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Check for portfolio Record Description Date of Photo Holdings Political Location World Region
Full Record: x-17069/17069

Lithic technology.

1966

35mm slide: 11292

World

Full Record: x-17070/17070

Lithic technology.

1966

35mm slide: 11293

World

Full Record: x-17071/17071

Flake and blade typology.

1966

35mm slide: 11294

World

Full Record: x-17072/17072

Biface typology.

1966

35mm slide: 11295

World

Full Record: x-17073/17073

Burin typology.

1966

35mm slide: 11296

World

Full Record: x-17074/17074

Microlith, backed and barbed typology.

1966

35mm slide: 11297

World

Full Record: x-17075/17075

Plesidapis, 60-55 million years ago. Paleocene.

1965

35mm slide: 11298

Old World

Full Record: x-17076/17076

Smilodectes, 50-45 million years ago, Eocene.

1965

35mm slide: 11299

Old World

Full Record: x-17077/17077

Pliopithecus, 23-12 million years ago, Miocene.

1965

35mm slide: 11300

Old World

Full Record: x-17078/17078

Pliopithecus: One of the earliest proto-apes, Pliopithecus had the look of a modern gibbon although its arms were not as disproportionately long and specialized for swinging through the trees. On the basis of its teeth and skull it is now classed as an ancestor of the gibbon line.

1965

35mm slide: 11301

Old World

Full Record: x-17079/17079

Oreopithecus, 14 -8 million years ago, Pliocene.

1965

35mm slide: 11302

Old World

Full Record: x-17080/17080

Oreopithecus: A likely sidebranch on man's family tree, Oreopithecus is believed t ohave stood around four feet tall and weighed about 80 pounds. Its teeth and pelvis led scientists to wonder if it could be ancestral to man, but apparently it became extinct some 8 million years ago.

1965

35mm slide: 11303

Old World

Full Record: x-17081/17081

Oreopithecus, a human collateral of the Pliocene epoch.

1965

35mm slide: 11304

Old World

Full Record: x-17082/17082

Dryopithecus: Though its skeleton is tantalizingly incomplete, Dryopithecus can be fairly described from a few jaws and teeth. First of the fossil great apes to be discovered, it was widely distributed; remains have been unearthed throughout Europe, in North India and China.

1965

35mm slide: 11305

Old World

Full Record: x-17083/17083

Proconsul, Miocene.

1965

35mm slide: 11306

Old World

Full Record: x-17250/17250

Proconsul: Known from numerous fragments adding up to almost complete skeletons, Proconsul is considered to be a very early ape, the ancestor of the chimpanzee and perhaps of the gorilla. A contemporary of Pliopithecus, it is often found with it in the same fossil site.

1965

35mm slide: 11307

Old World

Full Record: x-17251/17251

Proconsul (by Wilson).

1965

35mm slide: 11308

Old World

Full Record: x-17252/17252

Ramapithecus: The easliest manlike primate found so far, Ramapithecus is now thought by some experts to be the oldest of man's ancestors in a direct line. This hominid status is predicated upon a few teeth, some fragments of jaw and a palate unmistakably human in shape.

1965

35mm slide: 11309

Old World

Full Record: x-17257/17257

Craniograms of Australopithecus africanus, infant (dashed and dotted line); Australpithecus prometheus, female (solid line); and Paranthropus robustus, male (dotted line).

1951

35mm slide: 11314

Old World

Full Record: x-17258/17258

Craniograms of Australopithecus prometheus (solid line); Plesianthropus transvaalensis, male (dashed and dotted line); and Paranthropus robustus, male (dotted line).

1951

35mm slide: 11315

Old World

Full Record: x-17259/17259

First milk molars of Australopithecus, Paranthropus, and Bushman.

35mm slide: 11316

Old World

Full Record: x-17260/17260

Left lateral views of innominate bones in chimpanzee (left), Australopithecus prometheus (center), and Bushman (right).

35mm slide: 11317

Old World

Full Record: x-17266/17266

Australopithecus and Paranthropus. Australopithecus: Ramapithecus and this early form of Australopithecus, the first certain hominid, are seperated by a gap of nine million years. In this time, the prehumans made great advances - they walked upright, lived on the ground and may have used stones in their defense; Paranthropus: though he stood erect and had hominid features, Paranthropus represents an evolutionary dead end in man's ancestry. A vegeta

1965

35mm slide: 11323

Old World

Full Record: x-17268/17268

Paranthropus.

1965

35mm slide: 11325

Old World

Full Record: x-17269/17269

Paranthropus, small-brained and heavy-jawed, may have favored the more lush habitats of southern and eastern Africa.

1965

35mm slide: 11326

Old World

Full Record: x-17270/17270

Australopithecus court (after Wilson).

1959

35mm slide: 11327

Old World

Full Record: x-17271/17271

Australopithecus was a slender four-footer, weighing under 100 pounds. Standing eret, he ran with a swaying side-to-side motion, but walked in a short-stepping plod. His jaw was slightly forward-thrusting, a result of well developed canines and incisors.

1965

35mm slide: 11328

Old World

Full Record: x-17272/17272

Australopithecus. lustrated under the direction of the author by Zdeněk Burian.

35mm slide: 11329

Old World

Full Record: x-17273/17273

Advanced Australopithecus: Distinguished from the early australopithicenes by his increased canial capacity, advanced Australopithecus was a contemporary of Paranthropus. Primitive tools have been found with both, but whether one or the other or both produced them remains unsettled; and Homo Erectus:The first man of our genus, homo erectus is modern of limb but more primitive of hand and brain, with a cranial capacity extending only into the lower ra

1965

35mm slide: 11330

Old World

Full Record: x-17274/17274

Australopithecus to Homo erectus. Australopithecus: Ramapithecus and this early form of Australopithecus, the first certain hominid, are seperated by a gap of nine million years. In this time, the prehumans made great advances - they walked upright, lived on the ground and may have used stones in their defense; Paranthropus: though he stood erect and had hominid features, Paranthropus represents an evolutionary dead end in man's ancestry. A vegeta

1965

35mm slide: 11331

Old World

Full Record: x-17275/17275

Hominid cranial capacity.

1963

35mm slide: 11332

Old World

Full Record: x-17310/17310

Vision and olfactory centers in primates.

1967

35mm slide: 11491

World

Full Record: x-17311/17311

Primate genealogy.

1967

35mm slide: 11492

World

Full Record: x-17312/17312

The Common Tree Shrew: with its long bush tail ooks so much like squirrels in Malaysia there that the local natives make no distinction between the two, calling both of them tupai.

1967

35mm slide: 11493

World

Full Record: x-17313/17313

Tarsiers: Staring straight backward over its long, brush-tipped tail, a tarsier shows the mobility of its head, able to swivel 180° right or left. Below it, a companion clutches a lizard.

1967

35mm slide: 11494

World

Full Record: x-17314/17314

Sifaka (Indridae): Carrying her baby like a money belt around her waist, a sifaka mother bounds off the ground with a powerful kick. A stunning cowl of white fur frames her naked black face and ears.

1967

35mm slide: 11495

World

Full Record: x-17315/17315

Lion Marmoset: The marmoset, smallest of the living monkeys, is about the size of a squirrel. This particular species is found only in Brazil.

1967

35mm slide: 11496

World

Full Record: x-17316/17316

Woolly Monkey

1967

35mm slide: 11497

World

Full Record: x-17317/17317

Red Howler Monkey

1967

35mm slide: 11498

World

Full Record: x-17318/17318

Uakari: A baby uakari clings to its mother. Despite their surprising habit of emitting what sounds like hysterical laughter when annoyed, these creatures are reputed to make delightful pets when they are young- so loyal to their owners that if deserted they refuse all food and ultimately pine away. As adults, however, they are less tractable and do not adjust well to captivity.

1967

35mm slide: 11499

World

Full Record: x-17319/17319

Golden Langur: The golden Langur changes its color with the seasons. It is creamy white in summer, but in cold weather it turns to a light chestnut or golden hue.

1967

35mm slide: 11500

World

Full Record: x-17320/17320

Gorilla and Homo Skeletons: Comparative skeletons from a macaque monkey (not pictured- on page 82), gorilla and man illustrate the physiological progression from four-footedness through arm-swinging to two-legged walking. The monkey's arms are somewhat shorter than its legs; it can walk with its hands palm down, an impossible feat for a gorilla. On the other hand, the monkey's down-turned shoulder sockets prohibit brachiation in the true sense of

1967

35mm slide: 11501

World

Full Record: x-17321/17321

Indian Langur: Perched in a Tamarind tree, Indian langurs display their sleek lines. Although adapted to an arboreal way of life they often spend as much as 80 percent of the day on the ground.

1967

35mm slide: 11502

Old World

Full Record: x-17322/17322

Male Baboon: The fierce gape of a male in full prime displays canines several times the size of a female's.

1967

35mm slide: 11503

Old World

Full Record: x-17323/17323

Male baboon: Safe from predators, a male baboon adopts the posture it may keep all night long. Its ischial callosities, or callous pads, bear its weight and permit it to sleep sitting up even on slender branches.

1967

35mm slide: 11504

Old World

Full Record: x-17324/17324

Female baboon and child: Suckling, an infant baboon presses up to its mother, who will nurse it for almost a year.

1967

35mm slide: 11505

Old World

Full Record: x-17425/17425

Radioactivity formed in a 24 hour irradiation of 10 mg of obsidian. Likely internal fact sheet. Griffin and Gordus, UMMA 1967.

35mm slide: 11606

World

Full Record: x-17426/17426

Radioactivity formed in a 1.0 minute irradiation of 10 mg of obsidian. Likely internal fact sheet. Griffin and Gordus, UMMA 1967

1967

35mm slide: 11607

World

Full Record: x-17427/17427

Obsidian sample #51 cycles. UMMA

1967

35mm slide: 11608

World

Full Record: x-17603/17603

Russia, High Altai, Pazyryk tomb 1: Felt appliqué.

1965

35mm slide: 11790

Multiple World Regions