farm
Box   33  
Salk Vaccine Press Conference 1954
Box   33  
Commencement, Lyndon B. Johnson 1964
Box   33  
Martin Luther King Jr. at Hill Auditorium
 
Summer Field Trips 1952
Box   33  
Biological Station
Box   33  
Fresh Air Camp
Box   33  
Geography Camp
Box   33  
Women's Hospital-Delivery Room
Box   33  
Medical Color TV
Box   33  
Giancarlo Menotti at the Music School
Box   33  
ICLE
Box   33  
MPATI
Box   33  
Winter Commencement-Harlan Hatcher
 
Photo negatives [series]
Box   34  
Series I
Box   34  
Series A
Box   34  
Series B
Box   35  
Chronological 1953-1958
 
Slides [series]
 
Campus Buildings
Box   34  
Administration Building (1 slides)
Box   34  
Alumni Hall (2 slides)
Box   34  
Angell Hall (5 slides)
Box   34  
Burton Tower (1 slides)
Box   34  
Campus Roof Tops (1 slides)
Box   34  
Diag (1 slides)
Box   34  
East Engineering (1 slides)
Box   34  
Hill Auditorium (1 slides)
Box   34  
Law Quad (9 slides)
Box   34  
Michigan Union (1 slides)
Box   34  
Music School (old) (1 slides)
Box   34  
Student Activities Building (1 slides)
Box   34  
West Physics (1 slides)
Box   33  
General Motors Technical Center (21 slides)
 
Films and videotapes [series]

The Films and Videotapes in the Media Resources Center record group include ca. 1500 kinescope films and videotapes, 1948-1986, of television programs on academic topics, current affairs, the state of Michigan, and the University of Michigan; also ca. 1000 reels of 16 mm film and videotapes, 1952-ca. 1980, of documentary footage of events at the University of Michigan including commencements, building dedications, award ceremonies, classroom and laboratory scenes, homecoming, athletic events and marching band performances, student demonstrations, and general campus scenes.

The films and videotapes in the Michigan Media collection were appraised and only a portion have been selected for permanent retention by the Bentley Historical Library. A number of appraisal criteria were used in determining which television programs and films were retained:

  1. subject matter relating to the University of Michigan;
  2. subject matter relating to the state of Michigan;
  3. subject matter of general, national interest;
  4. participation of prominent UM faculty or staff;
  5. participation of prominent Michigan personalities;
  6. participation of persons of national or international significance;
  7. programs marking significant technical or artistic developments at Michigan Media;
  8. award winning programs.

The television programs and films are described in detail in a companion "Finding Aid for Media Resources Center (University of Michigan) Films and Videotapes". The arrangement of that finding aid is by television series, comparable to the arrangement of the scripts. The description of each program includes the title, episode or program number if part of a multi-part program, a brief summary of program content, a list of "stars," and negative, positive and cassette numbers as appropriate. There is also an index to individuals appearing in programs.

The Archival Film series is also described in "Finding Aid for Media Resources Center (University of Michigan) Films and Videotex." This series is made up of film footage documenting a variety of university and community events. Some of this film was shot as stock footage for use in television programs or films. Much of it, however, was produced as part of an effort to build a film archive of the university. Individual titles range from 20 to 1000 feet in length and may include negatives, prints, and work prints that have been cut up and spliced.

The description of each film includes the film number, a brief description of the content of the film, list of persons appearing on the film, information on length, polarity, sound and color characteristics, and occasional notes. The Film File series and the Audio-Visual Film File series are similar to the Archival series. They include documentary footage about the university and footage shot for inclusion in TVC and AVEC productions. There are personal name and subject indexes for the archival and Film File series.

 
Television Programs [subseries] (1300 titles (approximate))
 
Audio-Visual Education Center Films [subseries] (72 titles)
 
"Archives" Film [subseries] (600 titles (approximate))
 
"Film File" [subseries] (265 titles (approximate))