Proceedings of the Board of Regents (1995-1996)
University of Michigan. Board of Regents.

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Page  [unnumbered] Proceedings of the Board of Regents The University of Michigan July 1995 - June 1996

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Page  [unnumbered] JULY MEETING, 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Thursday, July20, 1995 The Regents met at 9:15 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Whitaker, Executive Vice President Womack, and Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford were also present. Vice Presidents Kinnear and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were absent. Executive Session Motion President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and recognized Regent Newman, who made the following motion: Pursuant to Sections 8(e) and 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session on July20, 1995, for the purposes of consulting with our attorney regarding trial or settlement strategy in connection with specific pending litigation [Sec. 8(e)]; and considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of written opinions from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. The Regents then proceeded to meet in executive session. The meeting reconvened in public session at 2:05 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Whitaker, and Executive Vice President Womack were also present, as were Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick. Regent Deitch arrived at 3:15 p.m. President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and welcomed Ms. Roberta Palmer, newly-appointed secretary of the university, to her first Regents' Meeting. President's Report The president noted that the role of affirmative action has been a major topic of discussion in higher education circles of late, and that the University of California Board of Regents was to decide that day whether or not to retain its current affirmative action policies. He stated that the University of Michigan has had a fundamental commitment to building a diverse campus for a number of years, and that the increased numbers of women and

Page  2 July Meeting, 1995 minority faculty, staff, and students have strengthened and enhanced the institution. He noted that the commitment to diversity is part of the fundamental character of the University and reiterated his intention to maintain that commitment. Regent Varner thanked President Duderstadt for his comments, and noted that the Board of Regents has strongly supported diversification and affirmative action, with significant results. The progress that's been made has not been accidental, she said, but the result of a conscious effort. She expressed the hope that the University would continue to remain committed to doing what is right. Regent McGowan observed that the timing of the president's remarks should be reassuring for the many people on campus who count on that commitment's being a part of the University of Michigan. Regent McFee commented that this is the only country in the world with a diverse population that comes from all parts of the world, and that she strongly believes that the University should reflect that as well. The strength of the University, she believes, lies in its diversity, and maintaining that diversity enhances its role in sustaining the unique diversity of American society. Provost's Report Department of Communication Studies. Provost Whitaker reported that he had appointed a committee to study the future role of the master's degree in journalism, and that this committee's work should be completed within the next few weeks. International Institute. Provost Whitaker noted that one goal of the International Institute, founded about one and a half years ago in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, was to hire faculty who would serve as bridges between the professional schools and LS&A. He reviewed the backgrounds of four newly-appointed faculty members in the International Institute to show how they would accomplish that goal. Shady Trails Camp. Provost Whitaker updated the Regents about two activities that were being carried out this summer to replace the services lost by the closing of Shady Trails Camp. Cost of compliance with regulations. In response to an earlier request from Regent Newman, Provost Whitaker reported that the "best guess" of the cost of compliance with federal, state, and other government regulations is $178 million across all funds. This figure is growing at a rate of about $600,000 per year. Chief Financial Officer's Report Executive Vice President Womack reported about the University's continuing disagreement with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) over its 2

Page  3 July Meeting, 1995 requirement that FICA contributions must be withheld from the wages of student workers. The University's position is that it should determine the definition of what constitutes a student, not the Internal Revenue Service. The University is engaged in ongoing discussions with the IRS on this issue, which affects student workers' take-home pay. Regent Power commented that this represents another attempt by the federal government at cost-shifting of educational expenses to state governments, families, or students. He said that it would be helpful if a determination could be made of the costs of the federal government's aggregate attempt to shift the cost of education from the government to other sources. Proposed 1995-96 Revenue and Expenditure Operating Budgets, Ann Arbor Campus Executive Vice President Womack provided an overview of the four funds that comprise the University's Current Funds: the General Fund, the Designated Fund, the Auxiliary Activities Fund, and the Expendable Restricted Fund. The proposed 1995-96 Current Funds revenue budget for all three campuses is $2.577 billion, an increase of 8.5 percent over 1994-95; the total expenditure budget is $2.446 billion, an increase of 8.7 percent. Executive Vice President Womack's presentation included ten-year comparisons of total budgeted revenues and of budgeted revenues by fund, as well as breakdowns of budgeted revenues by fund and by source for 1995-96. The 1995-96 revenue budget is broken down as follows: $1.027 billion (40 percent) from the Auxiliary Activities-Medical fund; $172 million (7 percent) from Auxiliary Activities-Other Fund; $839 million (33 percent) from the General Fund; $453 million (17 percent) from the Expendable Restricted Fund; and $86 million (3 percent) from the Designated Fund. Proposed 1995-96 General Fund Budget Provost Whitaker observed that a budget is a policy document matching expenditure patterns with policy objectives. Within this context, the role of the administration is to ensure that unit objectives are consistent with University objectives, and it is the Board's role to make sure that the University's objectives are met as the budget planning process proceeds. The central administration's budget objectives are "to continuously improve the University's role as a world leader, providing excellence in learning, where the faculty as well as the students are engaged in learning, the faculty is engaged in new discovery, often with the assistance of students, and where current knowledge is both transmitted and reinterpreted in the face of new learning." The University should also be engaged in reinventing the learning process itself. Provost Whitaker reviewed the fundamental budget objectives, which are to maintain and enhance the quality of instructional and research programs; improve the quality of the undergraduate educational experience; maintain and enhance access for Michigan undergraduates; improve racial 3

Page  4 July Meeting, 1995 and gender diversity; increase the investment in infrastructure maintenance and reduce the backlog of deferred maintenance; and provide reserves against potential revenue shortfalls to avoid midyear base-budget reductions. He described management initiatives designed to increase cost effectiveness, including M-Quality, process improvement, ("re-engineering"), and Value Centered Management. He also discussed the important role reallocation has played in the General Fund budget strategy over the last 15 years. For the past 5 years each unit has been required to reallocate at least 2 percent of its budget toward its highest priority needs. He pointed out that this process has resulted in the reduction of over 200 General Fund employees, resulting in an annual compensation savings of over $11 million. In response to Regent Newman's question as to whether any budgets were being decreased, Provost Whitaker said that each unit was to receive an increase; no budgets had been cut. Regent Power noted that the budget is presented in terms of dollars, not "dollars per unit of activity". The result is that economic activities are expressed in terms of raw cost, as opposed to "cost per unit of volume." He pointed out that use of the latter method would enable the Regents to more easily interpret the budget figures. Regent Newman asked why the University wasn't attempting to cut costs, as opposed to continually increasing costs. Provost Whitaker responded that about 70 percent of the budget is for personnel; the objective of attracting the best possible people requires resources to keep salaries competitive and to provide the laboratories and facilities needed. Regent Newman said that she is aware that the University has been making efforts to reduce costs, but that the message is not getting out about the specific management decisions that are being made to manage the institution effectively. President Duderstadt pointed out that the volume of knowledge being generated and disseminated at the University is increasing very rapidly, while the price of obtaining this knowledge (tuition rate) is increasing at a much slower rate. He believes that this is a point in history where the burden of paying for education is shifting from the past generation, which doesn't benefit directly, to the generation that receives the knowledge. Costs can be cut either by eliminating academic programs or by reducing costs at lower levels of management. The latter is being done by directing units to reduce their base budgets by two percent every year, and Value Centered Management should be even more effective at cost reduction. President Duderstadt concluded that the challenge is to gather the data and articulate it in a fashion that will show the results most effectively. Regent Power reiterated that this will be necessary to be able to address persistent claims about costs at the University. Provost Whitaker pointed out that the rate of increase in the General Fund budget is less than it has been in the past, and this is a result of the cost avoidance measures that have been implemented. He believes that the quality of the University has been improved while the rate of growth in expenditures has been reduced. 4

Page  5 July Meeting, 1995 Provost Whitaker displayed charts detailing the recommended FY 1995-96 General Fund expenditure budget of $755.1 million, including breakdowns by unit and by category of expenditure. Each unit is slated to receive a base operating budget increase of 2 percent, which is to be matched by the unit through reallocation. He compared the University's increase with those of other Michigan public and Big Ten public institutions. He reported that if the University of Michigan had received the same funding increase as had Michigan State University, it would have been enough to have enabled the University to leave resident tuition rates unchanged for 1995-96. He displayed a chart comparing the cost increase for a Michigan resident to attend the other universities ranked in the top 25 nationally, illustrating that total tuition cost at the University of Michigan is less than one-half that of the least expensive of the other institutions, even after tuition increases have been added in. The recommended increases in student fee rates for 1995-96 are 4.9 percent for lower division resident undergraduates, 5.8 percent for upper division resident undergraduates, special increases for Business Administration M.B.A., Engineering, Kinesiology, Law, Medicine, Pharmacy, and Public Policy, and 6.8 percent for all other students. In response to a question from Regent Baker as to what the recommended tuition rate would have been if the state appropriations had been spread equally across all public institutions, Provost Whitaker stated that if the University's appropriation increase had been equal to the average of that received by all state institutions (47 percent), the tuition recommendation could have been lower. Proposed 1995-96 General Fund Budget, UM-Dearborn Chancellor Renick reported that as part of its budget planning process, the Dearborn campus surveys currently enrolled and former students to assess their experience. A recent survey revealed that the three major factors are quality, value, and convenience. He noted that the campus has increased its enrollment by 2 percent over the previous year, and that it now represents 25 percent of the total number of University of Michigan resident undergraduate students for all three campuses. The recommended average resident student tuition increase for the Dearborn campus is 4.5 percent. Included in the 4.5 percent increase is a $7.00 increase in the student activity fee. Nonresident tuition will not be increased. Incremental funds will be targeted toward teaching and learning activities, a salary program, student services, and implementation of a touchtone registration system. Proposed 1995-96 General Fund Budget, Flint Campus Chancellor Nelms emphasized that UM-Flint seeks to provide a quality education at an affordable rate. The recommendation is for a 5.0 percent General Fund increase, funded by a 3.0 percent increase in state appropriation and a 5.8 percent increase in resident undergraduate and graduate tuition rates. Plans are to reduce the reliance on contingency funding 5

Page  6 July Meeting, 1995 through the reallocation of $1.2 million. The salary program recommendation is for 2.5 percent; if enrollment increases sufficiently, there will be a mid-term increase of 1.5 percent to bring the total to 4.0 percent. The 5.8 percent tuition increase will be the smallest on the Flint campus in over five years, he reported, and total costs of attending UM-Flint remain among the lowest in the state. Student financial aid will be increased by 6.0 percent. Chancellor Nelms pointed out that for 1995-96 the campus is instituting a new technology fee ($10 for part-time students and $20 for full-time). This recommendation is based on the findings of a task force which recommended a fee to support the enhancement of existing student laboratories and instructional resources. Regent McFee observed that the General Fund budget includes revenues from a number of sources in addition to state appropriation and tuition. The setting of tuition, therefore, is affected by such factors as indirect cost reimbursement rates and voluntary support as well as the amount of state appropriation. Provost Whitaker announced that the recommended resident tuition increase is the lowest in ten years. In response to a question from Regent Power about when data will be available comparing conventional budgeting methods with VCM budgeting, Executive Vice President Womack said that although the data is already available, his staff is still exploring alternative methods of presenting the data in the least cumbersome fashion. By early fall, he expects to have a model that would show what the effect would have been during the course of the year if the VCM system had been in use. There followed a five-minute break, after which the meeting reconvened for Public Comments. Public Comments The Regents heard comments from the following individuals, on the topics indicated: Anne Marie Ellison, student, on the Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities; Flint Wainess, president of Michigan Student Assembly, on the cost of higher education; and Beatrice Green, citizen, on the Nichols Arboretum hedge. Following Public Comments, the Regents reconvened at 4:30 p.m. to continue their earlier executive session. Friday, July21, 1995 The Regents met at 9:30 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Vice President Whitaker, and Executive Vice President Womack were also present, as were 6

Page  7 July Meeting, 1995 Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick. President's Remarks Freshmen Enrollment. President Duderstadt reported that in keeping with the University's efforts to ensure that the number of Michigan residents in the Fall 1995 freshman class would be at least 3,000, 332 resident applicants had been admitted from the wait list in June. Over two-thirds of those (233) have accepted the offer, so the University is confident that the fall enrollment goals will be met. Most of these students would have attended other institutions in the state of Michigan, with the largest fraction having planned to attend Michigan State University. Regent Horning commented that despite media predictions that had been made when the specific percentage of in-state/out-of-state enrollment figures was eliminated from state legislation, the University has not increased the proportion of nonresident students. Affirmative Action. President Duderstadt reported that the Regents of the University of California had acted to remove affirmative action programs with regard to admissions, hiring, and contracting. He reiterated that, as illustrated on the ABC evening news the previous night, the University of Michigan remains firmly committed to its own programs aimed at increasing the campus' diversity. Coach Gary Moeller Incident. President Duderstadt observed that some aspects of the situation that led to Coach Moeller's resignation had been handled quite well by the University, while other aspects, particularly involving communications, had not been handled well. He then called on Regent Baker, who stated that the Regents had reviewed this matter and were issuing the following statement: Statement of Regental Concern Regarding Resignation of Coach Gary Moeller The head football coach's, Gary Moeller's, resignation from the University of Michigan has stirred considerable public interest. The Regents have reviewed the circumstances surrounding this event, and intend to accept the legal understandings as negotiated between the University and Coach Moeller. They thank Coach Moeller for his long service to the University and wish him well in his new career. The Regents have also asked President Duderstadt to review the structural, reporting, and operating relationships between the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics and the University as a whole and to report his conclusions next fall. It was emphasized that the Regents expected to receive the report in September or October of 1995. 7

Page  8 July Meeting, 1995 1995-96 Revenue and Expenditure Operating Budgets and 1995-96 Student Tuition and Fee Rates for Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint Campuses Regent Varner moved approval of the 1995-96 revenue and expenditure operating budgets, the 1995-96 General Fund operating budgets, and the 1995-96 student fee rates for the Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint campuses. Regent Deitch seconded the motion. Regent Baker reiterated that had the University of Michigan received the same base increase as Michigan State, Western Michigan, and Grand Valley State universities, it might have been able to have kept its tuition increase at 2.5 percent. President Duderstadt pointed out that the state appropriation has not kept pace with inflation in recent years, and that it continues to decline. Regent McFee emphasized how important state appropriations are to the institution; they are critical to the University's being able to provide the high level of services it does. Regent Varner observed that loss of state appropriation causes students to have to pay ever increasing proportions of the costs, so that without the allocation of University resources, it would no longer be accessible to low income students. She said her support for tuition increases has always been based on her belief that the state's citizens want to maintain the quality of the institution, so it is for this reason that she continues, albeit reluctantly, to support increased tuition in the face of loss of state support. The vote was then taken on the motion to approve the 1995-96 operating budgets, general fund budgets, and student fee rates, and it was approved unanimously. Resolution in Honor of Gilbert R. Whitaker, Jr. President Duderstadt called on Regent Power, who read the following resolution: Regents' Resolution The Regents of the University of Michigan salute Gilbert R. Whitaker, Jr., as he prepares to complete his tenure as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. Gil Whitaker came to the University of Michigan in 1979 as dean of the School of Business Administration and professor of business economics. Under his leadership the school enjoyed remarkable growth in reputation; it became a center of far-reaching scholarship and innovative, disciplined curriculum planning. A $15 million expansion of facilities, funded through private gifts, doubled the school's space while its budget tripled and the number of faculty nearly doubled. At the same time, it developed a more diverse 8

Page  9 July Meeting, 1995 student body, growing from 5 percent to 28 percent minority enrollment in the MBA day program. When the University sought a provost in 1990, it seemed all but inevitable that it would turn to Gil Whitaker. His success as dean had been exemplary; he had chaired the Task Force to Study the Costs of Education; and he had the visionary audacity to call for a revenue diet that would be imposed without sacrificing excellence. As provost, Gil Whitaker has continued his legacy of strong fiscal and academic leadership. Through wise shepherding of resources, he has managed to sustain and even increase faculty compensation levels. Under his direction, programs designed to increase the number of underrepresented minority and women faculty and to provide support for their scholarship have achieved significant results. He has also been a strong supporter for increased attention to teaching and for improving the experiences of undergraduates. Throughout Gil's tenure as both dean and provost, his wife, Ruth Whitaker, has been an equally effective leader, contributing with unique style and grace to a wide array of University and community organizations. Ruth and Gil have been an exceptionally dedicated team whose efforts have had a lasting impact on the entire community. With deep appreciation for his dedication, commitment, and leadership, and, appropriately enough, on the day of his last official budget presentation, the Regents now name Gilbert R. Whitaker, Jr., dean emeritus and provost and executive vice president emeritus for academic affairs, effective September 1, 1995. The motion was accepted by acclamation. There followed a round of applause and a standing ovation. Regent Baker noted the "wonderful and significant contributions" made by Gil and Ruth Whitaker during their long association with the University. Provost Whitaker thanked the Regents for the resolution and quoted Lao-tzu in characterizing how he would like to be remembered: "'But of a good leader who talks little When his work is done, his aim fulfilled They will all say, "We did this ourselves.'" Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the June 1995 meeting. 9

Page  10 July Meeting, 1995 Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports on investments, plant extension, litigation, personnel-labor relations, and noncompetitive purchases from single sources for the period April 1 through June 30, 1995. He reviewed problems that have recently been experienced by the Common Fund, which stem from a loss it incurred as a result of unauthorized trading in violation of written guidelines by one of its managers. This loss affected the University of Michigan by an estimated $1.5-2.0 million reduction in return for fiscal year 1994-95. He described how the Common Fund is organized and noted that it has performed a very useful service to higher education, particularly to smaller endowments. Executive Vice President Womack responded to comments from the Regents about how best to respond to the current situation and about whether, given the size of the University's endowment, the Common Fund is still an appropriate vehicle. Vice President Neal submitted reports of projects established and summaries of a selection of current research for the month of June 1995. He also reported that the Matrigen Agreement discussed at the June Regents' Meeting had been successfully concluded. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear commented that the final report of fiscal-year gift receipts, including the totals for the month of June, will be presented in the September meeting. He reported, however, that voluntary support for 1994-95 was expected to reach a record level, and that the Campaign for Michigan had reached about $846 million towards its $1 billion goal. Personnel Actions. Provost Whitaker and Chancellors Nelms and Renick submitted a number of personnel actions. Regent McGowan commented on the strong support of the faculty for the appointment of Nancy Cantor as dean of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. She also expressed her own enthusiasm for that appointment as well as for the quality of the newly-appointed tenured faculty members. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITH TENURE Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Agee, Jonis, Ph.D., Professor of English and Creative Writing Cantor, Nancy E., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Vice Provost for Academic Affairs - Graduate Studies and Dean, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, five-year term, July 1, 1996 Crocker, Jennifer K., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Kim, KyungMann, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biostatistics Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan K., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology Pincus, Leslie B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of History Seidman, Gay W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Associate Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Health Sharf, Robert H., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Buddhist Studies 10

Page  11 July Meeting, 1995 Studlar, Gaylyn, Ph.D., Professor of English Language and Literature and Film and Video Studies, August 1, 1995 Traub, Valerie J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Willis, Robert J., Ph.D., Professor of Economics NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITHOUT TENURE Effective September 1, 1995 Cordes, Eugene H., Ph.D., Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, and Professor of Chemistry, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Hedstrom, Margaret L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Information and Library Studies Mead, David W., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Porter, Marianetta, M.A., Associate Professor of Art Raghunathan, Trivellore E., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biostatistics REAPPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective July 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Cox, Mary E., Professor of Physics and Engineering, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Physics and Engineering Science, UM-Flint, reappointed Chair, Department of Physics and Engineering Science, UM-Flint, three-year term Gramlich, Edward M., Professor of Economics, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Dean, School of Public Policy, reappointed Dean, School of Public Policy, five-year term, July 1, 1996 Lawrence, Janet H., Associate Professor of Education, with tenure, and Associate Dean, School of Education, reappointed Associate Dean, School of Education, six-month term Mancy, Khalil H., Professor of International Health, with tenure, and Professor of Environmental Chemistry, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, reappointed Chair, Department of Environmental and Industrial Health, three-year term Wheeler, John R. C., Professor of Health Services Management and Policy, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, reappointed Chair, Department of Health Services Management and Policy, three-year term White, B. Joseph, Professor of Business Administration, with tenure, and Dean, School of Business Administration, reappointed Dean, School of Business Administration, five-year term, July 1, 1996 JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective July 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Czarnecki, Richard E., Professor of Business Administration, with tenure, UM-Dearborn, also appointed Acting Chair, Department of Accounting and Finance, UM-Dearborn, one-year term Edwards, Harry K., Professor of Computer Science, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of Computer Science, UM-Flint, May 15, 1995-June 30, 1998 Gluck, Peter R., Professor of Political Science, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of Political Science, UM-Flint, three-year term Gull, Richard A., Associate Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of Philosophy, UM-Flint, three-year term King, Larry, Associate Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of Mathematics, UM-Flint, three-year term 11

Page  12 July Meeting, 1995 Kotowicz, William E., from Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, and Associate Dean, School of Dentistry, to Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, and Acting Dean, School of Dentistry, four-month term, September 1, 1995 Kugler, Lawrence D., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Interim Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UM-Flint, one-year term Lin, Shuen-Fu, from Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, with tenure, and Director, Center for Chinese Studies, to Professor of Chinese Language and Literature, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, three-year term Toman, Jindrich, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, with tenure, also appointed Chair, Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, three-year term Waissi, Gary R., from Associate Professor of Business Administration, with tenure, UM-Dearborn, to Associate Professor of Management Science, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Management, Marketing, Information Systems, and Decision Sciences, UM-Dearborn, three-year term Waters, Christine M., Associate Professor of Art, with tenure, also appointed Chair, Department of Music, UM-Flint, three-year term Webb, Paul W., Professor of Natural Resources and Environment, with tenure, School of Natural Resources and Environment, and Professor of Biology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Interim Dean, School of Natural Resources and Environment, one-year term, September 1, 1995 LEAVES OF ABSENCE FOR. REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Borgers, Christoph, Associate Professor of Mathematics, leave without salary extended Heinonen, Juha, Associates Professor of Mathematics, scholarly activity leave extended OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Betz, A. Lorris, from Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, with tenure, Professor of Neurology, without tenure, Professor of Surgery, without tenure, the Crosby-Kahn Collegiate Professor of Neurosurgery and Neuroanatomy, without tenure, and Senior Associate Dean, Medical School, to Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, with tenure, Professor of Neurology, without tenure, Professor of Surgery, without tenure, the Crosby-Kahn Collegiate Professor of Neurosurgery and Neuroanatomy, without tenure, and Executive Associate Dean, Medical School, July 1, 1995 Herbert, Norman G., from Treasurer and Investment Officer to Associate Vice President and Treasurer, August 1, 1995 Lafontaine, Francine, Associate Professor of Business Economics, without tenure, also named the Sanford R. Robertson Associate Professor of Business Administration, one-year term Marletta, Michael A., Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, with tenure, the John Gideon Searle Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, without tenure, College of Pharmacy, and Professor of Biological Chemistry, without tenure, Medical School, reappointed the John Gideon Searle Professor of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, four-year term, September 1, 1998 Ohnuki-Tierney, Emiko, the Toyota Visiting Professor of Japanese Studies, four-month term Ramaswamy, Venkatram, Assistant Professor of Marketing, also named the NBD Bancorp Assistant Professor in Business Administration, one-year term Schipani, Cindy A., Associate Professor of Business Law, with tenure, also named the Louis and Myrtle Moskowitz Research Professor in Business and Law, one-year Stecke, Kathryn E., Associate Professor of Operations Management, with tenure, also named the Jack D. Sparks - Whirlpool Corporation Research Professor in Business Administration, two-year term 12

Page  13 July Meeting, 1995 Interim appointment approval. The Regents authorized the president or the provost and vice president for academic affairs to make such interim appointments and/or changes as may become necessary from August 1-31, 1995, to complete the staffing for the fall term 1995. C. A. Patrides Professorship in English. The Regents approved the establishment of the C. A. Patrides Professorship in English, effective July 1, 1995. John Stephenson Perrin Professor. The Regents approved the establishment of the John Stephenson Perrin Professor, effective July 1, 1995. The following committee appointments were submitted for approval: Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics Lindeman, Joyce I., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice Christine M. Brooks, term expired Papadopoulos, Stephen M., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice Tom Hickey, term expired Committee on Honorary Degrees Becker, Judith 0., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice L. Ross Chambers, term expired Reame, Nancy E., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice Robert A. Weisbuch, term expired UM-Dearborn College of Arts. Sciences, and Letters Executive Committee Gillespie, John A., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1996, vice Barry A. Bogin, on sabbatical leave Hymes, Robert W., reappointed, September 1, 1995-August 31, 1998 James, David A., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1998, vice Roger F. Verhey, term expired Pearson, Sheryl S., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1996, vice Edward M. Sayles, retirement furlough UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Executive Committee D'Souza, Harry J., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice Gary L. Pace, term expired Miller, Douglas E., July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice Charles W. Bailey, term expired Personnel Reports. The following personnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective July 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated School of Business Administration Afuah, Allan N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Corporate Strategy, September 1, 1995 Nanda, Vikram K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance, September 1, 1995 Oxley, Joanne E., M.B.A., Lecturer in Business Administration Sastry, M. Anjali, Ph.D., Lecturer in Business Administration Shumway, Tyler G., B.A., Lecturer in Business Administration Warther, Vincent A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Finance, September 1, 1998 School of Dentistry Pileggi, Roberta, D.D.S., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, June 1, 1995 Ruona, Kimberly S., D.D.S., Lecturer in Dentistry Law School Hammer, Peter J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Law, September 1, 1995 13

Page  14 July Meeting, 1995 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Ammerlaan, Marcus C., Ph.D., Lecturer III in Biology, June 1, 1995 Collins, Peter A., M.S., Lecturer I in Mathematics Conekin, Becky E., B.A., Lecturer II in British History Hughes, Philip A., D.Phil., Lecturer II in Astronomy Medical School Belcher, Kelvin K., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology Blumstein, Sylvie L., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Obstetrics and Gynecology Charpie, John R., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Chen, Yun-Ching, M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Culler, Cynthia D., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, June 1, 1995 Engert, Susan F., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, July 3, 1995 Ernst, Robert D., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Gros, Kimberly E., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology Grunz, Donald J., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology Hamilton, Brian H., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology Jasty, Rama, M.D., Lecturer in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Kim, Hyung T., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Kopicki, Maria T., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Obstetrics and Gynecology Korszun, Anna-Krystyna, M.D., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, School of Dentistry, and Lecturer in Psychiatry, Medical School, May 15, 1995 Liu, J. Rebecca, M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Obstetrics and Gynecology, July 10, 1995 McCort, Jane T., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Mulligan, Michael S., M.D., Lecturer in Pathology and Lecturer in Surgery Musci, Adrienne T., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, June 19, 1995 Nypaver, Michele M., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery Ojo, Akinlolu O., M.B.B.S., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine Peschers, Ursula M., ARZT, Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynecology Pu, Anthony T., M.D., Lecturer in Radiation Oncology School of Music Calabria, Pier G., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music (Conducting), September 1, 1995 Petty, Wayne C., M.Phil., Assistant Professor of Music (Music Theory), September 1, 1995 Sheng, Bright, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Music (Composition/Music Theory), September 1, 1995 Velez-Aguayo, Evelyn, M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Dance, September 1, 1995 Wilson, Robin M., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Dance, September 1, 1995 School of Nursing Low, Lisa K., M.S., Lecturer in Nursing, April 1, 1995 Mayes, Frances L., M.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing, September 1, 1995 McCook, Judy G., M.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing, May 1, 1995 UM-Dearborn College of Arts Sciences, and Letters Bretz, Stacey L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry, September 1, 1995 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, JOINT APPOINTMENTS, OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective July 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Cui, Shuqin, from Lecturer II in Chinese to Graduate Student Teaching Assistant, June 12, 1995 Roth, Aaron, Lecturer II in English Language and Literature, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Lecturer in Theatre and Drama, School of Music, September 1, 1995 14

Page  15 July Meeting, 1995 Medical School An, Lawrence C., from Lecturer to House Officer IV in Internal Medicine Brown, Randall W., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Caldicott, Catherine V., from Clinical Instructor II to House Officer IV in Internal Medicine Garver, Kimberly A., from Lecturer to Clinical Instructor II in Radiology Jamadar, David A., from Lecturer to House Officer IV in Internal Medicine Leber, Steven M., from Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and Assistant Professor of Neurology to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and Clinical Assistant Professor II of Neurology Macoska, Jill A., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Surgery Patterson, Stephanie K., from Lecturer to Clinical Instructor II in Radiology Warschausky, Seth A., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Business Administration Moore, Scott A., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science, September 1, 1995 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective July 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Bartell, Lawrence S., the Philip J. Elving Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, one-month term Medical School Alpern, Mathew, Professor Emeritus of Physiological Optics, Medical School, and Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, one-year term Dickinson, David G., Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, one-year term, September 1, 1995 Heyn, Ruth M., Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, one-year term Ladu, Bert N., Jr., Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology, one-year term McLean, James A., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term, January 1, 1995 O'Connor, Patricia A., Associate Professor Emerita of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, one-year term, September 1, 1995 Oxender, Dale L., Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry, one-year term Stern, Aaron M., Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, one-year term, December 1, 1995 School of Business Administration Edwards, Alfred L., Professor Emeritus of Business Administration, 10 month term, September 1, 1995 School of Natural Resources and Environment Bassett, John R., Professor Emeritus of Forestry, eight-month term, September 1, 1995 College of Pharmacy Sinsheimer, Joseph E., Professor Emeritus of Medicinal and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, and Professor Emeritus of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, one-year term ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Anspach, Renee, Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave Antonucci, Toni C., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Associate Professor of Human Development, without tenure, Medical School, duty off campus, June 19-August 31, 1995 15

Page  16 July Meeting, 1995 Colburn, C. William, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, with tenure, leave without salary, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996 Deardorff, Alan V., Professor of Economics and Public Policy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Haslanger, Sally A., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave Hochster, Melvin, Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, and the Robert W. and Lynn H. Browne Professor in Science, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Jennings, M. Kent, Professor of Political Science, with tenure, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Kingdon, John W., Professor of Political Science, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Lott, John W., Associate Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, scholarly activity leave Milne, James S., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1-December 31, 1995 Mullaney, Steven G., Associate Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Munro, Donald J., Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, and Professor of Chinese, with tenure, retirement furlough Rauch, Jeffrey B., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Rosser, Jill A., Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, duty off campus Saxonhouse, Arlene W., Professor of Political Science and Women's Studies, with tenure, and the James Orin Murfinm Professor of Political Science, sabbatical leave Schelle, Hansjoerg, Professor of German, with tenure, retirement furlough Sears, Elizabeth L., Assistant Professor of History of Art, leave without salary, September 1-December 31, 1995 Shapiro, Matthew D., Associate Professor of Economics, with tenure, duty off campus, September 1- December 31, 1995 Sklar, Lawrence, Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, and the James B. and Grace J. Nelson Professor of Philosophy, sabbatical leave Smoller, Joel A., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Stacchetti, Ennio S., Associate Professor of Economics, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1-December 31, 1995 Wald, Alan M., Professor of English and American Culture, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Yoffee, Norman, Professor of Near Eastern Studies, with tenure, and Curator of Archaeology, sabbatical leave College of Engineering Anderson, David J., Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, with tenure, College of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, without tenure, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical School, sabbatical leave Winful, Herbert G., Professor of Electrical and Computer Science, with tenure, and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, sabbatical leave Medical School Blane, Caroline E., Professor of Radiology, with tenure, leave without salary, July 3-July 30, 1995 Blumstein, Sylvie L., Clinical Instructor II in Obstetrics and Gynecology, leave without salary, July 1-July 31, 1995 Kopicki, Maria T., Clinical Instructor II in Obstetrics and Gynecology, leave without salary, July 1-July 31, 1995 Naylor, Bernard, Professor of Pathology, with tenure, retirement furlough, July 1, 1995- June 30, 1996 Payne, Anita H., Professor of Biological Chemistry, with tenure, and Professor of Biological Chemistry, without tenure, retirement furlough, August 1, 1995-July 31, 1996 Sullivan, Donita B., Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, with tenure, retirement furlough, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996 School of Art Cervenka, Sister Barbara, Lecturer in Art, leave without salary 16

Page  17 July Meeting, 1995 School of Business Administration Moller, William G. Jr., Associate Professor of Business Administration, with tenure, retirement furlough School of Dentistry Berger, Eli V., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, retirement furlough, July 15, 1995-July 14, 1996 School of Natural Resources and Environment Stoermer, Eugene F., Professor of Natural Resources, without tenure, leave without salary, July 9-August 12, 1995 Taylor, Dorceta E., Assistant Professor of Environmental Sociology, School of Natural Resources and Environment, and Assistant Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, leave without salary School of Nursing Lusk, Sally L., Associate Professor of Nursing, with tenure, sabbatical leave Rogers, Ann E., Associate Professor of Nursing, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 School of Public Health Penchansky, Roy, Professor of Health Services Management and Policy, with tenure, retirement furlough January 1-December 31, 1996 UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Linn, William J., Associate Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, scholarly activity leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences McDonald, James H., Assistant Professor of Anthropology, leave without salary CHANGE TO PREVIOUSLY REPORTED ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVE OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Nica, Alexandru M., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, leave without salary, January 1-December 1, 1995 (previously reported as January 1-May 31, 1995) TERMINATION OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective June 30, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Burton, Stephan L., Lecturer II in Philosophy, term complete, August 31, 1994 Clark, Gracia C., Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Afroamerican and African Studies, term complete, May 31, 1995 Hertz, Dalia, Lecturer II in Philosophy, term complete, April 30, 1995 Markus, Hazel J., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, and Helen Peak Professor of Psychology, resigned, May 31, 1995 Nissen, Eugene W., Assistant Dean and Lecturer in Administration, retired, August 4, 1995 Ortner, Sherry B., Professor of Anthropology and Women's Studies, with tenure, and the Sylvia L. Thrupp Professor of Anthropology, resigned, May 31, 1995 Rosello, Mireille D., Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, with tenure, resigned, August 31, 1995 Stebbins, William C., Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, with tenure, Medical School, and Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, retired Turner, James C., Professor of History, with tenure, resigned May 31, 1995 Velez, Marvirdia, Lecturer II in Urban Planning, term complete, April 30, 1995 Vrettos, Athena, Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, term complete, May 31, 1995 17

Page  18 July Meeting, 1995 Weirick, Allen P., Lecturer III in Germanic Languages and Literatures, term complete, May 31, 1995 Medical School Bass, James C., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Caduff, Jurg H., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Chimowitz, Marc I., Assistant Professor of Neurology, resigned Connor, G. Patrick, Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynecology, resigned, Cornett, Joseph B., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Donovan, Charles B., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Gabriel, Helena, Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Hammerberg, Craig, Lecturer in Dermatology, resigned Hartshorn, Duane O., Lecturer in Otorhinolaryngology, resigned Hill, Timothy A., Lecturer in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, resigned, June 19, 1995 Hurd, William W., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, without tenure, resigned, August 13, 1995 Kim, Thomas A., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Kohut, Karen G., Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynecology, resigned, July 30, 1995 Mata, Marina, Associate Professor of Neurology, with tenure, resigned McCullough, Neil B., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Mittelman, Mark A., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Nairn, Roderick, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, resigned, June 20, 1995 Niebauer, Mark J., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, resigned Pfammatter, Thomas, Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Pranikoff, Thomas, Lecturer in Surgery, resigned Tran, Duc D., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Van Erp, Jeffrey S., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned Weech, Mark A., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, resigned Wilborn, Jerome, Lecturer in Internal Medicine, resigned, April 30, 1995 Yutzy, Gerlad G., Lecturer in Radiology, resigned School of Art Bowers, John N., Assistant Professor of Art, resigned School of Business Administration Bradley, Michael H., Professor of Finance, with tenure, and the Everett E. Berg Professor of Business Administration, School of Business Administration, and Professor of Law, without tenure, Law School, resigned Danos, Paul P., Associate Dean, Professor of Accounting, with tenure, and Arthur Anderson Professor of Accounting, resigned Israel, Ronen, Associate Professor of Business Administration, without tenure, resigned, May 31, 1995 Slezak, Steve L., Assistant Professor of Finance, resigned, May 31, 1995 Wrobleski, William J., Professor of Statistics, with tenure, retired, May 31, 1995 Yi, Youjae, Associate Professor of Marketing, with tenure, resigned, May 31, 1995 School of Dentistry Linger, Jackson B., Lecturer in Dentistry, resigned Rodriguez, Juan P., Lecturer in Dentistry, resigned Wagner, Warren C., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, term complete School of Education Baggett, Patricia M., Associate Professor of Education, without tenure, term complete, May 31, 1995 Crawford Barbara E., Lecturer in Education, term complete, July 31, 1995 Law School Seligman, Joel, Professor of Law, with tenure, resigned, May 31, 1995 School of Music Lewis, Gary J., the Donald R. Shepherd Assistant Professor of Conducting and Assistant Professor of Music (Band), resigned, July 31, 1995 18

Page  19 July Meeting, 1995 School of Nursing Petersen, Barbara A., Assistant Professor of Nursing, resigned School of Public Health Grinker, Joel A., Professor of Human Nutrition, with tenure, retired, July 1, 1995 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Schroeder, John B., Associate Professor of Political Science, retired UM-Flint School of Management Hallam, Stephen F., Dean and Professor of Management, with tenure, resigned Retirement Memoirs. Eight retirement memoirs were submitted. Malcolm S. Cohen, associate research scientist and former director of the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, retired from active faculty status on November 15, 1994, after 26 years of service to the University of Michigan. Dr. Cohen received his B.A. degree summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota in 1963 and won a full academic scholarship to pursue graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned his Ph.D. degree in 1967. He began his career at the University of Michigan in 1968 as assistant to the vice president for state relations and planning and in 1969 as assistant professor of economics. In 1969, he chaired the Management Information System Team, a group charged with responsibility for determining the University of Michigan's management information needs. He joined the Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations in 1972 and became co-director of its research division in 1973. He served as director of the institute from 1983-93. He also served as chair of the Program for Human Resource Development, a certificate program under the auspices of the University's Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies. Dr. Cohen is nationally known for his work in the area of labor market information, particularly with regard to labor shortages. He developed a methodology for identifying labor shortages by occupation, which the U.S. Department of Labor has considered in its criteria for deciding whether to grant labor certification to foreign applicants, and has written a book describing this methodology and the research behind it (University of Michigan Press, 1995). Dr. Cohen has testified as an expert witness, chaired boards of directors, and lectured extensively. He has also conducted studies involving labor market information for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Cost of Living Council, and numerous state and federal government agencies. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Malcolm S. Cohen associate research scientist emeritus. Howard A. Crum, professor of botany in the Department of Biology and curator of bryophytes and lichens in the Herbarium, will retire from active faculty status on August 31, 1995. Professor Crum received his B.S. degree magna cum laude from Western Michigan College in 1947 and his M.S. (1949) and Ph.D. (1951) degrees from the University of Michigan. He served as curator of cryptograms in the 19

Page  20 July Meeting, 1995 National Museum of Canada from 1954-65, when he joined the faculty at the University of Michigan as associate professor of botany and curator of bryophytes. He was promoted to professor in 1969, served as chair of the Department of Botany from 1981-83, and was editor of The Michigan Botanist from 1977-84. Professor Crum is widely considered one of this century's foremost authorities on the taxonomy and phytogeography of mosses. With L. E. Anderson, he published Mosses of Eastern North America, which received the H. A. Gleason Award from the New York Botanical Garden in 1981. Other major floristic works that he authored or co-authored have treated the mosses of the Great Lakes forest, Puerto Rico, and Mexico, and the genus Sphagnum in North America. A steady stream of over 230 papers in journals continues unabated. Professor Crum also served bryology as editor or associate editor of The Bryologist from 1954-76 and as president of the American Bryological and Lichenological Society from 1962-63. His doctoral students occupy important bryological positions in three nations, and practically every bryologist in the United States and Canada has taken his famous course at the University of Michigan Biological Station. For his achievements as a teacher at the Biological Station, he earned an Excellence in Education Award from the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts in 1993. Since 1973, Professor Crum has also served as an academic counselor for the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. His friendly curiosity, wry humor, and warm and supportive manner earned him the Ruth M. Sinclair Memorial Award for Freshman-Sophomore Counseling in 1978. The University of Michigan Herbarium has long had one of the hemisphere's largest and most important collections of bryophytes and lichens. Under Professor Crum's curation, those collections have been reorganized, greatly enlarged, and extensively studied. The Regents now salute this distinguished teacher and scholar by naming Howard A. Crum professor emeritus of botany and curator emeritus of bryophytes and lichens. Cedric V. Fricke, professor of business administration at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, retired from active faculty status on April 30, 1995, following 35 years of service. Professor Fricke received his B.S.E. degree in chemical engineering in 1949, his M.B.A. degree in accounting in 1950, and his Ph.D. degree in business administration in 1959, all from the University of Michigan. He joined the faculty of the University of Michigan-Dearborn as an assistant professor of finance in 1960 after several years of teaching at Wayne State University. He was promoted to associate professor of business administration in 1963 and professor in 1967. During his tenure at Dearborn, Professor Fricke helped develop the finance, business economics, and general management curricula and enjoyed a very successful career as a teacher and advisor. Because of his professional experience in industry, he was able to integrate theory and practice in the classes that he taught, thereby enriching his students' classroom experiences and making their courses more meaningful. 20

Page  21 July Meeting, 1995 While on the faculty, Professor Fricke contributed actively to business and industry by serving as a board member of a number of Detroit area businesses. He was also a member of several professional and academic associations. The Regents now salute this dedicated teacher and senior member of the Dearborn campus by naming Cedric V. Fricke professor emeritus of business administration. Joel A. Grinker, professor of human nutrition in the School of Public Health, professor of nutrition in the Medical School, and research scientist in the Center for Human Growth and Development, will retire from active faculty status on July 1, 1995. Professor Grinker received her B.A. degree in psychology from Wellesley College in 1961 and her Ph.D. degree in experimental social psychology from New York University in 1967. From 1967-69, she served as a Russell Sage Postdoctoral Fellow at Rockefeller University. After serving on the faculty at Rockefeller University from 1971-82, Professor Grinker joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1982 as professor of human nutrition and served as director of the Program in Human Nutrition from 1982-88. In 1983, she received the additional appointment as professor of nutrition in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, Medical School; in 1984, was named research scientist in the Center for Human Growth and Development. Professor Grinker taught courses in the areas of nutrition and aging and in maternal and child nutrition. During her tenure as director of the Program in Human Nutrition, she directed teaching responsibilities in human nutrition. Professor Grinker's principal research focus was in the area of childhood obesity. She received funding from the National Institutes of Health for her research in this area and was a frequent speaker on the subject at nutrition conferences in many parts of the world. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Joel A. Grinker professor emerita of human nutrition, professor emerita of nutrition, and research scientist emerita. Jane M. Lucas, associate librarian, will retire from the Business Administration Library on July 31, 1995. Ms. Lucas earned her B.B.A. degree in 1947 from Michigan State University and her A.M.L.S. degree in 1971 from the University of Michigan. She was inducted into Sigma Epsilon, an honorary society for business administration graduates, and into Beta Phi Mu, the national honorary society for library science graduates. Prior to joining the University of Michigan School of Business Administration Library in 1971, she was employed at Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company and the Detroit News. At the Business Administration Library, Ms. Lucas began in reserves, and then moved into reference work. With her business background, she contributed effectively to the publication selection process and handled a number of key subject areas, including accounting, finance, statistics, and 21

Page  22 July Meeting, 1995 most recently, international business. Her selection responsibilities have grown over the years, and she is currently the library's collection coordinator. In this role, she works not only with faculty and departments, but with technical services staff to ensure that selected materials are acquired and retained appropriately. Among Ms. Lucas' unique achievements are those which have improved the library in an often "unsung" way. She developed a career information center, setting up the career information structure currently in place in the library and managing and maintaining the most current information available. Another of her contributions is in the area of working papers. Due to her efforts, the library has a collection of about 5,000 working papers from approximately 80 institutions to assist patrons in their research work. Ms. Lucas has also written a number of guides and bibliographies to assist patrons in their searches and has co-authored a paper entitled "Compromises in the Management of Working Papers," which appeared in the October 1992 issue of the refereed journal Library Resources and Technical Services. She has made significant and long-lasting contributions to the Business Administration Library. The Regents now salute this librarian by naming Jane M. Lucas associate librarian emerita. George I. Mavrodes, professor of philosophy, retired from active faculty status on May 31, 1995, after a distinguished career as one of the world's foremost philosophers of religion. Professor Mavrodes received his B.S. degree (1945) from Oregon State College, his B.D. degree (1953) from Western Baptist Theological Seminary, and his M.A. (1960) and Ph.D. (1961) degrees in philosophy from the University of Michigan. He taught at Princeton University from 1960-61, after which he returned to the University of Michigan as assistant professor of philosophy. He was promoted to associate professor in 1967 and professor in 1973. He made important contributions to the Program on Studies in Religion, as well as to the Department of Philosophy. Professor Mavrodes has been in the vanguard of an influential movement that has used the tools of contemporary analytic philosophy to elucidate the foundations of religion, and of Christianity in particular. He is the author of Belief in God: A Study in the Epistemology of Religion (1970) and Revelation in Religious Belief (1988) and has edited two anthologies: Problems and Perspectives in the Philosophy of Religion (1967) and The Rationality of Belief in God (1970). His nearly one hundred other publications cover such topics as revelation, divine omnipotence, resurrection, miracles, personal identity and survival of death, and faith and reason, as well as ethics and social policy issues that intersect with religion and morality-abortion, pacifism, the just war, and nuclear deterrence. A leader in his field, Professor Mavrodes has served as president of both the Society for Philosophy of Religion and the Society of Christian Philosophers and as a member of the executive committee of the American Theological Society. He has served in editorial capacities for The American Philosophical Quarterly, Faith and Philosophy, and The Reformed Journal. 22

Page  23 July Meeting, 1995 He has been a fellow of the Calvin Center for Christian Scholarship at Calvin College and of the Center for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Notre Dame and has held visiting positions at Carleton and Kenyon colleges. Over the years, faculty colleagues came to rely on Professor Mavrodes' shrewd and incisive philosophical criticism, while students took advantage of his wide learning and scholarship in philosophy, religion, and theology, and staff appreciated his consideration and personal kindness. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member for his 33 years of service by naming George I. Mavrodes professor emeritus of philosophy. William C. Stebbins, professor of otorhinolaryngology in the Medical School and professor of psychology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, retired from active faculty status on June 30, 1995. Professor Stebbins received his A.B. degree from Yale University in 1951 and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University in 1954 and 1957, respectively. He served as an assistant professor at Hamilton College from 1957-61 and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Washington from 1961-63. He joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1963 with appointments in the departments of psychology and otorhinolaryngology and in the Kresge Hearing Research Institute. Professor Stebbins is the author of more than 60 journal articles and 30 book chapters and has edited or written 7 books. Although these contributions cover a wide range of topics, most deal with his primary interest, which is the measurement of sensory function, particularly hearing, in animals. Perhaps nowhere is this interest better illustrated than in his book, The Acoustic Sense ofAnimals, a scholarly yet readable treatise on animals' sense of hearing that deals not only with how animals hear, but why they listen. Within the University, Professor Stebbins has chaired the Budget Priorities Committee and has served as acting director of the Kresge Hearing Research Institute, chair of the psychobiology area and of the graduate program in the Department of Psychology, chair of the Faculty Senate, LS&A ombudsman, and associate dean for faculty programs in the graduate school. At the national level, Professor Stebbins has served as president of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, as a study section member of NINCDS, and has been active in the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otorhinolaryngology. He has also served on the external advisory committees for a number of institutions across the U.S., has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals, and has been a reviewer for several funding agencies. His honors include his appointment as a fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America, and a fellow of the American Psychological Society. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming William C. Stebbins professor emeritus of otorhinolaryngology and professor emeritus of psychology. William J. Wrobleski, proei fessor of statistics in the School of Business Administration, retired from active faculty status on May 31, 1995. 23

Page  24 July Meeting, 1995 Professor Wrobleski received his B.S. degree in 1953, his M.S. degree in 1954, and his Ph.D. degree in 1963, all from the University of Michigan. He joined the faculty of the School of Business Administration as an assistant professor in 1963 and was promoted to associate professor in 1966 and professor in 1974. From 1981-84, he served as chair of the school's statistics and management area. During his tenure at the School of Business Administration, Professor Wrobleski was recognized for his work in nonlinear time series analysis and its application to important issues in economics and business administration. He conducted some of the early international analysis of U.S. monetary policy effects on major foreign money and capital markets. He has an impressive publication record and has served as a referee on some of the major professional journals. Professor Wrobleski has been a good citizen of the school and a strong teacher. He has served on sixty-four dissertation committees and is completing service on three more; this is an extraordinary contribution to graduate education. He has made significant contributions to the school and to his profession, and the faculty and staff wish him a long and satisfying retirement. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming William J. Wrobleski professor emeritus of statistics. Memorial Statements. No deaths were reported to the Regents this month. Degrees. There were no actions with respect to degrees. Consent Agenda Approved. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved the consent agenda. Alternative Asset Investments On a motion by Regent Horning, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved commitment of $15.0 million of the Long Term Portfolio to Avanti Strategic Land Investors II, pending favorable review of the documents for their legal acceptability by the general counsel and completion of due diligence. Currency Overlay On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved the appointment of Pareto Partners as currency overlay manager. Multinational/Emerging Markets Energy Fund In May 1995, the Board approved investment of $20.0 million in Multinational/Emerging Markets Energy Fund composed of two companion funds: Acquisition Fund and Exploration Fund. Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents thathe decision has been made not to proceed with the investment in the Acquisition Fund and only to invest in the Exploration Fund. 24

Page  25 July Meeting, 1995 Summit Ventures, L.P. Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that based on actions taken in May 1994, and in accordance with the provisions of Regents Bylaw Section 3.07(.2a), the University has committed $5 million to Summit Ventures IV, L.P. Alumni Association of the University of Michigan Camp Michigania, Walloon Renovation Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that the Alumni Association's Business and Financial Affairs Committee had approved Phase III of a project for construction, renovation, and site development at Camp Michigania-Walloon and had authorized external financing for both the Phase III project and the reimbursement of $540,000 to the Alumni Association's General Fund for the Phase I and II projects. UMMC East Campus Primary Care Facility Project The Regents were informed that bids have been received and a construction contract has been awarded to the lowest responsive bidder, Loyer Construction Co. of Detroit, for the first of five packages for construction of the East Campus Primary Care Facility Project. University Health Service, Michigan Union, Michigan League, and North Campus Commons Mr. Doug Hanna, university architect, presented the proposed design of the five-story addition to the University Health Service building, a project that had been previously approved by the Regents, along with projects involving the Michigan Union, Michigan League, and North Campus Commons. He displayed schematic drawings, an elevation of the front of the building, and an architectural model of the building with the proposed addition. Following Mr. Hanna's presentation, Regent Deitch moved approval of the design of the University Health Service addition, and authorization for soliciting bids and awarding construction contracts for the four projects and two associated projects as described in the Regents Communication, providing the contract values are within the approved budget. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. UM-Dearborn General Campus Renovation Phase II On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved a revised budget for the UM-Dearborn General Campus Renovation Project Phase II and authorized award of the construction contract to Walbridge Aldinger Company. 25

Page  26 July Meeting, 1995 Energy Conservation Projects On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Varner, the Regents unanimously approved proceeding with energy conservation projects at the Kresge Medical Research Building I and the UM-Dearborn Mardigian Library and University Mall, as described in the Regents Communication. Lease Assumption Agreement with Dr. Robert E. Anderson and Mr. Saul Rose On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved a lease assumption agreement with Dr. Robert E. Anderson and Mr. Saul Rose for a medical office building located at 4990 Clark Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan. Because Dr. Anderson is also a University employee by virtue of his appointment as a clinical instructor II in the Medical School, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan, Dr. Robert E. Anderson, and Mr. Saul Rose. 2. Terms of the contract are as follows: The duration of the contract is 34 months. The University will lease property located at 4990 Clark Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan. The medical office facility is 1,666 square feet, at a rental rate of $15.65 per square foot, $26,067.12 annually, beginning on March 13, 1995, plus the Tenant's pro rata share of the Landlord's operating expenses for each calendar year during the term of the lease. The medical center will place clericals, medical office assistants, nurses, and physicians to provide necessary primary care services to the community. 3. Dr. Anderson's pecuniary interest arises from his commitment to the original lease agreement with Mr. Rose. Dr. Anderson will be relieved of his liability for the original lease, and Mr. Rose will receive revenues generated by the leasing of the property to the University. Lease Agreement with Barron Associates On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved a lease agreement with Barron Associates. Because Dr. Parviz Panahi, a University employee with a 100 percent appointment in the School of Medicine, has a 12.07 percent equity interest in Barron Associates, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Barron Associates. 2. Terms of the contract are as follows: The duration of the contract is 60 months. The University will lease property located at 4870 Clark Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan. The medical office facility is 2,445 square feet, at a rental rate of $16.00 per square foot, $39,120.00 annually, beginning on July 1, 1995, plus the Tenant's pro rata share of the Landlord's operating expenses for each calendar year during the term of the lease. The medical center will place clericals, medical office assistants, nurses, and physicians to provide necessary primary care services to the community. 26

Page  27 July Meeting, 1995 3. Dr. Panahi's pecuniary interest arises from his 12.07 percent interest in Barron Associates, the owners of the building. Through Barron Associates, he will receive a percentage of revenues generated by the leasing of the property to the University. Change in Name of Department of Nuclear Engineering On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Newman, the Regents unanimously approved a change in the name of the Department of Nuclear Engineering to the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences. New Degree Program for College of Engineering Regent McFee moved approval of the establishment of a new degree program, "Doctor of Engineering in Manufacturing" ("D.Eng. in Mfg.") to be offered by the College of Engineering. Regent Newman seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. New Degree Program for UM-Dearborn School of Education On a motion by Regent McGowan, seconded by Regent Varner, the Regents unanimously approved a new degree program, "Master of Arts in Adult Instruction and Performance Technology," to be offered by the School of Education at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. 733 South State Street, Ann Arbor On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved acquisition of the property at 733 South State Street (the former Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house) at a price of $630,000, subject to satisfactory completion of the University's environmental due diligence. New Degree Program for UM-Flint School of Health Professions and Studies On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved establishment of a new degree program at the University of Michigan-Flint, "Master of Science in Health Education," to be offered in the School of Health Professions and Studies. Value Centered Management Regent Power commented that during the 1995-96 fiscal year the University would begin implementing its new Value Centered Management (VCM) budgeting system, using it in tandem with the current system for this first year. He observed that VCM represents a significant change from the traditional method of budget management, and said he was looking forward to examining its potential impact at the earliest convenient opportunity in the fall. 27

Page  28 July Meeting, 1995 There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m. The next meeting will be held on September 21 and 22, 1995. Regents' expenses for the month of June 1995 totaled $2,811.35. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 28

Page  29 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Thursday, September 21, 1995 The Regents met at 9:20 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Interim Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, and Vice President Harrison were also present. Vice Presidents Hartford, Kinnear and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were absent. Executive Session Motion President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and recognized Regent Baker, who made the following motion: Pursuant to Sections 8(a) and 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session at 9:00 a.m. on September 21, 1995, and reconvene at 7:30 a.m. on September 22, 1995, for the purposes of considering periodic personnel evaluations of people who have requested confidentiality [Sec. 8(a)] and considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent McGowan seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. The Regents then proceeded to meet in executive session. The meeting reconvened in public session at 2:05 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Interim Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal, and Chancellor Nelms were also present. Chancellor Renick was absent. President's Report The president observed that higher education has been under pressure to increase productivity and noted that while staff productivity is relatively easy to measure, faculty productivity is more difficult to assess. That is because faculty productivity, as evidenced by a factor such as a high reputational ranking, is not determined through quantitative measures, but through competition for the respect and high evaluation of knowledgeable colleagues. Intercollegiate athletics is another example of a case where reputation is not measured in quantitative measures, but by a team competing for a specific competitive goal. These examples indicate that measuring 29

Page  30 September Meeting, 1995 productivity in an academic institution is very complex; although there are some measurable products, the level of an institution's quality is evaluated by such factors as respect by peers, diversity, intellectual breath, and leadership impact, all of which are very difficult to quantify. A means has yet to be devised for measuring the productivity of knowledge-intensive enterprises. Provost's Report Interim Provost Machen observed that his first month on the job had been exciting and enjoyable. He reported that freshman orientation week had been very successful, and that he had received many positive comments from parents. He reviewed the activities planned by SACUA for the coming year and noted that the president would be appointing three faculty task forces to address the future composition of the faculty, the faculty contract, and the recruitment and retention of exceptional faculty and students. Provost Machen observed that in a recent study of U.S. colleges and universities, 38 University of Michigan academic programs had been ranked: four were ranked in the top three of their discipline, eight in the top five, and thirteen were in the top ten of their respective disciplines. He reaffirmed the University's commitment to institute value centered management in 1996. Chief Financial Officer's Report Executive Vice President Womack reported that earlier that week he had accepted the 1995 Corporation of the Year Award-Educational Sector, which had been given to the University of Michigan by the Michigan Minority Business Development Council for its continued commitment to minority business development. He recognized three individuals who had been responsible for the University's winning this award: Dick Throne, Minority Vendor Program Coordinator, who had started the program with former purchasing director Eugene Ingram in 1983; Dennis Pozywak, senior purchasing agent on the Flint campus, and Philip Abruzzi, director of purchasing. The three men stood and received a round of applause. Regent Varner observed that the winning of this award marked a major milestone for the University, and that she had been encouraging the University to adopt an attitude of welcoming minority businesses since she was a faculty member in the early 1970s. It was personally very rewarding to her that the University had received this award. Executive Vice President Womack then commented on the University's new "Flex Benefits" program, which will be inaugurated in October. He noted that many individuals in the Human Resources office had worked hard to make sure that the University community would have an understanding of this program. Regents McFee and Power commented on the importance of flexible benefits programs, given the changing and diversified nature of the work force. 30

Page  31 September Meeting, 1995 Michigan Student Assembly Biannual Report Vice President Hartford called on Mr. Flint Wainess and Mr. Sam Goodstein, president and vice president, respectively, of Michigan Student Assembly, to present the first MSA biannual report to the Regents. Mr. Goodstein noted that the presence of MSA officers at the Regents' table is evidence of the improving relationship between MSA and the administration and thanked the Regents and past MSA administrations for their hard work in arriving at this point. He observed that although MSA has long been labeled as ineffective and out of touch, it is now a credible, responsible, effective student government that is capable, willing, and able to address the needs of its constituencies. Student government officials are expected to follow up on their campaign promises and are held accountable for doing so. They also are looked to by other students to provide leadership on issues of concern to students and to voice student concerns to the administration. Mr. Wainess noted that work on the new draft of the Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities has been a source of friction between students and the administration, although he was optimistic that all parties will eventually be able to agree on a reasonable outcome. He expressed the concern that the October deadline will be difficult to meet because it will not allow sufficient time to receive feedback from students. He requested that the deadline be extended to November, by which time he believes a reasonable consensus could be reached among all the parties. Finally, Mr. Wainess expressed concerns brought to him by the Campus Safety Task Force. He asked that the Regents be mindful of safety concerns brought about by construction on campus. Mr. Goodstein closed with the observation that now that the Michigan student government had achieved its goal of formally representing student concerns to the Board, it was the envy of other Big Ten student government organizations. Regent Power asked Vice President Hartford if she felt there was any merit to the notion of extending the deadline for adoption of a Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities to November. She responded that it could be done in October, but it would be easier to do in November. Regent Power observed that if the outcome would be better, he was in favor of extending the deadline. Regent Newman stated that she would prefer to wait until November, both for that reason and to be responsive to student concerns that it not be taken up in October since that meeting would be taking place in Flint. University Program Rankings President Duderstadt called on Vice President Harrison, who in turned called to the table Robert Weisbuch, interim dean of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, and Marilyn Knepp, director of the Office of Academic Planning and Analysis. Vice President Harrison reviewed the 31

Page  32 September Meeting, 1995 history of the U.S. News and World Report rankings. He pointed out that there is a distinction between guides and rankings. Guides provide descriptions of colleges and universities, with the intent of showing prospective students the differences between them. Rankings only began proliferating in the 1980s, and their purpose is more to assign quality rankings that infer one institution is better than another. He called on Ms. Knepp, who gave a presentation describing the types of methodologies used to produce the various rankings of colleges and universities, the underlying assumptions that accompany rankings employing each methodology, and the pros and cons of each type. Ms. Knepp observed that not all universities measure and report the same way to the organizations compiling the rankings; thus, the results must be viewed and interpreted with caveats in mind. Rankings imply a precision that doesn't exist, for instance, that there is a material difference between institutions that vary from each other by only a few points in any particular ranking. She suggests viewing the rankings as indicating broad bands of institutions; within any one band, institutions are probably very similar in quality. When many rankings, all prepared using different methodologies, are viewed collectively in a "meta-analysis", the result confirms this view. In conclusion, Ms. Knepp noted that all rankings of quality are subjective. It is better to look at groupings of institutions, rather than absolute rank orders, and to look at groupings of studies employing different methodologies, rather than one study in isolation. President Duderstadt observed that the only category in the UVS. News and World Report rankings that should be of concern is academic reputation, an area in which the University of Michigan consistently ranks highly. Next, Interim Dean Robert Weisbuch gave a report on the National Research Council (NRC) Survey of graduate programs. He noted that the University of Michigan had 14 programs in the top ten, but said that ranking matters less than ratings of faculty quality. In the latter area, 19 of the 25 programs rated in 1982 improved in 1993. Dean Weisbuch reviewed various aspects of the NRC study's rankings of the University's programs, noting that some of the University's strongest programs were not considered. He concluded that "we know ourselves much better than strangers can and are constantly evaluating ourselves." Dean Weisbuch reported that he and prospective Dean Nancy Cantor had selected four themes for the graduate school: 1) "Sponsoring the future" (learning where the new paradigms and new ideas are so that these can be translated into courses and programs); 2) "Better the good" (continuing to make tough decisions, to award differentially, and to award most the programs with the strongest ambitions and the best ideas); 3) "Population control" (with fewer students and the same amount of resources, better support and better education can be provided to students); 4) "Pedagogy is us" (the promotion of graduate student teaching skills as integral to the professional development of all graduate students). 32

Page  33 September Meeting, 1995 There followed a discussion about how influential the U.S. News and World Report and National Research Council rankings are in helping students determine which university to attend. Vice President Harrison asserted that the rankings are influential, especially with respect to undergraduate and professional schools. Regent Deitch asserted that if these rankings are important and widely read, it is incumbent upon the University to respond in some fashion. President Duderstadt pointed out that the disparity between the results of the U.S. News and NRC rankings clearly shows the bias of the former toward private institutions. Dean Weisbuch reported that the graduate school is composing a two-page handout that discusses some of the issues surrounding rankings that will be made available to departments to send to applicants. "Welcome to Michigan '95" Activities Vice President Hartford gave a report on move-in and welcoming activities that had taken place for incoming students at the start of the school year. She stated that her office had received many positive comments from parents about the success of both the move-in itself and all of the events that had been scheduled as part of the "Welcome to Michigan" week. She also commented on the extremely tight housing situation, noting that over 1,000 residents were living in rooms that had been converted from doubles to triples ("converted triples"). She reported that members of her and Executive Vice President Womack's staffs had begun preliminary discussions to consider whether the construction of new residence halls would be desirable. Regent Power said that creativity needs to be employed when thinking about possible new residence hall construction. He reinforced the notion that removing students from converted triples should be the highest priority. Vice President Hartford responded that her highest priority is to place students in housing that is sized appropriately for the academic demands that are placed on them and noted that there are a lot of creative ideas on this issue. The meeting recessed at 3:55 p.m. and reconvened at 4:15 p.m. in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union to hear Public Comments. Public Comments The Regents heard comments from the following individuals, on the topics indicated: Craig Stutzky, student and chair of Students for Representative Diversity, on expanding the definition of diversity to include economic diversity; and Michael Schroer, citizen, Jane Ferguson, David Kwan, and Paul Rogers, prospective president, treasurer, and member, respectively, of the Oxbridge Neighborhood Association, Barbara Bach, citizen, and Barbara Levin Bergman, member of the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners, all on the topic of possible relocation of the Burnham House to the Geddes Avenue entrance to the Arboretum. The meeting recessed until the following day. 33

Page  34 September Meeting, 1995 Friday, September 22, 1995 The Regents met at 9:15 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Interim Provost Machen, and Executive Vice President Womack were also present, as were Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellor Nelms. Provost Simpson was present in place of Chancellor Renick, who arrived shortly after the start of the meeting. University Annual Financial Statements for 1994-95 and Year-End Financial Information for 1994-95 Executive Vice President Womack reported that Ernst & Young, the independent auditors, had issued a clean opinion in its audit of the University's financial statement. He noted that the auditors would be present at the next month's meeting to present their opinion in detail and to answer any questions the Regents might have. Executive Vice President Womack called on Associate Vice President Randy Harris, who gave a slide presentation on the year end financial information for 1994-95 compared with 1985-86. Mr. Harris explained that the Current Funds consist of the Educational and General funds (E&G) (General, Designated, and Expendable Restricted Funds), and the Auxiliary Activities funds. In 1985-86, state appropriations accounted for 34 percent of the Current Funds revenues; in 1994-95, these constituted 24 percent of the total. Student fees increased from 26 percent to 32 percent of the Current Funds during the same ten-year period, and government programs increased by 4 percent. The compound growth rate adjusted for inflation (real growth rate) for student fees for the ten year period was 6.7 percent, while for state appropriations, it was 0.2 percent. In 1975, student fees made up 32.0 percent of the combined revenues from student fees and state appropriations; in 1995, student fees made up 57.0 percent of the total, a 25.0 percent increase. Revenues from government programs and gifts and sponsored programs experienced 6.0 percent compound growth rates since 1985-86, while revenues from all other sources grew by 2.2 percent. Total Educational and General revenues grew by 4.2 percent during this period, from $647 million to $938 million. Total Auxiliary Activities revenues ($1.051 billion in 1994-95) had an adjusted compound growth rate of 5.6 percent since 1985-86, with the hospital, medical, and dental component of that having grown by an adjusted rate of 6.0 percent to a total of $919 million. Expenditures and transfers for the Educational and General portion of the Current Funds totaled $634 million in 1985-86 and $1.270 billion in 1994 -95, for an adjusted compound growth rate of 4.2 percent. Salaries and wages decreased from 51.0 percent of this category in 1985-86 to 46.0 percent in 34

Page  35 September Meeting, 1995 1994-95, while staff benefits increased from 11.0 percent to 13.0 percent and scholarships and fellowships increased from 7.0 percent to 9.0 percent. Total compensation (salaries and wages plus staff benefits) experienced a 10-year adjusted compound growth rate of 3.7 percent, increasing from $390 million to $748 million, and scholarships and fellowships grew by 7.4 percent (from $46 million to $120 million). Supplies expenditures grew by 4.2 percent, from $143 million to $286 million, and equipment and plant expenditures grew by 4.9 percent, from $54 million to $116 million. Total Auxiliary Activities expenditures grew from $407 million to $1.131 billion, for an adjusted compound growth rate of 8.1 percent. The hospital, medical, and dental portion of those expenditures grew from $339 million to $1.003 billion, for an adjusted growth rate of 8.8 percent for the ten-year period. In 1985-86, Current Funds revenues totaled $991 million, with Auxiliary Activities comprising 42 percent; General Funds, 38 percent; Expendable Restricted, 17 percent; and Designated, 3 percent. In 1994-95, total revenues were $2,347 million, consisting of 45 percent Auxiliary Activities, 34 percent General Fund, 18 percent Expendable Restricted Fund, and 3 percent Designated Fund. Total expenditures and transfers were $1,041 million in 1985, with salaries and wages accounting for 51 percent; supplies, 22 percent; staff benefits, 11 percent; equipment and plant 9 percent; and scholarships and fellowships 7 percent. In 1994-95, expenditures and transfers totaled $2,401 million, with salaries and wages decreasing to 46 percent of the total, staff benefits increasing to 13 percent, scholarships and fellowship increasing to 9 percent, and the other two areas remaining relatively constant. Following his presentation on the budgets, Associate Vice President Harris updated the Regents about the status of the new M-Card. He distributed cards to each Regent and the executive officers. Executive Vice President Womack explained that in the system of fund accounting, any transfer is treated as an expenditure. In the case of the Auxiliary Activities fund, the Hospitals deliberately transfer excess revenue to funds functioning as endowment. That transfer results in an increase in expenditures, when in fact, this has not really occurred. It will always appear that expenditures and transfers have exceeded revenues when fund balances are invested in a different way or if funds have been accumulated for the purchase of expensive equipment or capital items. Regent Power observed that during his tenure on the Board, the financial reports have consistently contained clean opinions, have come out on time, and have been comprehensible and well-organized. Regent Power moved adoption of the financial statements for fiscal year 1994-95 and December 31, 1994, as submitted. Regent Horning seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. 35

Page  36 September Meeting, 1995 President's Salary Regent Baker made the following resolution: Regents' Resolution Consistent with past practice, the Regents grant to President James J Duderstadt for fiscal year 1995-96 a 5 percent ($11,621) increase to his current annual salary of $232,421. In 1993, the Regents adopted a presidential compensation policy and inaugurated a three-year phased equity adjustment program to bring the salary of the president of the University of Michigan into conformity with this policy. This portion of presidential compensation is funded from the Auxiliay Activities Fund rather than from tax dollars in the General Fund. The Regents implement the last installment of this program, granting President Duderstadt an annual increase of $16,667. These two increases bring President Duderstadt's total annual salary for fiscal year 1995-96 to $260, 709. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the July 1995 meeting. Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports on investments, plant extension, litigation, and personnel-labor relations. Vice President Neal submitted reports on projects established and summaries of a selection of current research for the months of July and August 1995. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear submitted reports of gifts received for the months of June, July, and August, 1995, as well as the report for FY 1994-95. He also reported that with 22 months remaining in the Campaign for Michigan, $879 million of the $1 billion goal had been received in gifts, pledges, and new bequest intentions. Allied Signal Foundation, Inc., Morristown, New Jersey for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program and other support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering and for employee matching gifts.................................................. 112,765 American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Biophysics Research Division..................... 127,638 American Foundation for Urological Disease, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland for research in the Medical School................................................. 6,250 American Heart Association of Michigan, Southfield for research in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts..................................................................... 130,342 American Paralysis Association, Springfield, New Jersey for research in the Medical School............................................. 14,985 American Society for Quality Control, Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the National Quality Research Center, School of Business Administration......... 200,000 36

Page  37 September Meeting, 1995 Ameritech Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for support at the University of Michigan-Dearborn and for employee matching gifts.... 326,070 Ameritech Michigan, Detroit for support in the Schools of Engineering and Management, the University of Michigan-Dearborn.......................................... 60,000 Amoco Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for employee matching gifts.............................................. 11,147 Ann Arbor Area Community Foundation, Ann Arbor for support in the University of Michigan Hospitals................................. 11,988 Anonymous Donor 350 shares of Walgreen Company common stock for the John M. Jenks Graduate Scholarship in the School of Business Administration.... 17,981 Anonymous Donor 3,113 shares of NBD Bancorp common stock and a cash gift for the Library Development Fund, the University of Michigan-Flint................ 102,173 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..... 16,833 Association of American Railroads, Washington, DC for the Affiliates Program and the Physical Stress Research Fund in the College of Engineering....................................................................56,000 AT&T Foundation, New York, New York for employee matching gifts.......................................................5,270 Association Francois-Xavier Bagnoud, Geneva, Switzerland for the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Fellowship in the College of Engineering.......... 101,991 Bergstrom Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Henry A. Bergstrom Dean's Discretionary Endowment in the Law School....... 25,000 Mandell L. Berman, Franklin for the William Davidson Professorship in the School of Business Administration and for program support in the School of Social Work................................ 6,000 Peter D. Bernardo, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.......................... 9,200 Guido A. and Elizabeth H. Binda Foundation, Battle Creek for the Guido and Elizabeth Binda Award Fund in the College of Architecture and U rban Planning............................................................... 5,000 Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington for employee matching gifts....................................................... 9,144 Borders, Inc., Ann Arbor for the Living Writers Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the University Musical Society............................................ 11,362 David A. Brandon, Livonia for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................ 20,000 Brauer Investment Company, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Ford R. Bryan, Dearborn 200 shares of Ford Motor Company common stock for the Henry Ford Estate of Fair Lane Powerhouse, the University of M ichigan-Dearborn.............................................................. 5,413 James W. Callison, Atlanta, Georgia 385 shares of Delta Airlines common stock for the James W. Callison Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the Law School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 26,373 Cancer Research Institute, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,083 Carnegie Corporation, New York, New York for research in the School of Education............................................ 49,500 Chamberlain Foundation, Birmingham for graduate research internships and fellowships in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......................................................... 10,000 Chicago Community Trust, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 30,000 Chrysler Corporation, Livonia for the Museum of Art Friend's Benefit............................................ 24,450 Church & Dwight Company, Inc., Piscataway, New Jersey for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 15,000 Code Alarm, Madison Heights for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering............... 5,000 37

Page  38 September Meeting, 1995 Marlin Cole and Connie Belin Charitable Foundation, Des Moines, Iowa for the David W. Belin Phi Beta Kappa Merit Scholarships in the Law School........... 62,000 Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan, Detroit for the MBA Peace Corp Fund in the School of Business Administration................ 7,800 Ralph G. Conger, Jr., Detroit 3,300 shares of various corporate common stock for the Ralph G. Conger, Jr., Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, for the Pauline M. Conger Scholarship and the Julia Henning Conger Memorial Scholarship in the Alumni Association, and for the Ralph G. Conger Scholarship........ 57,269 Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, Oklahoma for the Industrial Affiliates Program in Flow and Reaction in Porus Media in the College of Engineering..........................................................20,000 Consumers Power Foundation, Jackson for the Corporate Environmental Management Program, School of Business Administration..................................20,000 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation National Headquarters, Bethesda, Maryland for research in the Medical School................................................ 47,534 Delta Dental Fund, Lansing for research in the School of Dentistry....................................... 31,850 Detroit Red Wing Alumni Association, Inc., West Bloomfield for research in the Medical School.................................... 5,000 Mrs. Archibald W. Diack, Jr., Portland, Oregon 145 shares of Dow Chemical Company common stock for the Frances Novy Diack Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the M edical School........................................................... 10,340 Dover Fund, Inc., New York, New York for the Office for the Study of Private Equity Finance in the School of Business A dm inistration.................................................................. 5,000 E. C. Fackler, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for the University Library........................................................ 5,000 Robert B. Fiske, Jr., New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 6,000 Mildred S. Fletcher Estate for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan................................ 5,000 Ford Motor Company, Dearborn for the Solar Car Project Fund and mechanical engineering support in the College of Engineering................................................................. 17,500 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Humanities Institute in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 7,500 Stanley and Judith Frankel Support Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for program support in the School of Business Administration and for the Frankel Fellowship in Jewish Communal Service in the School of Social Work.......... 22,500 Robert W. Galvin Foundation, Schaumburg, Illinois for research support and equipment............................................... 50,000 General Electric Foundation, Fairfield, Connecticut for employee matching gifts....................................................... 6,855 Ralph J. Gerson, Bloomfield Hills for the William Davidson Professorship of Business, School of Business Administration..... 5,000 Richard C. Gerstenberg, Bloomfield Hills 250 shares of Marsh & McLennan Companies common stock for the Richard C. Gerstenberg Endowed Scholarship, School of Business Adm inistration................................................................. 20,109 Ellen Weis Goldstein, Washington, DC for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................ 10,000 Joseph I. Goldstein, Washington, DC for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 Government of Canada, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School................................................. 7,162 Carleton H. Griffin, Ann Arbor 215 shares of Sysco Corporation common stock for the William A. Paton Scholarship and the Teaching Excellence Fund in the School of Business Administration and for the Living Writers Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 6,074 Barbara Hamric, Dallas, Texas 701 shares of Exxon Corporation common stock for the Barbara Hamric Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the University of Michigan....................................................... 49,902 38

Page  39 September Meeting, 1995 Marian E. Harris, Lakewood, New Jersey for the James E. Harris Chemistry Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................................ 5,000 Highfield Foundation, Cincinnati, Ohio for support in the School of Social Work................................ 10,000 Richard L. Hirsch Foundation, New York, New York for support in the Division of Kinesiology................................... 10,000 HOCO, Ltd., Niagara Falls, Canada for research in the Medical School................................................ 72,201 Homeland Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the Bentley Historical Library.......................................... 6,500 Betty M. Hsiao, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................ 5,000 Hudson Development, Inc., San Francisco for the Ara G. Paul Professorship and the Sam C. H. Ching and Barbara W. Ching Scholarship in the College of Pharmacy...................................... 15,000 Frederick G. L. Huetwell Estate for the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Scholarship, the Student Loan Program, and for gifts pending designation........................................................ 10,312 Intel Corporation Oregon Divisions, Hillsboro, Oregon for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering....... 29,300 Joseph R. Jarabak Charitable Lead Trust, Valparaiso, Indiana for the Joseph and Louise Jarabak Funds in the School of Dentistry................... 10,000 Charles F. Johnson, Grand Rapids for the Charles and Barbara Johnson Term Scholarship, School of Business A dm inistration.................................................................10,000 Louise Ganiard Johnson, Lyme, New Hampshire 31,500 shares of various corporate common stocks for the Louise G. Johnson Weins Fund in the College of Engineering................ 957,656 Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Contributions Fund, New Brunswick, New Jersey for research in the College of Pharmacy........................................... 15,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 95,359 Beatrice L. Johnston Trust for support in the College of Engineering........................................ 420,000 Clair C. Johnston Estate for the Civil Engineering Scholarship in the College of Engineering................... 16,119 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 22,659 Kellogg Company, Battle Creek for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Golf Classic Benefit Fund and for employee m atching gifts.................................................................. 5,220 John H. Kellogg Estate for the John H. Kellogg Genetics Fund in the Medical School......................... 15,000 Kimberly-Clark Foundation, Inc., Dallas, Texas for employee m atching gifts...................................................... 10,175 Gerald P. Kolb, Alden 200 shares of Merck & Company common stock for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................... 9,688 Elizabeth Ford Kontulis, New Canaan, Connecticut 385 shares of Pyxis Corporation and 26 shares of Applix common stock for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of M ichigan-Dearborn.............................................................. 9,515 King Chiu Kwan, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.......................... 5,000 Lamparter Foundation, Grosse Pointe Shores for studies in religion support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......... 7,500 L. S. B. Leakey Foundation, Oakland, California for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 16,900 Winfield H. and Grace Song Line Trusts for support in the School of Public Health, in memory of Grace Song Line............ 100,000 Lynne Fowler Linn Estate for support of the Law School.................................................... 25,000 Claude D. London, Oscoda for the Kathy London Memorial Fund, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 8,240 Al Long Ford, Warren for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn........... 5,000 39

Page  40 September Meeting, 1995 Gillson Longenbaugh Foundation, Bellaire, Texas for support in the Medical School.................................... 30,000 Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 Benard L. Maas Foundation, Ann Arbor for Nichols Arboretum in the School of Natural Resources and Environment, for the Matthaei Botanical Gardens in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for the University Musical Society...................................... 6,000 Managed Resources, Inc., Long Beach, California for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Golf Classic Benefit Fund....................... 9,000 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 17,500 Marion Merrell Dow, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri for the Ara G. Paul Professorship, College of Pharmacy and for employee matching gifts................................................................. 10,000 Martin Marietta, Orlando, Florida Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering.........20,000 McGregor Fund, Detroit for the Building Fund in the School of Social Work.................................. 70,000 George Meader Estate for the George Meader Law Library Book Fund in the Law School................ 25,000 Robert E. Meader Trust for the Meader Family Award Fund, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........ 50,893 Meijer, Inc., Grand Rapids for support in the College of Pharmacy, WUOM/WVGR and WFUM-TV, the University of M ichigan-Flint...................................................... 7,640 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York, New York for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 Merck & Company, Inc., West Point, Pennsylvania for research and other support in the Medical School................................. 5,800 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota for the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Scholarship and the MEAM Undergraduate Financial Aid Fund in the College of Engineering..................... 20,000 Janette M. Minnis Estate for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 24,882 Motorola Foundation, Schaumburg, Illinois for electrical and computer engineering support in the College of Engineering.......... 10,000 James P. Murphy, Bethesda, Maryland for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland for research in the Medical School................................................. 7,590 New York Council on Adoptable Children, Inc., New York, New York for research in the School of Social Work.......................................... 12,500 North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology, Natick, Massachusetts for research in the Medical School................................................. 7,000 Richard W. Odgers, Mill Valley, California for support in the Schools of Art and Law and for the Institute for Public Policy Studies.... 10,000 Orthopedic Research and Education Foundation, Rosemont, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 48,248 Mary T. Padzieski Trust for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn........... 5,000 Paideia Foundation, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Elsa U. Pardee Foundation, Midland for research in the Medical School............................................... o 61,710 Clifford A. Pedderson Trust for support of the Law School.................................................... 20,000 Perrin Foundation, Dallas, Texas for the John S. Perrin Chair in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......... 40,000 Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for research in the School of Natural Resources and Environment.................. 1,820,500 Pfizer, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School and for employee matching gifts................... 30,575 Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,000 40

Page  41 September Meeting, 1995 Porter Foundation, Grand Rapids for the Burke E. Porter Foundation Scholarship in the College of Engineering, and for WUOM/WVGR.............................10,300 Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio for the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Scholarship and the Minority Convertible Loan Fund in the College of Engineering................................ 8,000 Procter & Gamble Fund, Cincinnati, Ohio for scholarships, fellowships and other support in the School of Business Administration and the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts, for the University Career Planning and Placement Office, and for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan..................................87000 Bernard and Audre Rapoport Foundation, Waco, Texas for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 5,000 Douglas P. Rearick, Brighton for the Rearick Graduate Student Fund in the School of Education.................... 10,000 Ralph E. Reins, Vero Beach, Florida for the Ralph E. and Victoria L. Reins Fund in the College of Engineering............. 25,000 Margaret A. Riecker, Midland 1,000 shares of Dow Chemical Company common stock for the Margaret A. Riecker Funds in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and the Center for the Education of Women................................... 70,563 Russell Sage Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Institute of Public Policy Studies................................ 13,000 Schering Sales Corporation, Kenilworth, New Jersey for the Cancer Center in the Medical School........................................ 22,000 Schneider (USA), Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota for the Cardiac Biomaterials Research Fund in the Medical School.................... 29,720 Robert G. and Susan E. Schuur Trust, New York, New York for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 Peter A. Schweitzer Trust for the Schweitzer Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........ 8,000 G. D. Searle & Company, Chicago, Illinois for support in the Medical School................................................. 20,000 Share Foundation, Grandview, Missouri for research in the Medical School.............................................. 125,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Santa Fe, California 4,052 shares of various corporate common stocks for the Donald R. Shepherd Chair in Conducting and the University Marching Band Fund in the Department of Athletics....................................... 268,121 Irene Shipman Estate for the Irene G. Shipman Scholarship............................................. 16,555 'Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Society Bank Michigan, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................ 25,000 Margaret Sokol, New York, New York for the D'Arms Awards in the Humanities, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies........................................................................ 10,000 Spencer Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Research Center for Group Dynamics in the Institute for Social Research........ 94,300 Mary C. and Perry F. Spencer Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana for support in the Medical School................................................. 10,000 St. Jude Medical, St. Paul, Minnesota for the Cardiac Biomaterials Research Fund in the Medical School.................... 38,488 Harold E. Steig, Bloomfield Hills for the Elmer C. and Louise A. Steig Memorial Scholarship........................... 50,000 Supreme Council 33rd Degree, A.A.S.R. Benevolent Foundation of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, Lexington, Massachusetts for the Scottish Rite Funds in the Medical School.................................... 8,581 Tanner Lecture Trust, Salt Lake City, Utah for the Obert C. Tanner Philosophy Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................50,000 TAP Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Deerfield, Illinois for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, Medical School.......5,000 Tauber Family Support Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for the Joel D. Tauber Endowment Funds in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering................................... 200,000 41

Page  42 September Meeting, 1995 Estelle Titiev, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society and for the D'Arms in the Humanities, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies..................................... 5,100 Trenton Firefighters Local 2701 for the Trauma Burn Center Firefighters Fund and the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School................................19,000 University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor for the D'Arms Awards in the Humanities in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................................. 5,000 USX Foundation, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh for employee matching gifts..................................................... 14,018 John J. Voorhees, Ann Arbor for the MomentUm Fund in the Medical School..................................... 5,000 Ellen C. Wagner, Ann Arbor for the Cancer Center in the Medical School......................................... 5,000 Charles R. Walgreen, Jr., Northfield, Illinois for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy......................... 11,032 Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund, New York, New York for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Gary T. Walther, Chicago, Illinois 503 shares of Endosonics and 300 shares of Digital Microwave common stock for support in the School of Business Administration............................... 8,071 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for the Ara G. Paul Professorship and other support in the College of Pharmacy. 67,200 Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri for the Consortium for Graduate Study in Management, School of Business Administration................................................................ 126,217 Whitaker Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the College of Engineering....................................... 123,966 Whitman Corporation Foundation, Rolling Meadows, Illinois for employee m atching gifts........................................................ 6,050 Manford L. Will Estate for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School....... 125,000 Hugh M. Wright, Battle Creek 78 shares of Michigan National Corporation common stock for golf course restoration and other support in the Department of Athletics............. 8,249 E. Lisk Wyckoff, Jr. New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Ferdinand B. Zienty, St. Louis, Missouri for the Ferdinand B. Zienty Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Pharm acy....................................................... 5,000 AAE Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Dentistry........................................... 24,575 Richard M. Adams, Mill Valley, California for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 Rebecca Adams-Nestor, San Jose, California for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................ 20,000 American Brain Tumor Association, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................. 6,250 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts and the Biophysics Research Division........................ 123,023 American Diabetes Association, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................ 19,325 American Digestive Health Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland for research in the Medical School................................................34,000 American Foundation for Urological Disease, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland for research in the M edical School................................................. 6,250 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.... 32,450 American Lung Association National Office, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 32,500 American Xyrofin, Inc., Schaumburg, Illinois for biochemical research in the School of Dentistry................................ 16,500 42

Page  43 September Meeting, 1995 Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, California for support in the Medical School....................................... 40,000 Amoco Foundation, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Scholarship in the College of Engineering and for the Under-Represented Students Scholarship in the School of Business Administration................................................ 10,000 A. P. Bartholomew, Jr., Ocean Ridge, Florida 125 shares of Progressive Corporation common stock and a cash gift for the Ernst & Young Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, and for scholarships in the Department of Athletics................................. 5,370 Blowitz-Ridgeway Foundation, Des Plaines, Illinois for research in the Medical School......................................... 20,900 Will M. Caldwell, Bloomfield Hills 1,271 shares of Ford Motor Company common stock for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund..........................................41,387 Cancer Research Foundation of America, Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................. 8,000 Chrysler Corporation Fund, Highland Park for the Chrysler Minorities and Women Scholarship, for the Associates Program, the BBSA Alumni Scholarship and other support in the School of Business Administration for the School of Engineering at the University of MichiganDearborn, and for the University Musical Society and employee matching gifts....... 209,284 Citizens Commercial & Savings Bank, Flint for WFUM/TV, the University of Michigan-Flint..................................... 7,250 Commission on Preservation and Access, Washington, DC for research in the School of Information and Library Studies........................ 30,000 Howard J. Cooper, Jr., Ann Arbor 1,200 shares of LSI Logic Corporation common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 53,625 Council for Tobacco Research-U.S.A., Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 32,739 Charles E. Culpeper Foundation, Inc., Stamford, Connecticut for the Program in Society and Medicine........................................... 30,000 Gilbert A. Currie, Midland for scholarships in the Department of Athletics...................................... 5,000 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation National Headquarters, Bethesda, Maryland for research in the Medical School........................ 14,922 Darby Group Companies, Inc., McLean, Virginia for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of Lew is A. Engm an................................................................ 5,000 Gladys E. Davis Trust for the Gladys E. Davis Endowments at the University of Michigan, in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................. 720,000 Deafness Research Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 8,500 John Deere Foundation, Moline, Illinois for mechanical engineering support in the College of Engineering..................... 15,000 Dermatology Foundation, Evanston, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 44,250 Caroline M. Duesberry Estate for the Caroline M. Duesberry Scholarship at the University of Michigan-Flint....... 100,000 Evangeline L. Dumesnil Estate for the Maurice H. and Evangeline L. Dumesnil Scholarship in the School of Music...... 25,000 Eileen M. Ebin, Longboat Key, Florida for the William E. Zimmie Visiting Professorship Fund in the College of Engineering...... 9,000 Ernst & Young Foundation, New York, New York for employee matching gifts...................................................... 57,978 Fesjian Foundation, Pelham, New York for Armenian studies support at the University of Michigan-Dearborn................. 30,000 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for employee matching gifts.................................................... 198,340 Francis Families Foundation, Kansas City, Missouri for research and the Parker B. Francis Fellowship in the Medical School............... 36,000 Stanley and Judith Frankel Support Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Social Work................ 22,500 43

Page  44 September Meeting, 1995 General Signal Corporation, Stamford, Connecticut for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering.........25,000 Allan D. Gilmour, Dearborn for the Allan D. Gilmour Endowed Doctoral Fellowship in the School of Business Administration........................................................ 10,000 Greenwall Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Medical School.............................................. 28,350 Halliburton Services, Duncan, Oklahoma for the Industrial Affiliates Program in Flow and Reaction in Porus Media in the College of Engineering...........................................20,000 Seong S. Han, Ann Arbor for prosthodontics support in the School of Dentistry................................ 10,000 Samuel D. Harris Trust for the Pediatric Dental Clinic Renovation Fund in the School of Dentistry............. 30,000 Harley E. Harshman, Grosse Pointe Woods 250 shares of Browning-Ferris Industries common stock for research in the Medical School.............................................. 9,953 Shirley and Barnett Helzberg Foundation, North Kansas City, Missouri for the Barnett and Shirley Helzberg Scholarship in the School of Business Administration.............................................................. 20,000 DuBose and Dorothy Heyward Memorial Fund for the Porgy and Bess Fund in the School of Music................................. 10,000 Hurley Medical Center, Flint for the Program in Pediatric Dentistry in the School of Dentistry..................... 95,000 IMRA America, Inc., Ann Arbor for integrated optics support in the College of Engineering........................... 25,000 Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon — for research in the College of Engineering......................................... 30,000 International Business Machines Corporation, Endicott, New York for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering...... 21,670 William R. Jentes, Chicago, Illinois for the Kirkland & Ellis Professorship in the Law School............................ 60,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the Medical School.............................................. 14,365 Judaic Studies Support Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for the Judaic Studies Development Fund, College of Literature, Science, and the A rts.................................................................... 7,430 W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for the Mildred L. Tuttle Scholarship in the School of Music....................... 340,000 Esther A. and Joseph Klingenstein Fund, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 40,000 Robert A. Line, Rochester Hills for the Stark/Line Dean's Merit Scholarship, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................................... 9,000 Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education.......................................... 182,000 Alex and Marie Manoogian Foundation, Grosse Pointe Farms for Armenian studies support, the University of Michigan-Dearborn.................... 5,000 Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust for research in the Medical School................................................ 91,800 Charles K. Marquis, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 McGraw Foundation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration................... 5,000 Meijer, Inc., Grand Rapids for WFUM/TV and WUOM/WVGR, the University of Michigan-Flint................... 5,276 Mental Illness Research Association, Auburn Hills for research in the Medical School................................................. 7,500 Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, Midland for the University Musical Society................................................12,000 Michigan Women's Athletic Association, Ann Arbor for support in the Department of Athletics.......................................... 5,000 44

Page  45 September Meeting, 1995 Midwest Stamping, Bowling Green, Ohio for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering............... 5,000 Philip Morris Companies, Inc., New York, New York for employee matching gifts....................................................... 7,240 Kenneth H. Mortenson, New York, New York 697 shares of Santa Fe Pacific Corporation common stock for the Robert A. Baumgartner Football Scholarship in the Department of Athletics..... 17,686 Mott Children's Health Center, Flint for the Program in Pediatric Dentistry Fund in the School of Dentistry................ 95,000 Munn Foundation, Inc., South Bend, Indiana for support in the Medical School............................................... 15,000 Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc., Tucson, Arizona for research in the M edical School................................................12,500 National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia & Depression, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 44,703 National Glaucoma Research, Rockville, Maryland for research in the Medical School.................................... 6,250 National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland for research in the Medical School..................................... 122,799 Norian Corporation, Cupertino, California for geology support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................. 5,000 NYNEX Foundation, White Plains, New York for employee matching gifts..................................................... 12,285 Casper Y. Offutt, Jr., Atherton, California three shares of Berkshire Hathaway common stock for the Helen Olson Brower Memorial Fellowship in Environmental Studies, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 72,900 O'Neal Construction, Inc., Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................ 5,000 Orbital Sciences Corporation, Pomona, California for the Space Physics Research Laboratory in the College of Engineering.............. 15,000 Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for research in the Center for Human Growth and Development....................... 91,000 John E. Pfeifer Trust for neurology research in the Medical School and for aerospace engineering support in the College of Engineering................. 10,000 Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC for graduate scholarships and fellowships in the College of Pharmacy and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of Lewis A. Engm an................................................................ 6,600 Power Foundation, Kalamazoo for support in the School of Music................................................. 5,000 Procter & Gamble Fund, Cincinnati, Ohio for employee matching gifts...................................................... 50,913 Ramapo Trust, New York, New York for the Brookdale National Fellowship in the Medical School.................. 67,500 Research Genetics, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama for pediatric genetics support in the Medical School................................. 14,000 Scripps Howard Foundation, Cincinnati, Ohio for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..................... 164,150 Siemens Automotive Corporation, Newport News, Virginia for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering and for the Center for Engineering Education and Practice, the University of Michigan-Dearborn 35,000 Simirex, Inc., Mount Laurel, New Jersey for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.......................... 9,200 Herbert Sloan, Jr., Trust for the University Musical Society................................................ 20,000 Goff Smith, Winnetka, Illinois for the Golf Course Commemorative Fund in the Department of Athletics............... 5,000 SmithKline Beecham Foundation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for employee matching gifts....................................................... 6,075 John L. Sobieski, Jr., Knoxville, Tennessee for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 45

Page  46 September Meeting, 1995 Standard Products Company, Cleveland, Ohio for the Manufacturing Initiatives Fund in the College of Engineering................. 5,000 Edward Surovell Company, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 8,570 Systemix, Palo Alto, California for the Solid Separation Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 7,500 Toledo Hospital, Toledo, Ohio for the Caroline B. Jobst Laboratory in the Medical School......................... 170,000 Torrey Foundation, Del Mar, California for the High-Field Science Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 17,000 Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki-Ku Kanagawa, Japan for support in the College of Engineering.......................................... 15,000 University of Michigan Alumni Association, Ann Arbor for the Alumnae Council Scholarship and the R. G. Forman Alumni Fund for undergraduate education in the Alumni Association................................. 61,000 University of Michigan Club of Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor for the University of Michigan Club of Ann Arbor Scholarship in the Department of Athletics.................................................................... 12,000 Unilever United States Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the student aid and the Associates Program, School of Business Administration..... 20,000 Union Oil Company of California, Brea, California for the Industrial Affiliates Program in Flow and Reaction in Porus Media in the College of Engineering.......................................................... 20,000 Vical, San Diego, California for the Vical Gift Fund in the Medical School....................................... 50,000 Daniel W. Vittum, Jr., Chicago, Illinois for the Kirkland & Ellis Professorship in the Law School............................ 20,000 Ronald N. Weiser, Ann Arbor 160 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for the University Musical Society................................................. 7,550 Whitaker Foundation, Rosslyn, Virginia for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering................... 73,370 Warren P. Williamson, Jr., Fund, Youngstown, Ohio for the Williamson Family Professorship in the School of Business Administration.... 592,000 Matilda R. Wilson Fund, Detroit for the Geriatrics Center in the Medical School..................................... 50,000 Wolverine Temporaries, Inc., Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 7,500 Morton M. Zedd, Richmond, Virginia for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the School of Education............................................ 10,000 Adac Plastics, Inc., Grand Rapids for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute.................. 15,000 Agvar Chemicals, Inc., Little Falls, New Jersey for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of Lewis A. Engman...............................................................10,000 Richard B. Ainsworth, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 10,000 George E. Amendt, Ann Arbor 1,612 shares of various corporate common stock for support in the Medical School................................................. 47,597 American Automobile Manufacturers Association, Detroit for support in the Highway Safety Research Institute.....I........................ 220,000 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts and the Biophysics Research Division.......................... 72,661 American Digestive Health Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland for gastroenterology research in the Medical School................................. 12,500 American Federation for Aging Research, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 19,997 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the Medical School................................................ 55,000 American Lung Association National Office, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................12,500 46

Page  47 September Meeting, 1995 American Society of Hematology, Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina for research in the Medical School................................................ 10,000 Ameritech Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Business Administration and for employee m atching gifts.................................................................88,258 Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, California for research and the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy..............6,000 Amoco Foundation, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for minority and female scholarships and the Amoco Foundation Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering in the College of Engineering, for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for gifts pending designation............................................... 108,500 Arthur Andersen & Company Foundation, Detroit for em ployee m atching gifts..................................................... 56,335 Ann Arbor Fire Protection, Ann Arbor for scholarships in the Department of Athletics.....................................12,000 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School................................................ 54,333 Robert Arthur Estate for unrestricted support at the University of Michigan-Flint........................... 5,561 Atlas Valley Golf and Country Club, Grand Blanc for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Gift Fund.................................... 16,500 Norman R. Bodine, Bloomfield Hills 62 shares of United Technologies Corporation common stock for the Ralph B. Bodine Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................................... 5,177 Eric V. and Linda Brown, Jr., Fund of the Kalamazoo Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Eric V. Brown Family Scholarship in the Law School.......................... 6,000 Budres Foundation, Grand Rapids for the Budres Foundation Scholarship in the School of Music......................... 5,000 James P. Byrne, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland for research in the School of Social Work.......................................... 25,000 Emma Chafitz Trust for the Robert and Emma Chafitz Endowment in the Medical School.................. 45,000 Lucian W. Chaney, Ann Arbor 605 shares of Standard Federal Bank common stock for the Lucian Chaney Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering.............................................. 22,007 Charles H. Chomet, Royal Oak for support in the Medical School................................................. 12,500 Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park for mechanical engineering support in the College of Engineering...................... 9,000 Circon ACMI, Stamford, Connecticut for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund in the M edical School.................................................................. 5,000 Civitas Initiative, Chicago, Illinois for the Civitas Scholarships in the School of Social Work........................... 147,500 Coca-Cola, U.S.A. Division of the Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Georgia for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for employee matching gifts..................... 50,200 Howard Cohodas, Marquette for student aid in the School of Business Administration.............................. 5,700 Graham H. Conger Estate for the Julia Henning Memorial Scholarship in the Alumni Association and for the Ralph G. Conger Scholarship............................................ 400,000 Conservation Food & Health Foundation, Inc., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts for research in the School of Public Health.........................................29,000 Albert C. Dames Estate for the Albert C. Dames Memorial Scholarship...................................... 5,000 Dana Corporation, Toledo, Ohio for the School of Engineering Building Fund, the University of Michigan-Dearborn..... 25,000 Sophia Dawson Estate for undergraduate student aid..................................................... 5,500 DeKalb Genetics Foundation, DeKalb, Illinois for em ployee matching gifts....................................................... 5,000 47

Page  48 September Meeting, 1995 Dekers Blue Line Club, Ann Arbor for ice hockey support in the Department of Athletics, in memory of Richard Dubay...... 5,000 Delta Dental Plan of Michigan, Lansing for the Delta Dental Scholarship in the School of Dentistry............................ 8,000 John H. DeYoung, Woodstown, New Jersey 100 shares of Motorola, Inc., common stock for the Class of 1936 Engineer's Fund in the College of Engineering............... 7,744 Dianon Systems, Stratford, Connecticut for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, Medical School......10,000 William T. Dobson, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex, the Yost Arena Renovation Fund and other support in the Department of Athletics; for the Risk Management Professorship in the School of Business Administration; for the Cecil J. Nesbitt Actuarial Education Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; for research in the Medical School; and for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women.....................................................24,800 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for employee matching gifts.......................................................6,323 Dow Chemical USA Midland Division, Midland for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy......................... 20,000 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware for the Dupont Funds and other support in the School of Business Administration, and the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts............ 140,000 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Communication Disorders Center in the Medical School....................... 25,000 Dale P. Fosdick, Saline 100 shares of International Business Machines common stock for the Ava Comin Case Scholarship and the Glenn McGeoch Memorial Scholarship in the School of Music................................................. 5,375 Foundation for Sports Medicine Education and Research, Rosemont, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,000 Lawrence C. Frank, Yakima, Washington for student aid in the School of Business Administration..............................5,700 Charles H. Gershenson Trust for the Arthur Schnabel Collegiate Professorship in the School of Music............. 74,007 James F. Goodrich, Washington, DC 84 shares of Federal National Mortgage Association and 39 shares of Intel Corporation common stock for the James F. Goodrich Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering..............................................10,082 Government of Canada, Neuroscience Laboratories, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,160 William T. Grant Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 52,008 Grundy Industries, Inc., Joliet, Illinois for support in the Department of Athletics.......................................... 5,000 Rodolfo Uy Ham, Flint for the Crosby-Kahn Professorship in Neurosurgery in the Medical School............. 10,000 William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Menlo Park, California for environmental studies support in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 75,000 James L. Hobart, Los Altos, California for physics support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 10,000 Hollywood Greyhound Track, Hollywood, Florida for the Cancer Center in the Medical School........................................ 50,000 S. C. Holman Foundation, Inc., Pennsauken, New Jersey for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, the University of M ichigan-Dearborn............................................................. 20,000 Hospital & Health Services Credit Union, Ann Arbor for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Golf Classic Benefit Fund....................... 9,000 Hudson's, Flint for the Music Academy and WFUM/TV, the University of Michigan-Flint............... 7,000 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bethesda, Maryland for scholarships, fellowships and research in the Medical School...................... 87,500 Huntington's Disease Society of America, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 15,000 48

Page  49 September Meeting, 1995 Intel Foundation, Hillsboro, Oregon for minority and female scholarships in the College of Engineering and for employee matching gifts.................................................... 21,630 International Business Machines Corporation, Endicott, New York for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering....... 21,700 Marion L. Johnson Estate for the H. Marvin Pollard Endowed Professorship in the Medical School............. 150,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health.......................... 332,109 W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for research in the Schools of Information and Library Studies and Public Health and for employee matching gifts........................................ 1,025,270 K-I Chemical Research Institute Company, Ltd., Shizuoka, Japan for the Synthesis Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.....15,000 Abe Kirshenbaum, St. Joseph for the Isadore Lampe Professorship in the Medical School............................ 5,000 Genevieve Latulip Irrevocable Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 15,000 Leukemia Society of America, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 8,910 Libbey-Owens-Ford Company, Toledo, Ohio for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute and for employee matching gifts.......................................... 15,200 J. Glenn and Marjorie Rose Longworth Trust for the Dean's Discretionary Endowment in the School of Education.................. 43,000 William T. Ludolph Estate for the William T. Ludolph Junior Faculty Development Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 150,000 John H. Lunden, Big Rapids 200 shares of Chrysler Corporation common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics...................................... 9,975 Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 Mallinckrodt Sensor Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................7,500 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 7,500 Masco Tech, Inc., Rochester for research in the Office for the Study of Automotive Transportation.................. 5,000 James S. McDonnell Foundation, St. Louis, Missouri for research in the School of Education............................................ 29,760 Michigan Masonic Home, Alma for support in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning........................ 8,000 Sarah Morgan Fund, Flint for the Sarah and Carl Morgan Theatre Scholarship, the University of M ichigan-Flint................................................................. 10,450 National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School............................................... 16,250 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 12,500 National Starch and Chemical Foundation, Inc., Bridgewater, New Jersey for the Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center.............................. 6,500 Maxine Painter Trust for undergraduate student aid.................................................. 141,292 Louis R. and Goldie Patchersky Trust for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School......... 20,191 Philip Morris Companies, Inc., New York, New York for the Philip Morris Campus Tolerance for Diversity Program in the School of Education.................................................................. 53,380 Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 10,000 Polk Brothers Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Adm inistration.................................................................. 5,000 Price Waterhouse Foundation, New York, New York for employee matching gifts....................................................... 7,470 49

Page  50 September Meeting, 1995 Renal Physicians Association Research & Education Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the Medical School................................................ 59,700 Research Fund of American Otological Society, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana for the Kresge Hearing Research Institute in the Medical School....................... 6,250 Ribozyme Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Boulder, Colorado for the Vical Gift Fund in the Medical School....................................... 50,000 Rockefeller Foundation, New York, New York for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......................64,500 Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Toledo, Ohio for the Biomechanic Trauma and Sports Medicine Fund in the Medical School.......... 7,500 G. D. Searle & Company, Chicago, Illinois for the Yellowstone Summit Fund in the Medical School............................. 25,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Sante Fe, California 2,900 shares of Arcadian Partners L.P. and 1,800 shares of Providian Corporation common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics and for the University Marching Band Fund in the School of Music............................ 149,056 Gordon H. Sindecuse Estate for the Sindecuse Dental Museum in the School of Dentistry...................... 1,877,296 Sledd Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana for the Samuel D., Martha B., and Mabel I. Sledd Loan Fund in the Medical School.......13,378 Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 258,032 Sparkasse Koblenz & Company, Koblenz, Germany for the Clare and Michael Callahan Fund in the School of Business Administration...... 10,000 Spinal Cord Research Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 24,111 Stanley Electric Company, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute.................. 15,000 Lyle L. Stephens, East Lansing for wheelchair restraints research in the Transportation Research Institute............ 20,000 Irvin Stern Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Comprehensive Studies Program, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...... 22,800 Alice A. Stoddard Trust for the Alice A. Stoddard Scholarship in the Medical School........................... 8,903 Charles J. Strosacker Foundation, Midland for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.......................................... 50,000 Joseph F. Tetlak, Cleveland, Ohio for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................. 5,000 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc., Torrance, California for student aid in the School of Business Administration............................. 10,000 University of Michigan Club-Flint, Flint for the Library Development Fund, the University of Michigan-Flint................... 5,000 University of Michigan Club of New York Scholarship Fund, Inc., New York, New York for the University of Michigan Club of New York Scholarship......................... 6,400 University of Michigan Dugout Club, Ann Arbor for baseball support in the Department of Athletics, in memory of Richard Dubay....... 13,610 USX Foundation, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for employee matching gifts...................................................... 15,050 Mark B. Wallner Foundation, Incline Village, Nevada for research in the Medical School................................................ 24,375 Warner Books, Inc., New York, New York for software development support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................................... 25,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for the Pharmacology Education/Research Fund and the Vincent Massey Symposium in the Medical School and for University Musical Society.................. 33,000 Westinghouse Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the R. Jamison Williams Fund in the College of Engineering and for employee matching gifts..................................................... 12,075 Whitaker Foundation, Rosslyn, Virginia for electrical engineering and computer science fellowships, College of Engineering, and for research in the Horace H. Rackham School of G raduate Studies............................................................. 118,100 Robert L. Willson Trust for undergraduate student aid.................................................... 10,000 50

Page  51 September Meeting, 1995 Elizabeth F. Wood Estate for the Walter F. Wood Scholarship in the School of Dentistry........................ 50,000 Xerox Corporation U.S.A., Rochester, New York for the Joel D. Tauber Endowment Funds in the School of Business Administration, and the College of Engineering...................................................50,000 AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the School of Education........................................... 10,000 Adac Plastics, Inc., Grand Rapids for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute..................15,000 Agvar Chemicals, Inc., Little Falls, New Jersey for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of Lewis A. Engman..........................................10,000 Richard B. Ainsworth, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 10,000 George E. Amendt, Ann Arbor 1,612 shares of various corporate common stock for support in the Medical School.................................................47,597 American Automobile Manufacturers Association, Detroit for support in the Highway Safety Research Institute............................. 220,000 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts and the Biophysics Research Division..........................72,661 American Digestive Health Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland for gastroenterology research in the Medical School................................. 12,500 American Federation for Aging Research, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 19,997 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the Medical School................................................ 55,000 American Lung Association National Office, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................12,500 American Society of Hematology, Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina for research in the Medical School................................................ 10,000 Ameritech Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research, School of Business Administration and for employee matching gifts........ 88,258 Amgen, Inc., Thousand Oaks, California for research and the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.............. 6,000 Amoco Foundation, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for minority and female scholarships and the Amoco Foundation Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering; for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; and for gifts pending designation..... 108,500 Arthur Andersen & Company Foundation, Detroit for employee matching gifts...................................................... 56,335 Ann Arbor Fire Protection, Ann Arbor for scholarships in the Department of Athletics..................................... 12,000 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School................................................ 54,333 Robert Arthur Estate for unrestricted support at the University of Michigan-Flint........................... 5,561 Atlas Valley Golf and Country Club, Grand Blanc for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Gift Fund.................................... 16,500 Norman R. Bodine, Bloomfield Hills 62 shares of United Technologies Corporation common stock for the Ralph B. Bodine Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..... 5,177 Eric V. and Linda Brown, Jr., Fund of the Kalamazoo Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Eric V. Brown Family Scholarship in the Law School.......................... 6,000 Budres Foundation, Grand Rapids for the Budres Foundation Scholarship in the School of Music.......................... 5,000 James P. Byrne, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Annie E. Casey Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland for research in the School of Social Work.......................................... 25,000 Emma Chafitz Trust for the Robert and Emma Chafitz Endowment in the Medical School.................. 45,000 Lucian W. Chaney, Ann Arbor 605 shares of Standard Federal Bank common stock for the Lucian Chaney Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering.......................................................... 22,007 51

Page  52 September Meeting, 1995 Charles H. Chomet, Royal Oak for support in the Medical School................................................. 12,500 Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park for mechanical engineering support in the College of Engineering..................... 9,000 Circon ACMI, Stamford, Connecticut for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, Medical School.......5,000 Civitas Initiative, Chicago, Illinois for the Civitas Scholarships in the School of Social Work........................... 147,500 Coca-Cola, U.S.A. Division of the Coca-Cola Company, Atlanta, Georgia for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for employee matching gifts..................... 50,200 Howard Cohodas, Marquette for student aid in the School of Business Administration.............................. 5,700 Graham H. Conger Estate for the Julia Henning Memorial Scholarship in the Alumni Association and for the Ralph G. Conger Scholarship............................................ 400,000 Conservation Food & Health Foundation, Inc., Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 29,000 Albert C. Dames Estate for the Albert C. Dames Memorial Scholarship......................... 5,000 Dana Corporation, Toledo, Ohio for the School of Engineering Building Fund, the University of Michigan-Dearborn... 25,000 Sophia Dawson Estate for undergraduate student aid..................................................... 5,500 DeKalb Genetics Foundation, DeKalb, Illinois for employee m atching gifts....................................................... 5,000 Dekers Blue Line Club, Ann Arbor for ice hockey support in the Department of Athletics, in memory of Richard Dubay...... 5,000 Delta Dental Plan of Michigan, Lansing for the Delta Dental Scholarship in the School of Dentistry............................ 8,000 John H. DeYoung, Woodstown, New Jersey 100 shares of Motorola, Inc., common stock for the Class of 1936 Engineer's Fund in the College of Engineering.................... 7,744 Dianon Systems, Stratford, Connecticut for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, Medical School...... 10,000 William T. Dobson, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex, the Yost Arena Renovation Fund and other support in the Department of Athletics, for the Risk Management Professorship in the School of Business Administration, for the Cecil J. Nesbitt Actuarial Education Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for research in the Medical School, and for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of W omen..................................................... 24,800 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for employee matching gifts....................................................... 6,323 Dow Chemical USA Midland Division, Midland for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy......................... 20,000 E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Wilmington, Delaware for the Dupont Funds and other support in the School of Business Administration, and the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 140,000 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Communication Disorders Center in the Medical School....................... 25,000 Dale P. Fosdick, Saline 100 shares of International Business Machines common stock for the Ava Comin Case Scholarship and the Glenn McGeoch Memorial Scholarship in the School of Music................................................. 5,375 Foundation for Sports Medicine Education and Research, Rosemont, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,000 Lawrence C. Frank, Yakima, Washington for student aid in the School of Business Administration.............................. 5,700 Charles H. Gershenson Trust for the Arthur Schnabel Collegiate Professorship in the School of Music............... 74,007 James F. Goodrich, Washington, DC 84 shares of Federal National Mortgage Association and 39 shares of Intel Corporation common stock for the James F. Goodrich Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering..................................................... 10,082 52

Page  53 September Meeting, 1995 Government of Canada, Neuroscience Laboratories, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,160 William T. Grant Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 52,008 Grundy Industries, Inc., Joliet, Illinois for support in the Department of Athletics................................... 5,000 Rodolfo Uy Ham, Flint for the Crosby-Kahn Professorship in Neurosurgery in the Medical School........... 10,000 William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Menlo Park, California for environmental studies support in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 75,000 James L. Hobart, Los Altos, California for physics support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................. 10,000 Hollywood Greyhound Track, Hollywood, Florida for the Cancer Center in the Medical School...................................... 50,000 S. C. Holman Foundation, Inc., Pennsauken, New Jersey for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, the University of Michigan-Dearborn...............................................20,000 Hospital & Health Services Credit Union, Ann Arbor for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Golf Classic Benefit Fund.......................9,000 Hudson's, Flint for the Music Academy and WFUM/TV, the University of Michigan-Flint............ 7,000 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bethesda, Maryland for scholarships, fellowships and research in the Medical School...................... 87,500 Huntington's Disease Society of America, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 15,000 Intel Foundation, Hillsboro, Oregon for minority and female scholarships in the College of Engineering and for employee m atching gifts......................................................... 21,630 International Business Machines Corporation, Endicott, New York for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering....... 21,700 Marion L. Johnson Estate for the H. Marvin Pollard Endowed Professorship in the Medical School............. 150,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health.......................... 332,109 W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for research in the Schools of Information and Library Studies and Public Health and for employee matching gifts............................................... 1,025,270 K-I Chemical Research Institute Company, Ltd., Shizuoka, Japan for the Synthesis Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 15,000 Abe Kirshenbaum, St. Joseph for the Isadore Lampe Professorship in the Medical School............................5,000 Genevieve Latulip Irrevocable Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 15,000 Leukemia Society of America, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 8,910 Libbey-Owens-Ford Company, Toledo, Ohio for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute and for employee m atching gifts......................................................... 15,200 J. Glenn and Marjorie Rose Longworth Trust for the Dean's Discretionary Endowment in the School of Education.................. 43,000 William T. Ludolph Estate for the William T. Ludolph Junior Faculty Development Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 150,000 John H. Lunden, Big Rapids 200 shares of Chrysler Corporation common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics...................................... 9,975 Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 Mallinckrodt Sensor Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........... 7,500 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the M edical School................................................. 7,500 Masco Tech, Inc., Rochester for research in the Office for the Study of Automotive Transportation.................. 5,000 James S. McDonnell Foundation, St. Louis, Missouri for research in the School of Education............................................ 29,760 53

Page  54 September Meeting, 1995 Michigan Masonic Home, Alma for support in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning........................ 8,000 Sarah Morgan Fund, Flint for the Sarah and Carl Morgan Theatre Scholarship, the University of M ichigan-Flint................................................................. 10,450 National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School................................................ 16,250 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School....................12,500 National Starch and Chemical Foundation, Inc., Bridgewater, New Jersey for the Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center.............................. 6,500 Maxine Painter Trust for undergraduate student aid.................................................. 141,292 Louis R. and Goldie Patchersky Trust for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School.........20,191 Philip Morris Companies, Inc., New York, New York for the Philip Morris Campus Tolerance for Diversity Program, School of Education.... 53,380 Plastic Surgery Educational Foundation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 10,000 Polk Brothers Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the William Davidson Professorship of Business, School of Business Administration.....5,000 Price Waterhouse Foundation, New York, New York for employee matching gifts................................... 7,470 Renal Physicians Association Research & Education Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the M edical School................................................59,700 Research Fund of American Otological Society, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana for the Kresge Hearing Research Institute in the Medical School....................... 6,250 Ribozyme Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Boulder, Colorado for the Vical Gift Fund in the Medical School....................................... 50,000 Rockefeller Foundation, New York, New York for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 64,500 Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Toledo, Ohio for the Biomechanic Trauma and Sports Medicine Fund in the Medical School...........7,500 G. D. Searle & Company, Chicago, Illinois for the Yellowstone Summit Fund in the Medical School............................. 25,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Sante Fe, California 2,900 shares of Arcadian Partners L.P. and 1,800 shares of Providian Corporation common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics and for the University Marching Band Fund in the School of Music............................ 149,056 Gordon H. Sindecuse Estate for the Sindecuse Dental Museum in the School of Dentistry...................... 1,877,296 Sledd Foundation, Fort Wayne, Indiana for the Samuel D., Martha B., and Mabel I. Sledd Loan Fund, Medical School........... 13,378 Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 258,032 Sparkasse Koblenz & Company, Koblenz, Germany for the Clare and Michael Callahan Fund in the School of Business Administration....... 10,000 Spinal Cord Research Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 24,111 Stanley Electric Company, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute.................. 15,000 Lyle L. Stephens, East Lansing for wheelchair restraints research in the Transportation Research Institute............ 20,000 Irvin Stern Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Comprehensive Studies Program, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...... 22,800 Alice A. Stoddard Trust for the Alice A. Stoddard Scholarship in the Medical School......................... 8,903 Charles J. Strosacker Foundation, Midland for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.......................................... 50,000 Joseph F. Tetlak, Cleveland, Ohio for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................. 5,000 Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc., Torrance, California for student aid in the School of Business Administration............................. 10,000 University of Michigan Club-Flint, Flint for the Library Development Fund, the University of Michigan-Flint................... 5,000 54

Page  55 September Meeting, 1995 University of Michigan Club of New York Scholarship Fund, Inc., New York, New York for the University of Michigan Club of New York Scholarship......................... 6,400 University of Michigan Dugout Club, Ann Arbor for baseball support in the Department of Athletics, in memory of Richard Dubay....... 13,610 USX Foundation, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for employee matching gifts............................................ 15,050 Mark B. Wallner Foundation, Incline Village, Nevada for research in the Medical School................................................ 24,375 Warner Books, Inc., New York, New York for software development support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.... 25,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for the Pharmacology Education/Research Fund and the Vincent Massey Symposium in the Medical School and for University Musical Society..................33,000 Westinghouse Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the R. Jamison Williams Fund in the College of Engineering and for employee m atching gifts.................................................................12,075 Whitaker Foundation, Rosslyn, Virginia for electrical engineering and computer science fellowships in the College of Engineering and for research in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.... 118,100 Robert L. Willson Trust for undergraduate student aid.................................... 10,000 Elizabeth F. Wood Estate for the Walter F. Wood Scholarship in the School of Dentistry........................ 50,000 Xerox Corporation U.S.A., Rochester, New York for the Joel D. Tauber Endowment Funds in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering................................................... 50,000 The following nonmonetary gifts-in-kind were received: Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Sunnyvale, California an Biorad Quaestor CD measurement tool, an Imagen Model 6320 image processor with laser printer, an Olympus microscope, and two digital VT320 computer terminals, for the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Apple Computers, Southfield two Power McIntosh computers with display monitors and keyboards for the School of Music Duane N. Diedrich, Muncie, Indiana nine letters written by Douglas MacArthur to Hamilton Fish, dated between 1921 and 1934, for the Clements Library Fife Electric Supply Company, Novi lighting fixtures, for the University Golf Course clubhouse Ford Motor Company, Dearborn a 1995 Ford Cargo CF-7000 truck for the Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Richard W. Frankel, Bloomfield Hills a 35-mm color slide collection, for the School of Natural Resources and Environment Hanson Research Corporation, Chatsworth, California one set Microette Autosampler circulating heater system and seven sets of vertical diffusion cell assemblies with installation and training, for the College of Pharmacy Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 30 Hp model 712/60 workstations with monitors, six HP LaserJet printers, six HP Jet direct interface cards, and six 8 MB memory expansion for HP 4SI printers, for the mathematics department Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon computer equipment, for CREW in the School of Business Administration Ernest N. McCarus, Ann Arbor volumes 6-44 of The Middle East Journal, dated 1952-1990, for the Department of Near Eastern Studies National Instruments, Austin, Texas a LabVIEW Full Development System with software upgrades, for the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Professional Alliance, Inc., Sterling Heights a CD-ROM product, Concise Vision for periodontics, for the School of Dentistry Wesley Rae, Flushing an Apple IIGS computer with a color monitor, key board, and other related equipment 55

Page  56 September Meeting, 1995 Southeast Asia Art Foundation 30 binders of 868 photographs, 1316 protective sleeves, 148 pages of text, 413 interleaving pages, and 39 prints illustrating Cambodian sculptures, for the history of art department Spectrum Printers, Tecumseh design and printing of 1,000 Jazz Revisited brochures and 10,000 letters, return cards, with mailing and return envelopes, for WUOM/WVGR's Michigan Radio annual end of year mail appeal Joan Heldreth Bell, Houston, Texas a collection of Gray Civil War and family letters, and the Source Book encyclopedia for the Clements Library Dory Heldreth Graham, Ann Arbor a collection of Gray Civil War and family letters, and the Source Book encyclopedia for the Clements Library Southeast Asia Art Foundation, Hill, New Hampshire 37 binders containing 1609 black and white photographs, 740 color slides, 451 pages of text, 288 interleaving pages, 2464 protective sleeves, and 163 other publication prints all illustrating Japanese Architecture for the history of art department IOTech, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio a data acquisition board and related equipment and software for a PC compatible computer for the Department of Aerospace Engineering Martin Marx, Bingham Farms a retrospective collection of art works by glass artist David R. Huchthausen for the University of Michigan-Dearborn art collection Robert Pilzninski, Dearborn a Macintosh computer with a monitor, keyboard, printer, computer desk and various software for the Child Development Center Q.E.D. Environmental Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor a Lepel inductive furnace, a 2.5KW 230/1 phase and a 24 amp for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ted Tuttle, Southfield four architectural books for the University Library Additional gifts ranging from $1 to $999 in value were received from the following donors: Afternoon Delight, Ann Arbor Kenneth Leach, Brattleboro, Vermont Block's Nursery, Romulus Paul R. Lichter, Ann Arbor Beatrice T. Caldwell, Flint Meijer, Inc. - Center Road, Flint Perry Daneshgari, Flint Meijer, Inc. - Pierson Road, Flint John D. Dillery, Ann Arbor Leslie Page Moch, East Lansing Carol J. Greene, Commerce Township Jeanette Navarre, Brighton Jewel F. Hunter, Ann Arbor Joseph L. Rife, Ann Arbor Imperial Sports Team Store, Flint Raymond J. Rogers, Riverside, Connecticut Michael J. Kruzich, Ypsilanti Personnel Actions. Provost Machen, Chancellor Nelms, and Chancellor Renick submitted a number of personnel actions. Chancellor Nelms highlighted the appointment of Virginia R. Allen as vice chancellor for student services and enrollment management. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITH TENURE Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Featherman, David L., Ph.D., Director, Institute for Social Research, also appointed Professor of Sociology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Lok, Anna S., M.B.B.S., Professor of Internal Medicine, October 1, 1995 Middlebrooks, John C., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, August 1, 1995 56

Page  57 September Meeting, 1995 Park, Denise C., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology Raitt, Suzanne, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll, Ph.D., Professor of History and Women's Studies, January 1, 1996 Strecher, Victor J., Ph.D., Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS FOR REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITHOUT TENURE Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Suchard, Suzanne J., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Waller, Patricia F., Ph.D., from Associate Professor of Public Health Policy and Administration, School of Public Health, and Director, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, to Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, and Director, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute REAPPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective May 1, 1995-August 31, 1998 Frost, Carolyn O., Professor of Information and Library Studies, with tenure, and Associate Dean, School of Information and Library Studies, reappointed Associate Dean JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Akil, Huda, Professor of Psychiatry, with tenure, and the Gardner C. Quarton Collegiate Professor of Neurosciences, also appointed Co-Director, Mental Health Research Institute, October 16, 1995 Barber, James R., Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, with tenure, also appointed Acting Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Barnfather, Janet S., from Assistant Professor of Nursing, School of Nursing, to Associate Professor of Nursing, School of Health Professions and Studies, without tenure, UM-Flint England, Anthony W., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with tenure, Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, without tenure, College of Engineering, also appointed Associate Dean for Faculty Programs, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, September 22, 1995-August 31, 1996 Gutierrez, Lorraine M., Associate Professor of Social Work, with tenure, School of Social Work, also appointed Associate Professor of Psychology, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Kunkel, Steven L., Professor of Pathology, with tenure, Medical School, also appointed Associate Dean for Interdisciplinary Programs and Initiatives, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, September 22, 1995-August 31, 1996 Lieberthal, Kenneth G., Professor of Political Science, with tenure, and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed the William Davidson Professor of Business Administration, School of Business Administration, five-year term Ludwig, Martha L., Professor of Biological Chemistry, with tenure, Medical School, and Research Biophysicist, also appointed Interim Chair, Biophysics Research Division, one-year term Macdonald, Robert L., Professor of Neurology, with tenure, and Professor of Physiology, without tenure, also appointed the Russell N. DeJong Professor of Neurology, five-year term, August 1, 1995 57

Page  58 September Meeting, 1995 Meyer, William J., Professor of Political Science, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Interim Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, UM-Flint, nine-month term Nabel, Elizabeth G., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, also appointed Professor of Physiology, without tenure, August 1, 1995 Watson, Stanley J. Jr., Professor of Psychiatry, with tenure, and the Theophile Raphael Collegiate Professor of Neurosciences, also appointed Co-Director, Mental Health Research Institute, October 16, 1995 OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Allen, Virginia R., Vice Chancellor for Student Services and Enrollment Management, UM-Flint, three-year term Bornstein, George J., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, also appointed the C. A. Patrides Collegiate Professor of English, five-year term, July 1, 1995 Chambers, David L. III, Professor of Law, with tenure, and Wade H. McCree, Jr., Collegiate Professor of Law, reappointed Wade H. McCree, Jr., Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term Green, Thomas A., Professor of History, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Professor of Law, with tenure, and the John Philip Dawson Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, reappointed the John Philip Dawson Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term Jones, Edward R., the James B. and Grace J. Nelson Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy, fall term Lempert, Richard O., Professor of Sociology, with tenure, Chair, Department of Sociology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Professor of Law, with tenure, and the Francis A. Allen Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, reappointed the Francis A. Allen Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term McClary, Susan, the Norman Freehling Visiting Professor, September 3-September 23, 1995 Mitofsky, Warren J., the Howard R. Marsh Visiting Professor of Journalism, fall term Moravcik, Jozef, from Visiting Professor of Law to the L. Bates Lea Visiting Professor of Law, fall term Nell, Victor, the Norman Freehling Visiting Professor, March 10-April 6, 1996 Nurse, Esrold A., Assistant Dean for Student Academic Affairs, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, five-year term Regan, Donald H., Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Professor of Law, with tenure, and the William W. Bishop, Jr., Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, reappointed the William W. Bishop, Jr., Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term Sklar, Lawrence, from Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, and the James B. and Grace J. Nelson Professor of Philosophy to Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, and the William K. Frankena Collegiate Professor of Philosophy, five-year term, July 1, 1995 Vicinus, Martha, correction to title reported in July 1994 Vining, Joseph, Professor of Law, with tenure, and the Harry Burns Hutchins Collegiate Professor of Law, reappointed the Harry Burns Hutchins Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term White, James B., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Professor of Law, with tenure, and the L. Hart Wright Collegiate Professor of Law, Law School, reappointed the L. Hart Wright Collegiate Professor of Law, five-year term William K. Frankena Collegiate Professorship in Philosophy. The Regents approved the establishment of the William K. Frankena Collegiate Professorship in Philosophy, effective July 1, 1995 William B. Taylor Collegiate Professorship in Dermatology. The Regents approved the establishment of the William B. Taylor Collegiate Professorship in Dermatology, effective September 1, 1995 58

Page  59 September Meeting, 1995 Lynn and Ruth Townsend Professorship in Communication Disorders. The Regents approved the establishment of the Lynn and Ruth Townsend Professorship in Communication Disorders, effective August 1, 1995 The following committee appointments were approved: Advisory Committee on Recreational Sports Downing, Karen E., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1997, vice Kent J. Sheets, term expired Thompson, Levi T. Jr., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1997, vice Peggy J. Foss, term expired Alumni Association Business and Financial Affairs Committee Beaver, Frank E., retroactive reappointments, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996 Krumm, William B., retroactive reappointments, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996 Traugott, Michael W., retroactive appointment, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996, vice Cedric V. Fricke, term expired Clements Library Associates Board of Governors Reappointments effective October 1, 1995-September 30, 1996: Beuche, James R. Hoyt, Ruth B. Schoff Joanna Clark, C. E. Fraser Jr. Karmazin, Anne M. Seger, Martha R. Cross, Thomas N. Kennedy, Sally Shapiro, Harold T. Diedrich, Duane N. Kingsley, Thomas C. Stebbins, William C. Hamp, Stephen Klancnik, James M. Thompson, Bradley M. Hatcher, Harlan H. Mason, Philip P. Thurber, Cleveland Jr. Hayes, Walter Pohrt, Richard A. Upton, David Heydon, Peter N. Price, Jacob M. Wheeler, John D. College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Executive Committee Railton, Peter A., September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996, vice Domna C. Stanton, on leave Institute for Social Research Executive Committee McDonald, Terrence, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998, vice John P. Chamberlain, term expired Military Officer Education Committee Pierce, Penny F., reappointed July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998 Woods, Richard D., reappointed July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996 UM-Dearborn School of Education Executive Committee Lazarus, Belinda D., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1998, vice Joseph A. Cepuran, term expired Thornton, Leslie II, September 1-December 31, 1995, vice Raymond P. Kettel, sabbatical leave Personnel Reports. The following personnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated School of Dentistry Gerigk, Carola A., D.D.S., Lecturer in Dentistry, August 8, 1995 Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel R., D.D.S., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Dentistry, August 1, 1995 College of Engineering Chick, Stephen E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering Collins, Kevin R., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Hu, Shixin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Northrop, Mary J., B.S., Lecturer in Technical Communications Semrau, Jeremy D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Shi, Jianjun, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering 59

Page  60 September Meeting, 1995 Stojadinovic, Bozidar, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering Wasserman, Kimberly M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Division of Kinesiologv George, Thomas R., Ph.D., Lecturer in Kinesiology, July 1, 1995 Law School Lyn, Andrea D., J.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Law Tonner, Grace C., J.D., Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, July 15, 1995 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Aguado-Perez, Norberto, Licenciado, Lecturer I in Spanish Banaszak Holl, Mark M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry Burnstein, James S., M.A., Lecturer II in Film and Video Studies Campbell, Stephen J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History of Art Caron, David, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French Cassin, Jan L., M.S., Lecturer I in Biology Chen, Qinghai, M.A., Lecturer III in Chinese Cornish, Alison, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Italian Croley, Laura S., A.B., Lecturer II in English, Residential College Dempster, Brian K., M.F.A., Lecturer I in English DeVries, Diana B., B.S., Lecturer II in Women's Studies, Dunavan, Sandra L., M.A., Lecturer I in Anthropology, July 1, 1995 Engblom, Philip C., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Marathi Language, July 1, 1995 Fredrickson, Barbara L., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology Friendly, Jonathan, B.A., Lecturer II in Communication, July 1, 1995 Frohlich, Michael, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology and Assistant Curator, Herbarium Glass, Jennifer M. B., A.M., Lecturer I in Psychology Greene, Dana M., A.B., Lecturer II in Sociology Hernandez, Maria P., M.A., Lecturer I in Spanish Kim, Richard S., M.A., Lecturer II in Asian American Studies Kinzer, Mark S., M.A., Lecturer I in New Testament, July 1, 1995 Laskowski, Gene L., Ph.D., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Lay, Howard G., Assistant Professor of History of Art Lee, Fiona, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Assistant Professor of Business Administration, School of Business Administration Libretti, Timothy R., Ph.D., Lecturer I in English Loncar, Michael G., B.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Martin, Karin A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology Mateo, Jill M., M.S., Lecturer I in Psychology McKay, Timothy A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics McKinney, Todd S., B.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Montoya, Maria E., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of History and American Culture Murphy, Margaret A., M.A., Lecturer II in Sociology Muth, Albert M., M.A., Lecturer I in Spanish Nagel, Julie J., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Psychology O'Foighil, Diarmaid, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology and Assistant Curator, Museum of Zoology Ozel, Bilge, M.A., Lecturer I in Turkish Language, July 1, 1995 Palmer, Janet P., B.A., Lecturer II in Sociology Pierce, Gillian B., Ph.D., Lecturer I in French Rodriguez, Maria I., M.A., Lecturer II in Spanish and Linguistics, Residential College Ryan, Clare M., M.S., Lecturer II in Geological Sciences Standish, Marc, Ph.D., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Starrels, Marjorie E., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Sociology Steiff, Julie A., M.A., Lecturer I in English Viers, Yannick A., Ph.D., Lecturer I in French Wang, Lan, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Yervasi, Carina, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of French Zhao, Shanyang, Ph.D., Lecturer II in Sociology 60

Page  61 September Meeting, 1995 Medical School Angelos, Peter, M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Athey, Brian D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, July 1, 1995 Ballester, Christina B., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Psychiatry, July 1, 1995 Breidahl, William H., M.B.B.S., Lecturer in Radiology, July 1, 1995 Chepeha, Douglas, A., M.D., Lecturer in Otorhinolaryngology, July 1, 1995 Cinti, Sandro K., M.D., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Clevens, Ross A., M.D., Lecturer in Otorhinolaryngology, July 1, 1995 Cole, William H., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, July 1, 1995 Cook, Timothy H., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, July 17, 1995 Crump, John R. C., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Devlin, William H., M.D., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Dumas, Michel D., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology, July 1, 1995 Fader, Darrell J., M.D., Lecturer in Dermatology, July 1, 1995 Flynn, Joseph T., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, August 15, 1995 Forde, Wayne A., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Family Practice, July 17, 1995 Freidberg, Andrew A., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, August 10, 1995 Geiger, James D., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Golladay, Eustace S., M.D., Clinical Professor II of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Goyal, Rajiva, M.B.B.S., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Groenhout, Edward G., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Hallinen, Diane L., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Heidebrink, Judith L., M.D., Lecturer in Neurology, July 1, 1995 Hilborn, Mark D., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology, July 1, 1995 Hogikyan, Norman D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, August 1, 1995 Hudson, Michael P., M.D., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Johnson, David B. S., M.B.B.Ch., Lecturer in Radiology, July 1, 1995 Kingery, Suzanne, M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, July 17, 1995 Koo, Harry P., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Kurtz, Ron M., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, July 17, 1995 McGinn, Cornelius J., M.D., Lecturer in Radiation Oncology, September 1, 1995 Meaney, James F. M., M.B.B.Ch., Lecturer in Radiology, July 1, 1995 Michael, Claire W., M.B.B.Ch., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pathology, July 1, 1995 Michaels, Andrew J., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Murman, Daniel L., M.D., Lecturer in Neurology, July 1, 1995 Nelson, Virginia A., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, July 10, 1995 Olson, Eva D., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Psychiatry, July 1, 1995 Osborne, Janet L., M.D., Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynecology, July 1, 1995 Pagani, Francis D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Panahi, Parviz, M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, July 1, 1995 Park, John M., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Pearson, Sayuri V., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, July 1, 1995 Pituch, Kenneth J., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, July 1, 1995 Polley, Linda S., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, August 1, 1995 Pou-Vendrell, Carlos R., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, July 7, 1995 Reeves, Pamela J., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Reickert, Craig A., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Salot, Lee A., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, July 1, 1995 Sanda, Martin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Schreiner, Robert J. Jr., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Schultz, Carol H., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Shane, Steven A., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Sheldon, Eric A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, August 1, 1995 Simeone, Diane M., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Singleton, John R., M.D., Lecturer in Neurology, July 1, 1995 Smith, Yolanda R., M.D., Lecturer in Obstetrics and Gynecology, July 1, 1995 Soriano, Jose A., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, August 1, 1995 61

Page  62 September Meeting, 1995 Su, Grace L., M.D., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, August 1, 1995 Sweeney, John F., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Tipirneni, Hiral V., M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Turner, Raymond S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology, July 1, 1995 Vallance, David K., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Varma, Navin K., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II in Neurology, July 1, 1995 Viltri, Salvatore, M.D., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Wang, Stewart C., Ph.D., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, July 1, 1995 Weber, James E., D.O., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Wilkerson, Catherine E., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Wilkerson, William M., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Surgery, August 1, 1995 Wittenberg, Marc I., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, July 1, 1995 Yahanda, Alan M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery, August 1, 1995 Zivot, Joel B., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Anesthesiology, July 1, 1995 School of Music Andre, Naomi A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Music (Music History/Musicology) Cleaver, Gerald W., B.M.E., Assistant Professor of Music (Jazz Studies) Herseth, Freda A., M.M., Assistant Professor of Music (Voice) Racine, Melody L., B.A., Lecturer in Music (Voice), May 1, 1995 Walden, Donald, Diploma, Assistant Professor of Music (Jazz Studies) School of Nursing Fisher, Maura A., M.S., Lecturer in Nursing Lee, Jan L., Ph.D., Lecturer in Nursing, August 15, 1995 Wurst, Delores S., M.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing College of Pharmacy Odeh, Rudina M., Pharm.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pharmacy, August 1, 1995 School of Public Health Banaszak-Holl, Jane C., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy Parker, Edith A., Dr.Ph., Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education Wang, Caroline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education School of Public Policy Charles, Kerwin K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Public Policy, School of Public Health, and Assistant Professor of Economics, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Ross, Douglas D., M.P.A., Lecturer in Public Policy UM-Dearborn College of Arts. Sciences, and Letters Samorski, Jan H., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communications UM-Dearborn School of Education Beyer-Houda, Bonnie, Ed.D., Assistant Professor of Education UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Jones, Kimberly R., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Theatre Kaufman, Martin M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Earth and Resource Science Parfitt, Bruce D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology Woehrle, Kathleen L., M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, JOINT APPOINTMENTS, OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Architecture and Urban Planning Dandekar, Hemalata, Professor of Urban Planning, with tenure, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, also appointed Director, Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, College of Literature, Science, and Arts, July 1, 1995 62

Page  63 September Meeting, 1995 School of Business Administration Oxley, Joanne E., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Business Administration School of Dentistry Edge, Marion J., from Assistant Professor to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Dentistry Johnson, Richard A., from Assistant Professor to Clinical Associate Professor II of Dentistry College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Alspector, Tammy L., from Lecturer II of Philosophy, to Graduate Student Teaching Assistant, July 1, 1995 Campbell, Andrew R., from Lecturer II in American Studies, to Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Guerra, Nancy, from Associate Professor of Psychology, without tenure, to Adjunct Associate Research Scientist, June 1, 1995 Henderson-King, Donna H., from Lecturer II to Visiting Assistant Professor II of Women's Studies McAlister, William L. II., from Lecturer I in Spanish, to Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Thompson, Heather A., from Lecturer I to Visiting Assistant Professor II of History Medical School Bloembergen, Wendy E., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Daoud, Emile G., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, July 1, 1995 Doi, Kei, from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Radiology, July 1, 1995 Ferguson, Kevin, from Lecturer to Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Joynt, Lynn K., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Radiology, July 1, 1995 Maxvold, Norma J., from Lecturer to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, August 1, 1995 Moroi, Sayoko E., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, July 8, 1995 Strouse, Peter J., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Radiology, July 1, 1995 UM-Dearborn School of Engineering Akingbehin, Kuimi, from Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science, with tenure, to Adjunct Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science, July 1, 1995 UM-Dearborn School of Management Schwartz, Joseph M., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Marketing ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Engineering Datsko, Joseph, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, September 1, 1995 Sawyer, Thomas M., Professor Emeritus of Technical Communication, September 1, 1995 -April 30, 1996 Institute for Social Research Douvan, Elizabeth M., the Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor Emerita of Psychology and Women's Studies and Research Scientist Emerita, June 1-July 31, 1995 College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Becker, Marvin B., Professor Emeritus of History, September 1-December 31, 1995 Dernberger, Robert F., Professor Emeritus of Economics, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Eldersveld, Samuel J., Professor Emeritus of Political Science, January 1, 1996-April 30, 1996 Garbaty, Thomas J., Professor Emeritus of English, September 1-December 31, 1995 Mann, Richard D., Professor Emeritus of Psychology, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Nordman, Christer E., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, September 1-December 31, 1995 Wagner, Warren H. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Botany, Curator Emeritus of Pteridophytes, and Professor Emeritus of Natural Resources, September 1-December 31, 1995 Weinreich, Gabriel, Professor Emeritus of Physics, July 1, 1995-August 31, 1995 63

Page  64 September Meeting, 1995 Medical School Bohr, David F., Professor Emeritus of Physiology, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Brandwin, Marvin A., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Psychology, August 1, 1995 -June 30, 1996 Bull, Frances E., Professor Emerita of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Dabich, Lyubica, Professor Emerita of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Floyd, John C. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Hawkins, Joseph E. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Otorhinolaryngology (Physiological Acoustics), one-year term Henley, Keith S., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Mikkelson, William M., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Sloan, Herbert, Professor Emeritus of Surgery, one-year term, July 1, 1995 Smith, William S., Professor Emeritus of Surgery, one-year term, March 1, 1995 Thompson, George R., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term, July 1, 1995 School of Nursing Gage, Lois W., Professor Emerita of Nursing, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 School of Social Work Wolfson, Charles S., Professor Emeritus of Social Work, September 1-December 31, 1995 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Coffey, Thomas L., Professor Emeritus of Sociology/Anthropology/Social Work, May 1-August 31, 1995 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996, unless otherwise indicated College of Architecture and Urban Planning Brandle, Kurt, Professor of Architecture, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1-May 31, 1996 Crandall, J. Sterling, Professor of Architecture, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1-December 31, 1995 Kleinman, Kent F., Assistant Professor of Architecture, leave without salary School of Art Hinton, Alfred F., Professor of Art, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995 -December 31, 1995 School of Business Administration Blair, David C., Associate Professor of Computer and Information Systems, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Karnani, Aneel G., Associate Professor of Corporate Strategy and International Business, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Kon, Stanley J., Professor of Finance, with tenure, sabbatical leave Lee, Charles M. C., Associate Professor of Marketing, with tenure, contract leave Pirrong, Stephen C., Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy, leave without salary Sepanski, Jungsywan H., Assistant Professor of Statistics and Management Science, leave without salary Taylor, James R., Professor of Marketing, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Tichy, Noel M., Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 School of Dentistry Hanks, Carl T., Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave, May 1-September 30, 1995 Israel, Jerold H., the Alene and Allan F. Smith Professor of Law, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 64

Page  65 September Meeting, 1995 College of Engineering Akhavan, Rayhaneh, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Beck, Robert F., Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Bilello, John C., Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, with tenure, College of Engineering, and Professor of Applied Physics, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, sabbatical leave Felbeck, David K., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, retirement furlough Liker, Jeffrey K., Associate Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 McClamroch, N. Harris, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, with tenure, Chair, Department of Aerospace Engineering, and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, without tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Papalambros, Panos Y., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Perakis, Anastassios N., Associate Professor of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Samson, Perry J., Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, with tenure, College of Engineering, and Professor of Environmental and Industrial Health, without tenure, School of Public Health, sabbatical leave Schwank, Johannes W., Professor of Chemical Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave Thompson, Levi T. Jr., Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave Tommelein, Iris D., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, with tenure, leave without salary Vinh, N. X., Professor of Aerospace Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Wight, James K., Professor of Civil Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Becchetti, Frederick D. Jr., Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Blinder, S. M., Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Bright, Charles C., Lecturer III in History, Residential College, leave without salary, January 1-December 31, 1996 Brown, Elsa B., Assistant Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies, duty off campus Burbank, Jane R., Associate Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Carpenter, Bogdana, Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Chamberlin, John R., Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Policy, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Clarke, Roy, Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Farley, W. Reynolds, Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Forsyth, Ilene H., Professor of History of Art, with tenure, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Fossum, Jarl E., Associate Professor of New Testament Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave Frohlich, Michael, Assistant Professor of Biology and Assistant Curator, Herbarium, duty off campus, September 1-December 31, 1995 Gasharov, Vesselin N., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, leave without salary Gidley, David W., Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Grew, Raymond, Professor of History, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 65

Page  66 September Meeting, 1995 Griffin, Henry C., Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Heirich, Max A., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave Helling, Robert B., Professor of Biology, with tenure, sabbatical leave Laitner, John P., Professor of Economics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Lewis, Donald J., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, duty off campus, one-year term, July 1, 1995 McLoyd, Vonnie C., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, sabbatical leave Roth, David, Assistant Professor of Economics, leave without salary Sandelands, Lloyd E., Associate Professor of Psychology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Scheppele, Kim L., Associate Professor of Political Science and Public Policy, with tenure, and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Policy, scholarly activity leave Simons, Patricia, Associate Professor of History of Art and Women's Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Skantze, P. A., Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, duty off campus, September 1-December 31, 1995 Smuts, Barbara B., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1-December 31, 1995 Terada, Rei M., Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature, duty off campus, September 1-December 31, 1995 Tomozawa, Yukio, Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Weinstein, Michael I., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Yablo, Stephen J., Associate Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Medical School Bree, Robert L., Associate Professor of Radiology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, July 1 -December 31, 1995 Coon, Minor J., the Victor C. Vaughn Distinguished University Professor, with tenure, phased retirement, September 1, 1995-August 31, 2006 Dowling, Catherine A., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, extended sick leave, July 10-July 31, 1995, family medical leave without salary, August 1-October 17, 1995 Koomey, John M., Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, October 1, 1995-July 31, 1996 Morley, George W., the Norman F. Miller Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, retirement furlough, January 1, 1996-December 31, 1997 Schwartz, Jessica, Professor of Physiology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995 -August 31, 1996 Smith, Yolanda R., Lecturer in Microbiology and Immunology, leave without salary, July 1-July 31, 1995 School of Music Becker, Judith O., Professor of Music (Music History/Musicology), with tenure, sabbatical leave Daugherty, Michael K., Associate Professor of Music (Composition), sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Korsyn, Kevin E., Associate Professor of Music (Music Theory), sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Lewis, Ralph B., Professor of Music (Theory), with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Sargous, Harry W., Professor of Music (Oboe), with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Shirley, George I., Professor of Music (Voice), with tenure, and the Joseph Edgar Maddy Distinguished University Professor of Music, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Udow, Michael W., Professor of Music (percussion), sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 66

Page  67 September Meeting, 1995 School of Natural Resources Patterson, Richard L., Professor of Natural Resources, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1-December 31, 1996 Yaffee, Steven L., Professor of Natural Resources and Environment, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 College of Pharmacy Partipilo, Maria L., Clinical Instructor II in Pharmacy, leave without salary, June 20-August 31, 1995 School of Public Health Becker, Mark P., Associate Professor of Biostatistics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Butter, Irene H., Professor of Health Management and Policy, with tenure, retirement furlough Cornell, Richard G., Professor of Biostatistics, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-January 31, 1996 Harris, Craig, Associate Professor of Toxicology, with tenure, School of Public Health, and Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, Medical School, sabbatical leave Neighbors, Harold W., Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, with tenure, leave without salary Smith, Dean G., Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Thomas, John W., Professor of Health Management and Policy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Warner, Kenneth E., Professor of Health Management and Policy, with tenure, and the Richard D. Remington Collegiate Professor of Public Health, sabbatical leave School of Social Work Powell, Thomas J., Professor of Social Work, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Taylor, Robert J., Associate Professor of Social Work, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 UM-Dearborn College of Arts. Sciences, and Letters Bogin, Barry A., Professor of Anthropology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Crapo, Paul B., Associate Professor of French, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Heady, Judith E., Associate Professor of Biology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 LaChance, Michael A., Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-December 31, 1995 UM-Dearborn School of Education Kettel, Raymond P., Associate Professor of Education, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 UM-Dearborn College of Engineering Mallick, Pankaj K., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Narasimhamurthi, Natarajan, Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Tsui, Louis Y., Associate Professor of Computer and Information Science, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Ames, James R., Associate Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Farrell, William J., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Paige, Bruno, Assistant Professor of Music, scholarly activity leave 67

Page  68 September Meeting, 1995 UM-Flint School of Management Moon, I. Douglas, Professor of Operations Management, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 TERMINATIONS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective August 31, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Architecture and Urban Planning Almy, Dean J. III, Assistant Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, resigned, July 31, 1995 School of Art Canine, Steven K., Assistant Professor of Art, resigned, May 31, 1995 School of Dentistry Bretz, Walter A., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, resigned, August 31, 1995 Gao, Zhirong, Assistant Professor of Dentistry, resigned, July 16, 1995 O'Neal, Robert B., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, resigned, August 31, 1995 School of Education Knowles, J. Gary, Assistant Professor of Education, term complete, July 31, 1995 College of Engineering Peek, Ralf, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, term complete, May 31, 1995 School of Information and Library Studies Foster, John K., Lecturer in Information and Library Studies, resigned, July 31, 1995 Pao, Miranda Lee, Professor of Information and Library Studies, deceased, August 10, 1995 College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Andrushkiw, Vera M., Lecturer II in Slavic Languages and Literatures, resigned, April 30, 1995 Barrett, Andrea F., Lecturer II in English Language and Literature, term complete, April 30, 1995 Boklan, Kent D., Lecturer II in Mathematics, term complete, August 31, 1995 Burr, Suzanne, Lecturer II in Telecommunication Arts, resigned, April 30, 1995 Carr, Robert K., Lecturer II in Biology, term complete, December 31, 1994 Cho, Nancy J., Lecturer II in American Studies, term complete, December 31, 1994 Clark, Francelia, Lecturer I in English Language and Literature, term, complete, June 30, 1995 Criso, Rachel A., Lecturer II in French, term complete, May 31, 1995 Fabos, Bettina J., Lecturer II in Communication, term complete, June 30, 1995 Giaquinto, Anthony, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, term complete, August 15, 1995 Grech, Elaine, Lecturer I in Italian, term complete, April 30, 1995 Grech, John, Lecturer II in French, term complete, April 30, 1995 Hovick, James W., Lecturer II in Chemistry, term complete, June 30, 1995 Hu, Yi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, term complete, August 31, 1995 Ischi, Nicolas P., Lecturer II in French, term complete, April 30, 1995 Kim, Jaemin, Lecturer II in Korean, term complete, December 31, 1994 Koskela, Pekka J., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, term complete, July 31, 1995 Messer, Sarah, Lecturer II in English Literature, term complete, December 31, 1994 Olmedo-Monje, David, Lecturer II in Spanish, term complete, April 30, 1995 Piccoli, Sonia, Lecturer I in Italian, term complete, April 30, 1995 Pitt, Nigel J. E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics, term complete, August 31, 1995 Place, Emi, Lecturer I in Japanese, term complete,,.December 31, 1994 Powers, Lyall H., Professor Emeritus of English Language and Literature, term complete, December 31, 1994 Reeves, Jimmie L., Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, term complete, June 30, 1995 Rosoff, Susan H., Lecturer II in French, Residential College, term complete, December 31, 1994 Satake, Kenji, Assistant Professor of Geological Sciences, resigned,. August 31, 1995 68

Page  69 September Meeting, 1995 Smail, Kathleen M. M., Lecturer III in French, resigned, May 31, 1995 Swanson, Irena, the T. H. Hildebrandt Research Assistant Professor of Mathematics, term complete, July 31, 1995 Taylor, G. Keith, Lecturer II in English Language and Literature, term complete, April 30, 1995 West, James E., Lecturer II in Economics, term complete, June 30, 1994 White, Nicholas P., Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, retired, May 31, 1995 Medical School Auslender, Marcelo J., Lecturer in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, term complete, June 30, 1995 Bainnson, Andrew N., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, July 6, 1995 Bassett, David R., Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, retired, July 31, 1995 Blasier, Ralph B., Associate Professor of Surgery, with tenure, resigned, June 30, 1995 Bradley, Scott M., Lecturer in Surgery, resigned, July 31, 1995 Braun, Daniel K., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, term complete, August 31, 1995 Brown, Sandra M., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, July 6, 1995 Cleary, Robert M. Jr., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, resigned, August 21, 1995 Collito, Michael F., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, resigned, June 30, 1995 Cooper, Kevin D., Associate Professor of Dermatology, with tenure, resigned, June 30, 1995 Ditto, John L., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, June 30, 1995 Eaton, Michael P., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, term complete, June 30, 1995 Fancher, Linda E., Lecturer in Dermatology, resigned, July 31, 1995 Felbeck, Peter G., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, term complete, July 7, 1995 Geiss, Michael J. III, Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, July 6, 1995 Gerndt, Steven J., Lecturer in Surgery, resigned, June 30, 1995 Green, Robert A., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, retired, August 31, 1995 Greenman, George W., Lecturer in Psychiatry, term complete, June 30, 1995 Henderson, Pamela R., Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, July 6, 1995 Jove, Richard, Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, with tenure, resigned, August 31, 1995 Kletter, Gad B., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, term complete, July 31, 1995 Majmudar, Gopa J., Lecturer in Dermatology, resigned, July 10, 1995 Maragos, William F., Lecturer in Neurology, resigned, August 15, 1995 Murray, Jeffrey R., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, resigned, June 30, 1995 Nelson, Bruce R., Assistant Professor of Dermatology, Assistant Professor of Surgery, and Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, resigned, August 3, 1995 Stewart, Donald H. III, Lecturer in Ophthalmology, term complete, July 6, 1995 Tallio, Debora G., Lecturer in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, resigned, August 31, 1995 Taylor, Richard P., Lecturer in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, resigned, June 30, 1995 Tennekoon, Gihan I., Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, with tenure, and Professor of Neurology, without tenure, resigned, August 11, 1995 Thomas, Giovana R., Lecturer in Otorhinolaryngology, resigned, August 16, 1995 Whitehouse, Frank Jr., Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, with tenure, retired, August 31, 1995 School of Music Lykes, Karen S., Assistant Professor of Music (Voice), resigned, May 31, 1995 School of Nursing Corte, Colleen M., Lecturer in Nursing, resigned, May 31, 1995 Wilson, Vicki I., Lecturer in Nursing, term complete, May 31, 1995 School of Social Work Van Hook, Mary P., Assistant Professor of Social Work, resigned UM-Dearborn School of Education Pena, Robert A., Assistant Professor of Education and Public Administration, resigned, June 30, 1995 69

Page  70 September Meeting, 1995 UM-Dearborn School of Management Choi, Jaehwa, Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems, resigned Fricke, Cedric V., Professor of Business Administration, with tenure, retired, April 30, 1995 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Bloom, Thomas A., Chair and Associate Professor of Theatre, with tenure, resigned, June 30, 1995 Johnston, Charles W., Assistant Professor of Economics, term complete, May 31, 1995 Matcheck, Dale C., Assistant Professor of Economics, resigned Ryan, Betty L., Lecturer in Music, retired, June 30, 1995 Velazco Y. Trianosky, Gregory W., Associate Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, resigned Retirement Memoirs. Six retirement memoirs were submitted. David R. Bassett, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine, retired from active faculty status on July 31, 1995. Dr. Bassett received his B.A. degree in 1949 from Harvard University and his M.D. degree in 1953 from Tufts College Medical School in Boston. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Jefferson Medical College Hospital in Philadelphia in 1955. In the last three years of his postdoctoral training, he held the title of NIH Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Cardiology and was an instructor in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. In 1963, Dr. Bassett went to Queen's Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii, where he was assistant chief of medicine in charge of teaching. In 1966, he was also appointed associate professor of public health at the University of Hawaii; he was appointed associate professor of medicine in 1967. In 1968, Dr. Bassett came to the University of Michigan as an associate professor of internal medicine. His hyperlipidemia program within the Division of Hypertension became a major referral and training center in atherosclerosis prevention and coronary risk reduction. Dr. Bassett's concept that an individual's lipid and blood sugar status should be the basis for both prevention and clinical services is reflected in his work on standardization of laboratory methods and in the organization of outreach screening programs for atherosclerosis risk factors. These programs became the logical base for his research productivity. During his 27 years of service at the University of Michigan, Dr. Bassett has distinguished himself by his devotion to his work, his scholarly approach to all issues at hand, his sincere interest in his patients, his readiness to educate others, and his unswerving concentration on cardiovascular prevention, both as a clinical and as a public health problem. His always-evident idealism and humanism, his unselfish cooperative spirit, and his personal modesty have made him a highly appreciated and respected colleague and a role model to younger physicians. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming David R. Bassett associate professor emeritus of internal medicine. Harriet A. Burge, associate research scientist in the Department of Internal Medicine, retired from active faculty status on June 30, 1993. Dr. Burge received her B.A. (1960) and M.A. (1962) degrees from San Francisco State University and her Ph.D. degree (1966) from the University 70

Page  71 September Meeting, 1995 of Michigan, under the guidance of Professor Robert Shaffer. She was a research assistant and Rackham predoctoral fellow during this period and, subsequently, a postdoctoral assistant to Professor Shaffer (1966-68). Dr. Burge joined the University of Michigan faculty in 1972 as a research associate in the Department of Internal Medicine. She was promoted to assistant research scientist in 1977 and associate research scientist in 1988. During their 25-year collaboration, she and Dr. William Solomon systematically evaluated the prevalence and clinical impact of a broad range of airborne allergens. This work was recognized by the Distinguished Service Award of the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology in 1988. Dr. Burge's painstaking studies of differential bioparticulate recoveries by mechanical sampling devices were especially critical to the success of this effort. Her work facilitated initial clinical appraisal of many important fungus materials, and she also conducted productive studies of pollen, mite, and insect allergens. Many fellows of the Allergy Division were introduced to bench research under her supervision, and several of them have continued to pursue aeroallergen studies as academic physician-scientists. In the course of her work, Dr. Burge developed special interest in the microbial ecology and, especially, aeromycology of enclosed situations. In addition to her many-layered research effort and resulting publications, she developed a clinical reference laboratory for the analysis of indoor air samples in the Midwest. Her input was increasingly sought in the analysis of "sick buildings," and she served as a consultant to NASA, EPA, and several state departments of public health. Especially notable contributions were made in the area of aircraft cabin air quality and as coordinator of a national bioaerosal sampling network that continues to grow. Dr. Burge's career epitomizes the value of interdisciplinary research, exemplifying both the benefits and the best traditions of the research university. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Harriet A. Burge associate research scientist emerita. Sylvie J. Carduner, lecturer III in French and director of the French Language Program in the Residential College, retired from active faculty status on May 31, 1995. Sylvie Carduner received her B.A. degrees in Latin, Greek, English (1947), and Philosophie Lettres (1948) and attended the school for the Professorat de Frangais a 1'Etranger at the Sorbonne (1949-52). She received her A.M. degree in education from the University of Michigan in 1971 and joined the faculty that year as a lecturer in French. For 21 years, Ms. Carduner served as head of the Residential College's French Program. Under her expert guidance, students enjoyed a vigorous and rewarding education in French, while teaching assistants and lecturers profited from her expertise in teaching. Ms. Carduner reorganized the foreign language proficiency programs; developed criteria for evaluation of language skills; designed an accelerated review course; organized innovative upper-level seminars; created a program known as FLAIR which enabled students to earn additional credit by reading texts in other programs in the 71

Page  72 September Meeting, 1995 original language; and developed the course, "Advanced Proficiency in French," for students who participate in the Junior Year Abroad in France Program. She is the co-author of several language textbooks, workbooks, language readers, and articles on second language learning. She has been a member of the American Association of Teachers of French, the Alliance Fran~aise, and the American Council on Teaching Foreign Languages. In 1984, the University awarded her the Matthews Underclass Teaching Award. Her contributions to education were also recognized by the French government in 1992, when it awarded her the rank of Chevalier in the Ordre des Palmes Academiques. Over the course of two decades, Ms. Carduner's students have been consistent in their enthusiastic commendation of her excellence as a teacher. She is extremely well-organized and is an excellent lecturer, who knows her subject thoroughly and communicates it effectively. With her wonderful sense of humor, and her warm, encouraging, and understanding manner, she personifies the Residential College spirit. The Regents now salute this distinguished teacher for her dedicated service by naming Sylvie J. Carduner lecturer emerita in French. Robert A. Green, M.D., professor of internal medicine, retired from active faculty status on August 31, 1995. Dr. Green earned his B.S. and M.D. degrees from the University of Illinois College of Medicine in 1946 and 1948, respectively. He completed an internship at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City in 1949 and a residency at the Bronx VA Hospital in 1951. After serving in the U.S. Public Health Service from 1952-54, Dr. Green returned to the Bronx VA Hospital as assistant chief of the pulmonary diseases service from 1954-58. In 1958, he joined University of Michigan faculty as an instructor in the Department of Internal Medicine. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1960, associate professor in 1963, and professor in 1970. Dr. Green also served as chief of the pulmonary diseases section at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center from 1958-72 and as assistant chief of the medical service there from 1960-65. He was assistant dean of the Medical School from 1967-68, associate dean for student affairs from 1968-74, and associate dean from 1974-77. He was a member of the Senate Assembly and the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs, which he chaired in 1985-86. Dr. Green has received numerous awards for his teaching contributions, including the Senior Award from the 1963 Class of Medical Students, the H. Marvin Pollard Award for outstanding teacher of residents in 1966, rating among the top 10 attending faculty in internal medicine in 1984-85 and, more recently, the Galens Medical Society's Silver Shovel Award in 1992 and the Kaiser Permanente Award for Excellence in Teaching Clinical Sciences in 1992. In 1995, he was awarded special recognition for contributions to the medical student teaching program. Dr. Green has also lectured on pulmonary diseases at numerous institutions, has chaired the Michigan Advisory Committee for the Elimination of Tuberculosis since 1992, and has also been 72

Page  73 September Meeting, 1995 an active member in the American Lung Association of Michigan, serving as president from 1990-92. Dr. Green's most recent interest is in the field of geriatric medicine. He passed the initial certifying examination in this specialty in 1988 and, in 1992, he formally joined the Division of Geriatric Medicine. In this new role, he has actively participated in the clinical care and teaching activities for older adults in the long-term care setting at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Robert A. Green professor emeritus of internal medicine. Dorothy J. Himmelberger, associate librarian at the University of Michigan-Flint, retired from active status on June 30, 1995, after a productive career as a reference librarian. Ms. Himmelberger received her A.B. degree in English in 1970 and her M.L.S. degree in 1976, both from the University of Michigan. She joined the staff of the University of Michigan-Flint Library in August 1977, serving as reference librarian for 18 years. In addition to her faithful and important work at the reference desk assisting students and faculty in their use of the resources of the University of Michigan library system, Ms. Himmelberger served as liaison with a variety of academic departments, including art, music, philosophy and education. She was responsible for book selection in those disciplines, along with religion, dance, and children's literature (which do not have formal academic departments on the UM-Flint campus). Ms. Himmelberger was also responsible for compiling and scheduling library displays, including the library's annual holiday display of new and classical children's books. Among her special achievements, Ms. Himmelberger was instrumental in the appointment of UM-Flint as one of the select sites for the Foundation Center's "Foundation Center Cooperating Collection." She subsequently served as supervisor of the collection. The Foundation Center Collection, unique in the Flint area, serves as an up-to-date resource for vital information on grants and other funding sources. The collection is heavily used not only by UM-Flint patrons but also is regularly consulted by a wide variety of individuals and organizations in the greater Flint community. The Regents now salute this distinguished librarian for her dedicated service to the students, faculty and friends of the University of MichiganFlint, by naming Dorothy J. Himmelberger associate librarian emerita. Nicholas P. White, professor of philosophy in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, retired from active faculty status on May 31, 1995. Professor White received his A.B., A.M., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1963, 1965, and 1970, respectively. He joined the University of Michigan Department of Philosophy as an assistant professor in 1969 and was promoted to associate professor in 1975 and professor in 1981. He has also been adjunct professor in the Department of Classical Studies since 1987. 73

Page  74 September Meeting, 1995 Professor White has contributed two books, Plato on Knowledge and Reality (Hackett, 1976) and A Companion to Plato's Republic (Hackett, 1979), and twenty-five articles in ancient Greek philosophy. His Modern Morality and Greek Ethics is in preparation. He has also published a translation of Epictetus' Handbook and has a forthcoming translation of Plato's Sophist. Professor White's wide-ranging interests in contemporary metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of language, and ethics have infused his research and teaching over the years. He has held American Council of Learned Societies, Guggenheim, and National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, as well as a fellowship at the Center for Hellenic Studies. A world leader in the field of classical philosophy, Professor White was president of the Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy from 1986-87. He has served as consultant to the dean at the Georgetown University Law Center and as a member of the Advisory Committee, American Academy of Judicial Education, National Endowment for the Humanities Project on Jurisprudence. In addition to his service to the University's College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and the Senate Assembly, Professor White served as associate chair, placement director, and chair of the Committee on Graduate Studies in the Department of Philosophy. The Regents now salute this distinguished educator for his dedicated service by naming Nicholas P. White professor emeritus of philosophy. Memorial Statements. Two memorial statements were submitted to the Regents: Marilyn Sibley Fries, associate professor of Germanic languages and literatures and women's studies, passed away on August 1, 1995, after a long struggle against cancer. She was only 49 years old. Born in Honolulu, Professor Fries was raised in the small college town of Alfred, New York, where her father taught philosophy and her mother taught English. While in high school and following her undergraduate career at Bennington College, she studied for a year in Berlin, a city she came to love, and which later became the focus of her scholarly work. Her doctorate was obtained at Cornell, where she chose to write with an unknown beginning assistant professor named Sander Gilman -- currently president of the Modern Language Association. After ten years as an assistant professor at Yale, Professor Fries came to the University of Michigan in 1985 and was eventually given tenure. By the time of her death, she had emerged as an internationally-recognized expert on twentieth-century German literature and culture, specializing in the work of Christa Wolf. The symposium on German reunification she organized and hosted in Ann Arbor in October 1990 was widely regarded to have been the best scholarly assessment of that watershed event. In recent years, her interest had begun to expand further in the direction of literacy theory and German-Jewish writers such as Walter Benjamin. Professor Fries was a devoted and much-beloved teacher and mentor, especially to the many younger women who were drawn to her. For two years, she served as special assistant to the dean for international affairs, in 74

Page  75 September Meeting, 1995 which capacity she undertook a number of important initiatives, such as the new LAC (Languages Across the Curriculum) program. We join her husband Brant and two daughters, Kyra and Lorin, in mourning the loss of our dear colleague. She had a fine mind, a warm heart, and many friends who will miss her terribly. Miranda Hsu-Yung (nee Lee) Pao, professor of information and library studies, died of glioma on August 10, 1995, following an extended period of illness under the loving care of her husband, Richard. Professor Pao was born on February 14, 1936, in Shanghai, China, into a distinguished Cantonese family. She came to the U.S. in 1956 and earned bachelor's and master's degrees in piano performance and music literature from the Julliard School in New York City. In addition to pursuing a career in music, she earned master's and doctoral degrees in library and information science from Case Western Reserve University, where she began her academic career in 1972. She joined the faculty of the University of Michigan School of Information and Library Studies in 1986. Professor Pao's steady rise to international stature as a distinguished scholar in information and library studies resulted from the excellence of her teaching and research in bibliometrics, information retrieval, and evaluation of information systems. She received numerous awards, including the National Library of Medicine Medical Informatics Fellowship (1994), the School of Information and Library Studies Excellence in Research Award (1994), and the Lazerow Lecturer Award from Texas Women's University (1993). She was also honored as the only scholar in the field of information and library studies to receive the National Library of Medicine Research Career Development Award (1983-1988). Professor Pao made significant contributions to a variety of information retrieval and dissemination problems in medicine, including use of medical retrieval systems by health sciences practitioners; design, implementation and evaluation of state-of-the-art medical information retrieval systems; and bibliometric applications in biomedical literature. She authored a widelyused textbook on information retrieval and also wrote numerous journal articles, book chapters, and conference papers. Miranda Pao was a superb mentor to all and a guiding light to her doctoral students, showing them how to teach, how to write, and most importantly, how to be generous with time and service. Her warm personality, wit, and generosity touched many people. A thoughtful and meticulous person, she showed genuine concern and helpfulness for others. Miranda Pao is survived by Richard Hsien-Feng Pao, her husband of 34 years, as well as two sisters, three brothers, and several nephews and nieces. She left an enduring mark on her students and colleagues, both through her professional accomplishments and her quiet mentoring and dedication. As we celebrate the life of this distinguished scholar and teacher, our condolences go to her husband Richard Pao, as well as her brothers, sisters, nieces, and nephews. Degrees. There were no actions with respect to degrees this month. 75

Page  76 September Meeting, 1995 Consent Agenda Approved. On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent McGowan, the Regents unanimously approved the consent agenda. The University's Investments at June 30, 1995 Executive Vice President Womack submitted a set of seven "snapshot reports" describing the status of the University's $2.4 billion in investment portfolios as of June 30, 1995. University Treasurer Norman Herbert reviewed the reports, which include the University Endowment Fund, the Business School Growth Fund, the Donor Pooled Income Fund, the charitable remainder trusts, the University Investment Pool, the Veritas Insurance Corporation, and the Long-Term Portfolio and responded to questions and comments from the Regents about the portfolios and the investment objectives. Mr. Herbert emphasized that the University continues to make a concerted effort to invest a significant portion of the Long Term Portfolio in alternative investments, as it is believed these investments will add value in the long run and outperform the identified benchmarks. The real value added in the University Endowment Fund was 3.9 percent over the level of inflation plus distribution during the past year. Mr. Herbert also reviewed the performance of the other funds in the investment portfolio, noting that the charitable remainder trusts and Donor Pooled Income Fund returned 21.3 percent and 13.7 percent, respectively, and the University Investment Pool and Veritas returned 7.9 percent and 9.2 percent, respectively. 1995-96 Budgets Executive Vice President Womack commented that the University's Budget Book for 1995-96 had been distributed with the agendas. Business School Growth Fund At the request of Regent Deitch, Executive Vice President Womack reviewed the history of the Business School Growth Fund. Then Regent Deitch moved the following: 1. That the terms of service for Business School Growth Fund board members be revised to allow service for three consecutive three-year terms. 2. That the following seven members of the Growth Fund Board of Trustees each be reappointed to three-year terms expiring August 31, 1997: Louis Allen, Gary Baker, Mary Campbell, Cleveland Christophe, Dohn Kalmbach, Joel Tauber, and Bruce Zenkel. The appointments of two other members, Norman G. Herbert and B. Joseph White, will be automatically renewed as ex officio members, according to the Terms of the fund. 3. The appointment of Robert M. Brown, BSE '63, to the Board for a threeyear term (September 1, 1995-August 31, 1998). 4. The reappointment of Dixon Doll as alumni investment manager for a three-year term for the period September 1, 1995-August 31, 1998. 76

Page  77 September Meeting, 1995 5. The retroactive reappointment of Lawrence Goldstein as alumni investment manager for a three-year term for the period September 1, 1994- August 31, 1997. 6. The retroactive reappointment of Harold Kellman as alumni investment manager for a three-year term for the period September 1, 1993- August 31, 1996. Regent Homing seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Margaret Bell Pool Addition Mr. Doug Hannah, university architect, gave a presentation illustrating the proposed design for a project for construction of an addition to the Margaret Bell Pool Building. Following the presentation, Regent Deitch moved approval of the project and preliminary design and authorization for completion of the design, soliciting bids, and awarding a construction contract, providing the contract value is within the approved budget. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. UM-Dearborn General Campus Renovation Project Phase II Addition Mr. Hanna gave a presentation describing proposed plans for a two-story addition to the Engineering portion of the General Campus Renovation Project Phase II, including a site map, detailed plans for each floor, and a rendering of the exterior. On a motion by Regent Baker, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved the design and budget for the General Campus Renovation Project Phase II Addition and authorized issuing the project for bids and awarding a construction contract providing the project is within the budget. Tennis Center Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that a contract for construction of the Tennis Center building had been awarded to the low bidder, Freeman-Darling Construction Company, and a contract for the site work had been awarded to the low bidder, B&V Construction. Financing for the University of Michigan Tennis Center On a motion by Regent Horning, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved adoption of the resolution authorizing the executive vice president and chief financial officer to: 1. together with the Underwriter, develop the terms and legal documentation for the Bonds, and to prepare, circulate and execute preliminary and final official statements describing the Bonds, the University and its affairs; and 2. apply for and obtain from Moody's Investors Service their ratings on the Bonds; and 3. obtain a final proposal for the Bonds, including price and initial interest rate, negotiate, execute and deliver the Bond Purchase and Remarketing Agreements to the Underwriter and Remarketing Agent to be selected, and prepare related documentation setting forth the terms of the Bonds and the 77

Page  78 September Meeting, 1995 sale and remarketing thereof, all within the limitations of the following Resolution. The text of the resolution is in Appendix A, page 87. Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995 Executive Vice President Womack said that the purpose of this proposal is to arrange for a loan of $1.2 million to the Alumni Association through the issuance of debt which the Alumni Association would be obligated to repay over a period of ten years. Regent Baker noted that this was an unusual request and asked for assurance that the Alumni Association would be able to repay the loan, and with what funds. He noted that there had not been an appraisal of the property or an environmental impact evaluation. Executive Vice President Womack responded that he would not have made the recommendation if he did not believe that the Alumni Association had the capacity to retire the debt. He also pointed out that the Association's property at Camp Michigania, which would be used to secure the debt, is clearly worth more than the amount being financed. It is difficult to argue that the Alumni Association is not an integral part of the University, and this means of assisting them is, in his judgment, entirely appropriate. Regent Baker said his concerns were satisfied and he supported the recommendation. Regents Deitch observed that the real estate occupied by Camp Michigania is extremely valuable and that supporting the Alumni Association is entirely appropriate. Regent Deitch then moved, Regent Power seconded, and the Regents unanimously approved adoption of the resolution, authorizing the executive vice president and chief financial officer to: 1. together with the Underwriter develop the terms and legal documentation for the Bonds, and to prepare, circulate and execute preliminary and final official statements describing the Bonds, the University and its affairs; and 2. apply for and obtain from Moody's Investors Service and Standard & Poor's Corporation their ratings on the Bonds; and 3. obtain a fmal proposal for the Bonds, including price and initial interest rate, negotiate, execute and deliver the Bond Purchase Agreement to the Underwriter and Remarketing Agent to be selected, and prepare related documentation setting forth the terms of the Bonds and the sale and delivery thereof, and to execute and deliver the Bonds; and 4. arrange for a loan of $1,200,000 to the Alumni Association, hold a Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act hearing (TEFRA) and negotiate a secured loan agreement, all within the limitations of the following Resolution. The text of the resolution is in Appendix B, page 133. 78

Page  79 September Meeting, 1995 University of Michigan Medical Center East Campus Primary Care Facility Project Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that a construction contract for the structural steel package for the Primary Care Facility has been awarded to the lowest responsive bidder, Art Iron, Inc., of Toledo, Ohio, and a construction contract for the exterior building enclosure package has been awarded to the lowest responsive bidder, Clark Construction Co. of Lansing, Michigan. University of Michigan Medical Center East Campus Primary Care Facility Project (increase in project scope) Executive Vice President Womack called on Mr. John Forsyth, executive director of University of Michigan Hospitals, to review a request to increase the scope of the Primary Care Facility Project to include a mammography unit and an additional radiology imaging room. Mr. Forsyth explained that the original plans for the East Campus called for a women's clinic to be the next major facility placed there, so for that reason, the Primary Care Facility purposely did not include a mammography unit. In light of the general uncertainty in the health care markets, it has now been decided to make improvements in Women's Hospital instead and to delay decisions with regard to construction of a women's clinic on the East Campus. However, this decision means that the Primary Care Facility would not have a mammography function. Therefore, it is proposed to create a mammography facility and to complete the creation of a fully functioning radiology referral center by adding an additional radiology imaging room within the Primary Care Facility. Regent Baker moved approval of increasing the scope of the Primary Care Facility project to include a mammography component and an additional radiology room, as well as approval of the site and design for the mammography component and approval to proceed with bids and award of the construction contract for the mammography component along with the Primary Care Facility. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Regent Baker announced that he had to leave the meeting, but asked that when the issue of moving the Burnham house to the entrance to the Arboretum is addressed, that other options mentioned in the previous day's public comments session be considered. He then left the meeting (10:55 a.m.). University of Michigan Medical Center Demolition of Terrace Apartments and Construction of Parking Lot On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McGowan, the Regents unanimously approved proceeding with a project to demolish the Terrace Apartment Buildings and construct a 308-space parking lot on the site, as described in the Regents Communication. 79

Page  80 September Meeting, 1995 University of Michigan Medical Center Women's Hospital Renovation Project On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved a project and budget for renovation of Women's Hospital to provide office functions as described in the Regents Communication, the appointment of Giffels Hoyem Basso as architect, and proceeding with the project as described. University of Michigan Medical Center Med Tnn Building Renovation Project Regent Power moved approval of a project and budget for renovation of the Med Inn Building to allow relocation of most of the Cancer Center administration to that building, renovation of the Hospitals' executive offices on Level 2 of the Med Inn Building, removal of trailers adjacent to the Simpson Institute, submission of a Certificate of Need application to the Michigan Department of Public Health, and proceeding with the project as described in the Regents Communication. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Regent Power observed that the Med Inn facility has been enormously valuable for families of Hospitals' patients. Regent Newman left the meeting at this point, at 11:15 a.m. Nichols Arboretum Project Executive Vice President Womack called on University Planner Fred Mayer to present this request for relocation of the Burnham House from 940 Maiden Lane to the Geddes Road entrance to the Arboretum to house an Urban Environmental Education Center. Mr. Mayer noted that the School of Natural Resources and Environment has long believed that the educational value of the Arboretum would be enhanced if there were an interpretive center to provide space for interpretive talks, on-site classroom space, and other support facilities. To that end, Professor Harrison Morton, the director of the Arboretum, began a fundraising campaign which has so far raised about $200,000. Last year, a class in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning produced a design for such a facility, which would cost over $1 million to construct. When the University purchased the site that contains the Burnham House, which was built in 1839, local historic preservation groups had urged the University to try to save it. At that point, Professor Morton suggested that consideration be given to moving the house to the Arboretum for use as an interpretive center. Mr. Mayer reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of the three sites that had been considered for placement of the house, and the most desirable was determined to be at the Geddes Road entrance to the Arboretum. 80

Page  81 September Meeting, 1995 Relocating the historic house would serve the needs of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at a significantly lower cost than building a new building. Mr. Mayer suggested that as a next step the University should further investigate the details of moving the house, work with architects and landscape architects to determine the precise location for the building, and meet with the residents of the surrounding areas to address their concerns about the proposal to move the house to that location. After this consultation has been completed, a specific recommendation would be made to the Regents. Regent Power stated that he believes the Regents support the notion of an interpretive center and of investigating the feasibility of reusing the historic Burnham house for this purpose. However, he is not persuaded that the proposed site is appropriate, and he believes it is important for the University to consult with the people in the community who have strong feelings about the issue. Regent McGowan suggested that the discussion be tabled until such time as an action motion can be proposed that addresses the concerns that have been expressed. Regent McFee expressed her support for this idea. President Duderstadt observed that there are several competing goals being addressed by this proposal: preserving a historic house, providing an interpretive center for the Arboretum, and finding the most appropriate site for such a center, and said that the current proposal might not be the best method for addressing all of the issues. He expressed concerns about the proposed site. He also suggested that the original program statement for the center be reviewed to see whether the goals might be met by designing a more cost-effective building than the one originally proposed, and then by finding another site and use for the Burnham house. Executive Vice President Womack then called on Professor Morton, who noted that the Arboretum is a designed site, not a natural site, with a mission of furthering the educational opportunities of University of Michigan students, Ann Arbor school children, and other visitors. Currently there are many educational activities taking place at the Arboretum, including 30 University classes, a docent program, a volunteer program, and many special programs utilized by University and community groups. These educational and research activities, plus 90 years of use, call for a refurbishing and remodeling of the original idea of the Arboretum. He believes the site is appropriate, and noted that as a teaching and research facility within walking distance from campus, there is no intention to have parking at the site. He stated that he has always been willing to work with the community, but with the idea that the Regents needed to be consulted first. Now that this has occurred, the public will be fully involved. He noted that there is some urgency created by the limited window of time available to move the Burnham house and the necessity in fundraising to have an identifiable facility to focus on. Regent Deitch noted that he was particularly impressed by some of the comments made at the Public Comments session, and that the linkage 81

Page  82 September Meeting, 1995 between the community and the University requires reciprocity and respect. Although he has always been supportive of the growth and development of the University, the fact that this site is in the middle of a residential area means that the concerns of the residents have to be paramount. He also noted that the use of this historic building for this purpose might not be appropriate, and suggested that perhaps a more modest proposal for a new building might be more desirable. Provost Machen emphasized that the main purpose for this project is for education and research; it is not for recreation. The original action request was then tabled for consideration at a later meeting. Contract or Purchase Order with Angelini and Associates, Architects On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Power, all six Regents present unanimously approved entering into a contract or purchase order with Angelini and Associates, Architects. Because the owner of the firm, Bradford L. Angelini, is also a University of Michigan employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Angelini and Associates, Architects, owned by Bradford L. Angelini, a University employee. 2. The assignment is to develop a prototype living-learning design concept in West Quadrangle's Lloyd and Winchell Houses. Duration will be through December 31, 1996. The terms of the' contract or purchase order with Angelini and Associates, Architects will be based on a time (pre-determined hourly rates) and material basis, not to exceed $30,000. University personnel will be involved in coordinating the work, supplying support services and will represent the best interests of the University. 3. The pecuniary interest to Professor Angelini is the amount paid for the services as stated above. Purchasing Contract with Rising Edge Corporation On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Horning, all six Regents present unanimously approved entering into a purchasing contract with Rising Edge Corporation. Because a University employee, Parag Mody, is also an investor in and corporate officer of Rising Edge Corporation, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Rising Edge Corporation. 2. The terms of the contract to support research in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) include the purchase of CYCLOPS 1.5 circuit boards from Rising Edge Corporation as follows: 82

Page  83 September Meeting, 1995 Design at no cost plus: Layout $ 4,500 Fabrication of 12 circuit boards $ 3,255 Parts for 8 boards $ 8,800 Assembly & testing of 8 boards $ 3,200 TOTAL $19,725 Delivery will be made to the University of Michigan EECS by October 25, 1995. 3. Mr. Mody's pecuniary interest arises from his financial interest and corporate positions of secretary and treasurer of Rising Edge Corporation. Purchasing Contract with Rebus Planning Associates, Inc. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Varner, all six Regents present unanimously approved entering into a purchasing contract with Rebus Planning Associates, Inc. Because the owner of Rebus Planning Associates, Inc., Samuel J. Meisels, is also a University employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the purchase contract will be the Regents of the University of Michigan and Rebus Planning Associates, Inc. 2. The terms of the contract to support three University of Michigan research grants include the purchase of the following from Rebus Planning Associates, Inc.: 1,265 Teacher Reference Packs $ 89,852 9 Staff Developers Workshops $ 455 8 Implementers Workshops $ 3,160 30 Reference Sets $ 3,160 75 Work Sampling Systems $ 750 10 Participants/Training $ 400 TOTAL $102,367 The duration will be until December 31, 1995. 3. Dr. Meisels' pecuniary interest arises from his position as owner of Rebus Planning Associates, Inc. License Agreement with Ann Arbor Biomedical On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Deitch, all six Regents present unanimously approved a license agreement between the University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Biomedical. Because a founder of and senior partner in Ann Arbor Biomedical, Janice Jenkins, is also a University of Michigan employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the agreement will be the University of Michigan and Ann Arbor Biomedical. 2. Contract terms include: a) A non-exclusive, nontransferable right to use the program internally only. 83

Page  84 September Meeting, 1995 b) The University has the right to license the program to other parties and to renegotiate the license with Ann Arbor Biomedical if it decides it wants to distribute the program. c) The University will retain ownership of the program and may continue to further develop it and use it as a research tool. d) No use of University services or facilities, nor any assignment of University employees, is obligated under the agreement. 3. Professor Jenkin's pecuniary interest arises from her ownership interest in Ann Arbor Biomedical. She has waived any personal participation in the sharing of royalties received by the University from the company. Agreement between the University of Michigan and Orbital Sciences Corporation On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Power, all seven Regents present unanimously approved an agreement with Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) under which OSC would sponsor a research project at the University of Michigan. Because Dr. Lennard A. Fisk is both a University employee and a member of the OSC board of directors, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the agreement are the University of Michigan and Orbital Sciences Corporation. 2. The terms of the agreement are consistent with University policy. The research project is to be conducted over a two-month period at a total fixed cost of $100,000. Dr. Lennard A. Fisk will participate in the project as a coprincipal investigator without effort. 3. Dr. Fisk's pecuniary interest arises from his status as a member of the board of directors of OSC. He received 2,000 shares of OSC stock at 85 percent of market value in 1994 and 3,000 shares at market values in 1995. In addition, Dr. Fisk receives an annual retainer of $7,500 and $1,000 per meeting from OSC. His term as an OSC director ends no later than April 1999. Agreement between the University of Michigan and Public Data Queries, Inc. On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Deitch, all six Regents present unanimously approved an agreement between the University of Michigan and Public Data Queries, Inc. (PDQ) for the University of Michigan to participate as a subcontractor of PDQ in an award it has received from the National Institutes of Health. This agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute because the following three individuals are both University employees and are associated with PDQ in the following ways: Albert F. Anderson is chief executive officer; Paul H. Anderson is vice president for technology and a 40 percent shareholder; and William Frey is vice president for educational development. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the agreement are the University of Michigan and Public Data Queries, Inc. (PDQ). 84

Page  85 September Meeting, 1995 2. The terms of the agreement conform to University policy. The amount of the subcontract from PDQ is $30,000 and the period of performance is one year. None of the University employees who are officers and/or shareholders in PDQ will play any role in the University's performance of this agreement. 3. Paul H. Anderson and Albert F. Anderson are each University employees and officers of and shareholders in PDQ and will receive consulting compensation through PDQ for this project. William Frey is a University employee and an officer of PDQ and will also receive consulting compensation through PDQ for this project. Regent McFee announced that she had to leave the meeting at this point, 11:30 a.m. Utility Tunnel Expansion Joint Replacement On a motion by Regent Horning, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved a project for expansion joint replacement in a section of a utility tunnel between Stockwell Residence Hall and the Ruthven Museum. Medical Science I - A Wing Infrastructure and Laboratory Remodeling Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that the contract for the Medical Science I - A Wing Infrastructure and Laboratory Remodeling project had been awarded to the low bidder, J.C. Beal Construction, Inc. Membership in M-Care Board of Directors On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved revisions to the M-Care bylaws changing the makeup of the board of directors, as specified in the Regents Communication. Revision of Regents' Bylaw Sec. 11.035 (UM-Dearborn School of Management Executive Committee) On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved a change in Regents' Bylaw Sec. 11.035 to change the number of faculty members on the UM-Dearborn School of Management Executive Committee from three to five. The revised bylaw is as follows: Sec. 11.035: The University of Michigan-Dearborn School of Management Executive Committee The executive committee shall consist of the dean and five faculty members of Senate rank to be appointed by the Regents on recommendation by the chancellor and the president. The appointed members shall not be eligible for reappointment until after the lapse of one year. The terms shall be for three years and shall be so adjusted that one vacancy shall occur each year. The dean shall chair the committee. Recommendations for Appointment to Medical Staff Membership On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Deitch, and on the recommendation of the UM Hospitals executive board, the Regents 85

Page  86 September Meeting, 1995 unanimously approved certain specified appointments to medical staff membership. 939 Wall Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan Regent Power moved, Regent Horning seconded, and the Regents unanimously approved acquisition of the property at 939 Wall Street at a price of $105,000, subject to satisfactory completion of environmental due diligence. Naming of the New Field Hockey Field On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent McGowan, the Regents unanimously approved naming the new field hockey field in honor of Phyllis M. Ocker. Establishment of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender On a motion by Regent McGowan, seconded by Regent Deitch, the Regents unanimously approved establishment of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Adjournment There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m. The next meeting will be held on October 19 and 20, 1995. Regents' expenses recorded in the month of August 1995 totaled $1,794.50. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 86

Page  87 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1995 APPENDIX A RESOLUTION OF THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF BONDS IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF NOT TO EXCEED $5,000,000 TO FINANCE THE COST OF CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPPING OF A TENNIS CENTER FACILITY AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE PAYMENT AND SECURITY OF THE BONDS AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. WHEREAS, in the exercise of their constitutional duties and in order to properly serve the needs of students attending The University of Michigan (the "University"), the Regents of the University of Michigan (the "Issuer") has authorized the construction and equipping of a tennis center facility (hereinafter referred to as the "Project"); and WHEREAS, in the exercise of its constitutional duties and in order to properly serve the interests of students attending the University, the Issuer deems it necessary and advisable to issue Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995 (hereinafter defined as the "Bonds") in the original principal amount of not to exceed Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000) for the purpose of paying part of the cost of constructing and equipping the Project, and paying the expenses incidental to the issuance of the Bonds; and WHEREAS, the financing of the Project will serve proper and appropriate public purposes; and WHEREAS, the Issuer has been created as a constitutional body corporate under the provisions of Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, and has the full power under its constitutional authority and supervision of the University, and control and direction of expenditures from the University funds, to construct the Project, to pay the cost of the construction and equipping of the Project by issuance of the Bonds, to pledge the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues (hereinafter defined) for payment of the Bonds and to adopt this Resolution and enter into the covenants contained herein; and WHEREAS, the Issuer has previously issued, under a resolution adopted May 7, 1993, (the "Prior Resolution") its $3,170,000 Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 1993 (the "Prior Bonds"); and WHEREAS, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or Associate Vice President for Finance of the Issuer shall certify prior to delivery of the Bonds that the requirements under the Prior Resolution for issuing the Bonds on a parity basis with the Prior Bonds have been met: NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Regents of the University of Michigan, as follows: ARTICLE I DEFINITIONS In addition to the terms defined in the preambles to the Resolution, the following terms shall have, unless the context otherwise requires, the meanings herein specified: "Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues" means all revenues received by the Issuer from spectator admissions to all regularly scheduled Intercollegiate athletic events, and currently (as of September 1, 1995) accounted for as "Spectator Admissions": such revenues include receipts from home football games (less opponents' share); receipts from awaj football games; student and staff season ticket sales receipts for all sports for which such tickets are sold; admission receipts and away game guarantees or other payments from all other sports (less guarantees or other payments to opponents); and receipts from championship events (less guarantees or other payments to opponents); but excludes receipts from football bowl games, the National Invitational Tournament and National Collegiate Athletic 87

Page  88 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Association tournament in basketball, and all other items not currently (as of September 1, 1995) accounted for as "Spectator Admissions". "Adjusted Rate" means the Daily Rate, the Weekly Rate, the Quarterly Rate or the Long Term Rate, as the case may be, determined for each Interest Period for the Bonds, as provided in Section 203(a) hereof. "Annual Debt Service" means for any Fiscal Year the sum of (i) an amount equal to the amount of scheduled principal (at maturity or through mandatory redemption requirements) and interest to become due in that Fiscal Year on the then outstanding Bonds and any then outstanding Parity Obligations (excluding the principal of Balloon Indebtedness or amounts which may become owing at the option of the holder of such Bonds), plus (ii) an amount equal to the principal amount of then outstanding Balloon Indebtedness excluded from (i) divided by the number of years to maturity from the date of original issuance of the Balloon Indebtedness. Interest on Variable Rate Bonds shall be calculated at any date of calculation as an amount equal to the greater of (a) the average daily interest rate during the then preceding twelve month period or (b) the rate in effect on the date of calculation. For purposes of applying the calculation set forth in (a) above, if the Variable Rate Bonds have not been outstanding for at least twelve months on the date of such calculation, then the average daily interest rate during the then preceding twelve month period shall be based on the written certificate of an in ependent financial advisor or independent investment banker, as to the determination of the average interest rate the Variable Rate Bonds would have borne for such twelve month period had they been outstanding. Interest which is payable from the proceeds of Bonds or Parity Obligations or other funds set aside for such purpose on or before the date of delivery of the Bonds or Parity Obligation, and debt service scheduled to be paid from any reserves set aside for the Bonds or any Parity Obligations, shall be excluded in determining the Annual Debt Service requirement. "Authorized Officer" means either of the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance, of the University or their successors. "Balloon Indebtedness" means any issue of the Bonds or Parity Obligations, the debt service requirements on which in any consecutive 12 month period, including debt service which can become due by reason of a requirement that the indebtedness be redeemed or purchased or repurchased by or on behalf of the Issuer from the holder thereof prior to the stated maturity (other than at the option of the holder thereof), exceeds the average annual debt service requirements thereon by 30% or more. "Bond" or "Bonds" means the not to exceed $5,000,000 aggregate principal amount of Regents of the University of Michigan Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995, to be issued under the Resolution. "Bond FTund" means the University of Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995 Bond Fund established by Section 402 hereof. "Bond Purchase Agreement" means the Bond Purchase Agreement, between the Issuer and the Underwriter, pursuant to which the Bonds shall be sold by the Issuer to the Underwriter. "Bond Purchase Fund" means the University of Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds Series 1995 Bond Purchase Fund established pursuant to Section 404 hereof. 'Bondholder" or "Holder" (when used with reference to Bonds) means the registered owner of any Bond. "Business Day" means any weekday upon which the principal offices of the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent are not required or authorized by law or executive order to be closed and on which the New York Stock Exchange, Inc. is not closed. "Credit Support Instrument" means any irrevocable letter of credit, line of credit, insurance policy, ond purchase agreement guaranty or surety bond providing for the payment of, or guaranteeing the payment of, principal and interest on, or the purchase price of, the Bonds or any Parity Obligations when due. "'Daily Rate" means an interest rate on the Bonds determined pursuant to Section 203(a)(1) hereof. 88

Page  89 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A "Determination Date" means (1) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at a Daily Rate, each Business Day, or, for the initial commencement of a period during which Bonds bear interest at a Daily Rate, and such commencement date is not a Business Day the Business Day next following such commencement date, (2) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at a Weekly Rate, the Tuesday of each week (or if such Tuesday is not a Business Day, the next succeeding Business Day) or for the initial commencement of a period during which Bonds will bear interest at a Weekly Rate the last Business Day preceding such commencement date, (3) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at a Quarterly Rate, the Business Day immediately prior to the commencement of the first Interest Period during which the Bonds bear interest at the Quarterly Rate, and thereafter, except as otherwise set forth in Section 203(e)(4) hereof, the Business Day immediately prior to the fourth Interest Payment Date following the next preceding Determination Date for Bonds bearing interest at the Quarterly Rate, and (4) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at a Long Term Rate, the Business Day immediately prior to the commencement of the first Interest Period during which the Bonds bear interest at the Long Term Rate, and thereafter, except as otherwise set forth in Section 203(e)(4) hereof, the last Business Day of the then-current Long Term Rate Period for those Bonds. "Event of Default" means any of the events specified in Article XIII hereof. "Fiscal Year" means the fiscal year of the University, currently beginning on July 1 and ending on June 30. "Fixed Rate" means the interest rate or rates on the Bonds determined in accordance with Section 203(e) hereof. "Fixed Rate Bonds" means the Prior Bonds, the Bonds on and after the Fixed Rate Conversion Date and any Parity Obligations bearing interest at a fixed rate or rates of interest. "Fixed Rate Conversion Date" means the Business Day designated b the Issuer and specified in a notice delivered as provided herein, upon which the Adjusted Rate feature on the Bonds is terminated and the Bonds begin to bear interest at the Fixed Rate as provided in Section 203(e) hereof. "Fixed Rate Period" means the period in which interest on the Bonds accrues at a Fixed Rate. "Government Obligations" means (1) direct obligations of the United States of America (including obligations issued or held in bookentry form on the books of the Department of Treasury of the United States of America and including certificates or other instruments evidencing ownership interests in such direct obligations of the United States of America such as "CATS", "TIGRS" Treasury Receipts an& Stripped Treasury Coupons) or obligations the timely payment of which are unconditionally and fully guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the UJnited States of America and (2) obligations the interest on which is exempt from federal income taxation under the Code and the timely payment of the principal of and interest on which is fully provided for by the deposit in trust or escrow of cash or obligations described in clause (1) above. "Highest Lawful Rate" means the lesser of (i) twenty-five percent (25%) per annum or (ii) the maximum amount or rate of interest permitted by applicable law, as from time to time in effect, lawfully to be charged or received or contracted to be paid in respect of the Bonds. "Holder", "Bondholder" or "Owner", whenever used herein with respect to a Bond, means the person in whose name such Bond is registered. "Implementation Date" means (i) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at the Daily Rate, the Determination Date, (ii) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at the Weely Rate, the Wednesday of each week in which the Tuesday of such week is a Business Day, whether or not such Wednesday is a Business Day; or, if Tuesday is not a Business Day, the Determination Date; or for the initial commencement of an Interest Period during which Bonds will bear interest at the Weekly Rate the day succeeding the Determination Date, (iii) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at the Quarterly Rate, except as otherwise set forth in Section 203(e)(4) hereof, the first Business Day of the month following the Determination Date, and (iv) with respect to Bonds which bear interest at a Long Term Rate, except 89

Page  90 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A as otherwise set forth in Section 203(e)(4) hereof, the first day of the month following the Determination Date. "Interest Payment Date" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate in the thencurrent Interest Period the fifth Business Day of the next month, (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Quarterly Rate in the then-current Interest Period, the first Business Day of each month, (iii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or Fixed Rate, each June 1 and December 1, provided, that the first Interest Payment Date during any Long Term Rate Period or the Fixed Rate Period shall be the first June 1 or December 1 at least 90 days after the Implementation Date or the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, as the case may be, and (iv) the Fixed Rate Conversion Date. "Interest Period" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate, a calendar month or if the next succeeding Interest Period will be a Fixed Rate Period, a Long Term Rate Period or a Quarterly Rate Period, the first day of the calendar month to the day preceding the commencement of the next succeeding Interest Period, both inclusive; provided, however, that the initial Interest Period for the Bonds shall commence on the Original Issue Date and end on the last day of such calendar month, (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Quarterly Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and ending on the day immediately preceding the next Interest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided, however, that the initial Interest Period in each Quarterly Rate Period shall commence on the date such Quarterly Rate Period commences and end on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Quarterly Rate Period, (iii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and ending on the day immediately preceding the next Interest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided however, that the initial Interest Period in each Long Term Rate Period shall commence on the date such Long Term Rate Period commences and ends on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Long Term Rate Period, and (iv) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and ending on the day immediately preceding the next Interest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided however, that the initial Interest Period in each Fixed Rate Period shall commence on the date such Fixed Rate Period commences and end on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Fixed Rate Period. "Issuer Owned Bonds" means each Bond registered in the name of the Issuer or its nominee as a result of the purchase of such Bonds by the Issuer upon tender thereof in accordance with Article III hereof. 'Investment Income" means and includes all interest or profit, when received, earned through the investment or reinvestment of all moneys in the Bond Fund. "Issuer" means the Regents of the University of Michigan, a constitutional body corporate having general supervision of the University and control and direction of all expenditures from its funds. "Legally Available Funds" means any moneys of the Issuer that may be legally used by the Issuer to pay principal of, and interest on, the Bonds, or the Purchase Price of the Bonds, but shall not include any funds (a) currently or subsequently pledged for, or committed to present or future loans, bonds or debt service on other obligations or other purposes to the extent so pledged or committed, or (b) the use of which would result in the Bonds herein authorized being construed as a general obligation of the Issuer or as indebtedness of the state of Michigan under the Michigan Constitution of 1963. "Long Term Rate" means an interest rate on all or a portion of the Bonds determined pursuant to Section 203(a)(4) hereof. "Long Term Rate Period" means a period set by the Issuer, which must be one year or more and less than the remaining term of the Bonds, in which interest on certain specified Bonds accrues at a Long Term Rate. "Mandatory Purchase Date" means any of the dates specified in Section 309(a) hereof on which dates the Bonds are subject to mandatory purchase from the Owner. "Mandatory Sinking Account Payment" means, with respect to the Bonds, the amount required by Section 301(c) of this Indenture to be paid by the Issuer on any single date for the retirement prior to maturity of Bonds. 90

Page  91 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A "Moody's" means Moody 's Investors Service, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the State of Delaware, its successors and assigns, and, if such corporation is dissolved or liquidated or no longer performs the functions of a securities rating agency, "Moody's" will be deemed to refer to any other nationally recognized securities rating agency designated by the Issuer, by notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent. "Notice Parties" means the Issuer, the Remarketing Agent, and the Transfer/Tender Agent. "Opinion of Bond Counsel" means a written opinion of nationally recognized bond counsel (who may be counsel for the Issuer) selected by the Issuer. "Opinion of Counsel" means a written opinion of counsel (who may be counsel for the Issuer) selected by the Issuer. "Original Issue Date" means the date on which the Bonds are delivered to the original purchasers thereof. "Outstanding" means all of the Bonds which have been authenticated and delivered by the Transfer/Tender Agent under this except: (1) Bonds canceled by the Transfer/Tender Agent pursuant to this Resolution; (2) Bonds which have matured or for which the duly noticed redemption date shall have occurred and for the payment of which moneys equal to the principal amount thereof, redemption premiums, if any, and the interest to the date of maturity or earlier redemption, shall be held in trust for their payment by the Transfer/Tender Agency pursuant to this Resolution; (3) Bonds, including Undelivered Bonds, in lieu of which other Bonds have been authenticated under this Resolution; (4) Bonds and portions of Bonds not deemed Outstanding as specified in Article X hereof; and (5) Bonds paid pursuant to the last sentence of Section 207 hereof. "Operating Costs" means all costs and expenses required to be paid for the operation and maintenance of the Program, but shall not include payment of debt service on the Bonds, the Outstanding Bonds, any additional Parity Obligations and any Subordinated Obligations, depreciation or amortization. "Parity Obligations" means the Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations of the Issuer secured by a pledge of and first lien against Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues, hereafter issued or incurred by the Issuer from time to time in accordance with the terms of this Resolution. "Program" means the University of Michigan Intercollegiate Athletics Program. "Project" means the project referenced in the preambles hereto. "Project Fund" means the University of Michigan Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995 Project Fund established by Section 401 hereof. "Purchase Date" means (i) the Business Day designated by a Bondholder in a Tender Notice as the date for purchase, which for any Interest Period shall be the date set forth in Section 306, Section 307 or Section 308 hereof, as the case may be, and (ii) a Mandatory Purchase Date on which any Bond shall be required to be purchased pursuant to Section 309 hereof, and which shall be the day on which remarketed Bonds will be registered in the name of the purchaser in exchange for money paid for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund or the day on which unremarketed Bonds shall be registered in the name of the Issuer or its nominee (thereby becoming Issuer Owned Bonds). "Purchase Price" means an amount equal to the principal amount of any Bond tendered or deemed tendered pursuant to Sections 306, 307, 308 and 309 hereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest thereon, if any, to the Purchase Date; provided, however, that 91

Page  92 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (i) the interest component may be adjusted for Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate as described in Section 309(a)(2), and (ii) in the event the Purchase Date falls after the Record Date but prior to the next succeeding Interest Payment Date the interest component of the Purchase Price shall be reduced by the amount of interest to be paid on the Interest Payment Date to the Holder of record as of the Record Date. "Put" means the right of a Bondholder to require, or the act of requiring, the Transfer/Tender Agent to purchase a Bond (other than an Issuer Owned Bond) at its Owner's option pursuant to Section 306, Section 307 or Section 308 hereof, as the case may be. "Quarterly Rate" means an interest rate on the Bonds determined pursuant to Section 203(a)(3) hereof. "Quarterly Rate Period" means the period in which interest on the Bonds accrues at a Quarterly Rate. "Rating Category" means one of the general rating categories of Moody's or S&P without regard to any refinement or graduation of such rating category by a numerical modifier or otherwise. "Record Date" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate or a Quarterly Rate, the last Business Day prior to the next succeeding Interest Period, and (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate, each May 15 and November 15. "Remarketing Agent" means the initial Remarketing Agent designated by an Authorized Officer pursuant to Section 701 hereof, or any successor Remarketing Agent appointed pursuant to Section 702 hereof. "Remarketing Agreement" means the Remarketing Agreement entered into between the Issuer and the initial Remarketing Agent, or a similar agreement entered into with any successor Remarketing Agent. "Resolution" means this resolution and any other resolutions amendatory or supplementary hereto in accordance with the terms hereof. "Revenue Fund" means the University of Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Revenue Fund previously established by the Issuer and continued by Section 402 of the Prior Resolution. "S&P" means Standard & Poor's Corporation, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the State of New York, its successors and assigns, or, if such corporation is dissolved or liquidated or no longer performs the functions of a securities rating agency, "S&P" will be deemed to refer to any other nationally recognized securities rating agency designated by the Issuer by notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent. "Surplus Revenues" means in any Fiscal Year all Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues for such Fiscal Year remaining after the Issuer has made the deposits required to be made in such Fiscal Year to the Bond Fund pursuant to Section 504 hereof and after the Issuer has paid all Operating Costs for such Fiscal Year. "Tender Date" means the date on which a Bondholder must present the Tender Notice in order to effect a purchase of Bonds on the Purchase Date. "Tender Notice" means the notice of tender from a Bondholder to the Transfer/Tender Agent pursuant to Section 306, Section 307 or Section 308 hereof, as the case may be, in order to effect a purchase of Bonds on the Purchase Date. "Transfer/Tender Agent', or, as the context requires "Transfer/Tender Agent" or "Transfer Agent" means the Transfer/Tender Agent appointed by the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University or any successor Transfer/Tender Agent in accordance with the provisions of Section 803. "Undelivered Bonds" means Bonds described in Section 310 of this Resolution. "Underwriter" means the underwriter or, collectively, the group of underwriters, designated by an Authorized Officer pursuant to Section 1401, or successors thereto. 92

Page  93 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A "University" means the University of Michigan. "Variable Rate Bonds" means the Bonds prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date and any Parity Obligations bearing interest at variable or adjustable rates. "Weekly Rate" means an interest rate on the Bonds determined pursuant to Section 203(a) (2) hereof. ARTICLE II AUTHORIZATION OF BONDS, FORM OF BONDS AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO Section 201. Necessity for Issuance of the Bonds. The Issuer, in the exercise of its powers and authority relative to the general supervision of the University and control and direction of all expenditures from the University's funds, as provided in Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, hereby determines that the issuance of the Bonds for thepurposes set forth in the preambles hereto is necessary and advisable in order to enable the Issuer to finance the cost of the construction and equipping of the Project. For such purposes there shall be borrowed the sum of not to exceed Five Million Dollars ($5,000,000), and in evidence thereof there shall be issued the Bonds of the Issuer which shall be designated "Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995", in like aggregate principal amount, all to be equally secured as hereinafter set forth. Section 202. Limited Obligation and Other Bond Terms. The Bonds shall be limited obligations of the Issuer equally and ratably and solely secured by the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and any moneys in the Bond Fund or Revenue Fund, on a parity basis, as to Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund only, with the Prior Bonds and any Parity Obligations hereafter issued or incurred, and the Bonds shall not be a debt or liability of the State of Michigan or a general obligation of the Issuer. The Bonds shall be issued in the principal amount to be determined by an Authorized Officer in fully registered form without coupons and shall be issued in denominations of $100 000 each or an integral multiple thereof, except that when interest on the Bonds is payable at a Fixed Rate, such Bonds may be issued in the denomination of $5,000 or any integral multiple thereof. The Bonds shall mature on the dates determined by an Authorized Officer but the final maturity shall not be later than June 1, 2001; shall be dated as of and bear interest from the Original Issue Date or such later date to which interest on the Bond in exchange for which the Bond is issued has been paid, payable on the Interest Payment Dates, commencing with the first Interest Payment Sate. Interest shall be payable on the Interest Payment Dates to the persons in whose name the Bonds are registered at the close of business on the Record Date for the respective Interest Payment Date. Except as provided in the last paragraph of Section 204, interest shall be paid by check mailed to each Owner of Bonds at the address shown on the registration books maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent provided that an Owner of at least $1,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of Bonds ma be paid interest by wire transfer to a bank account in the United States of America if the Owner makes a written request of the Transfer/Tender Agent at least 10 days before a Record Date specifying the account address. Such a request may provide that it will remain in effect for subsequent interest payments until changed or revoked by written notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent. The principal and premium, if any, of the Bonds shall be payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent. Except as provided in the last paragraph of Section 204, no payment of principal shall be made on any Bond until such Bond is surrendered to the Transfer/Tender Agent. The Bonds shall bear interest as provided in Section 203 hereof, shall be subject to redemption as provided in Section 301 hereof and shall be subject to mandatory purchase as provided in Section 309 hereof. Section 203. Interest on the Bonds. 93

Page  94 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (a) Interest Rate on Bonds. Interest on the Bonds will be payable as provided in the Bonds and in this Section. Interest on the Bonds shall initially be payable under the interest rate determination method determined by an Authorized Officer prior to sale of the Bonds. The interest rate determination method thereafter may be changed with respect to the Bonds, or any portion of the Bonds, as described in subsections (c) and (e) of this Section at any time and from time to time. From and after the occurrence of an Event of Default described in Article XIII of this Resolution, the interest rate on the Bonds will be the rate on the Bonds on the day before the Event of Default occurred. (1) Daily Rate. (A) When interest on any Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, the Remarketing Agent shall set a Daily Rate on each Business Day pursuant to the provisions of this Section. Each Daily Rate shall be the minimum rate necessary (as determined by the Remarketing Agent taking into account prevailing market conditions) for the Remarketing Agent to sell such Bonds on the day the rate is set at their principal amount plus accrued interest. The Daily Rate for any day that is not a Business Day shall be the rate for the last day on which a Daily Rate was set. (B) If for any reason the Remarketing Agent does not set a Daily Rate for any Bonds on any Business Day or a court holds that the rate set for any Bonds for any day is invalid or unenforceable, the Daily Rate for such Bonds for that day shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at the rate equal to the Prime Commercial Paper (30 day), Tax-Exempt rate most recently published by The Bond Buyer, or by such other publisher as the Issuer shall designate in writing to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent, plus 1/8% per annum. If The Bond Buyer, or such replacement publisher, does not publish such a Commercial Paper rate within seven days preceding a day on which a Daily Rate is to be set, the Daily Rate shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at 50% of the interest rate for 30day taxable commercial paper (prime paper placed through dealers) announced on such date by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, converted to a couponequivalent rate. In the event that the Remarketing Agent does not set the Daily Rate as described in the preceding two sentences, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall set the rate based on the information so published upon which information the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be entitled to conclusively rely. Upon delivery to the Issuer of an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such action will not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exemption of interest on the Bonds from federal income taxation under the Code and of a certificate from the Remarketing Agent to the effect that the methods described in this paragraph for setting the interest rate are unavailable or unrealistic in the marketplace and the reasons therefor, then the Issuer, with the advice of the Remarketing Agent, may designate a new method of setting the Daily Rate for any Bonds. (2) Weekly Rate. When interest on any Bonds is payable at a Weekly Rate, the Remarketing Agent shall set a Weekly Rate on the Determination Date. The Weekly Rate shall be effective from and including the Implementation Date, to and including the day preceding the next succeeding Implementation Date. Each Weekly Rate shall be the minimum rate necessary (as determined by the Remarketing Agent taking into account prevailing market conditions) for the Remarketing Agent to sell such Bonds on the Determination Date at their principal amount plus accrued interest. If for any reason the Remarketing Agent does not set a Weekly Rate for any Bonds on a Determination Date or a court holds that any rate set for any Bonds is invalid or unenforceable, the Weekly Rate for such Bonds for that period shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at the rate equal to the 94

Page  95 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Prime Commercial Paper (30 day), Tax-Exempt rate most recently published by The Bond Buyer or by such other publisher as the Issuer shall designate in writing to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent, plus 1/8% per annum. If The Bond Buyer, or such replacement publisher does not publish such a Prime Commercial Paper rate within seven days preceding the Determination Date for which a Weekly Rate is to be set, the Weekly Rate for such Bonds shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at 55% of the interest rate for 30day taxable commercial paper (prime paper placed through dealers) announced by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York on the Determination Date, converted to a couponequivalent rate. In the event that the Remarketing Agent does not set the Weekly Rate as described in the preceding two sentences, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall set the rate based on the information so published upon which information the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be entitled to conclusively rely. Upon delivery to the Issuer of an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such action will not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exemption of interest on the Bonds from federal income taxation under the Code and of a certificate from the Remarketing Agent to the effect that the methods described in this paragraph for setting the interest rate are unavailable or unrealistic in the marketplace and the reasons therefor, then the Issuer, with the advice of the Remarketing Agent, may designate a new method of setting the Weekly Rate for any Bonds. (3) Quarterly Rate. When interest on any Bonds is payable at a Quarterly Rate, the Remarketing Agent shall, on each Determination Date, set a Quarterly Rate for each Bond. The Quarterly Rate shall be effective from and including the Implementation Date, to and including the day preceding the next succeeding Implementation Date. Each Quarterly Rate shall be the minimum rate necessary (as determined by the Remarketing Agent taking into account prevailing market conditions) for the Remarketing Agent to sell such Bonds on the Determination Date at their principal amount plus accrued interest. If for any reason the Remarketing Agent does not set a Quarterly Rate for any Bonds on a Determination Date, or a court holds that the Quarterly Rate set for any Bonds for any Interest Period is invalid or unenforceable, the Quarterly Rate for such Bonds for that period shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at the rate equal to the Prime Commercial Paper (30 day), Tax-Exempt rate most recently published by The Bond Buyer or by such other publisher or the Issuer shall designate in writing to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent, plus 1/4% per annum. If The Bond Buyer or such replacement publication does not publish such a Prime Commercial Paper rate within seven days preceding a Determination Date on which a Quarterly Rate is to be set, the Quarterly Rate for such Bonds shall be set by the Remarketing Agent at the rate equal to 70% of the yield on 91 day United States Treasury securities as most recently published by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York before such Determination Date. In the event that the Remarketing Agent does not set the Quarterly Rate as described in the preceding two sentences, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall set the rate based on the information so published upon which information the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be entitled to conclusively rely. Upon delivery to the Transfer/Tender Agent of an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such action will not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exemption of interest on the Bonds from federal income taxation under the Code and of a certificate from the Remarketing Agent to the effect that the methods described in this paragraph for setting the interest rate are unavailable or unrealistic in the market place and the reasons therefor, then the Issuer, with the advice of the Remarketing Agent, may designate a new method of setting the Quarterly Rate for any Bonds. (4) Long Term Rate. When interest on any Bond is payable at a Long Term Rate, the Remarketing Agent shall, on or before an applicable Determination Date, set a Long Term Rate or Rates for such Bond, in each 95

Page  96 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A case for the Long Term Rate Period for such Bond established by the Issuer after consultation with the Remarketing Agent on or before the Determination Date. The Long Term Rate for any such Bonds shall be effective from and including the Implementation Date, to and including the day preceding the next succeeding Implementation Date. Each Long Term Rate shall be the minimum rate necessary (as determined by the Remarketing Agent taking into account prevailing market conditions) for the Remarketing Agent to sell such Bonds on the Determination Date at a price equal to their principal amount plus accrued interest. A separate Long Term Rate shall be established for each portion of Bonds with different Long Term Rate Periods as designated by the Issuer. If for any reason the Remarketing Agent does not set a Long Term Rate for Bonds on an applicable Determination Date, or a court holds that the Long Term Rate set for such Bonds for any Interest Period is invalid or unenforceable, the interest on those Bonds shall be automatically converted to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate, pursuant to Section 203(a)(1) above, provided that the Issuer obtains an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such action will not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exemption of interest on the Bonds from federal income taxation under the Code; otherwise, those Bonds shall continue to bear the same Long Term Rate as had been set for that Interest Period for another Long Term Rate Period of the same duration as had been previously set for those Bonds by the Issuer pursuant to Section 203(a)(4). (b) Interest Rate Determination by Remarketing Agent. The determination by the Remarketing Agent in accordance with this Section of the rates to be borne by the Bonds during any Interest Period shall be conclusive and binding on the Bondholders and the other Notice Parties. Failure by the Remarketing or Transfer/Tender Agent to give any notice required hereunder, or any defect therein, shall not affect the interest rate borne by the Bonds or the rights of the Bondholders to demand purchase. The right of the Issuer to change any or a portion of the Bonds to or from the Long Term Rate from or to another Adjusted Rate shall be contingent upon its ability to obtain an Opinion of Bond Counsel on or before the date of the first notice required to be given by the Transfer/Tender Agent pursuant to paragraph (d) below, dated as of the date of such notice and to be reaffirmed as of the Implementation Date, that following the Implementation Date for the relevant Long Term Rate Period, the Bonds continue to be the valid and binding obligations of the Issuer and that the change to or from the Long Term Rate will not adversely affect the exclusion of the interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes. The Issuer's exercise of the option to change to or from the Long Term Rate shall be deemed rescinded in the event the foregoing condition is not satisfied on or before the date required, in which event the Bonds shall remain in the Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, the Quarterly Rate, or Long Term Rate, as the case may be, and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall promptly notify the affected Bondholders of such rescission. In the event of such rescission the Bonds affected shall remain subject to Mandatory Purchase on the date originally specified for the change to or from the Long Term Rate. If, in the event of such rescission, the Bonds continue to bear interest at the Quarterly Rate, notwithstanding any other provision hereof, the next Determination Date shall be the first Business Day following the Mandatory Purchase Date described in the preceding sentence and the next Implementation Date shall be the fifth Business Day following the Determination Date. If, in the event of such rescission, the Bonds continue to bear interest at a Long Term Rate, the Issuer shall, subject to the Issuer's tax covenant in the Resolution, determine the length of the next succeeding Long Term Rate Period for such Bonds. (c) Change in Rate Determination Method. The interest rate determination method with respect to the Bonds or any portion thereof in blocks of integral multiples of $100,000 may be changed from one Adjusted Rate specified in Section 203(a) hereof to another Adjusted Rate specified therein upon the 96

Page  97 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A direction of the Issuer, following consultation with the Remarketing Agent. Notice of such change in the Adjusted Rate period shall be given by the Issuer to the other Notice Parties, at least 25 but not more than 60 days before the change is to be effective. Such notice shall contain (a) the effective date of such change, (b) the proposed Adjusted Rate (Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Quarterly Rate or Long Term Rate) and (c) the Determination Date. The effective date of any such change shall be the first Business Day of a month; provided, however, that the effective date of the change of any Bond bearing interest at a Long Term Rate to another Adjusted Rate shall be the day following the last day of that Bond's then current Long Term Rate Period, or any other date in which such Bond is subject to optional redemption. Upon compliance with the provisions of this subsection, the interest rate on the Bonds or portion thereof so changed shall accrue at the new rate from the effective date specified in the notice of the Issuer until there is another change as provided in this subsection. Upon any change in an interest rate mode for the Bonds or any portion thereof, the Issuer and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall take all steps necessary to comply with any agreement entered into with The Depository Trust Company or its nominee with respect to such change, including, without limitation, the purchase and designation of sufficient CUSIP numbers. If the interest rate on less than all Outstanding Bonds is to be converted to a new Adjusted Rate, the particular Bonds to be converted shall be chosen by the Transfer/Tender Agent; provided, however, that (i) the portion of the principal amount of any Bond to be converted shall be equal to an authorized denomination for the new Adjusted Rate, and (ii) the portion of such Bond not so converted shall be equal to an authorized denomination for the current Adjusted Rate; and provided, further, that in selecting Bonds for conversion, the Transfer/Tender Agent may treat each Bond as representing the number of Bonds obtained by dividing the principal amount of such Bond into units based on the authorized denominations for the new Adjusted Rate and the current Adjusted Rate in such manner as the Transfer/Tender Agent in its discretion may deem proper. If it is determined that part, but not all, of the principal amount of any Bond is to be changed to a new Adjusted Rate, then upon notice of intention to change such part, the holder of such Bond shall forthwith surrender such Bond to the Transfer/Tender Agent for (i) payment of the Purchase Price (including the premium, if any, and accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the date fixed for conversion) of such part so called for change of Adjusted Rate, and (ii) exchange for a new Bond or Bonds in aggregate principal amount equal to the aggregate principal amount of the balance of the principal of such Bond not subject to such change. If the holder of any such Bond of a denomination greater than the applicable minimum authorized denomination for the current Adjusted Rate shall fail to present such Bond, such Bond shall nevertheless become due and payable on the date fixed for change of Adjusted Rate to the extent of the portion thereof subject to such change (and to that extent only). (d) Notice to Bondholders of Change in Adjusted Rate Determination Method. When a change in the Adjusted Rate for any Bonds is to be made, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall mail to the Owners of the Bonds, by first class mail at the addresses shown on the registration books of the Issuer maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent, at least 15 but not more than 60 days before the effective date of the change a notice prepared by the Issuer which shall state: (1) that the period for which the Adjusted Rate is effective for such Bonds will be changed and what the new Adjusted Rate period will be; (2) the effective date of a new Adjusted Rate period for the Bonds; (3) a description of the new Adjusted Rate for the Bonds (including the Determination Date); (4) the Interest Payment Dates and Record Dates applicable to the new Adjusted Rate; 97

Page  98 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (5) any ratings assigned or to be assigned to the Bonds by Moody's or S&P effective on such change; (6) the procedures that must be followed for the Bondholders to Put their Bonds under the new Adjusted Rate; and (7) that all Bonds (other than Bonds for which the holder has delivered notice of waiver of purchase pursuant to Section 309(c) and the notice shall describe the manner of waiving such purchase) shall be subject to mandatory purchase on the effective date of the change in the Adjusted Rate period, and all information required to be included in a notice of mandatory purchase pursuant to Section 309(b), including that any Bonds so required to be purchased which are not delivered to the Transfer/Tender Agent on or before 12:00 noon on the purchase date shall be deemed purchased in accordance with the provisions of Section 310. (e) Fixed Rate (1) At the option of the Issuer, subject to the conditions enumerated below, the Adjusted Rate feature of the Bonds (in whole and not in portions) may be permanently terminated. In such event all Bonds shall thereafter bear interest at a Fixed Rate determined in the manner provided -in this subsection. In order to exercise its option, the Issuer shall deliver a notice to the Notice Parties directing such termination. The notice shall specify the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, which shall be a Business Day not less than 45 days following the date such notice is sent; provided, however, that if any Bonds bear interest at a Long Term Rate, the Fixed Rate Conversion Date must be the date (or, if not a Business Day, the first Business Day thereafter) all Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate are subject to redemption or to mandatory purchase pursuant to Section 309(a)(2). Upon conversion to a Fixed Rate, the Bonds shall be converted to serial bonds with maturities corresponding to the mandatory sinking account redemption requirements set forth in Section 301(c), provided that the Issuer shall have the right to determine that only a portion or none of the Bonds shall be so converted into serial bonds upon receipt of an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such determination would not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exclusion of interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes under the Code. (2) The Fixed Rate shall be established by the Remarketing Agent on the "Fixed Rate Determination Date", which shall occur on or before the fifteenth day preceding the Fixed Rate Conversion Date (or, if such day is not a Business Day, the next preceding Business Day) as the rate which shall result as nearly as practicable in the market value of the Bonds on the Fixed Rate Determination Date being equal to 100% of the principal amount thereof plus, if the Issuer so elects, any premium necessary to pay for costs of conversion and remarketing of the Bonds. Upon determining the Fixed Rate the Remarketing Agent shall immediately notify the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Issuer of such Fixed Rate, promptly confirmed in writing. (3) Not less than 30 days prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date stated in the notice from the Issuer, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall mail by first class mail a notice prepared by the Issuer to each Bondholder stating: (A) that the Adjusted Rate feature will terminate and the interest rate on the Bonds will become a Fixed Rate; (B) the Fixed Rate Conversion Date; (C) the latest date the Fixed Rate shall be determined; 98

Page  99 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (D) that after the Fixed Rate Conversion Date the Bondholders will no longer have the right to Put Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent for purchase; (E) that all Bonds shall be subject to mandatory purchase on the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, and all information required to be included in a notice of mandatory purchase pursuant to Section 309(b), including that any Bonds so required to be purchased which are not delivered to the Transfer/Tender Agent on or before 12:00 noon on such date shall be deemed purchased in accordance with the provisions of Section 310; (F) that any ratings assigned the Bonds may change on and after the Fixed Rate Conversion Date; (G) the redemption provisions to which the Bonds are subject during the Fixed Rate Period; (H) that during the Fixed Rate Period, Bonds may be issued in denominations of $5,000 or integral multiples thereof; and (I) which Bonds the Issuer has elected will be term bonds subject to the Mandatory Sinking Account Payments as set forth in Section 301(c) hereof, and which are to be converted into serial bonds maturing in the years and at such principal amounts as set forth in Section 301(c) hereof. Promptly after the determination of the Fixed Rate, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall mail a second notice to each Bondholder advising such Bondholder of the Fixed Rate. In the event the Issuer determines at any time on or prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date that it is unable to meet the conditions set forth herein to convert the Bonds to the Fixed Rate, the Issuer will promptly so notify the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Transfer/Tender Agent will give prompt notice to the Bondholders that the Issuer has elected not to convert to the Fixed Rate. (4) The right of the Issuer to exercise the conversion option shall be contingent (i) upon its ability to obtain on or before the date of the first notice required to be given by the Transfer/Tender Agent pursuant to paragraph (e)(3) above, an Opinion of Bond Counsel, dated as of the date of such notice, to be reaffirmed as of the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, that following the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, the Bonds continue to be the valid and binding obligations of the Issuer and that the exercise of the conversion option will not adversely affect the exclusion of the interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes, and (ii) upon its ability to effect, on or before the second notice to be given by the Transfer/Tender Agent pursuant to paragraph (e)(3) above, the execution of a contract of purchase relating to the Bonds between the Issuer and the Remarketing Agent or other underwriter or institutional investor, providing for the simultaneous purchase of all Bonds. The Issuer's exercise of the Fixed Rate conversion option shall be deemed rescinded in the event any of the foregoing conditions are not satisfied on or before the date required or in the event the contract of purchase described in (ii) above cannot by its terms be performed on the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, in which event the Bonds shall remain in the Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, Quarterly Rate or Long Term Rate, as the case may be, and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall promptly notify all Bondholders of such rescission. In the event of such rescission all Bonds shall remain subject to Mandatory Purchase on the date originally specified for the conversion to the Fixed Rate. If, in the event of such rescission, the Bonds continue to bear interest at the Quarterly Rate, notwithstanding any other provision hereof, the next Determination Date shall be the first Business Day following the Mandatory Purchase Date 99

Page  100 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A described in the preceding sentence and the next Implementation Date shall be the fifth Business Day following the Determination Date. (f) Calculation of Interest Generally. (1) The Transfer/Tender Agent shall compute the amount of interest payable on any Bonds from the rates supplied to the Transfer/Tender Agent by the Remarketing Agent or from the rates determined by the Remarketing Agent or the Transfer/Tender Agent, as the case may be, in accordance with the terms of this Resolution. The Remarketing Agent shall notify the Transfer/Tender Agent of any rate set by the Remarketing Agent in writing or by telephone promptly confirmed in writing by 12:00 noon, New York time, (A) on the first Business Day after a month in which interest on any Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate, of the Daily Rate or the Weekly Rate, as the case may be, for each day in such month; (B) on the first Business Day following a Determination Date for a Quarterly Rate Period, of the Quarterly Rate set on that Determination Date; (C) on the first Business Day following a Determination Date for a Bond in a Long Term Rate Period, of the Long Term Rate and Long Term Rate Period established for such Bond. The Remarketing Agent shall inform the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the Issuer orally at the request of either of them of any interest rate set by the Remarketing Agent. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall inform the Issuer and the Remarketing Agent orally at the request of either of them of any interest rate set pursuant to Section 203(a) other than by the Remarketing Agent. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall confirm the effective interest rate by telephone or in writing to any Bondholder who requests it. (2) Notwithstanding any other provisions of this Resolution, interest payable on the Bonds shall not exceed the Highest Lawful Rate. (3) When interest on any Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate, or a Quarterly Rate interest on such Bonds shall be computed on the basis of the actual number of days elapsed over a year of 365 or 366 days, as appropriate. When interest on any Bonds is payable at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate, interest shall be computed on the basis of a 360day year of twelve 30day months. (4) The setting of the interest rates and the calculation of interest payable on the Bonds as provided in this Resolution shall be conclusive and binding on any Person, absent manifest error. Section 204. Purpose. Execution and Delivery of Bonds. The Bonds are being issued for the purpose of providing funds which, together with other available funds of the Issuer, will be used for paying the costs of acquiring, constructing, furnishing and equipping the Project and paying certain costs incurred in connection with the issuance and sale of the Bonds. The Bonds shall be signed in the name of and on behalf of the Issuer by manual or facsimile signatures of the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of Michigan. In case any officer whose signature or a facsimile of whose signature shall appear on any Bonds shall cease to be such officer before the delivery of such Bonds, such signature or facsimile shall nevertheless be valid and sufficient for all purposes the same as if he had remained in office until such delivery. No Bonds shall be entitled to any right or benefit under this Resolution unless such fillyregistered Bond shall have endorsed thereon a certificate of authentication substantially in the form hereinafter set forth duly executed by the Transfer/Tender Agent. 100

Page  101 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A No fullyregistered Bond shall be valid or obligatory for any purpose unless and until such certificate of authentication shall have been manually executed by the Transfer/Tender Agent, and such manually executed certificate of the Transfer/Tender Agent upon such Bond shall be conclusive evidence that such Bond has been authenticated and delivered under this Resolution. The Transfer/Tender Agent's certificate of authentication on any fullyregistered Bond shall be deemed to have been executed by it if manually signed by an authorized signatory of the Transfer/Tender Agent, as the case may be, but it shall not be necessary that the same person sign the certificate of authentication on all of the fullyregistered Bonds issued hereunder. Upon the execution and delivery of this Resolution, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of Michigan shall execute and deliver to the Transfer/Tender Agent on behalf of the Issuer and the Transfer/Tender Agent will authenticate, the Bonds and deliver them to the purchaser or purchasers at the place agreed upon by the authorized officers of the Issuer and the original purchaser of the Bonds. As per the direction of the initial purchasers of the Bonds, the Bonds shall be issued in bookentry-only form and the ownership of the Bonds shall be registered in the name of Cede & Co., as nominee of The Depository Trust Company ("DTC"). In the event the Issuer determines that the continuation of the system of book-entry-only transfers through DTC (or a successor securities depository) is not in the best interests of the beneficial owners of the Bonds or the Issuer, it will so notify the Transfer/Tender Agent whereupon the Transfer/Tender Agent will notify DTC of the availability through DTC of Bond certificates. In such event, or in the event DTC discontinues its services with respect to the Bonds the Issuer shall issue and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall transfer and exchange Bonds as requested by DTC of like tenor, series principal amount, interest or principal appreciation rate, series and maturity, in authorized denominations to the identifiable beneficial owners in replacement of the beneficial interests of such beneficial owners in the Bonds. While the Bonds are in book-entry-only form, payment of principal of and interest and premium, if any, on said Bonds by the Transfer/Tender Agent or the Purchase Price of Bonds by the Transfer/Tender Agent, to DTC or its nominee shall be made as shall be provided in a letter of representation among DTC, the Issuer and the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the procedure for making Puts of Bonds by Owners shall be in accordance to DTC procedures. Section 205. Form of Bond. The Bonds shall contain a recital that they are issued pursuant to the laws of the State and may have printed thereon such legend or legends as may be required to comply with any law, rule or regulation or to conform to several usage or practice as determined to be advisabe by the Issuer. Each Bond shall be numbered from R1 upwards. The Bonds shall be substantially in the form set forth in Exhibit A with such appropriate changes, omissions and insertions as are permitted or required by this Resolution. Section 206. Transfer of Bonds. Except as provided in Article III with respect to purchases and remarketing of Bonds and with respect to delivery of Issuer Owned Bonds, each Bond shall be transferable only upon the books of the Issuer, which shall be kept for that purpose at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent, by the registered owner thereof in person or by his attorney duly authorized in writing, upon surrender thereof at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent, together with a written instrument of transfer satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent duly executed by the registered owner or a duly authorized attorney. Upon the transfer of any Bond, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall issue in the name of the transferee and cause to be authenticated a new Bond or Bonds of the same sub-series and aggregate principal amount as the surrendered Bonds. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall make a charge for such transfer sufficient to pay for any tax or other governmental fee or charge required to be paid with respect to such transfer, but all other costs of making such transfer shall be borne by the Issuer. Subject to the provisions hereof relating to the Record Date and Issuer Owned Bonds, the Issuer, the Remarketing Agent, and the Transfer/Tender Agent may deem and treat the person in whose name any Bond shall be registered upon the books of the Issuer as the absolute owner of such Bond, whether such Bond shall be overdue or not, for the purpose of receiving payment of or on account of the principal and premium, if any, and interest on and Purchase Price of such Bond and for all other purposes, including the giving or receipt of notices, consents or directions as specified herein, and all such payments so made to any such registered owner or upon his order shall be valid and effectual to satisfy and discharge the liability upon such Bond to the extent of the sum or sums so paid, and neither the Issuer, the Remarketming Agent, nor the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be affected by any notice to the 101

Page  102 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A contrary. Any registered owner of the Bonds may take actions relating to consents or directions with respect to a portion (in authorized denominations) of such Bonds which are inconsistent with the actions taken with respect to other portions (in authorized denominations) of such Bonds. Except as provided in Article III, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall not be required (i) to issue transfer or exchange any Bond during a period beginning at the opening of business 15 days before the day of the mailing of a notice of redemption of Bonds selected for redemption and ending at the close of business on the day of such mailing, or (ii) transfer or exchange any Bond so selected for redemption in whole or in part within 30 days of the redemption date, except for the unredeemed portion of Bonds called for redemption in part. Section 207. Mutilated, Lost, Stolen or Destroyed Bonds. Subject to and in accordance with applicable law, if any Bond shall become mutilated, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of Michigan, at the expense of the holder of the Bond, shall, without further action being required by the Issuer execute or cause to be executed in the manner specified above, and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall authenticate and deliver, a new Bond of like tenor in exchange and substitution for the mutilated Bond, upon surrender to the Transfer/Tender Agent of the mutilated Bond and receipt by the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Issuer of indemnity satisfactory to them. Subject to and in accordance with applicable law, if any Bond issued under this Resolution shall be lost, destroyed or stolen, evidence of the loss, destruction or theft may be submitted to the Transfer/Tender Agent and if this evidence is satisfactory to both the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Issuer and indemnity satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Issuer shall be given, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of Michigan, at the expense of the owner, shall, without further action being required by the Issuer cause to be prepared and execute or cause to be executed in the manner specified above and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall thereupon authenticate and deliver, a new Bond of like tenor, bearing any statement required by applicable law in lieu of and in substitution for the Bond so lost, destroyed or stolen. If any such Bond shall have matured or shall be about to mature, instead of issuing a substitute Bond the Transfer/Tender Agent may pay the same without surrender thereof. Section 208. Cancellation of Bonds. All Bonds which have been retired by maturity, redemption or purchase by the Issuer shall be canceled by the Transfer/Tender Agent and returned promptly to the Issuer or cremated or shredded and a certificate of such cremation or shredding delivered to the Issuer. Bonds in substitution or exchange for which other Bonds have been delivered shall be canceled and returned promptly to the Issuer. ARTICLE III REDEMPTION OF BONDS; PUTS Section 301. Terms of Redemption. The Bonds shall be subject to redemption as described below. All redemptions shall be made at a redemption price of 100% of the principal amount of the Bonds being redeemed, unless a premium is required as provided below, plus interest to the redemption date. (a) Optional Redemption Of Bonds During Daily Rate, Weekly Rate, or Quarterly Rate. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate, or a Quarterly Rate, Bonds may be redeemed at the option of the Issuer in whole or in part at any time, at the principal amount thereof plus accrued interest, if any, without premium. (b) Optional Redemption of Bonds at a Premium During Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period. Bonds which are payable at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate may be redeemed at the option of the Issuer in whole or in part as provided in this subsection; provided, however, that an Authorized Officer may determine prior to the sale of the Bonds to establish a different schedule of redemption dates and prices for Bonds in the Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period. 102

Page  103 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Subject to adjustment by an Authorized Officer as described above, if the Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period, whichever is applicable, is greater than two years, the Bonds shall be redeemable at 100% of their principal amount in the final year, 1001/2% during the nexttolast year, and nonredeemable prior to that. If the Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period, whichever is applicable, is equal to or less than two years, the Bonds shall not be redeemable prior to maturity or the final Interest Payment Date in the Long Term Rate Period, but shall be redeemable at par, without premium, on the final Interest Payment Date in the Long Term Rate Period. The no-call periods and premiums described in this subsection (b) may be revised to those set forth in a written notice of the Remarketing Agent delivered to the Issuer and the Transfer/Tender Agent prior to the Implementation Date for the applicable Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date for Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate, if in the opinion of the Remarketing Agent such revisions more accurately reflect thencurrent market conditions. Such notice shall be accompanied by an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such revisions would not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exclusion of interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes under the Code. (c) Mandatory Sinking Account Redemption of Bonds. The Bonds are subject to mandatory redemption on the dates and in the principal amounts determined by the Authorized Officer at the time of sale of the Bonds at the principal amount thereof plus accrued interest, if any, without premium. The principal amount of Bonds to be redeemed pursuant to this subsection (c) shall be reduced, in the order determined by the Issuer, by the principal amount of Bonds which have been previously redeemed or called for redemption, other than pursuant to this subsection (c), or purchased or acquired by the Issuer and delivered to the Transfer/Tender Agent for cancellation. The Issuer shall give written notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent at least 30 days prior to any redemption date (but not less than 45 days prior to the redemption date in the case of Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate) pursuant to this subsection (c) of the Issuer exercise of its option to reduce the amount of the redemption requirements pursuant to this subsection (c) on such date and the amount of such reduction. Section 302. Selection of Bonds for Redemption. Whenever provision is made in this Resolution for the redemption of less than all of the Bonds or any given portion thereof, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall select the Bonds to be redeemed from all Bonds subject to redemption or suchgiven portion thereof not previously called for redemption, by lot in any manner which the Transfer/Tender Agent in its sole discretion shall deem appropriate and fair, and for this purpose the Transfer7Tender Agent shall consider each Bond in a denomination larger than the minimum denomination permitted by the Bonds at the time to be separate Bonds each in the minimum denomination. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall promptly notify the Issuer in writing of the Bonds or portions thereof so selected for redemption. Section 303. Notice of Redemption. Notice of redemption shall be mailed not less than 15 nor more than 60 days prior to the redemption date (but not less than 30 days prior to the redemption date in the case of Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate), to the respective Owners of any Bonds designated for redemption at their addresses appearing on the registration books maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent. Each notice ofredemption shall state the redemption date, the place or places of redemption, and, if less than all of the Bonds are to be redeemed, the distinctive number of the Bonds to be redeemed and, in the case of Bonds to be redeemed in part only, the respective portions of the principal amount thereof to be redeemed. Each such notice shall also state that on said date there will become due and payable on each of said Bonds the principal and premium if any, thereof or of said specified portion of the principal thereof in the case of a Bond to be redeemed in part only, together with interest accrued thereon to the redemption date, and that from and after such redemption date interest thereon shall cease to accrue, and shall require that such Bonds be then surrendered. Notice required under this Section which has been mailed is conclusively presumed to have been given, even if it has not been received. 103

Page  104 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Notice of redemption of Bonds shall be given by the Transfer/Tender Agent, at the expense of, for and on behalf of the Issuer. Section 304. Partial Redemption of Bonds. Upon surrender of any Bond redeemed in part only the Issuer shall execute and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall authenticate and deiver to te Owner thereof, at the expense of the Issuer, a new Bond or Bonds of the same authorized denominations equal in aggregate principal amount to the unredeemed portion of the Bond surrendered. Section 305. Effect of Redemption. Notice of redemption having been dul given as asforesaid, and moneys for payment of the principal and premium, if any, thereo together with interest accrued to the redemption date, on the Bonds (or portions thereof) so called for redemption being held by the Transfer/Tender Agent, on the redemption date designated in such notice, the Bons (or portionse, thereof) so called for redemption shall become due and payable, interest on the Bonds so called for edemption shall cease to accrue, said Bonds (or portions thereof) shall cease to be entitled to any benefit or security under this Resolution, and the Owners of said Bonds shall have no rights in respect thereof except to receive payment of said principal, premium, if any, and accrued interest. Section 306. Daily Rate Puts. (a) When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, an Owner of any such Bond may Put such Owner's Bond by delivering: (1) an irrevocable written or telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and to the Remarketing Agent by 10:00 a.m., New York time, on a Business Day, of such Owner's intent to Put such Bond and stating the principal amount of the Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond and the date (which must be a Business Day and may be the date the notice is delivered) such Bond is to be purchased; (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent to the principal office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but any Bond for which the notice described in (a)(1) above was given not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased shall nevertheless be deemed purchased as provided in Section 310 of this Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon, New York time, shall be required for same day payment of the Purchase Price. Promptly following receipt of the notice referred to in (1) above, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall give notice to the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds being tendered on that date. (b) On the Purchase Date (all times New York time) (1) On or before 11:30 a.m. the Remarketing Agent shall give irrevocable telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds subject to purchase on the Purchase Date which have not been remarketed by the Remarketing Agent at the time of such notice. In the event the Remarketing Agent fails to provide timely notice to the Issuer as provided in this clause (1), the Issuer shall presume that none of the Bonds being tendered on such date have been remarketed. (2) On or before 2:30 p.m. the Issuer shall pay or cause to be paid, but only from the sources specified in Section 311 hereof, by wire transfer of immediately available funds the amount of the Purchase Price of the unremarketed tendered Bonds specified in the notice provided pursuant to (b)(l) above (or otherwise presumed not remarketed), on such date to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (3) By the close of business the Transfer/Tender Agent shall register Issuer Owned Bonds in the name of the Issuer or its nominee in the 104

Page  105 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A principal amount of the unremarketed Bonds purchased by the Issuer on such date, authenticate said Bonds and hold the same for the benefit of the Issuer or for delivery to the Issuer or its designee as the Issuer shall direct. (4) On or before 3:30 p.m. the Remarketing Agent shall pay or cause to be paid in immediately available funds the Purchase Price of remarketed Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (5) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall pay, from such immediately available funds received by it for such purpose, the Purchase Price of Bonds properly delivered for purchase to the prior holders thereof in same day funds. (6) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall deliver to the purchaser of remarketed Bonds, Bonds registered as directed by such purchaser. Section 307. Weekly Rate Puts. (a) When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Weekly Rate, an Owner of any such Bond may Put such Owner's Bond by delivering: (1) a written, irrevocable notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent by 5:00 p.m., New York time, on a Business Day, of such Owner's intent to Put such Owner's Bond and stating the principal amount of such Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond and the date (which must be a Business Day at least seven days after the date the notice is delivered, provided that if such seventh day is not a Business Day, the Purchase Date may be the next preceding Business Day) such Bond is to be purchased; and (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent to the principal office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but any Bond not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased as provided in Section 310 of this Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon shall be required for same day payment of the Purchase Price. Promptly following receipt of the notice referred to in (1) above the Transfer/Tender Agent shalI give notice to the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds being tendered on the specified Purchase Date. (b) On the Purchase Date (all times New York time) (1) On or before 9:30 a.m. the Remarketing Agent shall give irrevocable telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds subject to purchase on the Purchase Date which have not been remarketed by the Remarketing Agent at the time of such notice. In the event the Remarketing Agent fails to provide timely notice to the Issuer as provided in this clause (1), the Issuer shall presume that none of the Bonds being tendered on such date have been remarketed. (2) On or before 2:30 p.m. the Issuer shall pay or cause to be paid, but only from the sources specified in Section 311 hereof, by wire transfer of immediately available funds the amount of the Purchase Price of the unremarketed tendered Bonds specified in the notice provided- pursuant to (b)(1) above (or otherwise presumed not remarketed), to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (3) By the close of business the Transfer/Tender Agent shall register Issuer Owned Bonds in the name of the Issuer or its nominee in the amount of the principal amount of Bonds purchased by the Issuer, authenticate said Bonds and hold the same for the benefit of the Issuer or for delivery to the Issuer or its designee as the Issuer shall direct. 105

Page  106 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (4) On or before 3:30 p.m. the Remarketing Agent shall pay or cause to be paid in immediately available funds the Purchase Price of remarketed Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (5) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall pay, from such immediately available funds received by it for such purpose, the Purchase Price of Bonds properly delivered for purchase to the prior holders thereof in same day funds. (6) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall deliver to the purchaser of remarketed Bonds, Bonds registered as directed by such purchaser. Section 308. Quarterly Rate Puts. (a) When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Quarterly Rate, an Owner of any such Bond may Put such Owner's Bond by delivering: (1) a written, irrevocable notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent by 5:00 p.m., New York time, on a Business Day, at least six Business Days prior to the next succeeding Implementation Date, which Implementation Date shall be the Purchase Date, of such Owner's intent to Put such Owner's Bond and stating the principal amount of such Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond. (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent to the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but any Bond not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased as provided in Section 310 of this Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon shall be required for same day delivery of the Purchase Price. Promptly following receipt of the notice referred to in (1) above the Transfer/Tender Agent shall give notice to the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds being tendered on the specified Purchase Date. (b) On the Purchase Date (all times New York time) (1) On or before 9:30 a.m. the Remarketing Agent shall give irrevocable telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds subject to purchase on the Purchase Date which have not been remarketed by the Remarketing Agent at the time of such notice. In the event the Remarketing Agent fails to provide timely notice to the Issuer as provided in this clause (1), the Issuer shall presume that none of the Bonds being tendered on such date have been remarketed. (2) On or before 2:30 p.m. the Issuer shall pay or cause to be paid, but only from the sources specified in Section 311 hereof, by wire transfer of immediately available funds the amount of the Purchase Price of the unremarketed tendered Bonds specified in the notice provided pursuant to (b)(1) above (or otherwise presumed not remarketed), to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (3) By the close of business the Transfer/Tender Agent shall register Issuer Owned Bonds in the name of the Issuer or its nominee in the amount of the principal of the Bonds purchased by the Issuer on such date, authenticate said Bonds and hold the same for the benefit of the Issuer or for delivery to the Issuer or its designee as the Issuer shall direct. (4) On or before 3:30 p.m. the Remarketing Agent shall pay or cause to be paid in immediately available funds the Purchase Price of remarketed Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. 106

Page  107 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (5) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall pay, from such immediately available funds received by it for such purpose, the Purchase Price of Bonds properly delivered for purchase to the prior holders thereof in same day funds. (6) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall deliver to the purchaser of remarketed Bonds, Bonds registered as directed by such purchaser. Section 309. Mandatory Purchase of Bonds. (a) The Bonds, other than Issuer Owned Bonds, are subject to mandatory purchase upon any of the following dates (each a "Mandatory Purchase Date"): (1) On the effective date of any change in the method of determining the Daily Rate, Weekly Rate and Quarterly Rate pursuant to Section 203(c) hereof; (2) With respect to each Bond bearing interest at a Long Term Rate, on the day following the last day of each Long Term Rate Period; provided, that if such date is not a Business Day, the Purchase Date shall be the following Business Day, but interest shall accrue only through the last day of the Long Term Rate Period and such purchase shall be deemed effective on the date following the last day of the Long Term Rate Period; or (3) On the Fixed Rate Conversion Date. (b) Notice of mandatory purchase pursuant to Section 309(a)(3) shall be mailed by the Transfer/Tender Agent in accordance with Section 203(e)(3). Notice of mandatory purchase pursuant to Sections 309(a)(1) and (a)(2) shall be mailed by the Transfer/Tender Agent in accordance with Section 203(d) hereof. Notice in each case shall be mailed to the respective Owners of the Bonds at their addresses maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent. Each notice of mandatory purchase shall state the Mandatory Purchase Date and the place or places of mandatory purchase and, with respect to mandatory purchases pursuant to Section 309(a)(1) that the holders may waive purchase upon filing of the instrument specified in (c) below. Each such notice shall also state that on said date there will become due and payable on said Bonds the Purchase Price and that from and after the Mandatory Purchase Date interest thereon shall cease to accrue to the prior holder of the Bond to be purchased, and shall require, unless waived pursuant to paragraph (c) below, that such Bonds be then surrendered and if not so surrendered that the Bonds will be deemed purchased in accordance with Section 310 of this Resolution. (c) Any Owner may waive a purchase of a Bond on a Mandatory Purchase Date established pursuant to Section 309(a)(1), by delivery to the Transfer/Tender Agent, on or before the sixth Business Day preceding the Mandatory Purchase Date, the Bonds with respect to which such waiver is made together with a written instrument of such Owner (1) directing that such Bonds not be purchased on the Mandatory Purchase Date, (2) agreeing not to sell such Bonds prior to the Mandatory Purchase Date, (3) agreeing not to exercise a Put applicable to such Bonds prior to the Mandatory Purchase Date, and (4) acknowledging that such waiver is irrevocable. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no waiver may be made with respect to any Bond that has been called for redemption. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall notify the Remarketing Agent by telephone at the opening of business on the fifth Business Day preceding a Mandatory Purchase Date, promptly confirmed in writing, of the principal amount of Bonds for which waivers have been received pursuant to this Section 309(c). (d) Any Bond subject to purchase shall be purchased, or deemed purchased, on its Mandatory Purchase Date at the Purchase Price. Delivery of such Bond (with an appropriate transfer of registration executed in blank in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent) at the principal corporate trust office of the 107

Page  108 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Transfer/Tender Agent at or prior to 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Mandatory Purchase Date shall be required for same day payment of the Purchase Price. Unless waived pursuant to Section 309(c) hereof, all Bonds subject to purchase shall be deemed to have been tendered for purchase on the Mandatory Purchase Date and if any such Bond is not delivered on the Mandatory Purchase Date, the provisions with respect to Undelivered Bonds in Section 310 of this Resolution shall apply. No Owner shall be entitled to payment of the Purchase Price for any Bond except upon surrender of such Bond as set forth herein. (e) On the Mandatory Purchase Date (all times New York time) (1) On or before 9:30 a.m. the Remarketing Agent shall give irrevocable telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent, and the Issuer of the principal amount of Bonds subject to purchase on the Mandatory Purchase Date which have not been remarketed by the Remarketing Agent at the time of such notice. In the event the Remarketing Agent fails to provide timely notice to the Issuer as provided in this clause (1), the Issuer shall presume that none of the Bonds being tendered on such date have been remarketed. (2) On or before 2:30 p.m. the Issuer shall pay, or cause to be paid, but only from the sources specified in Section 311 hereof, by wire transfer of immediately available funds the amount of the Purchase Price of unremarketed tendered Bonds specified in the notice provided pursuant to (e)(1) above (or otherwise presumed not remarketed) on such date to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (3) By the close of business the Transfer/Tender Agent shall register Issuer Owned Bonds in the name of the Issuer or its nominee in the amount of the Issuer principal of Bonds purchased by the Issuer on such date, authenticate said Bonds and hold the same for the benefit of the Issuer or for delivery to the Issuer or its designee as the Issuer shall direct. (4) On or before 3:30 p.m. the Remarketing Agent shall pay or cause to be paid in immediately available funds the Purchase Price of remarketed Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent for deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund. (5) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall pay, from such immediately available funds received by it for such purpose, the Purchase Price of Bonds properly delivered for purchase to the prior holders thereof in same day funds. (6) By the close of business on the Purchase Date the Transfer/Tender Agent shall deliver to, or make available for pickup by, the purchaser of remarketed Bonds, Bonds registered as directed by such purchaser. Section 310. Undelivered Bonds. Any Bonds which are required to be tendered for purchase on a Purchase Date to the Transfer/Tender Agent or Remarketing Agent that are not delivered on the Purchase Date for which there has been irrevocably deposited in trust in the Bond Purchase Fund an amount of money sufficient to pa the urchase Price thereof shall be deemed to have been purchased pursuant to this Section, and shall be Undelivered Bonds. In the event of a failure by a Bondholder to tender its Bonds on or prior to the required date, said Owner of such Undelivered Bonds shall not be entitled to any payment other than the Purchase Price and Undelivered Bonds in the hands of such nondelivering owner shall no longer accrue interest or be entitled to the benefits of this Resolution, except for the payment of the Purchase Price; provided, however, that the indebtedness represented by such Bonds shall not be extinguished. With respect to any Undelivered Bond, the Transfer/Tender Agent acting pursuant to the power of attorney granted by such Bondholder in the Bond, shall do the following: (a) Assign, endorse, and register transfer such Bond to the purchaser or purchasers thereof; 108

Page  109 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (b) Authenticate and deliver a new Bond or Bonds, as appropriate, to the purchaser or purchasers thereof including the Issuer, if appropriate. If the transferee of such Bond is the Issuer, then the Issuer or its nominee shall be registered as the owner thereof and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall authenticate and hold such authenticated Bond in trust for the Issuer. (c) Execute an acknowledgment that the holder of Undelivered Bonds, holds such Undelivered Bond for the benefit of the new purchaser or purchasers thereof, who shall be identified in such notation; (d) Promptly notify by first class mail the holder of such Undelivered Bond that: (1) The Transfer/Tender Agent has acted pursuant to such power of attorney to transfer the Undelivered Bond and to perform the other acts set forth in this Section; (2) The Undelivered Bond in the hands of the prior holder thereof is no longer deemed Outstanding under the Resolution and has ceased to bear interest on the Purchase Date; and (3) Funds equal to the applicable Purchase Price for such Bond are being held on behalf of such holder, without interest, in the Bond Purchase Fund established for such purpose by the Transfer/Tender Agent. Failure of the Transfer/Tender Agent to give such notice shall not affect the Mandatory Purchase of such Bonds or the fact that interest shall cease to accrue or impose any liability on the Transfer/Tender Agent. (e) Hold the Purchase Price for such Bond in the Bond Purchase Fund established for such purpose, without interest, and pay such Purchase Price to such holder upon presentation of the certificate representing the Undelivered Bond. Undelivered Bonds presented for payment by 12:00 noon on any Business Day shall be paid in same day funds, and if presented after 12:00 noon on any Business Day shall be paid on the next succeeding Business Day. Section 311. Sources of Payment by Issuer of Bond Purchase Price. The Issuer's obligation to pay the Purchase Price of Bonds tendered or deemed tendered pursuant to Sections 306, 307, 308 or 309 which have not been remarketed shall be payable from the Issuer's available cash reserves, but shall be limited in amount at any time to the amount of unrestricted fund balances of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics of the University of Michigan as of the close of the last Fiscal Year for which the report required by this Section 311 has been completed, less the amount of the Purchase Price of Bonds purchased by the Issuer and not subsequently remarketed since the last day of such Fiscal Year. In addition, the Issuer's obligation to pay the Purchase Price of Bonds tendered or deemed tendered may be payable from any Credit Support Instrument which the Issuer may, in its sole discretion, subsequently provide. The Issuer will produce an annual report within 180 days after the close of each Fiscal Year, certified by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or Associate Vice President for Finance of the University, which shows the unrestricted fund balances of the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics of the University of Michigan for purposes of the computing the amounts and limitations described in this Section 311. Section 312. Issuer Owned Bonds. Issuer Owned Bonds purchased by the Issuer pursuant to Sections 306, 307, 308 or 309 shall be held for remarketing by the Transfer/Tender Agent and shall remain outstanding (unless and until the Issuer surrenders them to the Transfer/Tender Agent for cancellation) and shall not be deemed paid or discharged by merger. Notwithstanding anything herein or in the Remarketing Agreement, Issuer Owned Bonds held by the Issuer or its nominee for thirty days or longer shall not be remarketed except upon delivery of an Opinion of Bond Counsel that such holding and remarketing will not adversely affect the exclusion from gross income for federal income tax purpose of the interest on such Bonds. 109

Page  110 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A ARTICLE IV ESTABLISHMENT OF FUNDS Section 401. Establishment of Proiect Fund. There is hereby created and established with the Issuer the Project Fund. There shall be deposited in the Project Fund all net proceeds from the sale of the Bonds. All moneys in the Project Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article V. Section 402. Establishment of Bond Fund. There is hereby created and established with the Transfer/Tender Agent the Bond Fund. There shall be deposited in the Bond Fund: 1. Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues as pledged and required to be paid into the Bond Fund at the times and in the amounts provided in Section 504. 2. All Legally Available Funds required to be paid into the Bond Fund pursuant to Section 505. 3. All Investment Income. 4. Any moneys remaining in the Project Fund after the disbursements provided for in Article V which are directed to be so deposited by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University. All moneys in the Bond Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article V. Section 403. Establishment of Revenue Fund. There was created and established by a prior resolution adopted by the Issuer the Revenue Fund, as a subaccount within a general banking account of the Issuer designated by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University. From and after the date of delivery of the Bonds there shall be deposited in the Revenue Fund as received all Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues. All moneys in the Revenue Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article V. Section 404. Establishment of Bond Purchase Fund. There is hereby created and established with the Transfer/Tender Agent the Bond Purchase Fund. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall deposit in the Bond Purchase Fund all moneys, and only the moneys, received in accordance with this Resolution from the proceeds of remarketing of the Bonds by the Remarketing Agent and from the payments made by the Issuer pursuant to Sections 306, 307, 308 and 309 hereof. All moneys in the Bond Purchase Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article III and Article VIII hereof. ARTICLE V FLOW AND USE OF FUNDS Section 501. Application of Bond Proceeds. Immediately upon the receipt thereof, the proceeds of the sale of the Bonds shall be deposited in the Project Fund. Section 502. Use of and Disbursements from Proiect Fund. Moneys in the Project Fund shall be used pursuant to the following purposes (the "Project Costs"): 1. Payment of accounting, financial consulting, legal, printing and other expenses of the University in connection with the preparation, issuance, sale and delivery of the Bonds; 2. Payments necessary to finance the cost of the construction and equipping of the Project or to reimburse the Issuer for general funds expended in connection with the foregoing. 110

Page  111 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Upon disbursement of all funds in the Project Fund, if the Project shall then be incomplete, the Issuer shall complete the Project using available funds. Any amount remaning in the Project Fund after satisfaction of the foregoing priorities shall, as directed by the Issuer, be used to retire Bonds on the first practicable redemption date, or used by the Issuer for payment of any other lawful capital costs of the Issuer relating to the Program as determined by the Issuer. The depository for the Project Fund shall make disbursements from the Project Fund upon the order of the Issuer and shall have no duty or liability with respect to the manner or method in which moneys are withdrawn by the Issuer from the Project Fund or in fact are used or applied by the Issuer. Section 503. Use of and Disbursements from Bond Fund. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall use moneys in the Bond Fund to pay principal, premium if any, and interest on the Bonds as the e become due and in the case of principal, as the Bonds are presented and surrendered. The Transfer/Tender Agent may use moneys in the Bond Fund not required to pay principal and interest on the Bonds on the next interest payment date for the acquisition of Bonds in the open market at the written direction of the Issuer. Any amounts remaining in the Bond Fund after the Bonds have been paid or provision made therefor under the Resolution shall be returned to the Issuer. Section 504. Use of and Disbursements from Revenue Fund. On or before the date prior to each interest payment date, the Issuer shall transfer or cause to be transferred from the Revenue Fund to the Bond Fund sufficient moneys (together with funds then on hand in the Bond Fund) to pay the interest or principal and interest due on the Bonds on such interes pa ent date. The Issuer shall transer erto the bond funds established for the Outstanding Bonds and any additional Parity Obligations sufficient moneys to pay the interest or principal, premium, if any, and interest due on any additional Parity Obligations on or before the interest payment dates for such Parity Obligations. Prior to making the transfers required by the preceding sentences, the Issuer shall use moneys in the Revenue Fund solely, together with other funds of the Issuer derived from or related to the Program, to pay Operating Costs; provided, however, that the Issuer shall manage the Program and the payment of Operating Costs in such a manner that sufficient funds shall be available in the Revenue Fund to make the transfers to the Bond Fund and to the bond funds established for the Prior Bonds and any additional Parity Obligations on the dates required. After making the required transfers to the Bond Fund and to the bond funds established for the Prior Bonds any additional Parity Obligations as required by this Section 504, and after the payment of Operating Costs in each Fiscal Year, Surplus Revenues may be withdrawn from the Revenue Fund and used for any lawful purpose of the University. Section 505. Covenant to Use Legally Available Funds. To the extent that on any date on which any payment is required to be made from the Bond Fund pursuant to Section 503, the amounts on deposit in the Bond Fund are insufficient to make such payment, the Issuer covenants to transfer to the Transfer/Tender Agent from any Legally Available Funds the amount sufficient to make up such payment deficiency and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall use the amount so transferred to make up such deficiency. In addition, the University may, but shall not be required to, use Legally Available Funds to pay the Purchase Price of Bonds tendered or subject to mandatory purchase, to the extent funds are not otherwise available under Section 311 hereof. Section 506. Investment of Funds. Moneys held in the Bond Fund, until required for use, shall be invested by Transfer/Tender Agent at the direction of the Issuer, in writing or orally (promptly confirmed in writing) in direct obligations of, or obligations the principal and the interest of which are guaranteed by the United States of America; or obligations of Federal Farm Credit Banks, Federal Home Loan Banks, the Federal National Mortgage Association, the Federal Land Bank, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Government National Mortgage Association, the Bank for Cooperatives, the Federal Financing Bank, the Farmers Home Administration and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association; or tax-exempt obligations rated A or better by Moody's Investors Service and Standard and Poor's Corporation in the case of long-term obligations, or in the highest category at each such rating agency in the case of short-term obligations; or may be deposited in a bank or banks (including the Transfer/Tender Agent) in an interest bearing savings account or accounts, bankers' acceptances or in certificates of deposit; or may be invested in any fund or fund composed entirely of any or all of the above-described investment vehicles (provided that, with respect to tax-exempt obligations in such funds, the obligations need not be rated A or better, but rather must be, or be deemed to be by the fund's sponsor or adviser, investment grade). Moneys held in the Project Fund and the Revenue Fund may be invested in any investments 111

Page  112 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A legally available for University funds. Moneys in the Bond Purchase Fund shall be held uninvested. Interest or profit earned on the investments or deposits in the funds listed above, and any loss on such investments or deposits shall be credited or charged to the fund in which the investment was held. Section 507. Non-Arbitrage and Tax Covenant. The Issuer hereby covenants that, to the it shall take all actions within its control and refrain from taking other actions, in each case as shall be necessary to maintain the exclusion of the interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the 'Code") including but not limited to, actions relating to the rebate of arbitrage earnings, if required, and the expenditure and investment of Bond proceeds and moneys deemed to be Bond proceeds. The Issuer is responsible for filing all reports relating to arbitrage matters and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall have no responsibility with respect thereto. ARTICLE VI SOURCES OF PAYMENT AND SECURITY FOR THE BONDS Section 601. Security for the Bonds. The Bonds are not debts or general obligations of the state of Michigan, nor general obligations of the Issuer, but are limited obligations of the Issuer, equally and ratably secured only by the following: 1. All moneys and investments in the Bond Fund; 2. Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and the Issuer's right to receive Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues; and 3. All moneys and investments in the Revenue Fund. The Issuer hereby pledges and grants to the Bondholders a security interest in all of the foregoing, and in order to assure this security the Issuer covenants and agrees that the Bondholders shall have a first lien on all moneys in the Bond Fund, and that Bondholders shall have a first lien against Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund of equal standing and priority of lien with the pledge of Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues for the Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations which the Issuer reserves the right to issue under Article IX. The lien of the pledge of the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues, and on the Bond Fund and the Revenue Fund, shall be valid and binding from the date of issuance and delivery of the Bonds and all moneys or properties subject thereto which are thereafter received shall immediately be subject to the lien of the pledge without hysical delivery or further act. The lien of the pledge shall be valid and binding against all parties having claim in tort, contract or otherwise against the Issuer (except for the holders of the Prior onds and any additional Parity Obligations of the Issuer payable from a first lien on Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues) irrespective of whether such parties have notice of the lien. Section 602. Limitations of Obligations. No recourse under any obligation covenant, stipulation or indenture contained in this Resolution or in any Bond issued hereunder or caused by the creation of any indebtedness hereby authorized, shall be had against the state of Michigan or the Issuer or any member or officer of the Issuer or the University; nor shall any such obligation ever be or become a charge against the state of Michigan, nor shall the same become a lien on or secured by any property, real, personal or mixed, of the state of Michigan or the Regents it being expressly understood and agreed that the Bonds and the obligations created hereunder are secured only by Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Bond Fund and Revenue Fund, and are additionally ayable from Legally Available Funds to the extent provided herein and that no other liability whatsoever shall attach to or be incurred by the state of Michigan, the Issuer, or any member or officer of the Issuer or the University, or its successors; all other liability, except as herein provided, being expressly waived. 112

Page  113 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A ARTICLE VII THE REMARKETING AGENT Section 701. Appointment of Remarketing Agent: Resignation and Removal. (a) The initial Remarketing Agent shall be designated by an Authorized Officer prior to the sale of the Bonds. The Remarketing Agent shall designate in writing to the Issuer and the Transfer/Tender Agent its principal office and signify its acceptance of the duties and obligations imposed upon it hereunder and in the Remarketing Agreement by a written instrument of acceptance delivered to the Issuer. (b) The Remarketing Agent may at any time resign and be discharged of the duties and obligations created by this Resolution by giving at least 30 days' written notice to the Notice Parties. The Remarketing Agent may be removed at any time by the Issuer by a written notice filed at least 15 days prior to the effective date of such removal with the Notice Parties. Upon the resignation or removal of the Remarketing Agent, the Remarketing Agent shall pay over, deliver and assign any moneys and Bonds held by it in such capacity to its successor. Section 702. Qualifications of Successor Remarketing Agent. If the position of Remarketing Agent shall become vacant for any reason, or if the Remarketing Agent gives notice of its resignation as provided in Section 701(b) hereof, the Issuer shall immediately use its best efforts to appoint a successor Remarketing Agent to fill the vacancy. A written acceptance of office shall be filed by the successor Remarketing Agent in the manner set forth in Section 701(a) hereof. Any successor Remarketing Agent shall be a member of the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc., having a capitalization of at least $50,000,000 (or, alternatively, maintaining a line of credit from a commercial bank having a capitalization of at least $25,000,000) an be authorized by law to perform all of the duties imposed on it under this Resolution. Section 703. General Responsibilities of the Remarketing Agent. (a) The Remarketing Agent shall perform the duties and obligations set forth in this Resolution, and in particular shall: (1) use its best efforts to solicit purchases of Bonds tendered, and deemed tendered and Issuer Owned Bonds from investors able to purchase municipal bonds, effectuate and process such purposes, bill and receive payment for Bonds purchased, and perform related functions in connection with the remarketing of Bonds hereunder; (2) keep such books and records as shall be consistent with prudent industry practice and which will document its action taken hereunder, and make such books and records available for inspection by the Notice Parties at all reasonable times; and (3) comply at all times with all applicable state and federal securities laws and other statutes, rules and regulations applicable to the offering and sale of the Bonds. (b) In performing its duties and obligations hereunder, the Remarketing Agent shall use the same degree of care and skill as a prudent person would exercise under the same circumstances in the conduct of his or her own affairs. The Remarketing Agent shall not be liable in connection with the performance of its duties hereunder except for its own willful misconduct, gross negligence or bad faith. (c) The Remarketing Agent may deal in Bonds and with the Issuer to the same extent and with the same effect as provided with respect to the Transfer/Tender Agent in this Resolution. 113

Page  114 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (d) The Notice Parties shall each cooperate to cause the necessary arrangements to be made and thereafter continued whereby Bonds prepared, executed, authenticated and issued hereunder shall be made available to the Remarketing Agent to the extent necessary for delivery pursuant to Section 704 hereof, and to otherwise enable the Remarketing Agent to carry out its duties hereunder. Section 704. Remarketing and Sale of Bonds. (a) With respect to all Issuer Owned Bonds (subject to Section 312 hereof) and all Bonds subject to purchase on a Purchase Date, the Remarketing Agent shall offer for sale and use its best efforts to sell all such Bonds at a price equal to the principal amount thereof plus accrued interest, if any, and with an interest rate determined by the Remarketing Agent as provided in Section 203; provided, that Issuer Owned Bonds, may, with the prior consent of the Issuer, be remarketed at a price higher or lower than par plus accrued interest. The Remarketing Agent shall first remarket Bonds registered in the name of holders other than the Issuer prior to remarketing Issuer Owned Bonds. (b) The Remarketing Agent shall not be required to offer for sale or sell any Bonds upon the occurrence and continuation of any Event of Default. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall notify the Remarketing Agent promptly of any Event of Default and the Remarketing Agent may rely upon such notice absent manifest error in it. Any Bond purchased pursuant to Sections 306, 307 or 308 hereof during the period following notice of a change in the interest rate determination method pursuant to Section 203(d) hereof or a notice of redemption pursuant to Section 301 hereof shall not be remarketed except to a purchaser who is provided with a notice to the same effect as the notice to be given Bondholders pursuant to Section 203(d) hereof or Section 301 hereof, as the case may be. (c) The proceeds of sale of any Bonds other than Issuer Owned Bonds sold by the Remarketing Agent pursuant to Section 704(a) hereof shall be transferred by or at the direction of the Remarketing Agent by wire transfer in immediately available funds to the Transfer/Tender Agent at the times and otherwise as provided herein, for application in accordance with this Resolution. The proceeds of the remarketing of Issuer Owned Bonds shall be transferred by or at the direction of the Remarketing Agent to the Issuer in immediately available funds on the date of remarketing in the manner as shall be specified by the Issuer to the Remarketing Agent. ARTICLE VIII THE TRANSFER/TENDER AGENT Section 801. Appointment of Transfer/Tender Agent. (a) The initial Transfer/Tender Agent shall be designated by an Authorized Officer prior to the sale of the Bonds. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall designate in writing to the Issuer its principal office and signify its acceptance of the duties and obligations imposed upon it hereunder by a written instrument of acceptance delivered to the Issuer. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall also be a copaying agent, coregistrar and coauthentication agent hereunder with respect to the Bonds. By such acceptance, the Transfer/Tender Agent will agree, particularly: (i) to hold all Bonds delivered to it for purchase hereunder in trust as agent and bailee of, and in escrow for the benefit of, the respective Owners which have so delivered such Bonds, until moneys representing the Purchase Price of such Bonds shall have been delivered to or for the account of or to the order of such Owners; 114

Page  115 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (ii) to act as attorney-in-fact on behalf of Owners of Undelivered Bonds and hold the Purchase Price of such Undelivered Bonds for the account of such Owners until the surrender of such Undelivered Bonds as provided in Section 310 of this Resolution; (iii) to hold all moneys delivered to it hereunder for the purchase of Bonds in the Bond Purchase Fund in trust as agent and bailee of, and in escrow for the benefit of, the person or entity which shall have so delivered such moneys, until the Bonds purchased with such moneys have been delivered to or for the account of such person or entity; (iv) to perform all duties of the Transfer/Tender Agent with respect to Tender Notices, other notices, the tender and purchase of Bonds and the deposit, holding and payment of funds as specified in this Resolution; and (v) to keep such books and records as shall be consistent with prudent industry practice, and make such books and records available for inspection by the Notice Parties at all reasonable times. (b) Liability of Transfer/Tender Agent. The Transfer/Tender Agent may not be relieved from liability for its own gross negligence or willful misconduct except that: (i) the Transfer/Tender Agent need perform only those duties that are specifically set forth in this Resolution to be performed by it as the Transfer/Tender Agent and no others; (ii) in the absence of bad faith on its part, the Transfer/Tender Agent may conclusively rely, as to the truth of the statements and the correctness of the opinions expressed upon certificates or opinions furnished to the Transfer/Tender Agent and conforming to the requirements of this Resolution, however, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall examine the certificates and opinions to determine whether they conform to the requirements of this Resolution; (iii) the Transfer/Tender Agent shall not be liable for any error of judgment made in good faith by an officer of the Transfer/Tender Agent, unless it is proved that the Transfer/Tender Agent was grossly negligent in ascertaining the pertinent facts; (iv) no provision of this Resolution shall require the Transfer/Tender Agent to expend or risk its own funds or otherwise incur any financial liability in the performance of any of its duties hereunder or in the exercise of any of its rights or powers; and (v) the Transfer/Tender Agent shall not be liable for interest on any cash held by it except as the Transfer/Tender Agent may agree in writing with the Issuer or as may be provided in this Resolution. Every provision of this Resolution that in any way relates to the Transfer/Tender Agent is subject to all the paragraphs of this Section. (c) (i) Rights of Transfer/Tender Agent. Subject to the foregoing Section, the Transfer/Tender Agent may rely on any document believed by it to be genuine and to have been signed or presented by the proper person. The Transfer/Tender Agent need not investigate any fact or matter stated in the document. (ii) Before the Transfer/Tender Agent acts or refrains from acting, it may require a certificate of an appropriate officer or officers of the Issuer or an opinion of counsel. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall not be liable for any action it takes or omits to take in good faith in reliance on the certificate or opinion of counsel. 115

Page  116 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (iii) The Transfer/Tender Agent may act through agents and shall not be responsible for the misconduct or negligence of any agent appointed with reasonable care and with the consent of the Issuer, which consent shall not be unreasonably withheld. (d) Transfer/Tender Agent's Disclaimer. The Transfer/Tender Agent makes no representation as to the validity or adequacy of the Bonds, and it shall not be accountable for the use of the proceeds from the Bonds, and it shall not be responsible for any statement in the Bonds other than its certificate of authentication. (e) Compensation and Indemnity of Transfer/Tender Agent. For acting under this Resolution, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be entitled to receive from the Issuer payment of reasonable fees for its services and reimbursement of advances, counsel fees and expenses and other expenses reasonably and necessarily made or incurred by the Transfer/Tender Agent in connection with its services under this Resolution. To the extent permitted by law, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be indemnified for, and be saved harmless by the Issuer from Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues against, any loss, liability or damages incurred without gross negligence or willful misconduct on its part arising out of or in connection with the exercise or performance of its powers and duties hereunder, and such indemnification shall include the costs and expenses of defending the Transfer/Tender Agent against any claim or liability in the premises. (f) Transfer/Tender Agent as Creditor. The Transfer/Tender Agent may become a creditor, directly or indirectly, of the Issuer, make any loan or loans thereto, hold any form of indebtedness thereof (including the Bonds), own, accept or negotiate any drafts, bills of exchange, acceptances or obligations thereof, make disbursements thereof and enter into any commercial or business arrangement therewith without limitation, all without any liability for any real or apparent conflict of interest by reason of any such dealings. (g) The Notice Parties shall each cooperate to cause the necessary arrangements to be made and to be thereafter continued whereby funds from the sources specified herein will be made available for the purchase of Bonds presented at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent, and otherwise to enable the Transfer/Tender Agent to carry out its duties hereunder. (h) The Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent, if different, shall cooperate to the extent necessary to permit the preparation, execution, issuance, authentication and delivery by the Transfer/Tender Agent of replacement Bonds in connection with the tender and remarketing of Bonds hereunder. (i) The Issuer acknowledges that, in carrying out its responsibilities hereunder, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall be acting solely for the benefit of and as agent for the Owners from time to time of the Bonds. No delivery of Bonds to the Transfer/Tender Agent or any agent of the Transfer/Tender Agent or purchase of Bonds by the Transfer/Tender Agent shall constitute a redemption of the Bonds or any extinguishment of the debt evidenced thereby. Section 802. Delivery of Purchased Bonds - Preparation and Delivery of Replacement Bonds. (a) The Transfer/Tender Agent shall authenticate, register and deliver to the person designated in writing by the Remarketing Agent as the purchaser of the remarketed Bonds, or to the Issuer or its nominee with respect to Issuer Owned Bonds, a new Bond or Bonds of any authorized denominations in an aggregate principal amount equal to the Bonds tendered or deemed to be tendered, as directed in writing by the Remarketing Agent pursuant to the Remarketing Agreement or by the Issuer with respect to Bonds purchased by the Issuer. 116

Page  117 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (b) Subject to the laws of escheat, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall hold moneys representing the Purchase Price, in trust in the Bond Purchase Fund, without liability for interest thereon, for the benefit of the Owners of Undelivered Bonds. Section 803. Resignation: Removal: Qualification of Successor Transfer/ Tender Agent. The Transfer/Tender Agent may resign and be discharged of the duties and obligations created by this Resolution by giving at least sixty (60) days' notice by mail to the Notlce Parties. The Transfer/Tender Agent may be removed at any time by an instrument signed by the Issuer, filed with the Noetice arties. A successor Transfer/Tender Agent shall be appointed by the Issuer and shall be a corporation duly organized under the laws of the United States of America or any state or territory thereof having a combined capital stock, surplus and undivided profits of at least Fifty Million Dollars ($50,000,000), authorized by law to perform all of the duties imp d posed upon it by this Resolution, having an office in New York, New York and having a rating (or being a bank comprising at least 51% of the assets of a bank holding company having a rating) from Moody's of Baa/P3 or higher. No removal or resignation will be effective until a successor has delivered an acceptance of its appointment to the Issuer. ARTICLE IX ADDITIONAL PARITY OBLIGATIONS Section 901. Additional Parity Obligations. The Issuer reserves the right to issue additional Parity Obligations as Fixed Rate Bonds or Variable Rate Bonds for any authorized purpose relating to the Program having equal standing and priority of lien against the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund with the Bonds and the Prior Bonds, provided that the Issuer by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University certifies that the average of Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues for the two most recently completed Fiscal Years for which the audited financial reports have been completed (the latest of which shall have ended within 18 months prior to the issuance of the proposed additional Parity Obligations), are equal to or greater than 200% of the maximum future Annual Debt Service on the Bonds, the Prior Bonds any previously issued additional Parity Obligations secured on a parity basis with the Bonds and the additional Parity Obligations proposed to be issued; provided, further, however, that additional Parity Obligations (in any form or designation) may be issued to evidence the Issuer's reimbursement obligations under a Credit Support Instrument securing any Parity Obligations which were issued in compliance with the foregoing tests. In addition, without meeting any of the foregoing tests, the Issuer may issue additional Parity Obligations to refund part or all of any Prior Bonds, Bonds or additional Parity Obligations so long as the maximum Annual Debt Service after issuance of such additional Parity Obligations shall not exceed the maximum Annual Debt Service immediately prior to the issuance by more than 10%. Any issue of additional Parity Obligations shall be secured by a pledge of Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund equal, on a parity basis with, the pledge hereunder, may be issued under a supplement to this Resolution or a separate resolution, indenture or other instrument, or may have a reserve fund established to secure such additional Parity Obligations (which may be in cash or in the form of a credit facility), may be payable from a bond fund established therefor (which shall be distinct from the Bond Fund in which the holders of such additional Parity Obligations shall have no claim), and may be secured by a Credit Support Instrument in each case in which holders of the Bonds, Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations therefore or thereafter issued shall have no claim. Except for the pledge of Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund, which shall be shared by all Bondholders, an individual series of additional Parity Obligations may be secured by rights or property different or distinct from that which secures the Bonds, and Prior Bonds and an additional Parity Obligations. Section 902. Issuance of Subordinate Obligations. The Issuer may issue Subordinate Obligations for any lawful purpose of the Issuer related to the Program, so long as the principal of and interest on such Subordinate Obligations is subordinate to the payment of the Prior Bonds, the Bonds and Parity Obligations. The resolution, indenture oan agreement, or other document pursuant to which Subordinate Obligations are issued 117

Page  118 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A shall provide that no debt service for any Subordinate Obligations shall be paid or funded from Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues during any period in which all amounts then required to be paid or funded with respect to the debt service on the Bonds and Parity Obligations have not been so paid or funded. ARTICLE X DEFEASANCE If the Bonds shall have become due and payable in accordance with their terms or otherwise as provided in this Resolution or are to be paid at their maturity or, if to be redeemed prior to maturity shall have been duly called for redemption or irrevocable instructions to call the Bonds for redemption shall have been given to the Transfer/Tender Agent by the Issuer and the whole amount of the principal and the interest (unpaid interest on Bonds bearing interest at an Adjusted Rate for any period prior to maturity or the specified redemption date for which the interest rate is not known being computed at an assumed rate of 25%) and the premium, if any, so due and payable upon all of the Bonds then Outstanding shall be paid or sufficient cash, or non-callable Government Obligations the principal of and the interest on which, when due and payable, will provide sufficient moneys therefor (and, in the case of Bonds bearing interest at an Adjusted Rate will provide funds sufficient to pay the Purchase Price of al~ such Bonds on the first or any subsequent potential Purchase Date), shall be held by the Transfer/Tender Agent or other escrow agent in trust for the benefit of the Bondholders for such purpose under the provisions of this Resolution, and sufficient funds shall also have been provided for paying all other obligations payable hereunder by the Issuer (including the payment of or provision for payment to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent of all sums of money due or to become due according to the provisions hereof), then and in that case the right, title and interest of the Bondholders and Transfer/Tender Agent hereunder shall thereupon cease terminate and become void, and the Transfer/Tender Agent shall turn over to the Issuer alf the remaining property held by it under this Resolution, and all balances remaining in all other funds and accounts created by this Resolution, other than money held for the redemption or payment of the Bonds or the Purchase Price thereof. Otherwise, this Resolution shall be, continue and remain in full force and effect. In the event cash or Government Obligations shall be deposited with and held by the Transfer/Tender Agent as hereinabove provided, the applicable provisions of this Resolution pertaining to the payment of the principal, interest, redemption premium, if any, and Purchase Price, of and on the Bonds issued under this Resolution, to registration and transfers of Bonds, and to redemption of Bonds (including the provisions respecting reductions in the amounts of mandatory sinking account redemptions) shall be continued in force until such Bonds and other obligations have been fully pai Bonds or portions of Bonds for which there has been deposited in trust with the Transfer/Tender Agent or any escrow agent cash or non-callable Government Obligations the principal of and interest on which will provide sufficient funds to pay all principal of and interest (as provided in the first paragraph of this Article X) and redemption premium, if any, on said Bonds to maturity or earlier specified redemption date (notice of redemption have been duly given or irrevocable instruction to give such notice having been given to the Transfer/Tender Agent) and in the case of Bonds bearing interest at an Adjusted Rate sufficient to pay the Purchase Price of such Bonds on the first or any subsequent potential Purchase Date, shall no longer be deemed Outstanding under the Resolution, and the holders thereof shall have rights solely against the funds so deposited in trust for the payment of principal, interest, premium, if any, and Purchase Price with respect thereto. All moneys and Government Obligations held by the Transfer/Tender Agent or other escrow agent pursuant to this Article shall be held in trust and applied to the payment, when due, of the obligations payable therewith, provided, however, that any moneys so held which are determined in a certificate filed by the Issuer with the Transfer/Tender Agent or other escrow agent (if any) (together with such supporting letters or opinions of independent consultants, auditors or attorneys as the Transfer/Tender Agent or other escrow agent may reasonably require) to be excess funds not required to pay principal interest, premium or Purchase Price of the Bonds shall, at the direction of the Issuer, be released from the escrow and paid to the Issuer. 118

Page  119 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A ARTICLE XI FURTHER COVENANTS AND LIMITATION ON RECOURSE OF BONDHOLDERS The Issuer covenants and agrees with the holders of the Bonds as follows: Section 1101. Operation and Maintenance of the Program. The Issuer covenants that it will at all times when Bonds are outstanding use its best efforts to operate the Program on a self-liquidating basis in such a manner so that sufficient Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues will be generated, together with other available funds, to pay principal and interest on the Bonds, the Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations when due and all Operating Costs, and shall maintain the facilities used in the Program in a sufficient manner to allow its operation in accordance with this sentence. Section 1102. Budget for Operation of the Program. The Issuer hereby covenants to annually establish a budget for the operation of the Program for each Fiscal Year sufficient to provide Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues equal to in each Fiscal Year commencing after the delivery of the Bonds to and including the Fiscal Year in which the last payment of principal on the Bonds is to be paid at least t 200% of that Fiscal Year's debt service requirements on the Bonds, the Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations (excluding debt service scheduled to be paid from capitalized interest or reserves). The Issuer further covenants to establish and maintain, so long as any of the Bonds are outstanding such admission fees as from time to time may be necessary to operate the Program, in such a manner as to provide sufficient Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues, together with other available funds, to pay the principal and interest on the Bonds, the Prior Bonds and additional Parity Obligations, and all Operating Costs, and to meet the budget requirements set forth above. Section 1103. Covenant not to Mortgage or Encumber. The Issuer hereby covenants that except as specifically permitted hereby, it will not mortgage, create or allow the creation of a lien on, or otherwise encumber the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues, so long as any Bonds are outstanding, except as specifically provided herein. Section 1104. Insurance on Program Facilities. Issuer covenants and agrees that it will procure and maintain insurance or self-insurance programs with respect to the facilities and operations of the Program substantially similar to those customarily maintained for like facilities, but only to the extent such insurance is reasonably available in the insurance market of the United States. Insurance required above may be evidenced by inclusion of the facilities of the Program in and under a blanket policy covering the facilities of the Program and other properties of the Issuer, or by umbrella coverage. The Issuer ma adopt alternative or supplemental risk management programs which the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University determines to be reasonable and which shall not, in the opinion of such officer, have a material adverse impact on the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues, including, without limitation, the right: to self-insure in whole or in part; to organize, either solely or in connection with other institutions or organizations, captive insurance companies; to participate in programs of captive insurance companies organized by others; to establish a self-insurance trust fund; to participate in mutual or other cooperative insurance or other risk management programs with other institutions or organizations; to participate in or enter into agreements with local, state or federal governments in order to achieve such insurance; or to participate in other alternative risk management programs. Section 1105. Audits and Records. The Issuer shall keep and maintain accurate books and records relating to the collection of Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and the payment of Operating Costs and the payments into the Revenue Fund and the Bond Fund, which said books and records shall be open for inspection by the Transfer Agent and any holder of the Bonds at any reasonable time. Said books and records shall be audited annually by a certified public accountant (which audit may be performed as part of the general audit of the University's funds). Section 1106. Performance of Covenants: Authority. The Issuer shall faithfully perform all of its covenants, undertakings, provisions and agreements contained in the Resolution and in any Bond executed and delivered hereunder and in all other proceedings of the Issuer pertaining thereto. The Issuer is duly authorized under the Constitution and laws of the State of Michigan to adopt the Resolution, to issue the Bonds, to pledge Adjusted 119

Page  120 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Gross Athletic Revenues in the manner and to the extent herein set forth, and to construct and equip the Project as contemplated by this Resolution; all action on its part relating to the adoption of the Resolution and the issuance, execution and delivery of any Bonds has been or will be duly and effectively taken prior to the delivery of such Bonds; and the Bonds in the hands of the holders and owners thereof are and will be valid and enforceable limited obligations of the Issuer according to their terms. Section 1107. Continuine Disclosure. To the extent deemed necessary or appropriate by an Authorized Officer in connection with the offer or delivery of the Bonds such Authorized Officer may, for and of behalf of the Issuer, execute and deliver a Disclosure Undertaking for the benefit of the holders and beneficial owners of the Bonds. Such Undertaking, if delivered, shall be substantially in the form of Exhibit B hereto, but the terms of Exhibit B are subject to completion and modification prior to the delivery of the Bonds by the Authorized Officer executing the Undertaking. After delivery of the Bonds, the Undertaking may be modified or amended as provided therein. ARTICLE XII SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTIONS Section 1201. Supplemental Resolutions Not Requiring Consent of Bondholders. The Issuer may without the consent of the Bondholders adopt resolutions supplemental to the Resolution as shall not be inconsistent with the terms and provisions hereof and which in the good faith judgment of the Issuer, are not materially adverse to the interest of the holder of the Bonds, for any one or more of the following purposes: (a) To provide for the issuance and sale of additional Parity Obligations; (b) To confirm or further assure the pledge of the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues or to grant or pledge to the Bondholders any additional security; (c) To add additional covenants and agreements of the Issuer for the purpose of further securing the payment of the Bonds; (d) To prescribe further limitations and restrictions upon the issuance of Parity Obligations by the Issuer; (e) To cure any ambiguity or formal defect or omission in the Resolution; (f) To amend or subtract from or make substitutions for the Project. Section 1202. Supplemental Resolutions Re lg Consent of Bondholders. Exclusive of supplemental resolutions covered by Section 1201 for which consent of Bondholders is not required, the holders of not less than 51% in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds outstanding shall have the right to consent to the adoption by the Issuer of such other supplemental or amendatory resolutions as shall be deemed necessary and desirable by the Issuer; provided, however, that nothing contained in this Section shall permit, or be construed as permitting, (i) an extension of the maturity of the principal of or the interest on any Bond issued hereunder, or (ii) a reduction in the principal amount or Purchase Price of any Bond or the rate of interest thereon, or (iii) a privilege or priority of any Bond or Bonds over any other Bond or Bonds, or (iv) a reduction in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds required for consent to such supplemental or amendatory resolution. If the Issuer shall propose to adopt a supplemental resolution requiring consent of the Bondholders, it shall cause notice of the proposed adoption of such supplemental resolution to be mailed to each registered owner at the registered address as shown on the books of the Issuer kept by the Transfer/Tender Agent. Such notice shall briefly set forth the nature of the proposed supplemental or amendatory resolution and shall state that copies thereof are on file at the Treasurer's Office of the University for inspection by all Bondholders. If within six months following the publication of such notice, the holders of not less than 51% in aggregate principal amount of the Bonds outstanding at the time of the mailing of such notice have consented in writing to the adoption thereof, upon the adoption of such supplemental or amendatory resolution, the Resolution shall be deemed to be amended in 120

Page  121 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A accordance therewith. Holders of Bonds of denominations greater than the minimum authorized denominations may vote separately with respect to each minimum authorized denomination. ARTICLE XIII EVENTS OF DEFAULT AND REMEDIES If the Issuer shall fail to pay any installment of principal or interest on any Bond when due, or shall fail to pay the Purchase Price of any Bond required hereby to be purchased by the Issuer on any Tender Date, or, if the Issuer shall fail to comply with any other covenant or requirement on its part hereunder (other than the requirements of Section 1107) and such failure shall continue for a period of thirty days after notice thereof has been given to the Issuer by the holders of not less than twenty-five percent (25%) aggregate principal amount of Bonds outstanding, such failure shall constitute an "Event of Default" hereunder. Upon e ccece the occurrence of an ent of Default, te holder of any Bond with respect to which the Event of Default has occurred may, in addition to any other remedies available in law or equity, bring action in a court of appropriate jurisdiction upon the Bond and to enforce the obligation of the Issuer thereunder and hereunder. ARTICLE XIV SALE OF BONDS AND PREPARATION OF OFFICIAL STATEMENT Section 1401. Arrangements for Sale of Bonds. The Bonds shall be sold by the Issuer to the Underwriter designated by an Authorized Officer, pursuant to the Bond Purchase Agreement, at a purchase price to be determined by an Authorized Officer (but the underwriter's discount, as opposed to any original issue discount, shall not exceed 0.8% of the principal amount of the Bonds), and otherwise in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Resolution. Section 1402. Approval of Official Statement. Preliminarv Official Statement. Bond Purchase Agreement and Remarketing Agreement. The Authorized Officers, or either of them, are hereby authorized to cause to be prepared a Preliminary Official Statement, and to execute and deliver on behalf of the Issuer an Official Statement, the Bond Purchase Agreement, and the Remarketing Agreement, each relating to the Bonds. The distribution and use of the Preliminary Official Statement in accordance with applicable laws by the Purchaser, in connection with the marketing of the Bonds, is hereby approved ratified and confirmed, and the distribution and use of the Official Statement in accordance with applicable laws by the Purchaser, in connection with the marketing of the Bonds, is hereby authorized and approved. Section 1403. Resolution Constitutes Contract. The provisions of the Resolution shall constitute a contract between the Issuer and Bondholders to the equal and ratable benefit and protection of each Bondholder, and after delivery of the Bonds, no material change, variation, or alteration of the provisions of the Resolution may be made except in accordance with its terms. Section 1404. Other Documentation. The Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University, the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University, the Associate Vice President and Treasurer of the University, the Secretary of the University, and each of such persons and any other appropriate officers or representatives of the Issuer or the Universit is authorized to execute and deliver all instruments and documents for and on behalf of the Issuer required by this Resolution, the Bond Purchase Agreement, the Remarketing Agreement, or necessary, expedient and proper in connection with the issuance, sale and delivery of the Bonds and the acquisition, construction and equipping of the Project as contemplated hereby. Subsequent to the issuance of the Bonds and except as otherwise specifically provided herein, all actions permitted or required by tle Issuer may be made or undertaen by an Authorized Officer or any other duly authorized representative of the Issuer or the University. All determinations of Bond terms required to be made by an Authorized Officer shall be made by him within the ranges or other limitations set forth herein. 121

Page  122 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A ARTICLE XV MISCELLANEOUS Section 1501. Severability. If any one or more sections, clauses or provisions of the Resolution shall be determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid or ineffective for any reason, such determination shall in no way affect the validity and effectiveness of the remaining sections, clauses and provisions of the Resolution. Section 1502. Headings. Any headings shall be solely for convenience of reference and shall not constitute a part of the Resolution, nor shall they affect its meaning, construction or effect. Section 1503. Conflict. All resolutions or parts of resolutions or other proceedings of the Issuer in conflict herewith be and the same are repealed insofar as such conflict exists. Section 1504. Effective Date. The Resolution shall take effect immediately upon its adoption. EXHIBIT A FORM OF BONDS Unless this certificate is presented by an authorized representative of The Depository Trust Company, a New York corporation ("DTC") to the issuer or its agent for registration of transfer, exchange, or payment, and any certificate issued is registered in the name of Cede & Co. or in such other name as is requested by an authorized representative of DTC (and any payment is made to Cede & Co. or to such other entity s reuested by an authorized representative of DTC) ANY TRANSFER, PLEDGE OR OTHER USE HEREOF FOR 1VALUE OR OTHERWISE BY OR TO ANYPERSONLI WRONGFUL inasmuch as the registered owner hereof Cede & Co., has an interest herein. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA STATE OF MICHIGAN REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN VARIABLE RATE DEMAND INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC REVENUE BOND, SERIES 1995 No. R1 $ Date of Interest Maturity Original Rate Date Issue CUSIP VARIABLE REGISTERED OWNER: CEDE & CO. PRINCIPAL AMOUNT: The Regents of the University of Michigan a body corporate created by and existing under the constitution of the state of Michigan (hereinafter sometimes called the "Issuer") for value received, promises to pay to the Registered Owner specified above, or registered assigns the principal amount specified above on the Maturity Date specified above, unless prepaid prior thereto as hereinafter provided, upon the presentation and surrender hereof at the principal corporate trust office of or 122

Page  123 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A its successor (the "Transfer/Tender Agent') and to pay by check mailed to the Registered Owner as of the Record Date (hereinafter defined) at the registered address, or, under the conditions specified in the Indenture, by wire transfer, interest on such principal sum from the date hereof or such later date to which interest on the Bond in exchange for which this Bond is issued has been paid until payment of said principal sum has been made or duly provided for, at the interest rates and on the dates set forth herein. Both principal and interest are payable in lawful money of the United States of America. In any case where the date of maturity or interest on or principal of the Bonds or the date fixed for redemption of any Bonds is not a Business Day (hereinafter defined), the payment of interest or principal shall be made on the next such succeeding Business Day, with the same force and effect as if made on the date of maturity or the date fixed for redemption, and no interest shall accrue for the period after such date of maturity or date fixed for redemption. This Bond is one of an issue of Bonds (the "Bonds') of even date, aggregating the principal sum of $ all issued pursuant to a Resolution (the Resolution") adopted by the Issuer on, 1995. This Bond and the series of which it is one are of equal standing and priority of lien as to the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and moneys in the Revenue Fund (each as defined in the Resolution) and are equally secured thereby with the Issuer's Prior Bonds (as defined in the Resolution). The proceeds of the Bonds will be utilized by the Issuer, together with other available funds of the Issuer, for the purpose of paying the costs of acquiring, constructing and equipping certain capital projects of the Issuer's Athletic Program and paying certain costs incurred in connection with the issuance and sale of the Bonds, all in accordance with the authority vested in the Issuer by law, particularly Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963. This Bond is a limited and not general obligation of the Issuer and is payable solely from the sources specified in the Resolution. This Bond is not a debt or obligation of the state of Michigan or any political subdivision thereof. Except as hereinafter provided with respect to purchases and remarketing of Bonds and with respect to delivery of Issuer Owned Bonds (hereinafter defined), each Bond shall be transferable only upon the books of the Issuer, by the Registered Owner thereof in person or by his attorney duly authorized in writing, upon surrender thereof at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent together with written instrument of transfer satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent duly executed by the Registered Owner or a duly authorized attorney. Upon the transfer of any Bond, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall issue in the name of the transferee and cause to be authenticated a new Bond or Bonds of the same aggregate principal amount as the surrendered Bonds. The Transfer/Tender Agent shall make a charge Tor such transfer or exchange sufficient to pay for any tax or other governmental fee or charge required to be paid with respect to such transfer or exchange, but all other costs of making such transfer or exchange shall be borne by the Issuer. Subject to the provisions of the Resolution relating to the Record Date, the Issuer, the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent (as defined in the Resolution) may deem and treat the person in whose name anyBond shall be registered upon the books of the Issuer as the absolute owner of such Bond, whether such Bond shall be overdue or not, for the purpose of receiving payment of or on account of the principal and premium, if any, and interest on and Purchase Price (hereinafter defined) of such Bond and for all other purposes, including the giving or receipt of notices, consents or directions as provided in the Resolution, and all such payments so made to any such Registered Owner or upon his order shall be valid and effectual to satisfy and discharge the liability upon such Bond to the extent of the sum or sums so paid and neither the Issuer, the Transfer/Tender Agent nor the Remarketing Agent shall be affected by any notice to the contrary. The Bonds, including this bond, Prior Bonds and Parity Obligations (defined in the Resolution), are equally and ratably secured by an irrevocable pledge of the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues (defined in the Resolution) collected by the Issuer and the funds from time to time on deposit in the Revenue Fund (as defined in the Resolution). The Bonds are also served by the funds from time to time on deposit in the Bond Fund (defined in the Resolution). In addition the Issuer has covenanted, to the extent necessary, to pay the principal of and interest on the Bonds from Legally Available Funds, (as defined in the Resolution). Except for the foregoing, no recourse shall be had for the payment of the principal of or premium, if any, and interest on the Bonds or any claim based thereon against the state of Michigan, the Issuer or against any officer member or agent thereof or any officer of the University of Michigan, as individuals, either directly or indirectly nor shall these obligations become a lien secured by any property, real, personal, or mixed, of the state of 123

Page  124 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Michigan or the Issuer, other than the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues and funds from time to t ime on deposit in the Revenue Fund and Bond Fund, as more fully described in the Resolution. By acceptance hereof and as a part of the consideration for the issuance hereof, the registered owner hereof expressly waives all other recourse. For a complete statement of the purposes for which the Bonds are issued, the funds from which and the conditions under which this Bond is payable, the general covenants and provisions pursuant to which this Bond is issued, the rights of the holders of Bonds, and the right of the Issuer to issue additional obligations of equal standing and priority of lien as to the Adjusted Gross Athletic Revenues wi the Bonds ad the Prior Bonds a e o ns, and the terms and conditions under which this Bond and the series of Bonds of which this is one, or any part thereof, shall be deemed to be no longer outstanding, reference is made to the above described Resolution. Copies of the Resolution are on file at the Treasureasr's Office of the Issuer. Any term used herein as a defined term but not defined herein shall be defined as in the Resolution. Prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, the interest rate on all Bonds shall be determined by the Remarketing Agent (as defined in the Resolution), daily, weekly, quarterly or long term (each an "Adjusted Rate") as provided in the Resolution and shall be the minimum rate necessary (as determined by the Remarketing Agent taking into account prevailing market conditions) for the Remarketing Agent to sell such Bonds on the day the rate is set at their principal amount plus accrued interest. If for any reason the Remarketing Agent does not set an Adjusted Rate for the Bonds or a court holds that the Adjusted Rate set for the Bonds for any day is invalid or unenforceable, the Adjusted Rate shall be set pursuant to the provisions of the Resolution. Interest accrued on this Bond shall be payable on each Interest Payment Date (as hereinafter defined). Interest on the Bonds shall initially be payable at a Daily Rate. The interest rate determination method thereafter may be changed with respect to the Bonds as described in the Resolution. A change in the interest rate determination method will result in a mandatory purchase of the Bonds, subject to the right of the holders to waive the mandatory purchase upon meeting the conditions therefor set forth in the Resolution. When a change in the interest rate determination method for the Bonds is to be made, the Transfer/Tender Agent is required to notify Bondholders as provided in the Resolution. At the option of the Issuer, subject to the requirements of the Resolution, the Adjusted Rate feature of the Bonds ma be permanently terminated and in such event the Bonds shall thereafter bear interest at a Fixed Rate determined in the manner provided in the Resolution. Prior to the date the Bonds will begin to bear interest at a Fixed Rate (the "Fixed Rate Conversion Date"), the Transfer/Tender Agent is required to notify all Bondholders as provided in the Resolution. All Bonds will be subject to mandatory purchase on the Fixed Rate Conversion Date. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate, or a Quarterly Rate, interest on the Bonds shall be computed on the basis of the actual number of days elapsed over a year of 365 or 366 days, as appropriate. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate, interest shall be computed on the basis of a 60day year of twelve 30day months. In no event shall the interest on the Bonds exceed the lesser of the maximum interest rate permitted by law or 25% per annum. "Business Day" means each weekday on which commercial banking institutions in the state of Michigan, the state of New York are not required or authorized by law or executive order to remain closed, and on which The New York Stock Exchange, Inc. is not closed. "Interest Payment Date" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate in the thencurrent Interest Period, the fifth Business Day of the next month, (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Quarterly Rate in the then-current Interest Period, the first Business Day of each month, (iii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or Fixed Rate, each June 1 and December 1, provided, that the first Interest Payment Date during any Long Term Rate Period or the Fixed Rate Period shall be the first June 1 or December 1 at least 90 days after the Implementation Date or the Fixed Rate Conversion Date, as the case may be, and (iv) the Fixed Rate Conversion Date. "Interest Period" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate or a Weekly Rate, a calendar month or if the next succeeding Interest Period will be a Fixed Rate Period, a Long Term Rate Period or a Quarterly Rate Period, the first day of the 124

Page  125 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A calendar month to the day preceding the commencement of the next succeeding Interest Period, both inclusive; provided, however, that the initial Interest Period for the Bonds shall commence on the Original Issue Date and end on the last day of such calendar month, (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Quarterly Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and en on the day immediately preeding the inext nterest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided, however, that the initial Interest Period in each Quarterly Rate Period shall commence on the date such Quarterly Rate Period commences and end on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Quarterly Rate Period, (iii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and ending on the day immediately preceding the next Interest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided however that the initial Interest Period in each Long Term Rate Period shall commence on the e tesuch Long Term Rate Period commences and ends on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Long Term Rate Period, and (iv) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate, the period commencing on an Interest Payment Date and ending on the day immediately preceding the next Interest Payment Date, both inclusive; provided however, that the initial Interest Period in each Fixed Rate Period shall commence on the date such Fixed Rate Period commences and end on the day immediately preceding the first Interest Payment Date in such Fixed Rate Period. "Issuer Owned Bonds" means each Bond registered in the name of the Issuer or its nominee as a result of the purchase of such Bonds by the Issuer upon tender thereof, as provided in the Resolution. "Purchase Price" means an amount equal to the principal amount of any Bond tendered or deemed tendered pursuant to the Resolution, plus accrued and unpaid interest thereon, if any, to the Purchase Date; provided, however, that (i) the interest component may be adjusted for Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate as described in the Resolution, and (ii) in the event the Purchase Date falls after the Record Date but prior to the next succeeding Interest Payment Date the interest component of the Purchase Price shall be reduced by the amount of interest to be paid on the Interest Payment Date to the Holder of record as of the Record Date. "Put" means the right of the Owner to require, or the act of requiring, the Transfer/ Transfer/Tender Agent to purchase a Bond (other than an Issuer Owned Bond) at the Owner's option as provided in the Resolution. "Record Date" means (i) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate or a Quarterly Rate, the last Business Day prior to the first day of the next succeeding Interest Period, and (ii) with respect to Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate, each May 15 and November 15. PART I - REDEMPTION OF BONDS A.Terms of Redemption. The Bonds shall be subject to redemption as follows: (1) Optional Redemption During Daily Rate, Weekly Rate or Quarterly Rate. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, a Weekly Rate, or a Quarterly Rate, Bonds may be redeemed at the option of the Issuer in whole or in part at any time, at the principal amount thereof plus accrued interest, if any, without premium. (2) Optional Redemption of Bonds at a Premium During Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period. Bonds which are payable at a Long Term Rate or a Fixed Rate may be redeemed at the option of the Issuer in whole or in part as provided in this subsection. [If the Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period, whichever is applicable, is greater than two years, the Bonds shall be redeemable at 100% of their principal amount in the final year, 1001/2% during the nexttolast year, and nonredeemable prior to that. If the Long Term Rate Period or Fixed Rate Period, whichever is applicable, is equal to or less than two years, the Bonds shall not be redeemable prior to the maturity or final Interest Payment Date in the Long 125

Page  126 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Term Rate Mode, but shall be redeemable, at par, without premium, on the final Interest Payment Date in the Long Term Rate Mode.] The no-call periods and premiums described in this subsection (b) may be revised to those set forth in a written notice of the Remarketing Agent delivered to the Issuer prior to the Implementation Date for the applicable Bonds bearing interest at a Long Term Rate or prior to the Fixed Rate Conversion Date for Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate, if in the opinion of the Remarketing Agent such revisions more accurately reflect then-current market conditions. Such notice shall be accompanied by an Opinion of Bond Counsel to the effect that such revisions would not adversely affect the validity of the Bonds or the exclusion of interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes under the Code. (3) Mandatory Redemption. The Bonds are required to be redeemed annually at par plus accrued interest commencing on _, in the amount of the mandatory redemption requirements established pursuant to the Resolution. The amount of Bonds required to be redeemed on each date is subject to reduction for previously redeemed or purchased Bonds as provided in the Resolution. B.Selection of Bonds for Redemption. If less than all of the outstanding Bonds are called for redemption, as herein provided, the Bonds to be redeemed shall be selected by the Transfer/Tender Agent by lot in any manner which the Transfer/Tender Agent, in its sole discretion, shall deem appropriate and fair, and for such purposes, the Transfer/Tender Agent shall consider each Bond in a denomination larger than the minimum denomination permitted by the Bonds to be separate Bonds each in the minimum denomination. In the case of partial redemption of a Bond, a new Bond shall be issued by the Transfer/Tender Agent in the remaining principal amount to the registered owner. C.Notice of Redemption. Not less than 15 nor more than 60 days prior to the redemption date (but not less than 30 days prior to the redemption date in the case of Bonds bearing interest at a Fixed Rate) to the respective Owners of any Bond designated for redemption at their addresses appearing on the registration book maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent. D. Effect of Redemption. Notice of redemption having been duly given as aforesaid, and moneys for payment of the principal and premium, if any, thereof, together with interest accrued to the redemption date on, the Bonds (or portions thereof) so called for redemption being held by the Transfer/Tender Agent, on the redemption date designated in such notice, the Bonds (or portions thereof) so called for redemption shall become due and payable, interest on the Bonds so called for redemption shall cease to accrue, said Bonds (or portions thereof) shall cease to be entitled to any benefit or security under the Resolution, and the Owners of said Bonds shall have no rights in respect thereof except to receive payment of said principal, premium, if any, and accrued interest. PART II PUTS A. Daily Rate Puts. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Daily Rate, an Owner of a Bond (other than Issuer Owned Bonds) may Put such Owner's Bond for purchase by delivering: (1) an irrevocable written or telephonic notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and to the Remarketing Agent by 10:00 a.m., New York time, on a Business Day, of such Owner's intent to Put such Bond and stating the principal amount of the Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond and the date (which must be a Business Day and may be the date the notice is delivered) such Bond is to be purchased; (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent, to the principal office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but 126

Page  127 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A any Bond for which the notice described in (1) above was given not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased and shall thereafter be an Undelivered Bond as provided in the Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon shall be required for same day payment of the Purchase Price. B.Weekly Rate Puts. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Weekly Rate, an Owner of a Bond (other than Issuer Owned Bonds) may Put such Owner's Bond for purchase by delivering: (1) a written, irrevocable notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent by 5:00 p.m., New York time, on a Business Day, of such Owner's intent to Put such Owner's Bond and stating the principal amount of such Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond and the date (which must be a Business Day at least seven days after the date the notice is delivered, provided that if such seventh day is not a Business Day, the Purchase Date may be the next preceding Business Day) such Bond is to be purchased; and (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent, to the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but any Bond not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased and shall thereafter be an Undelivered Bond as provided in the Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon shall be required for same day payment at the Purchase Price. C.Quarterly Rate Puts. When interest on the Bonds is payable at a Quarterly Rate, an Owner of a Bond (other than Issuer Owned Bonds) may Put such Owner's Bond for purchase by delivering: (1) a written, irrevocable notice to the Transfer/Tender Agent and the Remarketing Agent by 5:00 p.m., New York time, on a Business Day, at least six Business Days prior to the next succeeding Implementation Date (as defined in the Resolution), which Implementation Date shall be the Purchase Date, of such Owner's intent to Put such Owner's Bond and stating the principal amount of such Bond and the number of such Bond or other information as may be necessary to specifically identify such Bond; and (2) such Bond, together with an executed assignment in blank, in form satisfactory to the Transfer/Tender Agent, to the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent by 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Purchase Date but any Bond not so delivered shall nevertheless be deemed purchased and shall thereafter be an Undelivered Bond as provided in the Resolution; provided, that such delivery by 12:00 noon shall be required for same day payment at the Purchase Price. D. Mandatory Purchase of Bonds. (1) The Bonds are subject to mandatory purchase on any of the following dates (each a "Mandatory Purchase Date"): (a) the effective date of any change in the method of determining the Daily Rate, Weekly Rate or Quarterly Rate pursuant to the Resolution; (b) With respect to each Bond bearing interest at a Long Term Rate, on the day following the last day of each Long Term Rate Period; provided, that if such date is not a Business Day, the Purchase Date shall be the following Business Day, but interest shall accrue only through the last day of the Long Term Rate Period and such purchase shall be deemed effective on the date following the last day of the Long Term Rate Period; or (c) the Fixed Rate Conversion Date. 127

Page  128 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A (2) Notice of mandatory purchase pursuant to the preceding paragraph shall be mailed by the Transfer/Tender Agent prior to a Mandatory Purchase Date in accordance with the Resolution, in each case to the respective Owners of the Bonds at their addresses maintained by the Transfer/Tender Agent. On the specified Mandatory Purchase Date there will become due and payable on said Bonds the Purchase Price thereof and from and after the Mandatory Purchase Date interest thereon shall cease to accrue to the prior holder thereof, and all Bonds (other than Bonds for which a waiver or purchase is available and has been duly made as described below) must be surrendered on the Mandatory Purchase Date and if not so surrendered will be deemed purchased in accordance with the Resolution and will thereafter be an Undelivered Bond under the Resolution. (3) Any Owner may waive a purchase of a Bond on a Mandatory Purchase Date established pursuant to (l)(a) above, by delivery to the Transfer/Tender Agent, on or before the sixth Business Day preceding the Mandatory Purchase Date, the Bonds with respect to which such waiver is made together with a written instrument of such Owner (a) directing that such Bonds not be purchased on the Mandatory Purchase Date, (b) agreeing not to sell such Bonds prior to the Mandatory Purchase Date, (c) agreeing not to exercise a Put applicable to such Bonds prior to the Mandatory Purchase Date, and (d) acknowledging that such waiver is irrevocable. Notwithstanding the foregoing, no waiver may be made with respect to any Bond that has been called for redemption. (4) Any Bond subject to purchase shall be purchased, or deemed purchased, on its Mandatory Purchase Date at the Purchase Price. Delivery of such Bond (with an appropriate transfer of registration executed in blank in form satisfactory to the Transfer/ Transfer/Tender Agent) at the principal corporate trust office of the Transfer/Tender Agent at or prior to 12:00 noon, New York time, on the Mandatory Purchase Date shall be required for same day payment of the Purchase Price. THE HOLDER OF THIS BOND, BY ITS PURCHASE AND ACCEPTANCE OF THIS BOND, HEREBY IRREVOCABLY APPOINTS THE TRANSFER/TENDER AGENT AS ITS DULY AUTHORIZED ATTORNEYINFACT FOR THE PURPOSES OF ASSIGNMENT, ENDORSEMENT, CERTIFICATION, EXECUTION OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT THAT THE HOLDER IS HOLDING THIS BOND FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE PURCHASER OR PURCHASERS, REGISTRATION OF TRANSFERS AND DELIVERY OF BONDS IN THE EVENT OF A PUT OR A MANDATORY PURCHASE OF THE BOND PURSUANT TO THE RESOLUTION. THE TRANSFER/TENDER AGENT'S POWER OF ATTORNEY HEREUNDER IS COUPLED WITH AN INTEREST. IN THE EVENT OF A PUT OR A MANDATORY PURCHASE PURSUANT TO THE RESOLUTION, ANY UNDELIVERED BOND SHALL NO LONGER EVIDENCE THE DEBT OF THE ISSUER TO THE PRIOR HOLDER, AND THE PRIOR HOLDER THEREOF SHALL BE ENTITLED ONLY TO PAYMENT OF THE PURCHASE PRICE FOR THE UNDELIVERED BOND FROM THE FUNDS HELD IN THE BOND PURCHASE FUND MAINTAINED BY THE TRANSFER/TENDER AGENT. The obligation of the Issuer to provide funds for the Purchase Price of Bonds which are tendered for purchase or subject to Mandatory Purchase is limited to the sources provided in the Resolution. IT IS HEREBY CERTIFIED AND RECITED that all acts, conditions and things required to be done, to happen or to be performed precedent to and in the issuance of this Bond have been done, have happened and have been performed in due time, form and manner, as required by law. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Regents of the University of Michigan has caused this Bond to be signed for it and on its behalf by the facsimile signature of the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or Associate Vice President for Finance of the University of Michigan, all as of the Date of Original Issue. This Bond shall not be valid or become obligatory for any purpose or be entitled to any security or benefit under the Resolution until the Transfer/T en der Agent's or Transfer/Tender Agent's Certificate of Authentication hereon shall have been executed by the Transfer/Tender Agent. 128

Page  129 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN By Its Executive Vice Presldent and Chief Financial Officer DATE OF AUTHENTICATION: CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICATION This Bond is one of the Bonds described in the within-mentioned Resolution. as Transfer/Tender Agent By Authorized Signatory ASSIGNMENT FOR VALUE RECEIVED the undersigned hereby sells, assigns and transfers unto (Please print or type name and address of transferee) the within Bond and all rights thereunder, and hereby irrevocably constitutes and appoints attorney to transfer the within bond on the books kept for registration thereof, with full power of substitution in the premises. (Signature guaranteed) Dated: Signature(s) must be guaranteed by an "eligible guarantor institution" meeting the requirements of the Transfer/Tender Agent, which requirements on and after August 24, 1992 will include membership or participation in STAMP or such other "signature guarantee program" as may be determined by the Transfer/Tender Agent in addition to, or in substitution for, STAMP, all in accordance with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. 129

Page  130 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A The transfer agent will not effect transfer of this bond unless the information concerning the transferee requested below is provided. NOTICE the face of the within Bond in every particular, without alterations or enlargement or any change whatever. When assignment is made by a guardian, trustee, executor or administrator, an officer of a corporation, or anyone in a representative capacity, proof of his authority to act must accompany the Bond. PLEASE INSERT SOCIAL SECURITY Name and Addresso NUMBER OR OTHER IDENTIFYING NUMBER OF TRANSFEREE (insert number for first name transferee if held by joint account) (Include information for all joint owners if the Bond is held by joint account) EXHIBIT B DISCLOSURE UNDERTAKING In connection with the issuance and delivery of the $ Regents of the University of Michigan Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995 (the "Bonds"), authorized under a resolution (the "Resolution") adopted by the Regents of the University of Michigan (the "Issuer") on September 1995, and for the benefit of the holders and beneficial owners of the Bonds, the Issuer Fereby undertakes and agrees as follows: (a) The Issuer hereby agrees, in accordance with the provisions of Rule 15c2-12 (the "Rule") promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, to provide or cause to be provided to each nationally recognized municipal securities information repository ("NRMSIR") and to the appropriate state information depository, if any, for the State of Michigan ("SID"), in each case as designated by the SEC in accordance with the Rule, the following annual financial information and operating data commencing with the fiscal year ended June 30, 1996. (1) Updates of the following tables of financial information and operating data included in the official statement of the Issuer relating to the Bonds (the "Official Statement"). (2) Financial statements prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles by or on behalf of the Issuer pertaining to the Issuer and the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics of the University of Michigan and audited by an individual or firm of independent certified public accountants ("Audited Financial Statements"); provided, however, that the Issuer may from time to time, in order to comply with federal and State legal requirements, modify the basis upon which its financial statements are prepared. Notice of any such modification shall be provided to (i) either each NRMSIR or the Municipal Securities Rulemaking 130

Page  131 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A Board ("MSRB") and (ii) the SID, and such include a reference of the specific federal or State law or regulation describing such accounting basis. Such annual financial information and operating data described above are expected to be provided directly by the Issuer, but may be provided by reference to subsequent official statements of the Issuer filed with the MSRB. (b) Such annual information and operating data described in (a)(1) above and the Audited Financial Statements will each be available on or before the 180th day after the end of the fiscal year of the Issuer. (c) The Issuer agrees to provide or cause to be provided in a timely manner to (i) each NRMSIR or to the MSRB and (ii) the SID, if any, notice of the occurrence of any of the following events listed in (b)(5)(i)(C) of the Rule with respect to the Bonds, if applicable, if such event is material: (1) principal and interest payment delinquencies (2) non-payment related defaults (3) unscheduled draws on debt service reserves reflecting financial difficulties (4) unscheduled draws on credit enhancements, reflecting financial difficulties (5) substitution of credit or liquidity providers, or their failure to perform (6) adverse tax opinions or events affecting the tax-exempt status of the Bonds (7) modifications to rights of holders of the Bonds (8) bond calls (9) defeasances (10) release, substitution, or sale of property securing repayment of the Bonds (11) rating changes (d) The Issuer covenants that its determinations of materiality for purposes of (c) above, will be made in conformance with federal securities laws. (e) The Issuer agrees to provide or cause to be provided, in a timely manner, to (i) each NRMSIR or to the MSRB and (ii) the SID, notice of a failure by the Issuer to provide the annual financial information and operating data with respect to the Issuer described in subsection (a) above on or prior to the dates set forth in subsection (b) above. (f) The Issuer reserves the right to terminate its obligation to provide annual financial information and notices of material events, as set forth above, if and when the Issuer no longer remains an obligated person with respect to the Bonds within the meaning of the Rule, including upon legal defeasance of all the Bonds. (g) The Issuer agrees that its Undertaking pursuant to the Rule set forth herein is intended to be for the benefit of the holders of the Bonds (including all beneficial owners of the Bonds, as defined in Rule 13d-3 of the SEC) and shall be enforceable by any holder or beneficial owner of the Bonds; provided that, the right to enforce the provisions of this Undertaking shall be limited to a right to obtain specific enforcement of the Issuer's obligations hereunder and any failure by the Issuer to comply with the provisions of this Undertaking shall not constitute a default or an Event of Default with respect to the Bonds or under the Resolution. (h) The provisions of this Undertaking, including, but not limited to the provisions relating to the accounting principles pursuant to which the Issuer's 131

Page  132 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix A financial statements are prepared, may be amended as deemed appropriate by an Authorized Officer of the Issuer: provided, however, that any such amendment must be adopted procedurally and substantively in a manner consistent with the Rule, including any interpretations thereof made from time to time by the SEC, which, to the extent applicable, are incorporated herein by reference. (i) If a change is made to the basis on which financial statements are prepared, the annual financial information for the year in which the change is made shall present a comparison between the financial statements or information prepared on the basis of the new accounting principles and those prepared on the basis of the former accounting principles. Such comparison shall include a qualitative and, to the extent reasonably feasible, quantitative discussion of the differences in the accounting principles and the impact of the change in the accounting principles on the presentation of the financial information. (j) All terms not defined herein, but which are defined in the Resolution, shall have the meanings herein assigned to them in the Resolution. Dated:,1995 Regents of the University of Michigan By_______ Its 132

Page  133 SEPTEMBER MEETING, 1995 APPPENDIX B RESOLUTION OF THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND SALE OF STUDENT FEE BONDS IN THE PRINCIPAL AMOUNT OF NOT TO EXCEED $60,000,000 TO FINANCE PART OF THE COST OF ACQUISITION, CONSTRUCTION, RENOVATION, FURNISHING AND EQUIPPING OF CAPITAL PROJECTS AND RELATED COSTS, AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE PAYMENT AND SECURITY OF THE BONDS AND OTHER MATTERS RELATING THERETO. WHEREAS, in the exercise of their constitutional duties and in order to proerl serve the needs of students attending The University of Michigan (the "University"), the Regents of the University of Michigan (the "Issuer") has authorized the acquisition, construction, renovation, furnishing and equipping of certain facilities on the Ann Arbor and Dearborn Campuses of the University and the financing of improvements at Camp Michigania, owned by the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan (collectively, the "ProJects"), all as described on Exhibit A attached hereto; and WHEREAS, in the exercise of their constitutional duties and in order to properly serve the interests of students attending the University, and to prudently control and direct expenditures of the University's funds the Issuer deems it necessary and advisable to issue in one or more series Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995, with appropriate series designation (hereinafter defined as the "Bonds"), in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed Sixty Million Dollars ($60,000,000) for the purpose of paying part of the cost of acquiring, constructing, renovating, furnishing and equipping the Projects, and paying the expenses related thereto and incidental to the issuance of the Bonds; and WHEREAS, the financing of the Projects will serve proper and appropriate pubhic purposes; and WHEREAS, the University has previously incurred obligations secured by a pledge of and first lien against Student Fees, subject to the right to incur additional obligations similarly secured, upon conditions specified in the resolutions authorizing said previously incurred obligations, essentially as follows, to wit: "The total amount of Student Fees collected by the University in each of its last two preceding complete Fiscal Years prior to the issuance of such additional Parity Obligations are equal to at least 200% percent of the maximum annual principal and interest requirements of the then outstanding Parity Obligations and the proposed additional Parity Obligations during any future Fiscal Year the proposed additional Parity Obligations are scheduled to be outstanding." WHEREAS, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University shall certify in connection with the issuance of the Bonds, that all conditions and requirements precedent to the issuance of the Bonds shall have been met, as shown by audit reports of the University for each of its last two preceding fiscal years; and WHEREAS, the Issuer has been created as a constitutional body corporate under the provisions of Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, and has full power under its constitutional authority and supervision of the University, and control and direction of expenditures from the University funds, to construct the Projects, to pay the cost of the acquisition, construction, renovating, furnishing and equipping of the Projects by issuance of the Bonds, and to pledge Student Fees for payment of the Bonds; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Regents of the University of Michigan, as follows: 133

Page  134 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B ARTICLE I DEFINITIONS In addition to the terms defined in the preambles to the Resolution, the following terms shall have, unless the context otherwise requires, the meanings herein specified: "Bond" or "Bonds" means the Regents of the University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995, with appropriate additional series designations, to be issued in one or more series under this Resolution in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $60,000,000. "Bond Payment Date" means any date on which interest or principal and interest is payable on the Bonds, being April 1, and October 1 of each year beginning the first April or October 1 occurring at least 90 days after the date of the Bonds. "Bond Fund" means the University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects, Series 1995 Student Fee Bonds Bond Fund established by Section 402 hereof. "Bondholder" or "Holder" (when used with reference to Bonds) means the registered owner of any Bond. "Fiscal Year" means the fiscal year of the University, currently beginning on July 1 and ending on June 30. "Governmental Obligations" means any of the following which at the time of investment are legal investments for the moneys proposed to be invested therein: direct general obligations of, or obligations the payment of the principal of and interest on which is unconditionally guaranteed by, the United States of America, or other obligations, including defeased tax-exempt securities and maturing interests in a trusteed fund or funds composed entirely of any of the foregoing instruments, the timely payment of which is fully secured by the payment of principal and interest on direct general obligations of, or obligations the payment of principal ot and interest on which is unconditionally guaranteed by, the United States of America. "Investment Income" means and includes all interest or profit, when received, earned through the investment or reinvestment of all moneys in the Bond Fund. "Issuer" means the Regents of the University of Michigan, a constitutional body corporate having general supervision of the University and control and direction of all expenditures from its ifunds. "Legally Available Funds" means any moneys of the Issuer that may be legally used by the issuer to pay principal of and interest on the Bonds, but shall not include any funds (a) currently or subsequently pledged for, or committed to present or future loans, bonds or debt service on other obligations, or other purposes to the extent so pledged or committed, or (b) the use of which would result in the Bonds herein authorized being construed as a general obligation of the Issuer or as indebtedness of the state of Michigan under the Michigan Constitution of 1963. "Outstanding" or "Bonds Outstanding" means, as of any date, all Bonds delivered under the Resolution, except (i) Bonds theretofore acquired by the Issuer and canceled and (ii) Bonds for which the Issuer shall have made provision for payment in accordance with the Resolution by depositing with the Transfer Agent or other escrow agent cash or cash and Government Obligations, the principal of and interest on which when due will be sufficient to pa the rincipal of and, premium, if any, and interest on said Bonds as the same become due through maturity. "Parity Obligations" means the Bonds and any other debts or obligations of the Issuer secured by a pledge of and first lien against Student Fees, including the existing Parity Obligations specified in Section 601 and any additional Parity Obligations hereafter issued by the Issuer from time to time in accordance with the terms of the Resolution. "Projects" means the Projects described on Exhibit A hereto, with such adjustments as may be made thereto pursuant to Section 502 hereof. 134

Page  135 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B "Project Fund" means the University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects, Series 1995 Student Fee Bonds Project Fund established by Section 401 hereof. "Resolution" means this resolution and any other resolutions amendatory or supplementary hereto in accordance with the terms hereof. "Student Fees" means the general tuition fees established from time to time by the Issuer, and collected from the students attending any campus of the University. "Transfer Agent" means the Transfer Agent appointed by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University or any successor Transfer Agent in accordance with the provisions of Section 305 or 308. "Underwriter" means the underwriter or, collectively the group of underwriters, selected by an Authorized Officer pursuant to Section 1001, or successors thereto. "University" means the University of Michigan. ARTICLE II NECESSITY FOR ISSUANCE OF BONDS Section 201. Necessity for Issuance of the Bonds. The Issuer, in the exercise of its powers and authority relative to the general supervision of the University and control and direction of all expenditures from the University's funds, as provided in Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963, hereby determines that the issuance of the Bonds for the purposes set forth in the preambles hereto is necessary and advisable in order to enable the Issuer to finance the cost of the acquisition, construction, renovation, furnishing and equipping of the Projects. ARTICLE III THE BONDS Section 301. Authorization of the Issuance of the Bonds. For the purposes set forth in Article II, there shall be borrowed the sum of not to exceed Sixty Million Dollars ($60,000,000) and in evidence thereof there shall be issued in one or more series, the Bonds of the Issuer which shall be designated "Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995," with appropriate additional series designation, in like aggregate principal amount. The Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and the Associate Vice President for Finance are each hereby designated as an "Authorized Officer," and each, singly, is authorized to make the determinations specified herein. The Bonds shall be issued in such aggregate principal amount, not more than $60,000,000, as an Authorized Officer shall determine, and may be issued in one or more series corresponding to the financing of the separate components of the Projects, or any combination thereof, as an Authorized Officer may determine. The Bonds may be serial bonds or term bonds, which may be subject to redemption requirements, as an Authorized Officer shall determine. The Bonds shall mature on April 1 in the years determined by an Authorized Officer, but not earlier then April 1, 1996 nor later than April 1, 2016. The Bonds shall be sold to the Underwriter pursuant to a Bond Purchase Agreement to be negotiated, executed and delivered by an Authorized Officer on behalf of the Issuer, and the Underwriter, but the Underwriter's discount exclusive of original issue discount shall not exceed 0.8% of the principal amount of the Bonds. The Bonds shall bear such rates of interest as shall be determined by an Authorized Officer, but the net interest cost for the Bonds, taking into account the rates and any discount, shall not exceed 8.00 % per annum. The maximum annual principal and interest on the Bonds shall not exceed $6,600,000. The Bonds shall be dated as of a date or dates to be selected by an Authorized Officer, shall all be equally secured as hereinafter set forth, shall be issued in fully-registered form in the denomination of $5,000 or integral multiples thereof not exceeding the principal amount 135

Page  136 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B of Bonds maturing in the year of maturity of the Bond specified, and shall be numbered consecutively from 1 upwards. The Bonds shall bear interest payable on April 1 and October 1 of each ear until maturity, commencing on the first April 1 or October 1 at least 90 days after the date of the Bonds. Subject to the third paragraph of Section 305 hereof, the principal amount of each Bond shall be payable in lawful money of the United States of America upon surrender of the Bond at thet principal corpoate trust office of a bank or trust company designated by an Authorized Officer (the "Transfer Agent") in such coin or currency of the United States of America as ma be, on the respective dates of payment thereof, legal tender for the payment of debts due the Ufnited States of America. Subject to the third paragraph of Section 305 hereof, interest on the Bonds shall be payable when due to the person or entity who is, as of the 15th day of the month prior to each Bond Payment Date (the "Record Date") the registered holder of record b check or draft mailed by the Transfer Agent to the registered holder as ofd the hecord atie at the registered adress or by wire transfer by the Transfer Agent to any Bondholder of $100,000 or more in aggregate principal amount of Bonds to such wire transfer address as the Bondholder shall specify in a written notice requesting payment by wire transfer delivered to the Transfer Agent not later than 11:00 a.m. on the fifth business day prior to the Bond Payment Date (which notice may provide that it shall Section 302. Limited Obligation. The Bonds shall be limited obligations of the Issuer equally and ratably and solely secured by Student Fees and any moneys in the Bond Fund, and the Bonds shall not be a debt or liability of the state of Michigan or a general obligation of the Issuer. Section 303. Execution, Authentication and Deliveray The Bonds shall be signed in the name of and on behalf of the Issuer by facsimile signature of its Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or its Associate Vice President for Finance printed, lithographed or engraved thereon. No Bond shall be valid until authenticated by an authorized officer or agent of the Transfer Agent. The Bonds, when executed and authenticated, shall be delivered by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vie President for Finance to the purchaser thereof upon payment of the purchase price therefor determined pursuant to Section 301 hereof. Executed blank Bonds for registration of transfer shall be delivered to the Transfer Agent for safekeeping concurrently with the delivery of the Bonds, and from time to time thereafter as necessary. In case any officer a facsimile of whose signature shall appear on any Bonds shall cease to be such officer before the delivery of such Bonds, either as part of the initial delivery of the Bonds or in connection with a transfer or exchange, such facsimile shall nevertheless be valid and sufficient for all purposes the same as if he had remained in office until such delivery. The Transfer Agent's certificate of authentication of any Bond shall be deemed to have been executed by it if signed by an authorized signatory of the Transfer Agent, but it shall not be necessary that the same person sign the certificate of authentication on all of the Bonds issued hereunder. Section 304. Redemption of Bonds, The Bonds shall be subject to optional or mandatory redemption, or both, at the times and prices as shall be determined by an Authorized Officer; provided, however, that no redemption premium on the optional redemption of Bonds shall exceed 3% of the principal amount being redeemed. The principal amount of Term Bonds to be redeemed on any date shall, at the option of the Issuer, be reduced, in the order determined by the Issuer, by the principal amount of Term Bonds of the same series and maturity, which have been previously redeemed (other than pursuant to a previous annual redemption requirement) or purchased or acquired b the Issuer and submitted to the Transfer Agent for cancellation; provided that each such Bond has not theretofore been applied as a credit against any mandatory redemption requirement. The Issuer shall give notice to the Transfer Agent at least 45 days prior to any mandatory redemption date of the Issuer's exercise of its option to reduce the amount of the mandatory redemption requirement on such date as herein set forth. The provisions set forth in this paragraph, including the provisions pertaining to the reduction of mandatory redemption requirements, shall survive the defeasance of the Bonds and this Resolution as permitted by Section 702 hereof. Notice of redemption of any Bond shall be given at least thirty (30) days rior to the date fixed for redemption by mail to the registered holder or holders of the ond to be redeemed at the registered addresses shown on the registration books kept by the Transfer Agent. Bonds shall be called for redemption in multiples of $5,000 and Bonds of denominations of more than $5,000 shall be treated as representing the number of Bonds obtained by 136

Page  137 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B dividing the denomination of the Bond by $5,000 and such Bonds may be redeemed in part. The notice of redemption for Bonds redeemed in part shall state that upon surrender of the o Bond to be redeemed a new B on or onds in aggregate principal amount eual to the unredeemed portion of the Bond surrendered shall be issued to the registered holdr ther teof, without cost to the holder. No further interest on the Bonds or portions of Bonds called for redemption shall accrue after the date fixed for redemption, whether presented for redemption or not, provided funds are on hand with the Transfer Agent to redeem the same. Section 305. Form of Issuance and Transfer of the Bonds. The Bonds shall be issued in the form of fully-reistered bonds without coupons. Any Bond may be exchanged for Bonds of other authorized denominations or transferred upon the books required to be kept pursuant to this section by the person in whose name iis registered n person or by his duly authorized attorney, upon surrender of the Bond to the Transfer Agent for cancellation, accompanied by delivery of a duly executed written instrument of transfer in a form approved by the Transfer Agent. Whenever any Bond or Bonds shall be surrendered for transfer or exchange, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University shall execute or cause to be executed, as specified above, and the Transfer Agent shall authenticate and deliver a new Bond or Bonds, in like aggregate principal amount, and with like interest rateand maturity. The Transfer Agent shall require the payment by the Bondholder requesting the transfer or exchange of any tax or o ther governmental charge required to e paid with respect to the transfer or exchange. The Transfer Agent shall not be required to make any transfer or exchange of (except the unredeemed portion of a Bond to be redeemed in part), or any Bond within 10 days prior to the date of publication of a notice of redemption. The Transfer Agent shall keep or cause to be kept, at its principal office, sufficient books for the registration and transfer or exchange of the Bonds, which shall at all times be open to inspection at reasonable times by the Issuer and its and its auditors or their designees; and, upon presentation for such purpose, the Transfer Agent shall, under regulations as it may prescribe, transfer or exchange or cause to be transferred or exchanged, on said books, Bonds as hereinbefore provided. As per the direction of the initial purchasers of the Bonds, the ownershi of the Bonds shall be registered in the name of Cede & Co., a nominee of The DepositoryTrust Company ("DTC"). In the event the Issuer determines that the continuation of the system of bookentry-only transfers through DTC (or a successor securities depository) is not in the best interests of the beneficial owners of the Bonds or the Issuer, it will so notify the Transfer Agent and DTC, whereupon the Transfer Agent shall notify DTC of the availability through DTC of Bond certificates. In such event, or in the event DTC discontinues its services with respect to the Bonds, the Issuer shall issue, and the Transfer Agent shall transfer and exchange Bonds as requested by DTC of like tenor, principal amount, interest rate and maturity, in authorized denominations to the identifiable beneficial owners of the Bonds. While the Bonds are in book-entry-only form, payment of principal of and premium, if any and interest on the Bonds shall be made as provided in a Letter of Representations among DTC, the Issuer and the Transfer Agent. The form of the Bonds shall be substantially as follows, with such changes as an Authorized Officer may, by executing the definitive Bond, approve: FORM OF BOND Unless this certificate is presented by an authorized representative of The Depository Trust Company a New York corporation ("DTC") to the issuer or its agent for registration of transfer, exchange or payment, and any certificate issued is registered in the name of Cede & Co. or in such other name as is requested by an authorized representative of DTC (and any payment is made to Cede & Co. or to such other entity as is requested by an authorized representative of DTC), ANY TRANSFER, PLEDGE, OR OTHER USE HEREOF FOR VALUE OR OTHERWISE BY OR TO ANY PERSON IS WRONGFUL inasmuch as the registered owner hereof, Cede & Co., has an interest herein. 137

Page  138 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B UNITED STATES OF AMERICA STATE OF MICHIGAN REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN CONSTRUCTION AND RENOVATION PROJECTS STUDENT FEE BOND, SERIES 1995 No. _Maturity Date: Principal Amount: Interest Rate: Date of Original Issue: __ Registered Holder: THE REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, a body corporate created by and existing under the Constitution and laws of the state of Michigan (the "Issuer"), for value received, hereby promises to pay the Principal Amount shown above to the Registered Holder or registered assigns, in lawful money of the United States of America on the Maturity Date shown above unless previously redeemed as provided herein, with interest thereon until maturity from the Date of Original Issue or such later date through which interest on the Bond in exchange for which this Bond has been issued has been paidat the Interest Rate shown above, first payable April 1, 1996, and semiannually thereafter on April 1 and October 1. Principal of this bond is payable at the principal corporate trust office of ____________ in ______ (the "Transfer Agent") or such other transfer agent as the Issuer may hereafter designate by notice mailed to the registered owner not less than 60 days prior to any interest payment date. Interest on this bond is payable to the person or entity who is as of the 15th day of the month prior to each interest payment date (the "Record Date") the registered owner, by check or draft mailed by the Transfer Agent to the registered holder as of the Record Date at the registered address, or by wire transfer by the Transfer Agent to any holder of $100,000 or more in aggregate principal amount of the Bonds to such wire transfer address as the holder shall specify in a written notice requesting payment by wire transfer delivered to the Transfer Agent not later than 11:00 a.m. on the fifth business day prior to the interest payment date (which notice may provide that it shall remain effective until changed or revoked). This bond is one of an issue of bonds (the "Bonds"), of like tenor, except as to series designation, denomination, rate of interest and date of maturity, aggregating the principal amount of $, all issued pursuant to a resolution adopted by the Issuer on 1995 (the "Resolution"), for the purpose of paying part of the cost of the acquisition, construction, renovation, furnishing and equipping of certain capital projects of the University of Michigan or related entities, and paying costs related thereto and incidental to the issuance of the Bonds, all in accordance with the authority vested in the Issuer by law, particularly Article VIII, Section 5 of the Michigan Constitution of 1963. The Bonds, including this bond, are equally and ratably secured by an irrevocable pledge of the Student Fees (defined in the Resolution) from the students attending the University of Michigan. The Issuer has covenanted and agreed to establish and maintain Student Fees to be collected in an amount sufficient to provide annually sums equal to at least two hundred percent of the maximum future annual debt service requirements on all outstanding bonds or obligations payable on a first lien basis therefrom. No recourse shall be had for the payment of the principal amount of or interest on this bond or any claim based thereon against the state of Michigan, the Issuer or any officer or agent thereof or of the University of Michigan, as individuals, either directly or indirectly nor shall these obligations become a lien on or be secured by an property, real, personal or mixed, of the state of Michigan or the Issuer, other than the Student Fees and the Bond Fund as more fully defined in the Resolution. By acceptance hereof and as a part of the consideration for the issuance hereof, the registered owner hereof expressly waives all other recourse. For a complete statement of the purposes for which the Bonds are issued, the funds from which and the conditions under which this bond is payable, the general covenants and provisions pursuant to which this bond is issued, the outstanding obligations of the Issuer which have an equal claim on the Student Fees with the Bonds, the rights of the holders of Bonds and the right of the Issuer to issue additional obligations of equal standing and priority of lien on the Student Fees with the Bonds, and the terms and conditions under which this bond and the series of Bonds of which this is one, or any part thereof, shall be deemed to 138

Page  139 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B be no longer outstanding, reference is made to the above described Resolution. A certified copy of the Resolution is on file at the Treasurer's Office of the University. The Bonds maturing prior to,, shall not be subject to redemption prior to maturity. Bonds maturing on or after __, _, shall be subject to redemption prior to maturity at the option of the Issuer in whole or in part on any date on or after,____, in such order of maturity as the Issuer shall designate and by lot within a maturity, at the following redemption prices (expressed as a percentage of the principal amount to be redeemed), plus accrued interest to the redemption date: Redemption Date Redemption Price The Bonds maturing, (the "Term Bonds"), are also subject to mandatory redemption by lot prior to maturity, on, in the years and the amounts set forth in the order of an authorized officer of the Issuer establishing the terms of the Bonds at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount to be redeemed plus accrued interest to the redemption date without premium. The principal amount respectively of the Term Bonds to be redeemed on the dates set forth in the Indenture shall be reduced, in the order determined by the Issuer, by the principal amount of any Term Bonds of the same series and maturity which have been previously redeemed (otherwise than as a result of a mandatory redemption requirement) or purchased by the Issuer and delivered to the Transfer Agent for cancellation as provided in the Resolution. Notice of redemption of any Bond shall be given at least thirty (30) days prior to the date fixed for redemption by mail to the registered holder or holders of the Bond to be redeemed at the registered addresses shown on the registration books kept by the Transfer Agent. Bonds shall be called for redemption in multiples of $5,000 and Bonds of denominations of more than $5,000 shall be treated as representing the number of Bonds obtained by dividing the denomination of the Bond by $5,000 and such Bonds may be redeemed in part. The notice of redemption for Bonds redeemed in part shall state that upon surrender of the Bond to be redeemed a new Bond or Bonds in aggregate principal amount equal to the unredeemed portion of the Bond surrendered shall be issued to the registered holder thereof, without cost to the holder. No further interest on the Bonds or portions of Bonds called for redemption shall accrue after the date fixed for redemption, whether presented for redemption or not, provided funds are on hand with the Transfer Agent, to redeem the same. Any Bond may be exchanged for Bonds of other authorized denominations or transferred by the person in whose name it is registered, in person or by his duly authorized attorney, upon surrender of the Bond to the Transfer Agent for cancellation, together with a duly executed written instrument of transfer in a form approved by the Transfer Agent. Whenever any Bond is surrendered for transfer or exchange, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University shall execute or cause to be executed, and the Transfer Agent shall authenticate and deliver, a new Bond or Bonds, in like aggregate principal amount, and with like interest rate and maturity. The Transfer Agent shall require the bondholder requesting the transfer or exchange to pay any tax or other governmental charge required to be paid with respect to the transfer or exchange. The Transfer Agent shall not be required to make any transfer or exchange of any Bond or portion of a Bond called for redemption within 30 days of the redemption date (except the unredeemed portion of a Bond to be redeemed in part), or any Bond within 10 days prior to the date of publication of a notice of redemption. This Bond is not valid or obligatory for any purpose until the Transfer Agent's Certificate of Authentication on this Bond has been duly executed by the authorized signatory of the Transfer Agent. IT IS HEREBY CERTIFIED AND RECITED that all acts, conditions and things required to be done, to happen or to be performed precedent to and in the issuance of this Bond, have been done, have happened and have been performed in due time, form and manner, as required by law. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Regents of the University of Michigan has caused this Bond to be signed for it and in its behalf by the facsimile signature of its 139

Page  140 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B, all as of the Date of Original Issue set forth above. REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN By Its CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICATION This is to certify that the within Bond is one of the Regents of the University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995, described in the Resolution herein referred to. Its Authorlzed signatory Date of Authentication: FORM OF ASSIGNMENT FOR VALUE RECEIVED the undersigned hereby sells, assigns and transfers unto the within Bond of the Regents of the University of Michigan and does hereby irrevocably constitute and appoint Attorney to transfer the said Bond on the books of the within-named Corporation, with full power of substitution in the premises. Dated: ___ In the presence of: Signature(s) Guaranteed Signature(s) must be guaranteed by an eligible guarantor institution participating in a Securities Transfer Association recognized signature guarantee program. Note: The signature to this Assignment must correspond with the name as written on the face of this Bond in every particular, without alteration or enlargement or any change whatever. When assignment is made by a guardian, trustee, executor or administrator, an officer of a corporation, or anyone in a representative capacity, proof of his authority to act must accompany the Bond. 140

Page  141 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B Section 306. Mutilated Bonds. Subject to and in accordance with Act 354, Public Acts of Michigan, 1972, as amended ("Act 354"), if any bond shall become mutilated, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University, at the expense of the holder of the Bond, shall without further action being required by the Regents of the University of Michigan, execute or cause to be executed in the manner specified above, and the Transfer Agent shall authenticate and deliver, a new Bond of like tenor in exchange and substitution for the mutilated bond, upon surrender to the Transfer Agent of the mutilated Bond and receipt by the Transfer Agent and the Issuer of indemnity satisfactory to them. Subject to and in accordance with Act 354, if any Bond issued under this Resolution shall be lost, destroyed or stolen, evidence of the loss, destruction or theft may be submitted to the Transfer Agent and, if this evidence is satisfactory to both the Transfer Agent and the Issuer and indemnity satisfactory to the Transfer Agent and the Issuer shall be given, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or the Associate Vice President for Finance, at the expense of the owner, shall without further action being required by the Regents of the University of Michigan, execute or cause to be executed in the manner specified above and the Transfer Agent shall thereupon authenticate and deliver, a new Bond of like tenor and bearing the statement required by Act 354, or any applicable Michigan law hereafter enacted, in lieu of and in substitution for the Bond so lost, destroyed or stolen. If any such Bond shall have matured or shall be about to mature, instead of issuing a substitute bond the Transfer Agent may pay the same without surrender thereof. Section 307. Cancellation of Bonds. All Bonds which have been retired by maturity, redemption or purchase shall be canceled by the Transfer Agent and returned promptly to the Issuer or cremated or shredded and an appropriate certificate of such cremation or shredding delivered to the Issuer by the Transfer Agent. Bonds in substitution or exchange for which other Bonds have been delivered shall be canceled and returned promptly to tEe Issuer, or cremated or shredded, with an appropriate certificate of cremation or shredding delivered to the Issuer as provided above. Section 308. Resignation of Transfer Agent. The Transfer Agent ma resign by giving not less than ninety (90) days prior written notice to the Issuer, and the Issuer may remove the Transfer Agent by giving not less than ninety (90) days prior written notice to the Transfer Agent. The Issuer shall designate a successor Transfer Agent and shall mail notice of the appointment of the successor Transfer Agent to each registered owner of the Bonds not less than sixty (60) days prior to the next Bond Payment Date. Upon the appointment of a successor Transfer Agent, the predecessor Transfer Agent shall transfer all moneys and funds the registration books, and all other documents and instruments relating to the Bonds held by it as Transfer Agent to the successor Transfer Agent. ARTICLE IV ESTABLISHMENT OF FUNDS Section 401. Establishment of Project Fund. There is hereby created and established the Project Fund, which shall be a sub-account within a general banking account of the University designated by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. There shall be deposited in the Project Fund (i) all proceeds from the sale of the Bonds, except accrued interest to be deposited in the Bond Fund pursuant to Section 501, and (ii) all investment earnings on investments of the Project Fund. All moneys in the Project Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article V. Section 402. Establishment of Bond Fund. There is hereby created and established with the Transfer Agent the Bond Fund. There shall be deposited in the Bond Fund: 1. Any accrued interest received at the time of delivery of the Bonds. 2. Student Fees as pledged and required to be paid into the Bond Fund at the times and in the amounts provided in Section 602. 3. All Legally Available Funds authorized or permitted to be paid into the Bond Fund pursuant to Section 603. 4. All Investment Income. 141

Page  142 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B 5. Any moneys remaining in the Project Fund after the disbursements provided for in Article V which are directed by the Issuer to be deposited therein. All moneys in the Bond Fund shall be used for the purposes and disbursed as provided in Article V. ARTICLE V FLOW AND USE OF FUNDS Section 501. Application of Bond Proceeds. Immediately upon the receipt thereof, the proceeds of the sale of the Bonds shall be apportioned among and deposited in the following funds and accounts in the following manner: 1. Any accrued interest received on sale of the Bonds shall be deposited in the Bond Fund; 2. The balance of the proceeds of the Bonds shall be deposited in the Project Fund. Section 502. Use of and Disbursements from Project Fund. Moneys in the Project Fund shall be used pursuant to the following purposes: 1. Payment of accounting, financial consulting, legal, printing and other expenses of the Issuer in connection with the preparation, issuance, sale and delivery of the Bonds; 2. Payments necessary to finance the cost of the acquisition, construction, renovation, furnishing and equipping of the Projects or to reimburse the Issuer for general funds expended in connection with the foregoing. 3. The making of a loan in the amount of not to exceed $1,200,000 (the amount to be determined by an Authorized Officer) to the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan (the "Association") for the purpose of financing the costs of acquisition, construction, renovations, furnishings and equipment at Camp Michigania, owned and operated by the Association. Any amount remaining in the Project Fund after satisfaction of the foregoing priorities shall, as directed by the Issuer, be promptly transferred to the Bond Fund or used by the Issuer for payment of any other lawful capital costs of the University as determined by the Issuer. The depository for the Project Fund shall make disbursements from the Project Fund upon the order of the Issuer, and shall have no duty or liability with respect to the manner or method in which moneys are withdrawn by the Issuer from the Project Fund or in fact are used or applied by the Issuer. The Issuer may, by filing a certificate of an Authorized Officer in the office of the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, add or delete components of the Projects, subject to the Issuer's normal requirements for project approvals. Section 503. Use of and Disbursements from Bond Fund. On each Bond Payment Date, the Transfer Agent shall use moneys in the Bond Fund to pay principal of and interest on the Bonds as the same become due and, in the case of principal payments, as the Bonds are presented and surrendered. The Transfer Agent may use moneys in the Bond Fund not required to pay maturing principal or interest on the next Bond Payment Date for the acquisition of Bonds in the open market at the written direction of the Issuer. Any amount remaining in the Bond Fund after the Bonds have been paid or provision made therefor under the Resolution shall be returned to the Issuer. Section 504. Investment of Funds. Moneys held in the Bond Fund, until required for use shall be invested by Transfer Agent in direct obligations of, or obligations the principal and the interest of which are guaranteed by the United States of America; or obligations of Federal Farm Credit Banks, Federal Home Loan Banks, the Federal National Mortgage Association, the Federal Land Bank, Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Government National Mortgage Association, the Bank for 142

Page  143 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B Cooperatives, the Federal Financing Bank, the Farmers Home Administration and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Association; or tax-exempt obligations rated A or better by Moody's Investors Service and Standard and Poor's Corporation in the case of long term obligations, or in the highest category by each such rating agency in the case of short-term obligations; or may be deposited in a bank or banks (including the Transfer Agent) in an interest bearing savings account or accounts, bankers' acceptances or in certificates of deposit; or may be invested in any fund or funds composed entirely of any or all of the above described investment vehicles (provided that, with respect to tax-exempt obligations in such funds, the obligations need not be rated A or better, but rather must be, or be deemed to be by the Fund's sponsor or adviser, investment grade), all as shall be directed by the Issuer. Interest or profit earned on the above investments or deposits when received shall be deposited in the Bond Fund. Any loss on the above investments or deposits shall be charged to the Bond Fund. Moneys held in the Project Fund may be invested in any investments legally available for University funds. All earnings, gains or losses thereon shall be credited to the Project Fund. Section 505. Tax Covenant. The Issuer hereby covenants that it shall take all actions within its control necessary to maintain the exclusion of the interest on the Bonds from gross income for federal income tax purposes under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the " ode"), including but not limited to actions relating to the rebate of arbitrage earnings, if required, and the expenditure and investment of Bond proceeds and moneys deemed to be Bond proceeds. The Issuer shall require that the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan enter into a similar covenant prior to the loan of any proceeds of the Bonds to the Association as provides in Section 502. ARTICLE VI SOURCES OF PAYMENT AND SECURITY FOR THE BONDS Section 601. Security for the Bonds. The Bonds are not debts or general obligations of the state of Michigan, nor general obligations of the Issuer, but are limite obligations of the Issuer equally and ratably secured only by the following: 1. All moneys in the Bond Fund; 2. Student Fees and the Issuer's right to receive Student Fees; and 3. All of the proceeds of the foregoing. The Issuer hereby pledges and grants to the Bondholders a security interest in all of the foregoing, and in order to assure this security the Issuer covenants and agrees that the Bondholders shall have a first lien on all moneys in the Bond Fund, and that Bondholders shall have a first lien against Student Fees of equal standing and priority of lien with the pledge of Student Fees for other Parity Obligations, including additional Parity Obligations which the Issuer reserves the right to issue under Article VII and the existing (as of September 1, 1995) Parity Obligations of the Issuer, as follows: 1. University Events Building Bonds Original Amount -$5,800,000 Dated - February 1, 1966 Final Maturity - April 1, 1996 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $265,000 2. Graduate Library Building Bonds Original Amount - $2,000,000 Dated - July 1, 1969 Final Maturity - April 1, 1999 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $370,000 143

Page  144 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B 3. Recreational Activities Buildings Fee Refunding Bonds Original Amount - $6,590,000 Dated - July 1, 1977 Final Maturity- April 1, 2005 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $5,135,000 4. Dearborn Recreational Buildings Fee Refunding Bonds Original Amount - $3,500,000 Dated- April 1, 1978 Final Maturity - April 1, 2008 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $2,405,000 5. Dearborn Campus Project Fee Bonds Original Amount - $10,180,000 Dated- July 1, 1979 Final Maturity- April 1, 2005 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $6,955,000 6. Telecommunications System Bonds, Series 1984 Original Amount - $45,858,587 Dated - October 1, 1984 and November 1, 1984 Final Maturity - April 1, 1996 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $2,822,692 7. Construction Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1986 Original Amount - $14,140,000 Dated - August 1, 1986 Final Maturity - April 1, 2012 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $320,000 8. Construction and Refunding Student Fee Bonds, Series 1987 Original Amount- $24,985,000 Dated - May 1, 1987 Final Maturity - April 1, 2009 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) $5,440,000 9. Telecommunications System and Refunding Bonds, Series 198 Original Amount - $7,253,682.80 Dated - March 22, 1988 Final Maturity - April 1, 1998 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $7,253,683 10. Engineering College Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1991 Original Amount- $8,100,000 Dated July 15, 1991 Final Maturity - April 1, 2002 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $6,700,000 11. Major Capital Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1993A, Series 1993B and Series 1993C Original Amount - $66,080,000 Dated- February 1, 1993 Final Maturity - April 1, 2013 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $65,890,000 12. Student Fee Refunding Bonds, Series 1993 Original Amount - $27,585,000 Dated- September 1, 1993 Final Maturity - April 1, 2011 Amount Outstanding (September 1, 1995) - $26,615,000 The lien of the pledge of the Student Fees, and on the Bond Fund, shall be valid and binding from the date of issuance and delivery of the Bonds and all moneys or properties 144

Page  145 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B subject thereto which are thereafter received shall immediately be subject to the lien of the pledge without physical delivery or further act. The lien of the pledge shall be valid and binding against all parties having claim in tort, contract or otherwise against the Issuer (except for the holders of any other indebtedness of the Issuer payable from a first lien on Student Fees) irrespective of whether such parties have notice of the lien. Section 602. Student Fees as Source of Payment of Bonds. To the extent that on the fifth day preceding any Bond Payment Date the moneys then on deposit in the Bond Fund are not sufficient to meet the interest, or principal and interest, payment coming due on such Bond Payment Date, the Issuer shall, commencing the fifth day prior to the first Bond Payment Date, and on each subsequent fifth day preceding each Bond Payment Date while the Bonds remain outstanding, pay to the Transfer Agent for deposit into the Bond Fund all Student Fees thereafter received until the amount on deposit in the Bond Fund is sufficient to pay the interest, and principal, if any, coming due on the Bonds by maturity on such Bond Payment Date; provided, however, that in making the payment over to the Transfer Agent, Student Fees shall be divided pro rata between the Bond Fund and any similar fund for the payment of other obligations of the Issuer secured by a first lien on Student Fees, to the extent necessary to effect the pari passu basis of the lien on Student Fees. Subject to the above requirements, the Issuer shall have and retain the full right and ability to receive, collect, expend, invest, use or otherwise hold or dispose of Student Fees as the Issuer deems appropriate. Section 603. Funds Legally Available Therefor as Source of Payment for the Bonds. The Issuer reserves the right, but shall not be required, to use any Legally Available Funds for the purpose of paying principal or interest on the Bonds. Section 604. Covenant re: Student Fees. The Issuer covenants and agrees that as long as any of the Bonds remain outstanding and unpaid, as to either principal or interest, it will establish and maintain Student Fees to be collected from the students attending the University in an amount sufficient to provide annually sums equal to at least two hundred percent (200%) of the maximum future annual debt service requirements on all outstanding bonds or obligations payable on a first lien basis from said Student Fees or allocations therefrom. Such collections shall be sufficient, together with other available funds, to provide such sums as are necessary for the operation, administration and maintenance of the University and its facilities and programs. Section 605. Limitations of Obligations. No recourse under any obligation, covenant, stipulation or indenture contained in this Resolution or in an Bond issued hereunder or caused by the creation of any indebtedness hereby authorized, shall be had against the State of Michigan, or the Issuer or any member or officer of the Issuer or any officer of the University; nor shall any such obligation ever be or become a charge against the State of Michigan, nor shall the same become a lien on or secured by any property, real personal or mixed, of the State of Michigan or the Issuer, it being expressly understood and agreed that the Bonds and the obligations created hereunder are secured by and payable only from Student Fees and moneys in the Bond Fund, and that no other liability whatsoever shall attach to or be incurred by the State of Michigan, the Issuer, or any member or officer of the Issuer or any officer of the University, or its successors; all other liability, except as herein provided, being expressly waived. ARTICLE VII ADDITIONAL PARITY OBLIGATIONS AND DEFEASANCE Section 701. Additional Parity Obligations. The Issuer reserves the right to issue additional Parity Obligations for any authorized purpose having equal standing and priority of lien against Student Fees with the Bonds and other then existing Parity Obligations of the Issuer, provided: (a) the Issuer by its Associate Vice President for Finance certifies that the total amount of Student Fees collected by the Issuer in each of its last two preceding complete Fiscal Years prior to the issuance of such proposed additional Parity Obligations are equal to at least 200% of the maximum annual principal and interest requirements of the then outstanding Parity Obligations and the proposed additional Parity Obligations during any future Fiscal Year the Bonds are scheduled to be outstanding; and 145

Page  146 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B (b) the proposed additional Parity Obligations shall be payable as to principal only on April 1 of the year or years of maturity and payable as to interest either annually or semiannually on April 1 or October 1 of such years. Section 702. Defeasance. If all the Bonds shall have become due and payable in accordance with their terms or are to be paid at their maturity or maturities or are to be redeemed prior to maturity (notice of redemption, or irrevocable instructions to the Transfer Agent to mail such notice, having been duly given) and the whole amount of the principal and the interest so due and payable upon all of the Bonds then outstanding shall be paid or sufficient cash or cash and non-callable Government Obligations the principal of and the interest on which without reinvestment, when due and payable will provide sufficient moneys for such payment, shall be held by the Transfer Agent in the Bond Fund or by any other escrow agent in trust for the benefit of the holders of the Bonds, then and in that case the Resolution shall be defeased and terminated and all obligations of the Issuer hereunder shall thereupon cease, terminate and become void and, on demand of the Issuer, any surplus in the Bond Fund other than money held for the payment of the Bonds shall be transferred to the Issuer; provided, that the applicable provisions of this Resolution pertaining to the payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds and redemption, registration, exchange and transfer of Bonds, and the tax covenant contained in Section 505 shall be continued in force until such have been fully paid. Bonds or portions of Bonds for which cash or cash and Government Obligations (including principal of and interest thereon) shall be held by the Transfer Agent or other escrow agent in trust for the holders of saidBos or tions of Bonds s ufficient to pay all principal and interest through maturity or earlier redemption (notice of redemption, or irrevocable instructions to the Transfer Agent to mail such notice, having been duly given) shall no longer be outstanding hereunder, and the holders thereof shall have no further rights hereunder or under the Bonds except the right to receive payment from the cash or cash and Government Obligations held in trust as specified above and the right to effect transfers or exchanges of Bonds as described above. All moneys and Government Obligations held by the Transfer Agent or other escrow agent as described above shall be held in trust and applied to the payment, when due, of the Bonds payable therewith. ARTICLE VIII FURTHER COVENANTS AND LIMITATION ON RECOURSE OF BONDHOLDERS The Issuer covenants and agrees with the holders of the Bonds as follows: Section 801. Audits and Records. The Issuer shall keep and maintain accurate books and records relating to the collection of Student Fees and the allocation thereof and the payments into the Bond Fund, which said books and records shall be open for inspection by any holder of the Bonds at any reasonable time. Said books and records shall be audited annually by a certified public accountant. Section 802. Performance of Covenants; Authority. The Issuer shall faithfully perform- all of its covenants undertakings, provisions and agreements contained in the Resolution and in any Bond executed and delivered hereunder and in all other proceedings of the Issuer pertaining thereto. The Issuer is duly authorized under the Constitution and laws of the state of Michigan to adopt the Resolution, to issue the Bonds, to pledge Student Fees in the manner and to the extent herein set forth, and to acquire, construct, renovate and equip the Projects as contemplated by this Resolution; all action on its part relating to the adoption of the Resolution and the issuance, execution and delivery of any Bonds hasbeen or will be duly and effectively taken prior to the delivery of such Bonds; and the Bonds in the hands of the holders and owners thereof are and will be valid and enforceable limited obligations of the Issuer according to their terms. Section 803. Continuing Disclosure. In accordance with the requirements of Rule 15c2-12 of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, the Issuer shall enter into the Undertaking for the benefit of the holders and beneficial owners of the Bonds, as more specifically set forth in Exhibit B hereto: provided, however, that the terms of Exhibit B are subject to completion and modification prior to delivery of the Bonds by an Authorized 146

Page  147 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B Officer executing the Undertaking as such Officer shall deem necessary to comply with law or market requirements. After delivery of the Bonds, the Undertaking may be modified or amended as provided therein. Either Authorized Officer is authorized to modify, complete, execute and deliver, on behalf of the Issuer, the Undertaking. ARTICLE IX SUPPLEMENTAL RESOLUTIONS Section 901. Supplemental Resolutions Not Requiring Consent of Bondholders. The Issuer may without the consent of the Bondholders adopt resolutions supplemental to the Resolution as shall not be inconsistent with the terms and provisions hereof or any one or more of the following purposes: (a) To provide for the issuance and sale of additional Parity Obligations; (b) To confirm or ther assure the Stdent Fees or or pledge to the Bondholders any additional security; (c) To add additional covenants and greements of the Issuer for the purpose of further securing the payment of the Bonds; (d) To prescribe fuirther imitations and restrictions upon the issuance of Parity Obligations by the Issuer; (e) To cure any ambiguity or formal defect or omission in the Resolution; (f) To amend or subtract from or make substitutions for the Projects. Section 902. Supplemental Resolutions Requiring Consent of Bondholders. Exclusive of supplementaresolutions covered by Section 901 for which consent of Bondholders is not required, the holders of not less than 51% in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds outstanding shall have the right to consent to the adoption by the Issuer of such other supplemental or amendatory resolutions as shall be deemed necessary and desirable by the Issuer; provided, however, this Section shall permit, or be construed as permitting (i) an extension of the maturity of the principal of or the interest on any Bond issued hereunder, or (ii) a reduction in the principal amount of any Bond or the rate of interest thereon, or (iii) a privilege or priority of any Bond or Bonds over any other Bond or Bonds, or (iv) a reduction in the aggregate principal amount of the Bonds required for consent to such supplemental or amendatory resolution. If the Issuer shall propose to adopt a supplemental resolution requiring consent of the Bondholders, it shall cause notice of the proposed adoption of such supplemental resolution to be mailed to each registered owner at the registered address as shown on the books of the Issuer kept by the Transfer Agent. Such notice shall briefly set forth the nature of the proposed supplemental or amendatory resolution and shall state that copies thereof are on file at the Treasurer's Office of the University for inspection by all Bondholders. If within six months following the publication of such notice, the holders of not less than 51% in aggregate principal amount of the Bonds outstanding at the time of the mailing of such notice have consented in writing to the adoption thereof, upon the adoption of such supplemental or amendatory resolution, the Resolution shall be deemed to be amended in accordance therewith. ARTICLE X MISCELLANEOUS Section 1001. Authorization of Official Statement, Preliminary Official Statement and Bond Purchase Agreement. The Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, or the Associate Vice President for Finance, or either of them are hereby authorized to execute and deliver the Bond Purchase Agreement with the Underwriter selected by either of them, and to cause to be prepared and circulated a Preliminary Official Statement 147

Page  148 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B with respect to the Bonds, and to cause to be prepared, and to execute and deliver on behalf of the Issuer an Official Statement substantially in the form of the previously prepared Preliminary Official Statement, relating to the Bonds. The Associate Vice President and Treasurer is also authorized to additionally execute any of such documents, if so required by an Authorized Officer. The distribution and use of the Preliminary Official Statement in accordance with applicable laws, in connection with the sale of the Bonds, is hereby ratified and confirmed, and the distribution and use of the Official Statement in accordance with applicable laws by the successful bidder, in connection with the marketing of the Bonds, is hereby authorized and approved. Section 1002. Resolution Constitutes Contract. The provisions of the Resolution shall constitute a contract between the Issuer and Bondholders to the equal and ratable benefit and protection of each Bondholder, and after delivery of the Bonds, no material change, variation, or alteration of the provisions of the Resolution may be made except in accordance with its terms. Section 1003. Enforcement of Contract. The contract constituted by the Resolution shall be enforceable by appropriate proceedings taken by the Bondholder(s) under the law. Section 1004. Loan to Alumni Association and Related Procedures. Either of the Authorized Officer is authorized to make a loan of the proceeds of the Bonds to the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan as provided in Section 502, in the amount of not to exceed $1,200,000, for the purpose of Anancing the portion of the Projects to be completed at Camp Michigania. Either Authorized Officer is authorized to negotiate, execute and deliver a Loan Agreement with the Association and to accept from the Association a Note evidencing its repayment obligations with respect to the Loan. The Note shall be payable at times and in amounts (principal, interest and premium) corresponding, as closely as practicable, to the debt service on the portion of the Bonds used to finance the loan. Such Authorized Officer is also authorized to accept such mortgages or security agreements, covering such property of the Association, as the Authorized Officer deems appropriate, as security for the Association's obligations under the Loan Agreement and Note. The Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Associate Vice President for Finance and the Associate Vice President and Treasurer or any one of them, are authorized to pubfish notice of, and conduct, a public hearing on the issuance of the portion of the Bonds to finance the loan to the Association, and to seek the approval of the Governor of the State of Michigan therefor, all as required by the Internal Revenue Code in order to establish the tax-exempt status of the interest on such Bonds. Section 1005. Other Documentation. The Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University, the SecretaryUniversity o, ther University, the Associate Vice President for Finance of the University, the Associate Vice President and Treasurer of the University, and any other appropriate officers or representatives of the Issuer or the University, and each of them, are authorized to perform al acts and deeds and execute and deliver all instruments and documents for and on behalf of the Issuer required by this Resolution, or necessary, expedient and proper in connection with the issuance, sale and delivery of the Bonds, and the acquisition, construction, renovation, furnishing and equipping of the Projects all as contemplated hereby. Subsequent to the issuance of the Bonds, all actions permitted or required by the Issuer may be made or undertaken by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or Associate Vice President for Finance, or any other duly authorized officer of the Issuer or the University. All determination of Bond terms required to be made by the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer or Associate Vice President for Finance shall be made by him within the ranges or other limitations set forth herein Section 1006. Severability. If any one or more sections, clauses or provisions of the Resolution shall be determined by a court of competent jurisdiction to be invalid or ineffective for any reason, such determination shall in no way affect the validity and effectiveness of the remaining sections, clauses and provisions of the Resolution. Section 1007. Headings. Any headings shall be solely for convenience of reference and shall not constitute a part of the Resolution, nor shall they affect its meaning, construction or effect. 148

Page  149 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B Section 1008. Conflict. All resolutions or parts of resolutions or other proceedings of the Issuer in conflict herewith be and the same are repealed insofar as such conflict exists. Section 1009. Effective Date. adoption. The Resolution shall take effect immediately upon its EXHIBIT A PROJECTS Current Amount Estimate To Be Total Current Ann-Arbor Campus Estimated Cost * Financed * $7,500,000 Student Health Services Michigan Union North Campus Commons Michigan League School of Social Work Building Kinesiology Addition Dearborn Campus Renovations Addition Camp Michigania Cabin Construction and Renovations $7,500,000 10,300,000 10,300,000 2,250,000 2,250,000 6,450,000 6,450,000 25,000,000 25,000,000 2,000,000 1,300,000 16,200,000 2,500,000 2,200,000 2,500,000 1,200,000 1,200,000 Totals $73,400,000 58,700,000 * Exclusive of Bond Issuance Expense EXHIBIT B DISCLOSURE UNDERTAKING In connection with the issuance and delivery of the $ Regents of the University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995A, Series 1995B, Series 1995C, and Series 1995D (collectively the "Bonds"), authorized under a resolution (the "Resolution") adopted by the Regents of the University of Michigan (the "Issuer") on September, 1995, and for the benefit of the holders and beneficial owners of the Bonds, the IssuerThereby undertakes and agrees as follows: 149

Page  150 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B (a) The Issuer hereby agrees, in accordance with the provisions of Rule 15c2-12 (the "Rule") promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, to provide or cause to be provided to each nationally recognized municipal securities information repository ('NRMSIR") and to the appropriate state information depository, if any, for the State of Michigan ("SID"), in each case as designated by the SEC in accordance with the Rule, the following annual financial information and operating data commencing with e fiscal year ended June 30, 1996. (1) Updates of the following tables of financial information and operating data included in the official statement of the Issuer relating to the Bonds (the "Official Statement"). (2) Financial statements pertaining to the Issuer prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles by the Issuer and audited by an individual or firm of independent certified public accountants ("Audited Financial Statements"): provided, however,that the Issuer may from time to time, in order to comply with federal or State legal requirements modify the basis upon which its financial statements are prepared. N'otice of any such modification shall be provided to (i) either each NRMSIR or the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board ("MSRB") and (ii) the SID, and shall include a reference to the specific federal or State law or regulation describing such accounting basis. Such annual financial information and operating data described above are expected to be provided directly by the Issuer, but may be provided by reference to subsequent official statements of the Issuer filed with the MSRB. (b) Such annual information and operating data described in (a)(1) above and the Audited Financial Statements will each be available on or before the 180th day after the end of the fiscal year of the Issuer. (c) The Issuer agrees to provide or cause to be provided in a timely manner to (i) each NRMSIR or to the MSRB and (ii) the SID, if any, notice of the occurrence of any of the following events listed in (b)(5)(i)(C) of the Rule with respect to the Bonds, if applicable, if such event is material: 1. principal and interest payment delinquencies 2. non-payment related defaults 3. unscheduled draws on debt service reserves reflecting financial difficulties 4. unscheduled draws on credit enhancements, reflecting financial difficulties 5. substitution of credit or liquidity providers, or their failure to perform 6. adverse tax opinions or events affecting the tax-exempt status of the Bonds 7. modifications to rights of holders of the Bonds 8. bond calls 9. defeasances 10. release, substitution, or sale of property securing repayment of the Bonds 11. rating changes (d) The Issuer covenants that its determinations of materiality for purposes of (c) above will be made in conformance with federal securities laws. (e) The Issuer agrees to provide or cause to be provided, in a timely manner, to (i) each NRMSIR or to the MSRB and (ii) the SID, notice of a failure by the Issuer to provide 150

Page  151 September Meeting, 1995 - Appendix B the annual financial information and operating data with respect to the Issuer described in subsection (a) above on or prior to the dates set forth in subsection (b) above. (f) The Issuer reserves the right to terminate its obligation to provide annual financial information and notices of material events, as set forth above, if and when the Issuer no longer remains an obligated person with respect to the Bonds within the meaning of the Rule, including upon legal defeasance of all the Bonds. (g) The Issuer agrees that its undertaking pursuant to the Rule set forth herein is intended to be for the benefit of the holders of the Bonds (including all beneficial owners of the Bonds, as defined in Rule 13d-3 of the SEC) and shall be enforceable by any holder or beneficial owner of the Bonds; provided that, the right to enforce the provisions of this Undertaking shall be limited to a right to obtain specific enforcement of the Issuer's obligations hereunder and any failure by the Issuer to comply with the provisions of this undertaking shall not constitute a default or an event of default with respect to the Bonds or under the Resolution. (h) The provisions of this Undertaking, including but not limited to the provisions relating to the accounting principles pursuant to which the Issuer's financial statements are prepared, may be amended as deemed appropriate by an Authorized Officer of the Issuer: provided, however, that any such amendment must be adopted procedurally and substantively in a manner consistent with the Rule, including any interpretations thereof made from time to time by the SEC, which, to the extent applicable, are incorporated herein by reference. (i) If a change is made to the basis on which financial statements are prepared, the annual financial information for the year in which the change is made shall present a comparison between the financial statements or information prepared on the basis of the new accounting principles and those prepared on the basis of the former accounting principles. Such comparison shall include a qualitative and, to the extent reasonably feasible, quantitative discussion of the differences in the accounting principles and the impact of the change in the accounting principles on the presentation of the financial information. (j) All terms not defined herein which are defined in the Resolution shall have the meanings herein assigned to them in the Resolution Dated:, 1995 Regents of the University of Michigan By___ ________ Its 151

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Page  153 SPECIAL MEETING, OCTOBER 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Tuesday, October 10, 1995 The Regents met at 6:00 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Interim Provost Machen, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal, and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were also present. Executive Vice President Womack was absent. Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and stated that he was recommending the appointment of J. Bernard Machen as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs for the period September 1, 1995, through August 31, 1997. He observed that a search for a new provost had been underway for several months, but due to his own decision to retire from the presidency on June 30, 1996, the provost search advisory committee had recommended that the search be halted until such time as a new president has been selected. His recommendation is based on the high regard shown for Dr. Machen's leadership throughout the University since he began serving as interim provost and in the interest of providing continuity during this time of transition. Regent McGowan moved approval of J. Bernard Machen as provost and executive vice president for academic affairs for the period September 1, 1995, through August 31, 1997. Regent Newman seconded the motion. Regent McFee thanked Dr. Machen for his willingness to serve in this role, and observed that it would be important for everyone to work together during the coming months. Regent Baker observed that this would be a difficult time and expressed confidence that Dr. Machen would provide strong leadership. There being no further discussion, the vote was taken, and the motion was approved unanimously. Regent Power congratulated Provost Machen on his appointment, and expressed the Regents' appreciation to Professor Warner and the entire provost search advisory committee for their diligence in carrying on the search for a permanent provost. Executive Session Motion Regent Baker made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in 153

Page  154 Special Meeting, October 10,1995 closed session on October 10, 1995, to consider material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. There followed a short recess, after which the meeting resumed in executive session. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 154

Page  155 OCTOBER MEETING, 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Thursday, October 19, 1995 The Regents met at 9:20 a.m. in the Michigan Rooms of the University Center Building on the campus of the University of Michigan-Flint. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellor Nelms were also present. Chancellor Renick arrived at noon. Executive Session Motion President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and recognized Regent Baker, who made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session at 9:00 a.m. on October 19, 1995, and reconvene at 7:30 a.m. on October 20, 1995, for the purposes of considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then continued in executive session. The meeting reconvened in public session at 1:45 p.m. in the Michigan Rooms. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were also present. Regent Deitch arrived shortly after the start of the meeting and Vice President Harrison arrived at around 3:00 p.m. President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and expressed the Board's gratitude to Chancellor Nelms and his colleagues for their hospitality in hosting the meeting. Noting this would be the last time he would chair a Regents' Meeting in Flint, he commented on the state of the Flint campus as it approaches its 40th year. He observed that the city of Flint is facing challenges typical of other cities that had formerly relied on manufacturing for their economic base. The president suggested that the key determinant of Flint's future will be education, as it is through education that all of the other challenges to our society can be addressed. He observed that the city of Flint not only has a strong public school system and strong community 155

Page  156 October Meeting, 1995 and private colleges, but also is the home of a major university: the University of Michigan-Flint. President Duderstadt observed that Chancellor Nelms has brought great integrity, personal warmth, energy, and vision to the Flint campus since he became chancellor. He then welcomed Professor Lawrence Kugler back to the table as interim provost of the Flint campus and called on Chancellor Nelms to present the academic plan developed over the past year. University of Michigan-Flint Academic Plan Chancellor Nelms reported that over the past year, the UM-Flint community had been working to create a campus-wide consensus as to how the campus would proceed through the next decade. The plan had been developed under the leadership of Interim Provost Larry Kugler, with the financial support of the Mott Foundation. Chancellor Nelms called on Provost Kugler, who stated that the charge to the committee had been to produce a refined mission statement and address the following seven planning clusters: academic quality, academic programs, educational collaborations, community outreach, student support, minority attainment, and technology and education. Provost Kugler said that the committee's extensive consultation with students, faculty, staff, community leaders, and other stakeholders had yielded a number of recurring themes, from which the committee drew its mission statement and recommendations. He reviewed the mission statement and the committee's specific recommendations related to each of the seven areas mentioned above, all of which are contained in the document that was distributed to the meeting participants, "A Vision for the Future: A Report to the Community on the 1995 University of Michigan-Flint Academic Plan." Following his presentation, Provost Kugler responded to questions from the Regents about the academic plan. Chancellor Nelms observed that one of the responsibilities of a leader is to articulate a vision; his vision is that the University of Michigan-Flint, because of its academic excellence, its responsiveness to students, and outreach to the community, will become the university of choice in mid-Michigan. He believes that this plan will help the University to move in that direction. For the next several years, Chancellor Nelms reported that the Flint campus will focus on the following six areas: 1) developing a mechanism to assess quality; 2) managing enrollment to enhance retention; 3) developing new academic programs that serve the needs of the region, with emphasis on graduate programs; 4) forming strategic alliances with other educational institutions; 5) delivering courses in communities experiencing population growth; and 6) enhancing the use of technology in delivering services to students and providing administrative support. Chancellor Nelms said that he will fund these initiatives with a $500,000 academic excellence grant received some years ago. 156

Page  157 October Meeting, 1995 Chancellor Nelms acknowledged the presence in the audience of Mr. Woodrow Stanley, mayor of the city of Flint and a UM-Flint graduate. He then introduced Mr. Bill White, chair of the Mott Foundation, which had donated the funds to generate the 1995 Academic Plan. Mr. White gave an overview of the economic situation in the city of Flint and the surrounding region, noting that although thousands of traditional manufacturing jobs have disappeared in the area, there are also world class high tech industries that require employees with advanced education. He observed that the presence of the University of Michigan in Flint offers the University a unique place to confront many of the issues that are plaguing the nation. Mr. White stated that the former Autoworld property across the river from the Flint campus should be devoted to higher education, so to that end, the Mott Foundation has offered funding in the range of $40 million to help the University of Michigan-Flint bring this about. Regent Baker observed that the Mott Foundation has supported the University continuously since its inception. He expressed his gratitude to the foundation for its latest contribution, the Autoworld property. Regent Newman also expressed her thanks. Regent Varner left the meeting at this point, at 2:40 p.m. Chancellor Nelms then called on Ms. Kristen Skivington, assistant to the chancellor, who described the Community Stabilization and Revitaliza. tion Project (CSR), through which the UM-Flint provides technical assistance to businesses and nonprofit organizations in Genesee County. Ms. Skivington called on Professor Fataneh Taghaboni, who gave a presentation on the work she had done with Genesee Packaging, Inc., through CSR. Chancellor Nelms then thanked the Regents for having been willing to spend a portion of their meeting learning more about the Flint Campus. There followed a five-minute break, after which the meeting reconvened at 3:10 p.m. 1996-97 and 1997-98 State Budget Requests, Ann Arbor Campus President Duderstadt called on Provost Machen, who noted that state support will be critical in the coming year as the University searches for a new president. He also stated that the means of classifying the state's universities according to Carnegie Commission criteria, as was done last year during the appropriations process, is flawed, and our budget request to the state recommends it not be used again.. For 1996-97, the University is requesting an increase of 3.1 percent ($8.9 million) for inflation and an increase of $9.5 million for two areas of program revisions: $7.5 million for new and expanded partnerships for outreach to the state, which will consist of the Center for Learning through Community Service; the State and Local Policy Research Center; economic development outreach, done largely through the Business and Industrial Assistance Division (BIAD); and the Institute for Educational Innovation in 157

Page  158 October Meeting, 1995 K-12. The second component of the program revision is expansion of opportunities for undergraduate research ($2.0 million). The total incremental request for 1996-97 is $18.4 million. For 1997-98, the incremental request is for $10.1 million (3.3 percent) for inflation on operations, and $10 million for program revisions (further expansion of partnerships for outreach), for a total requested increase of $20.1 million. Provost Machen reported that the program revisions are slated to begin in the current year. However, he and President Duderstadt both noted that the additional funding that has been requested will be important to their continuation. Regent McFee called attention to the planned Institute for Educational Innovation in K-12, which she believes will fill an extremely important need. President Duderstadt noted that it is generally agreed among leaders of higher education that improving the K-12 education system constitutes one of the great challenges of our time. He reviewed some proposals for major changes in teaching credentials and course content that are soon to be announced in an attempt to respond to these challenges. In response to a question from Regent Baker as to whether the University had reduced any programs, Provost Machen noted that whenever there are opportunities to downsize or re-allocate, there is always a huge backlog of programs waiting to be started. He noted that the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies had eliminated three programs during the past year. Regent McFee suggested that the two percent reallocation program described in the budget request be highlighted to reinforce the University's commitment to hold down costs. 1996-97 and 1997-98 State Budget Requests, UM-Dearborn Chancellor Renick observed that outreach and partnership activities have always been hallmarks of the Dearborn Campus. The UM-Dearborn budget requests reflect the campus' ongoing priorities, including investments in technology, competitive faculty salaries, the Environmental Interpretive Center, and funding for enrollment growth. Specifically, the total 1996-97 incremental request of $3,632,000 calls for $1,477,000 for maintenance of quality educational programming (compensation and non-compensation); $955,000 for Technology in Service of Learning (Phase 1); and $1,200,000 for the Environmental Interpretive Center. The incremental increase requested for 1997-98 calls for $1,621,000 for maintenance of quality educational programming; $816,000 for technology in service of learning (Phase 2); and $663,000 for faculty to support program growth. 158

Page  159 October Meeting, 1995 1996-97 and 1997-98 State Budget Requests, UM-Flint Chancellor Nelms reported that the Flint campus' budget focuses on the growth potential of the campus, student retention, improved use of technology, and faculty and staff compensation. The 1996-97 incremental request of $2,735,000 calls for $225,000 for improvements in the quality of student life (student retention and scholarships), $575,000 for new program development and academic planning initiatives, $800,000 for infrastructure and technology improvements, and a 3.1 percent inflationary salary and non-salary increase ($1,135,000). The 1997-98 incremental request of $2,846,000 calls for $175,000 for improvements in the quality of student life, $625,000 for new program development and academic planning initiatives, $800,000 for infrastructure and technology, and a 3.3 percent inflationary salary and non-salary increase ($1,246,000). The president called on Ms. Cynthia Wilbanks, associate vice president for university relations, and Mr. Ed Bagale, associate vice chancellor for government relations at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, to comment on how well these requests respond to the current climate in the state legislature. Ms. Wilbanks stated that she believes the documents respond appropriately to concerns that have been expressed among the legislators, particularly the sections describing the University's efforts at cost-reduction and value centered management and in the reinforcement of a partnership relationship with the state's citizens. She and Mr. Bagale believed that the documents would be received favorably in the legislature. Regent Deitch commented that he was heartened by the quality of the team representing the University in Lansing, and said that he was confident that combined with the efforts of the rest of the administrative team, the University would be successful in this legislative season. There followed a 15 minute recess at 3:45 p.m., after which the meeting reconvened to hear public comments. However, there being no speakers present for Public Comments, the meeting recessed at 4:00 p.m. Friday October 20, 1995 The Regents reconvened at 7:30 a.m. to continue in executive session, as approved on Thursday, October 19, 1995. They then met in public session at 9:20 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, and Power. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were also present. Regent Varner was absent. President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and called on Executive Vice President Womack. 159

Page  160 October Meeting, 1995 Ernst & Young LLP Management Report with University Responses Executive Vice President Womack invited Mssrs. Bob Emde, Harold Miller, and George Johnson, who represent the firm Ernst & Young, LLP, to the table to present the external auditor's report. Mr. Emde noted that Mr. Johnson is a managing partner in the firm George Johnson and Company, which works with Ernst & Young to perform the audit, Mr. Emde reported that the audit report expresses a clean, unqualified opinion on the University's combined financial statements, including the financial statements for those entities that are part of the combined financial statements, but that are audited separately. In addition, there were no material weaknesses noted in procedures or controls. In each instance noted in the management letter, Mr. Emde noted that the University had concurred with the recommendations. Regent Baker commented that the Regents were available to meet with the auditors privately if they deemed such a discussion necessary. Regent Deitch noted that the Regents do not have an audit committee and asked whether an audit committee would serve to facilitate communication. Mro Emde responded that he did not believe having an audit committee would be particularly productive, given the way the University is organized and the very public nature of all of its activities. Regent Deitch asked Mr. Emde to provide the Regents with information on the relationship between audit committees and external auditors in other public universities that do have audit committees. Regent McFee observed that the Regents rely on the objective review provided by the external auditors to bring to their attention any issues that the auditors believe merit their involvement. Presidential Search his retirement at the end of the current academic year, much interest has been expressed about consulting with the Board about the search for his successor. Regent McFee read the following letter into the record in the form of a resolution: An Open Letter to the University Community: President James J Duderstadt's recent announcement that he intends to step down from the presidency of the University of Michigan signals the beginning of one of the most important responsibilities the University community undertakes: the selection of its next president. As stewards of the public trust, the Board of Regents approaches this task with unified resolve to find the best person for this most important leadership role, a person in the tradition most recently defined by Harlan Hatcher, Robben 160

Page  161 October Meeting, 1995 Fleming, Harold Shapiro, and James Duderstadt. We approach this task with two important principles in mind: clarity and community. While we are clear that our goal is to find the best possible president for our great University, we also firmly believe that we need to consult extensively within the University community before undertaking the search. We believe that the involvement of the entire University community is an essential component of this process: envisioning the University's needs over the next decade, defining the qualities the next president must have, and advising us on the best process for conducting a search. The selection of the next president of the University is a shared responsibility, and we intend to consult with all segments of the community —faculty, students, staff, and alumni-before and during the search. We call upon all of you, therefore, for your input and guidance. To that end, we are asking Provost Machen, Vice President Harrison, and Secretary Palmer to: 1) Plan a series of public forums for the Regents to hear from various constituencies of the University community. We will also invite letters and other written communication from faculty, students, staff, and alumni. 2) Provide the Board with background information on past presidential searches here at Mi'chin and review current and recent searches at other iswitutbns idthin Michigan and around the country. We are asking Provost Machen, Vice President Harrison, and Secretary Palmer to arrange for these sessions to be held and this information to be gathered within the next two months. We do want to encourage you all to bring us your ideas and viewpoints. 'hile the ultimate authority to select the president is vested in the Board of Regents by the Constitution of the State of Michigan, your involvement will be vital to our success and to the future of our great University. Sincerely, The Regents of the University of Michigan Regent McFee offered a resolution that this letter be entered into the record as an open letter to the University community and as a statement of how the Regents are to begin this task. Regent Power supported the resolution, and it was approved unanimously. Comments on the Service of President Duderstadt Regent Baker made the following statement: 161

Page  162 October Meeting, 1995 The Regents have accepted the presidents resignation with regret. We are grateful for his service to the University as a teacher, professor, researcher, dean, scientist, provost, interim president, and president President Duderstadt's contributions to the University have been immense. I personally am very grateful for all he has done, and it is appropriate that the Regents express their gratitude. Regent Power supported Regent Baker's statement. Regent McFee added that the Regents sincerely appreciate the forthrightness and willingness the president has expressed in going forward with this period of transition and making it as expeditious and smooth as possible. President Duderstadt responded that the Regents would have his continued, 100 percent effort until the end of his term to maintain the momentum of the institution. 1995-96 Enrollment Figures President Duderstadt observed that minority enrollment figures continue to increase, with students of color comprising 25.0 percent of the student body and African-Americans comprising 8.7 percent. When international students are included in the calculations, about one-third of the student body are students of color. Not only is this balance beginning to reflect the diversity of society, but the quality of the student body is as strong as it has ever been. This demonstrates the close relationship between diversity and excellence in higher education, as well as the leadership role the University continues to play in serving all of our society. Regent Deitch commented that President Duderstadt's commitment to diversity and the advances that have been achieved as a result of this commitment are at the "top of the list" of his accomplishments. As a Regent, he wished to reaffirm the president's commitment to these principles and said that seeking out a person with similar commitments and leadership in these issues will be paramount in his decision-making. Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the September 1995 meeting for approval Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports of investments, plant extension, litigation, and personnel-labor relations, and a report on noncompetitive purchases greater than $2,000 for the period July 1-September 30, 1995. He commented on the recent performance of the market, noting that the University's high return is a direct result of its longterm commitment and diversification. He invited the Regents to attend the Investment Advisory Committee meeting at the end of the month. Executive Vice President Womack also commented on the large number of construction projects that is scheduled for completion by Fall 1996. These include the Central Campus Infrastructure, Haven Hall Connector, East 162

Page  163 October Meeting, 1995 Engineering Building Remodeling, the Tennis Center, ITIC and the Engineering Center Buildings, C.C. Little Pharmacy Project, Medical Center East Campus Primary Care Facility, North Entrance Parking Structure, Medical Science I A-Wing Infrastructure, North Campus Bell Tower, UM-Hospitals Cancer and Geriatrics Centers, UM-Hospitals Single Room Maternity Care Project, and the Visitors Center. Olympia & York Investment. Executive Vice President Womack responded to Regent Baker's question about the status of the University's investment with Olympia & York. He noted that the value of the University's Olympia & York notes has increased. Research Reports. Vice President Neal submitted reports of projects established and summaries of a selection of current research for September 1995. He informed the Regents that he expected to bring to the Board a new intellectual property policy for consideration by February 1996. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear submitted the report of voluntary support for September 1995. He reported that the Campaign for Michigan has reached $903 million towards its goal of $1 billion. Andrew Abel, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics................ $ 5,000 Mary C. Adams, Ann Arbor for the Matilda Bookmiller Bickel Memorial Fund in the School of Education............ 5,000 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the Biophysics Research Division................................. 84,923 American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education, North Plainfield, New Jersey; for the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education Fellowship in the College of Pharm acy........................................................... 26,500 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the M edical School................................................ 21,890 American Kennel Club, New York, New York for research in the M edical School............................................. - 18,750 American Society for Quality Control, Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the National Quality Research Center, School of Business Administration......... 218,942 American Suicide Foundation, New York, New York for research in the M edical School................................................ 12,500 AMP, Inc., Harrisburg, Pennsylvania for the Cumulative Trauma Disorders Fund in the College of Engineering.............25,000 William R. Applegate Estate for undergraduate student aid....................................................36,924 Patsy F. Arpino Estate for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Gift Fund.................................... 20,948 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the M edical School............................................... 12,750 Don Barden, Detroit for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn.......... 50,000 Barr Group, Inc., Southfield for golf course restoration and the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics....................................................... 100,000 Bedding Plants Foundation, Inc., Lansing for research in the Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn.............................................................. 6,000 Jerry Bilik Music, Inc., Washington, DC for the Helga and Jerry Bilik/William Revelli Music Education Scholarship in the School of Music.............................................. 10,000 163

Page  164 October Meeting, 1995 Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd., Ridgefield, Connecticut for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy...................... 10,000 Edward S. and Ruth B. Bordin Estate for the Edward S. Bordin Graduate Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for researcher travel support in the Bentley Historical L ibrary....................................................................... 50,000 Alice I. Bourquin Trust for scholarship support in the College of Engineering, and for the Alice I. Bourquin Memorial Fellowship in the School of Natural Resources and Environment............................................ 17,050 Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, New Jersey for the Bristol-Myers Squibb Dean's Discretionary Endowment in the College of Pharm acy......................................................... 100,000 Bernice C. Burns, Frazier Park, California 582 shares of New Dimensions (IDS) Mutual Fund for the Bernice and Jack Burns Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the School of Natural Resources and Environment......................... 9,998 Burroughs Wellcome Company, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina for gastroenterology research in the Medical School.................................. 6,000 Cancer Research Institute, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 5,083 Cigna Foundation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the Property & Casualty-Actuarial Sciences Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, Department of Mathematics..................................13,000 Citicorp Foundation, New York, New York for the Citibank Academic Excellence Award Fund in the School of Business A dm inistration................................................................. 16,000 Ralph F. Colton, Chicago, Illinois four shares of Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., common stock for the William Gabb Smeaton Memorial Fellowship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......................................................... 100,400 Cook Family Foundation, Owosso for research in the School of Natural Resources and Environment...................... 7,285 Core Industries, Inc., Bloomfield Hills for the Cancer Center in the Medical School................................... o...... 5,000 Goldie B. Corneliuson Trust for support in the M edical School................................................. 95,251 Deafness Research Foundation, New York, New York for research and the Kresge Hearing Research Institute in the Medical School.......... 15,000 Dermik Laboratories, Inc., Collegeville, Pennsylvania for the William B. Taylor Endowment in the Medical School........................... 5,000 Detroit Association of University of Michigan Women, Wyandotte for the Gagnon-Rosenthal-Smith Scholarship, the Henderson House Scholarship, and other Alumnae Council Scholarships.......................................... 7,450 Dover Fund, Inc., New York, New York for the Robert I. Kleinberg English Language Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 20,000 James J. and Anne M. Duderstadt, Ann Arbor for the James and Anne Duderstadt Endowment Fund.............................. 10,000 Gertrude S. Eaton, Toledo, Ohio for support in the Medical School, in memory of George A. Stimson................. 10,000 Eileen M. Ebin, Longboat Key, Florida for the William E. Zimmie Visiting Professorship in the College of Engineering........ 9,000 Beulah R. Elving, Ann Arbor for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 5,000 Ford Foundation, New York, New York for research the School of Education, and the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................. 262,000 Ford Motor Company, Dearborn for the Transportation Reporting Fellowship in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................................. 55,000 Margaret D. Foster Trust for support in the College of Engineering..................................... 11,026 C. Edward Frisinger, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 6,750 shares of First of America common stock; for the C. Edward and Mary A. Frisinger Unitrust Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering and the Medical School....................................................... 298,266 164

Page  165 October Meeting, 1995 Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, California for the Immunopathology Research Fellowship and Training Fund in the M edical School.........................................................25,000 General Electric Foundation, Fairfield, Connecticut for research in the School of Business Administration, and for minority and female scholarships in the College of Engineering............................ 109,000 General Motors Foundation, Inc., Detroit for employee matching gifts.......................................61,389 Byron Gerson, Franklin for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Adm inistration.................................................................20,000 Matthew B. Gerson, Scottsdale, Arizona for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Adm inistration............................................................. 5,000 Alvin Glick, Jackson for support in the Department of Athletics....................................... 125,200 GR Group, Inc., Bowling Green, Ohio for the Martin Luther King Scholarship...................................... 5,000 G. Robert Greenberg, Ann Arbor for the G. Robert Greenberg Symposium in the Medical School....................... 5,000 G. T. Investment, Sterling Heights for the Communications Disorders Center in the Medical School....................... 5,000 Samuel D. Harris Trust for the Pediatric Dental Clinic Renovation Fund in the School of Dentistry............ 30,000 DuBose and Dorothy Heyward Memorial Fund, New York, New York for the Porgy and Bess Fund in the Medical School.................................. 10,000 Daniel F. Hopp, St. Joseph for scholarships in the Department of Athletics...................................... 5,000 IBM Canada, Ltd., Markham, Ontario, Canada for the Digital Library Research Fund in the College of Engineering............... 14,500 Ideation, Inc., Ann Arbor for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................. 5,000 Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon for the HPS Architecture Fund in the College of Engineering.........................55,000 Intel Foundation, Hillsboro, Oregon for minority and female scholarships, and electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering.......................................... 66,100 Verne G. Istock, Bloomfield Hills 1,500 shares of NBD Bancorp common stock for support in the School of Education and for gifts pending designation in the Campaign for Michigan.........................................................52,313 Fred E. Ittner, Marago, California for the Edward A. Jones Memorial Fund in the School of Business Administration....... 5,000 Bazley and Roena Johnson Estate for the Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center in the College of Engineering.............. 18,000 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International, New York, New York for research in the M edical School................................................34,206 Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, California for research in the School of Nursing.............................................. 25,000 Robert P. Kirby, Augusta, Georgia for support in the School of Natural Resources and Environment...................... 5,000 Barbara M. Kitzner, Allen Park for the Environmental Study Area Fund, the University of Michigan-Dearborn.......... 5,000 Korea Foundation, Seoul, Korea for the Korean Foundation Professorship of Korean Studies in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 100,000 Jack Lapides, Ann Arbor for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, and the Schools of Medicine, Music, Nursing and Public Health; and for unrestricted support of the University of M ich igan....................................................................... 5,000 Genevieve Latulip Irrevocable Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................. 180,022 Norman J. and Marilyn Leven Family Foundation, Grand Rapids for the Marilyn and Norman Leven Scholarship in the School of Business A dm inistration.................................................................. 5,000 165

Page  166 October Meeting, 1995 Lewis Unitrust, Washington, DC for the Frances and Sydney Lewis Visiting Leaders Program in the Center for the Education of W omen.................................................... 40,000 Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, and for support in the College of Pharmacy............................................... 10,000 Winfield H. and Grace Song Line Trust for the Winfield H. and Grace Song Line Fund in the School of Public Health......... 825,000 Little Family Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts for the Little Family Foundation Fellowship, School of Business Administration......... 7,500 Ruth Lobdell Charitable Foundation, Dillard, Georgia for the Ruth Lobdell Scholarship................................................17,000 Lubrizol Foundation, Pepper Pike, Ohio for support in the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts and for the Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center......................... 5,000 Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering....................... 100,000 Benard L. Maas Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Raoul Wallenberg Scholarship in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, the Matthaei Botancial Gardens in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, the Maas Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, the Herbert S. and Carol L. Amster Lupus Research Fund in he Medical School, and for the Maas Foundation MJMI Scholarship in the College of Engineering.................................................................. 31,250 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education............................................ 85,000 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the M edical School................................................ 12,812 R. Gordon Mathews, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics............................. 30,000 McDonnell Douglas Foundation, St. Louis, Missouri for the Minority Engineering Program and other support in the College of Engineering....................................................................20,000 McKinley Associates, Inc., Ann Arbor 1,503 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics............................... 89,335 Merck & Company, Inc., White House Station, New Jersey for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering.........10,000 Midwest Eye-Banks and Transplantation Center, Ann Arbor for research in the M edical School................................................ 15,000 Mobil Foundation, Inc., Fairfax, Virginia for the Industrial Affiliates Program in Flow and Reaction in Porus Media in the College of Engineering....................................................10,000 Morris Animal Foundation, Englewood, Colorado for research in the M edical School............................................... 18,750 Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc., Tucson, Arizona for research in the Medical School, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................................... 75619 National Academy of Education, Stanford, California for research in the School of Education............................................ 20,000 National Institute for Burn Medicine, Ann Arbor for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 13,451 National Retinitis Pigmentosa Foundation, Baltimore, Maryland for research in the Medical School......................................... 7,590 George J. Nichols, Jr., Ann Arbor 200 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for the MBA Peace Corp Fund in the School of Business Administration.e............ 11,263 Nike, Inc., Beaverton, Oregon for the Nike Athletic Scholarship for Women and the Nike Women's Basketball Scholarship in the Department of Athletics, for the Sports Reporting Fellowship in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies; and for the Chris Webber/Nike Foundation Scholarship......................60,000 Nobelpharma USA, Inc., Westmont, Illinios for the Center for Excellence Fund in the School of Dentistry....................... 25,000 166

Page  167 October Meeting, 1995 Olympus America, Inc., Melville, New York for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund in the Medical School...................................... 10,000 Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation, Rosemont, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 24,863 Orthopedic Foundation for Animals, Inc., Columbia, Missouri for research in the Medical School................................................ 18,750 Perceptron, Inc., Farmington Hills for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering................................................................... 13,810 Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for biological chemistry research in the Medical School.......................... 50,000 Pontiac Fire Fighters Union Good and Welfare Fund, Pontiac for the Trauma Burn Center Firefighter's Fund in the Medical School................. 13,000 Edwin Przybylowicz, Webster, New York 100 shares of Eastman Chemical Company common stock for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 6,456 Quaker Oats Company, Chicago, Illinois for support in the Department of Athletics....................................... 40,000 Radiological Society of North America R & E, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School............................................... 10,000 Reader's Digest Foundation, Inc., Pleasantville, New York for the Reader's Digest Excellence in Journalism Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................21,500 Christine Reissman, Huntington, New York for support in the Division of Kinesiology.......................................... 10,000 Royal Bank of Canada, Montreal, Canada for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration........................................................20,000 Russell Sage Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Public Health.........................................15,991 Santen Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd., Osaka, Japan for ophthalmological research in the Medical School................................. 99,990 Margery J. Schneider, Nashville, Tennessee for the Dwight F. Benton Scholarship in the School of Business Administration......... 6,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Santa Fe, California for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics..................... 120,000 Howard B. and Irene S. Sobel for the Naomi Saferstein Literary Award Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 10,000 Southeast Asia Art Foundation, Hill, New Hampshire for the Southeast Asia Art Foundation Photo Archive Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Southeast Asia Art Foundation Book Fund in the University Libraries............................................. 6,329 Spinal Cord Research Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the M edical School................................................ 6,863 Alice A. Stoddard Trust for the Alice A. Stoddard Scholarship in the Medical School........................... 8,678 Zelig N. Stutz Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan................................ 5,983 Supreme Council 33rd Degree, A.A.S.R. Benevolent Foundation of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, Lexington, Massachusetts for the Scottish Rite Funds in the Medical School................................. 8,625 Osram Sylvania, Inc., Danvers, Massachusetts for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute.................. 15,000 G. Leonard Teitelbaum, Holmdel, New Jersey for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics................. 100,000 Ronald L. Thompson, Holland, Ohio for the Martin Luther King Scholarship............................................ 5,000 Tourette Syndrome Association, Bayside, New York for research in the M edical School............................................... 12,196 Richard F. Towner, Venice, Florida 500 shares of Schlumberger Ltd., common stock for the Richard F. Towner Unitrust Fund in the College of Engineering............... 34,219 University of Michigan Club of Washington, DC for the University of Michigan Club of Washington, DC, Scholarship................. 18,500 167

Page  168 October Meeting, 1995 L. Vad Technology, Inc., Detroit for research in the School of Public Health........................................ 5,000 Helen F. Vida, Bradbury, California for the Alexander S. Vida Memorial Scholarship in the Medical School............... 50,000 John Wagner, Ann Arbor for the Helen S. and John Wagner Fund, and the English Honors Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...................................... 23,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School, for the Parke-Davis/Warner Lambert Fellowship for Nursing Research in the School of Nursing; and for the Department of Natural Sciences, the University of Michigan-Dearborn.............. 70,908 Ronald N. Weiser, Ann Arbor 200 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics............................ 11,888 Whirlpool Foundation, Benton Harbor for Employee Matching Gifts................................... 5,525 Whitaker Foundation, Rosslyn, Virginia for the Applied Physics Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for research in the Colleges of Engineering and Pharmacy................. 132,935 WJBK-TV 2, Southfield for scholarships in the Department of Athletics................................... 9,000 Frank B. Womer, Ann Arbor for the Frank B. Womer Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the School of Education; and for other support in the School of Education........... 11,000 The following nonmonetary gifts-in-kind were received: Brad Canale, Ann Arbor an original hand made paper artwork entitled "BC's Blue Canal", by Clinton Hill for the College of Engineering John C. Dann, Dexter 29 books, 2 serial publications, and one illustration of a livingroom Christmas scene for the Clements Library Duane N. Diedrich, Muncie, Indiana four manuscript items for the Clements Library Kenneth R. Milks, Clio audio visual and photocopier materials for the University of Michigan-Flint, Frances Willson Thompson Library Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota a 3M Scotchprint full color wall mural of the 18th hole of the University of Michigan golf course for the University of Michigan Golf Course Clubhouse South Redford School District, Redford laboratory chemicals for the University of Michigan-Dearborn, Department of Natural Sciences William and Electra Stamelos, Livonia a blown glass sculpture, untitled, by Macchia for the University of Michigan-Dearborn Art Collection H. Parker Tagsold, Blissfield six photographs dated from 1850-1913, seven manuscript lots, and one hand sewn flag made by Thirza Parker, dated 1862 for the Clements Library Peter S. Wright, Ann Arbor 107 Storer and Osborn family papers including documents and related ephemera and books for the Clements Library Additional gifts ranging from $1 to $999 in value were received from the following donors: Jacqueline R. Brown, Ann Arbor Lucy S. Schultz, Flint Justin F. Krasnoff, Ann Arbor Johannes Tall, Flint Joe Lunn, Ann Arbor Donald L. Wilcox, Ann Arbor Carl B. Makahian, Palm Springs, California Clarence Wolf, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania Harold J. Peplau, Ypsilanti 168

Page  169 October Meeting, 1995 Vice President for Development. President Duderstadt noted that Vice President Kinnear had done an outstanding job of leading the Campaign for Michigan, and that he had expressed his willingness to serve in this role through the end of the campaign. Included in the personnel actions is a recommendation to remove the "interim" from his title and extend his tenure as vice president for development for two more years. He observed that Vice President Kinnear is also a noted professor of marketing, and his willingness to commit himself to leading the campaign shows his extraordinary commitment to the University of Michigan. Regent Power moved approval of the appointment of Thomas C. Kinnear as vice president for development from October 1, 1995 through August 31, 1997. Regent Newman seconded the motion. Regent Power observed that since August 1994, when Professor Kinnear was named interim vice president for development, he has raised over $265 million in new gifts and pledges in the Campaign for Michigan. He commented on the high levels of energy, confidence, teamwork, and other outstanding attributes he had brought to the position. The vote was then taken and the motion was approved unanimously. Vice President Kinnear thanked the Regents, president, officers, and his staff for their confidence and support. Personnel Actions. Provost Machen, Chancellor Renick, and Chancellor Nelms submitted a number of personnel actions. Provost Machen reported that the Medical School had withdrawn the request for establishment of the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorship in Ophthalmology. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR AND ASSOCIATE FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITH TENURE Effective September 1, 1995 Lansing, John S., Ph.D., Professor of Anthropology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Natural Resources and Environment, School of Natural Resources and Environment NEW APPOI NTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR AND ASSOCIATE FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITHOUT TENURE Effective November 1 1995 Nanda, Vikram K., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Finance JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Gramlich, Edward M., Professor of Economics and Public Policy, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Dean, School of Public Policy, also appointed Professor of Public Policy, with tenure, School of Public, November 1, 1995 169

Page  170 October Meeting, 1995 Olson, Gary M., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Professor of Information and Library Studies, without tenure, School of Information and Library Studies, five-year term, September 1, 1995 Olson, Judith S. R., Professor of Computer and Information Systems, with tenure, School of Business Administration, and Professor of Psychology, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Professor of Information and Library Studies, without tenure, School of Information and Library Studies, five-year term, September 1, 1995 Price, Richard H., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management, without tenure, School of Business Administration, five-year term, October 1, 1995 OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Kinnear, Thomas C., from Professor of Marketing, with tenure, the D. Maynard Phelps Professor of Business Administration, and Interim Vice President for Development, to Professor of Marketing, with tenure, the D. Maynard Phelps Professor of Business Administration, and Vice President for Development, October 1, 1995-August 31, 1997 McKinley, Donna L., Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs, UM-Dearborn, reappointed Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, five-year term, September 1, 1995 Thorson, Jayne A., Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs, Medical School, November 1, 1995 Associate Dean for Research and Doctoral Programs. The Regents approved the establishment of the position of associate dean for research and doctoral programs in the Medical School, effective October 1, 1995. Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorships. The Regents approved the establishment of the following Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorships, effective November 1, 1995: the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorship for the Cure and Prevention of Birth Defects, the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorship for the Cure and Prevention of Cystic Fibrosis, the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorship in Hypertension, and the Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professorship in Ophthalmology. Frederick G. L. Huetwell and William D. Robinson, M.D., Professorship in Rheumatology. The Regents approved the establishment of the Frederick G. L, Huetwell and William D. Robinson, M.D., Professorship in Rheumatology, effective November 1, 1995. H. Marvin Pollard Collegiate Professorship in Gastroenterology. The Regents approved the establishment of the H. Marvin Pollard Collegiate Professorship in Gastroenterology, effective November 1, 1995. Henry Sewall Professorship in Medicine. The Regents approved the establishment of the Henry Sewall Professorship in Medicine, effective November 1, 1995. John C. and Sally S. Morley Professorship in Finance. The Regents approved the establishment of the John C. and Sally S. Morley Professorship in Finance, effective November 1, 1995. 170

Page  171 October Meeting, 1995 Otis Dudley Duncan Collegiate Professorship in Sociology. The Regents approved the establishment of the Otis Dudley Duncan Collegiate Professorship in Sociology, effective July 1, 1995. Committee Appointments. The following committee appointments were submitted for approval: Advisory Committee on Recreational Sports Foss, Peggy J., reappointed September 1, 1995-August 31, 1997 Committee on Honorary Degrees Roach, Sally B., alumna, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1997, vice Richard D. Rattner, term expired School of Natural Resources and Environment Executive Committee Low, Bobbi S., September 1, 1995-August 31, 1996, vice Donald R. Zak, unable to serve UM-Flint School of Management Executive Committee Fortner, Richard W., October 1, 1995-January 31, 1996, during promotion and tenure deliberations vice L. Charles Bokemeier Personnel Reports. The following personnnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Aarsvold, John N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Aitches, Marian A., Ph.D., Lecturer I in English Alvarez-Garcia, Sergio, Licenciate, Lecturer II in Spanish Ault, Heather S. Lecturer II in Film and Video Studies Bate, J. Bernard, M.A., Lecturer II in Anthropology Behling, Charles F., Ph.D., Lecturer in Psychology Benini, Stefania, Diploma, Lecturer I in Italian Bennett, Michael A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Blickle, Peter, Ph.D., Lecturer I in Germanic Languages and Literatures Cardenas, Brenda E., M.F.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature and Lecturer II in American Culture Chow, Timothy Y., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Countryman, Matthew J., Ph.D., Lecturer II in History and Afroamerican and African Studies Doherty, Amy F., M.A., Lecturer I in English Everson, Stephen D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Philosophy Gallagher, Richard R., M.F.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Garver, Susan E., B.S., Lecturer I in Chemistry Gidal, Eric, Ph.D., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Glahn, Kate E., M.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Gockenbach, Mark S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Heinrich, Robert K., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Psychology, October 4, 1995 Hopkins, Richard L., M.A., Lecturer I in Studies in Religion Ji, Lizhen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Kafka, Kimberly, M.F.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Kirsch, Stuart A., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Anthropology Leicher, Sheryl S., B.A., Lecturer II in English Levine, Noga M., L.L.B., Lecturer II in Political Science Lewis, John L., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Anthropology Lombardi, Margaret, M.A., Lecturer II in Romance Languages and Literatures Marongiu, Elena, University Degree, Lecturer I in Italian Marsh, E. Neil G., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry Martin, Glenn B., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Chemistry 171

Page  172 October Meeting, 1995 McDaniel, Raymond C., M.F.A., Lecturer I in English, and Lecturer I in English Language and Literature McGuire, Mary K., M.A., Lecturer II in American Culture, Residential College, January 1, 1996 Mintz, Eric S., M.A., Lecturer I in Communication Studies Molenda, John J., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Chemistry Moore, Kathleen A., B.S., Lecturer II in Music, Residential College, January 1, 1996 Myers, Eric A., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Physics Naginski, Erika, M.A., Lecturer II in French Palen, Joseph J., M.A., Lecturer II in Mathematics Phillips, Ann T., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Psychology Pietila, Richard W., M.A., Lecturer II in Communication Studies Portet, Celene H., Maitreise, Lecturer II in French Prayoonhong, Chutiman, D.Arch., Lecturer II in Asian Languages and Cultures Rogovic, Svetlana, Teacher of Foreign Languages, Lecturer II in Ukrainian Language and Literature Sandoval, Michael I., M.F.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Saveliev, Nikolai N., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Scheker, Elka R., Master, Lecturer I in Spanish Schindler, Petra S., M.A., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature Schonle, Andreas X., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pre-19th Century Russian Literature Schoonhoven, Richard D., A.B., Lecturer I in Classical Studies Seigneurie, Kenneth E., B.A., Lecturer I in Classical Studies Stephens, Sharon K., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Anthropology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Assistant Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work Tackett, Astrid E., M.S., Lecturer I in Spanish Toumajan, Dickran, M.A., Lecturer II in Armenian Language and Literature Werner, Caryn, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Zevallos, Ann J., M.A.T., Lecturer I in Spanish Zevallos-Aguilar, Ulises J., M.A., Lecturer II in Spanish Medical School Andreae, Margie C., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, September 15, 1995 Fessler, Kathryn B., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Gahagan, Sheila, M.D., Clinical Associate Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Kirsch, Anita H., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Krause, Christine W., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Family Practice, August 16, 1995 Lawrence, Linda L., M.D., Lecturer in Radiology, October 1, 1995 LeDesai, Thuy, M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine and Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, October 1, 1995 Levine, John E., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Osawa, Yoichi, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology, November 1, 1995 School of Dentistry Gould, Kari L., M.P.H., Lecturer in Dentistry Hamilton, James C., D.D.S., Lecturer in Dentistry Law School Jones, Lance R., J.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Law School of Music Berg, Mark A., M.F.A., Lecturer in Theatre Minor, John, M.F.A., Lecturer in Theatre, September 1, 1995 School of Nursing Gregory, Lynn A., M.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing Hayes-Hall, Patricia T., B.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing Kise, Kathy M., M.S., Lecturer in Nursing McDevitt, Susanne E., M.S.N., Lecturer in Nursing Russell, Beth C., M.S., Lecturer in Nursing 172

Page  173 October Meeting, 1995 School of Public Health Philbert, Martin A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Toxicology UM-Dearborn School of Engineering Ray, Sibabrata, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science UM-Dearborn School of Management Klein, Barbara D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Management Information Systems Lending, Diane, B.A., Lecturer in Management Information Systems UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Mueller, Douglas A., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of Theatre CHANGE TO PREVIOUSLY REPORTED NEW APPOINTMENT OF REGULAR INSTRUCTION STAFF Effective August 1, 1995 Medical School Su, Grace L., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, (previously reported as Lecturer) ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, JOINT APPOINTMENTS, OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Rasul, Jawaid W., from Assistant Professor of Physics to Lecturer in Physics Medical School Clark, Nina M., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, October 1, 1995 Eisbruch, Avraham, from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology Herzog, Susan B., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Physiology School of Nursing Fitzpatrick, Michelle M., from Lecturer in Nursing, School of Nursing to Clinical Nurse IV, University of Michigan Hospitals, October 2, 1995 College of Pharmacy Couch, Patricia, Clinical Assistant Professor II of Pharmacy to Clinical Professor I of Pharmacy, August 21, 1995 UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Reaves, Natalie D., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Economics UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Woehrle, Kathleen L., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Social Work ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective September 1-December 31, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Buning, Harm, Professor Emeritus of Aerospace Engineering College of Engineering Glysson, Eugene A., Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering Orlin, Louis L., Professor Emeritus of Ancient Near Eastern History and Literature Shaffer, Robert L., the Lewis E. Wehmeyer and Elaine Prince Wehmeyer Professor Emeritus of Fungal Taxonomy and Curator Emeritus of, July 1, 1995-December 31, 1996 173

Page  174 October Meeting, 1995 Shafter, Edward M. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Humanities Stebbins, William C., Professor Emeritus of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical School, and Professor Emeritus of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, September 1, 1995-January 31, 1996 Teske, Richard G., Professor Emeritus of Astronomy, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Law School Reed, John W., the Thomas M. Cooley Professor Emeritus of Law UM-Dearborn School of Engineering Sullivan, Joseph E., Associate Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Cox, Kendall B., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Philosophy Curtis, Theodore T., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Sociology ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1-December 31, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Bernstein, Marc S., Assistant Professor of Near Eastern Studies, duty off campus, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Blouin, Francis X., Director, Bentley Historical Library, Professor of Information and Library Studies, with tenure, School of Information and Library Studies, and Professor of History, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, sabbatical leave Bound, John, Associate Professor of Economics, with tenure, duty off campus, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Brusati, Celeste A., Associate Professor of History of Art and Women's Studies, with tenure, scholarly activity leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Colas, Santiago, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin American Literature and Comparative Literature, scholarly activity leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Coucouvanis, Dimitri N., Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave Eccles, Jacquelynne S., Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Education, without tenure, School of Education, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Faraway, Julian J., Associate Professor of Statistics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Francis, Anthony H., Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave Hegyi, Dennis J., Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Heirick, Jane R., Lecturer III in Music, Residential College, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Johnson, Susan L., Assistant Professor of History, leave without salary, September 1, 1995 -May 31, 1996 Li, Boa Qin, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, leave without salary, September 1, 1995= May 31, 1996 Lohmann, Kyger C., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 MacDonald, Michael P., Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave Meyers, Philip A., Professor of Geological Sciences, with tenure, sabbatical leave Muirhead, Robb J., Professor of Statistics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Mukasa, Samuel B., Associate Professor of Geological Sciences, with tenure, sabbatical leave Porter, James I., Associate Professor of Greek, Latin, and Comparative Literature, with tenure, scholarly activity leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Porter, Richard C., Professor of Economics, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Robertson, Jennifer E., Associate Professor of Anthropology, with tenure, scholarly activity leave 174

Page  175 October Meeting, 1995 Shaffer, Greg E., Assistant Professor of Economics, duty off campus, September 1, 1994~ December 31, 1995 Shappirio, David G., Professor of Biological Sciences, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 22-December 31, 1995 Varian, Hal R., Professor of Economics, with tenure, scholarly activity leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 College of Engineering Brake, Mary L., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 22-October 15, 1995 Klaver, Peter R., Associate Professor of Technical Communication, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Mathes, John C., Professor of Technical Communication, with tenure, retirement furlough Tien, Tseng-Ying, Professor of Materials Engineering, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1-May 31, 1995 Medical School Counsell, Raymond E., Professor of Pharmacology, with tenure, Medical School, and Professor of Medicinal Chemistry, with tenure, College of Pharmacy, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-August 31, 1996 Morley, George W., the Norman F. Miller Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1, 1996-December 31, 1997 Schteingart, David E., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-June 30, 1996 Steude, Georgine M., Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology and Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-August 31, 1997 College of Architecture and Urban Planning Chaffers, James A., Professor of Architecture, with tenure, duty off campus Rycus, Mitchell J., Professor of Urban Planning, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 22-October 20, 1995 School of Art Baird, Kenneth W., Professor of Art, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995 -May 31, 1996 School of Business Administration Hosmer, LaRue T., Professor of Corporate Strategy, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Oswald, Lynda J., Associate Professor of Business Law, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Paul, Jonathan M., Assistant Professor of Finance, contract leave, September 1, 1995 -May 31, 1996 Spivey, W. Allen, Professor of Statistics, with tenure, and the Clare E. Griffin Professor of Business Administration, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Wheeler, James E., Professor of Accounting, with tenure, phased retirement, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1999 Wright, David W., Associate Professor of Accounting, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 School of Dentistry Hacker, Corrine H., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Dentistry, leave without salary, September 7-November 11, 1995 School of Information and Library Studies Durrance, Joan C., Associate Professor of Information and Library Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave Law School Kamisar, Yale, Professor of Law, with tenure, sabbatical leave 175

Page  176 October Meeting, 1995 School of Public Health Cornell, Richard G., Professor of Biostatistics, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-January 31, 1996 Garabrant, David H., Associate Professor of Occupational Medicine, with tenure, School of Public Health, and Associate Professor of Occupational Medicine, without tenure, Medical School, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 and duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 School of Social Work Barbarin, Oscar A., III, Professor of Social Work, with tenure, School of Social Work, and Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Axsom, Richard H., Professor of Art History, with tenure, sabbatical leave Baumgarten, Elias, Associate Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-April 30, 1996 Clark, Elaine G., Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-April 30, 1996 Cohn, Thomas S., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, sabbatical leave Gardner, Gerald T., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-April 30, 1996 Garland, Frank, Associate Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, sabbatical leave Hughes, Paul M., Associate Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-April 30, 1996 Mazian, Florence I., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-April 30, 1996 UM-Dearborn School of Management Cowan, D. Ross, Associate Professor of Operations Management, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Blakely, Everett J., Associate Professor of Social Work, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Boys, Donald W., Associate Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Faires, Nora H., Associate Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Hansen, Kristina D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Marsh, William M., Professor of Physical Geography, with tenure, and the David M. French Professor, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Mawby, Carolyn M., Associate Professor of Music, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Nas, Tevfilk F., Professor of Economics, with tenure, sabbatical leave Perlman, Ellis B., Professor of Political Science, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Provost, Consuela M., Professor of English and Theatre, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Rinne, Carl H., Associate Professor of Education, with tenure, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Rubenstein, Bruce A., Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Towsley, Ann E., Associate Professor of Education, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Webb, Nancy C., Associate Professor of Education, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Bell, John C., Associate Professor of Theatre, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 176

Page  177 October Meeting, 1995 TERMINATIONS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Barinova, Galina, Lecturer II in Slavic Languages and Literatures, retired, April 30, 1995 Bodenbender, Brian E., Lecturer II in Geological Sciences, resigned, April 30, 1995 Buchbinder, Jane, Lecturer I in English Language and Literature, resigned, August 31, 1995 Drummond, Carl N.Jr., Lecturer II in Geological Sciences, resigned, August 31, 1994 Gates, Bronwen, Lecturer II in Biology, resigned, September 30, 1995 Hill-Collins, Patricia, University of Michigan Presidential Professor of Women's Studies and African-American and African Studies, term complete, December 31, 1994 Isaacson, Helen, Lecturer II in English, retired, December 31, 1995 Martin-Esker, Amanda A., Lecturer I in Chemistry, term complete, December 31, 1994 Quandt, Kim S., Lecturer I in Chemistry, term complete, December 31, 1994 Smith, Neil D., Lecturer II in Communication Studies, term complete, August 31, 1995 Thompson, Gregory K., Lecturer I in Chemistry, term complete, December 31, 1994 Medical School Boland, C. Richard, Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, resigned, August 20, 1995 Cosio, Margaret, Lecturer in Anesthesiology, resigned, September 8, 1995 Gordon, Tobey R., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, resigned, September 20, 1995 Grady-Benson, John C., Instructor in Surgery, resigned, August 31, 1995 Johnson, Arlan T., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, resigned, September 15, 1995 Law School Snow, Mary A., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Law, term complete, August 31, 1995 School of Nursing Kahn, David L., Assistant Professor of Nursing, resigned, May 31, 1995 There were no retirements, deaths, or degree actions this month. Consent Agenda Approved. On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved the Consent Agenda. Financial Report for the University of Michigan for the Year Ended June 30, 1995 Executive Vice President Womack submitted the summary version of the Financial Report for the year ended June 30, 1995. Alternative Asset Investments Regent Horning moved that $10 million of the Long Term Portfolio be committed to Douglas Emmett Realty Fund 1995, pending completion of due diligence and favorable review of the documents for their legal acceptability by the general counsel. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe VII, L.P. Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that the University has committed $15 million to Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe VII, L.P., after previously having invested $10 million in Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe VI, L.P. This is consistent with the Regentally-approved 177

Page  178 October Meeting, 1995 policy that would allow a follow-on investment in a new fund sponsored by a previously approved partnership provided the new fund has the same investment strategy and core investment personnel as the prior fund. E.H. Krause Building Laboratory Renovations On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Newman, the Regents unanimously approved renovations for laboratories in the E. H. Kraus Building, as described in the Regents Communication. School of Medicine Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scanner On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved installation of a third Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) unit to support research activity on the B2 level of University Hospital, along with submission of a Certificate of Need application to the Michigan Department of Public Health. Intercollegiate Athletics Yost Ice Arena Renovations On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved increasing the scope of a previously approved renovation project for Yost Ice Arena, as well as the following amendment to the financing resolution: REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN RESOLUTION AMENDING RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING ISSUANCE AND SALE OF NOT TO EXCEED $5,000,000 VARIABLE RATE DEMAND INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC REVENUE BONDS, SERIES 1995 WHEREAS, on September 22, 1995, the Regents of the University of Michigan adopted its "Resolution Authorizing Issuance and Sale of Not to Exceed $5,000,000 Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995" (the "Resolution"), authorizing the issuance and sale of bonds in the principal amount of not to exceed $5,000,000 to finance the cost of construction and equipping of a tennis center facility and providing for the payment and security of the bonds and other matters relating thereto; and WHEREAS, it is necessary to amend the Resolution to add an additional component to the Project (as defined in the Resolution), consisting of renovations to and remodeling of the Yost Ice Arena, including related furnishings and equipment: NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Regents of the University of Michigan, as follows: 1. The first WHEREAS clause of the Resolution is hereby amended to include within the definition of the "Project" renovations to and remodeling of the Yost Ice Arena, including related furnishings and equipment, so that the term "Project" shall mean as used throughout the Resolution, the construction and equipping of a tennis center facility, and the above described renovations to and remodeling of Yost Ice Arena. 2. Amended hereby, the Resolution is hereby ratified and confirmed. 178

Page  179 October Meeting, 1995 Parking Services 1996 Annual Maintenance Program On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved the Parking Services 1996 annual maintenance program, as described in the Regents Communication. 1996-97 and 1997-98 State Budget Requests for All Three Campuses Regent Power moved approval of the 1996-97 and 1997-98 State Budget Requests for the Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint Campuses. Regent McFee seconded the motion. She commented on the importance of these requests and complimented the staff on the requests' presentation and content. In particular, she noted the importance of the Institute for Educational Innovation in K-12 that is described in the Ann Arbor Campus document. The vote was then taken, and the motion was approved unanimously. Purchasing Contract with Fitness Finders, Inc. On a motion by Regent Baker, seconded by Regent Deitch, all seven Regents present unanimously approved the University's entering into a purchasing contract with Fitness Finders, Inc. Because two University employees, Charles T. and Beth A. Kuntzleman, are also co-owners of Fitness Finders, Inc., this contract falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the purchasing contract will be the Regents of the University of Michigan and Fitness Finders, Inc. 2. The terms of the contract to support in a cost effective manner the Blue Cross-Blue Shield funded Fitness for Youth program, participated in by some employees of the University's Division of Kinesiology, include the following purchases during the current academic year from Fitness Finders, Inc.: 534 Mileage Club Packets $ 2,856.90 45 Coordinator Packets 240.75 12 Skill-A-Week Programs 120.00 87 Mega Mileage Club Kits 3,654.00 Shipping 140.00 Total $ 7,002.65 3. Charles T. and Beth A. Kuntzleman's pecuniary interest arises from their positions as co-owners of Fitness Finders, Inc. Agreement between the University of Michigan and the University of Georgia On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent McFee, all seven Regents present unanimously approved the University's entering into an agreement with the University of Georgia. The agreement involves two grants from the National Institutes of Health that were transferred from the University of Georgia to the University of Michigan because the principal investigator (Dr. Denise Park) and her principal collaborator (Dr. Roger Morrell) moved to the University of Michigan from the University of 179

Page  180 October Meeting, 1995 Georgia. Because both contracts involve sub-contracts to the University of Georgia, and Drs. Park and Morrell retain adjunct faculty status there, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the agreement are the University of Michigan and the University of Georgia. 2. The terms of the agreement are as follows: Under Project 1 a total subcontract of approximately $125,000 is planned for the period August 1, 1995 through January 31, 1997. Under Project 2 a total subcontract of $341,120 is planned for the period August 1, 1995 through July 31, 1998. The University's standard subcontract provisions will apply. 3. Neither Dr. Denise Park nor Dr. Roger Morrell will receive any compensation from the University of Georgia. Instructional Technology Integration Center (ITIC) President Duderstadt circulated a brochure describing the "media union" that is occurring at ITIC. M-Quality Expo The president announced that the University's second M-Quality Expo was currently underway in the Michigan Union, and he and Executive Vice President Womack encouraged the Regents and executive officers to attend following the meeting. Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities In response to a question from Regent Power, Vice President Hartford said that the final draft of the Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities will be ready for Regental action at the November meeting. Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics President Duderstadt reported that proposed changes to the bylaws regarding the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics should be ready for consideration by the Board at the November meeting. Vice President Harrison reminded the Regents that prior to the Regents actually acting on proposed bylaw changes, there is a required period for public notice and comment, and that discussion of the topic might not occur before the December meeting. Regents' Meeting on Flint Campus Regent McFee commented that the meeting on the Flint Campus had been extremely worthwhile and pleasurable, and observed that the Flint Campus "had the right chancellor at the right campus at the right time." 180

Page  181 October Meeting, 1995 Adjournment There being no further discussion, the meeting was adjourned at 10:10 a.m. The next meeting will be held on November 16 and 17, 1995. Regents' expenses recorded in the month of September 1995 totaled $1,159.46. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 181

Page  182 SPECIAL MEETING, NOVEMBER 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor November 8, 1995 A special meeting of the Board of Regents commenced via telephone conference call at 6:00 p.m. Present were Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Regent McFee joined the call at 6:15 p.m. Also present were Vice President Harrison, Secretary Palmer, and General Counsel Cole. Executive Session Motion Regent Power made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session on November 8, 1995, for the purpose of considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Horning seconded the motion and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then continued in executive session. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 182

Page  183 NOVEMBER MEETING, 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Thursday, November 16, 1995 The Regents met at 10:05 a.m. in the Welker Room of the Michigan Union. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, and Power. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, and Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford were also present. Vice Presidents Kinnear and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were absent; Regents Deitch and Varner arrived after the start of the meeting. Executive Session Motion President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and recognized Regent Horning, who made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session at 10:00 a.m. on November 16, 1995, and reconvene at 7:30 a.m. on October 20, 1995, for the purposes of considering material exempt from discussion or disclosur e by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously, The meeting then continued in executive session. The meeting reconvened in public session at 1:40 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellor Nelms were also present. Chancellor Renick arrived at about 2:30 p.m.; Provost Simpson attended in his stead until that time. President's Report President Duderstadt commented on the recent appointment of Lloyd Carr as head football coach, noting that this highlights the extraordinary attention paid by the media to intercollegiate athletics at Michigan and also highlights why intercollegiate athletics is important to higher education. He observed that the fact that college sports has become a major form of entertainment for the public at large has led to many of the current difficulties in intercollegiate athletics. One reason this has become difficult to control is that the organizations set up to control intercollegiate athletics, particularly the NCAA, have had great difficulty in coping with the extraordinary pressure exerted by the media and the public. 183

Page  184 November Meeting, 1995 The president noted that in recent years, university presidents have taken steps to reassert their control over intercollegiate athletics and to better align them with the academic philosophy and purpose of universities. One such proponent of such activity was the Knight Commission, which spelled out the following fundamental principles: that the educational values, practices, and missions of the institution would determine the standards by which intercollegiate athletics were conducted; that the responsibility and authority for the administration of the athletic department are vested in the president and through the president, to the Board of Regents; that the welfare, health, and safety of student athletics are primary concerns of athletics; and that every student athlete will receive equitable and fair treatment. The University is currently undergoing a major certification effort in which its programs are being examined in a peer review process in cooperation with the NCAA. President Duderstadt announced that at the NCAA annual meeting in January, a proposal will be on the ballot that would restructure the NCAA from an association into a federation. That would mean that the three principle divisions would become separate entities and would develop their own internal structures to govern their behavior. He pointed out that with its current structure, the NCAA doesn't well serve the large institutions commonly associated with Division IA. The Division I institutions would be governed by an executive board comprised of presidents, eight of whom would come from the eight major conferences. This move is seen as the next logical step in the effort to align college sports with the academic mission of the institutions; if this proposal is not successful, the president suggested that the NCAA may cease to exist. Chief Financial Officer's Report Executive Vice President Womack deferred to Vice President Kinnear, who said that in response to Regental request, there would be a presentation on planned giving (trusts and bequests). He turned the floor over to Ms. Kathy Okun, director of trusts and bequests in the Office of Development, and Mr. Norman Herbert, University treasurer, who gave a presentation about planned giving opportunities currently available at the University of Michigan, as well as recent performance figures and portfolio values. Following the presentation, Vice President Kinnear observed that some of the vehicles mentioned in the presentation as issues to be considered for the future will require Regental approval. Presidential Search Activities Provost Machen presented two proposed plans for scheduling public fora for the Regents to receive input on the presidential search, in response to the Regents' request to him, Secretary Palmer, and Vice President Harrison at the October Regents' Meeting. Plan Two is identical to Plan One, except for the inclusion of two additional fora to be held in western Michigan and 184

Page  185 November Meeting, 1995 metropolitan Detroit. The proceedings would be recorded for the benefit of any Regents who might not be able to attend all of the fora. Regent McGowan noted that consistent with the Regents' invitation for public input issued at the last meeting, Plan Two is preferable as it extends the opportunity for accessibility to the widest array of the University's constituency. Regent Newman concurred. It was decided that it would be preferable to conclude all of the fora before the January 1996 Regents' meeting, if possible. Regent McGowan moved approval of proposed Public Forum Schedule Plan Two, which calls for the scheduling of nine fora to be concluded by January 1996. Regent Newman seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Provost Machen proposed that written communication be solicited from a range of constituencies in the form of a letter from the Board of Regents to be published as an advertisement in a variety of publications. The letter would serve the purpose of announcing the fora schedule and would provide mailing and electronic mail addresses for the submission of public input. All correspondence received will be copied and bound in notebooks and provided to the Regents and will be considered public documents consistent with the Freedom of Information Act. Regent Power asked what the Regents wanted the public to write to them about, noting that in previous discussions, three main topics had emerged: 1) the needs of the University in the years to come; 2) what qualities should be sought in the next president; and 3) what kind of search should be undertaken. Provost Machen responded that several drafts in response to this question have been proposed, each with various nuances. Regent Power stated that it would be important to state the nature of the Regents' concerns, rather than invite generalized comment. Provost Machen noted that this document would be brought before the Regents for approval before being placed in the public domain. There followed a discussion of what publications would be used to advertise the public fora; the original suggestions had been the Michigan Daily, the Michigan Review, the Black Student Monthly, the University Record, the Michigan Alumnus, and Michigan Today. In response to a question from Regent McFee about the advisability of advertising in more general public newspapers, Regent Newman observed that most newspapers will publish notices of public meetings free of charge. Provost Machen pointed out that the short time frame for holding the student campus forum prior to the end of classes might preclude some forms of advertising. Finally, Provost Machen noted that the report requested by the Regents about how presidential searches have been conducted at peer institutions, as 185

Page  186 November Meeting, 1995 well as at the University of Michigan in the past, would be presented to the Regents at the December meeting. Report of the Senate Advisory Committee on University Affairs (SACUA) President Duderstadt introduced Professor George Brewer, chair of SACUA, to present his report. Professor Brewer gave an overview of the faculty governance system, noting that while it is advisory, it is wellorganized, comprehensive, and capable of giving the perspective of the faculty on all areas of University activity. Professor Brewer thanked President Duderstadt for his service and leadership on behalf of the faculty. He noted that the quality of the faculty is the most important determinant of the quality of the University, and that the University of Michigan has a great faculty. The two keys to developing maintaining a great university are to recruit excellent faculty and to provide an environment in which they have an opportunity to excel. He described the keys to an optimal academic environment for faculty as an open intellectual climate, the time and resources to develop their scholarship, and an administration that accepts the faculty as partners in charting the best course for the university. Overall, Professor Brewer asserted that the environment at the University of Michigan is excellent for faculty. Professor Brewer noted that perhaps the most important task facing the new president will be to preserve and even to enhance that environment. Of paramount concern is that the president come from an academic background, grounded in scholarship, teaching, and research in order to appreciate and preserve the University's greatness. Regarding the presidential search, Professor Brewer noted that while a closed search is against the law, a search conducted entirely in the open would fail to turn up the kind of candidates needed to preserve the University's greatness. He reported that the faculty had suggested to the Regents a search process modeled after the recent provost search. This would consist of a faculty advisory committee with alumni and student representation to provide a list of candidates from which the Regents could conduct the search in an open manner. He stated that the general counsel's office had advised SACUA that this approach would comply with the law, but could not guarantee against a suit. If the Regents do what is legal and best for the University, he said that the faculty would be supportive. Professor Brewer reported that "the faculty will accept nothing less than doing what's best for the University." He warned that the faculty "has bitten before and can bite again. If an unqualified president is rammed down our throats and soon exhibits those lack of qualifications, the Senate Assembly is fully capable of rendering a vote of no confidence." Professor Brewer then observed that he had great respect for each of the Regents as individuals, but that now it was important for them to function as a team. This means that each individual must suppress some personal tendencies for 186

Page  187 November Meeting, 1995 the overall good of the team. He had full confidence that the Regents would do a good job in the challenge ahead because of their individual personal strengths and the fact that they each valued the future of the University so highly. Proposed Code of Student Conduct Vice President Hartford invited to the table the students who had been involved in the drafting of the most current draft of the proposed Code of Student Conduct. She noted that Dean Jeffrey Lehman of the Law School would be joining the group and commenting at a later point. Vice President Hartford noted that two members of the student work group, Kim Wilson, a senior in LS&A, and Margaret Kinnear, a senior at Emory University, could not be present. She introduced the other students as Jack Bernard, a recent graduate of the Law School; Emi Nakazato, a recent graduate of LS&A; Kenneth Sachs, a senior in LS&A; Christopher Hodges, a junior in LS&A and the representative from the Civil Liberties Board; Sean McCabe-Plius, a graduate student in a dual-degree M.S.W. and Ph.D. program; and Larry LaTarte, a senior in LS&A. Each student spoke to the Board about various aspects of how the committee went about its work of drafting a new code. Mr. Bernard concentrated on how the charge to the group, which described the type of code that was desired, had provided challenges and opportunities in drafting the new code; Ms. Nakazato, Mr. Sachs, and Mr. Hodges described the methods the group had used to receive input and feedback; Mr. McCabe-Plius described the background research done by the group to become familiar with the issues involved, and Mr. LaTarte reviewed some of the specific examples of feedback the group had received. Following the work group's presentations, Dean Jeffrey Lehman spoke in more general terms about codes of conduct. He noted that every community has some type of code, along with sanctions for when its norms are violated. He observed that there is a relationship among community codes of conduct, as people belong to more than one community and must therefore adhere to more than one code, whether written or not. He enumerated some of the communities that exist at the University, as well as some of the codes of conduct, implicit and explicit, that its members are subject to. He gave examples of some of the conditions and codes of conduct as they apply at the Law School. Dean Lehman observed that it is important to have written procedures that protect members of a community from arbitrary and capricious conduct on the part of the institution, and it is also important to preserve common law authority to deal with concerns that might not have been anticipated by the drafters of a written code. He also believes that even though individual units might have their own student conduct codes, it would be helpful for the University as a whole to have a general code of student conduct. 187

Page  188 November Meeting, 1995 Dean Lehman had reviewed the current code draft from his perspective as dean of the Law School, and observed that the following aspects of it are most important to him: 1) Vice President Hartford, her staff, and students have worked diligently on the document and are happy with it, believing it to be broad, inclusive, and responsive to the Regents' concerns; 2) the code does not pre-empt or displace unit-based codes of conduct, such as the one that governs the Law School; 3) and there will be ample opportunity to amend the document as experience is gained with it. Vice President Hartford and President Duderstadt expressed their gratitude to the work group and to Dean Lehman. Mr. Flint Wainess, president of Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) joined the group to respond to questions. In response to a question from Regent Newman, Mr. Wainess stated that he did not have any prepared remarks about the proposed code. In response to Regent Power's question about his role as MSA president and MSA's role institutionally in the drafting of the code, Mr. Wainess stated that the MSA did not have any institutional role in the drafting of the document with the work group. However, through his membership on the Student Relations Committee of SACUA, he became involved in the process after the work group had submitted its recommendations to Vice President Hartford. Through that involvement, a number of changes were made. Mr. McCabe-Plius observed that the work group felt it was important to provide opportunities for input; however, some groups chose not to participate. Mr. Wainess reported that MSA had voted to encourage the Regents not to impose any code that exceeds federal and state mandates. MSA also had expressed support for some changes that had been made from the old Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities to the new Code of Student Conduct and suggested some additional changes. Regent Power noted that the Regents had received a letter from SACUA about the code; Vice President Hartford pointed out that she had not been invited to discuss the document with SACUA. Regent Deitch asked the students why they believe a code is needed at this time, and why the adoption of the code would improve student life. Mr. Bernard responded that their mandate had been to develop a code, not whether or not there should be a code. Therefore, the group had not addressed the issue of whether or not a code was necessary. Regent McGowan agreed with this assessment. Regent Deitch concurred, but said he was interested in the students' views about the code. Noting that he believes that questions that deal with issues unique to this community are appropriate for codification, he asked Dean Lehman for his view on aspects of the code that deal with behaviors that are otherwise covered by the law. 188

Page  189 November Meeting, 1995 Dean Lehman responded that the law might impose one set of sanctions that are appropriate to the interests of the state of Michigan, and the University might decide as a community that some behaviors mean something different to its community than they do to the state. The University might decide that its norms and values call for a set of rules and potential sanctions that are special to it and that these are what makes it different from the state. For example, whether or not the state chooses to punish a student who falsifies information on an application, the University has a powerful interest in punishing such a student. Regent McFee noted that in her opinion, including some actions in the code that are also considered crimes by the state provides an opportunity to address some issues in a less severe and more educational manner than taking someone to court. Regent Baker wondered whether a student who was found innocent in a court of a law for a crime but then punished by the University for the same action would be subject to double jeopardy. Dean Lehman responded that when people are members of multiple communities, they are subject to the codes of each community. For instance, if someone commits a crime punishable by both state and federal law, he/she could be acquitted under state law and convicted under federal law. He also pointed out that standards might be different for the different communities. Building upon Regent Deitch's previous question to the work group as to whether they felt a code was necessary and how they believed it would improve the lives of students, Regent Baker asked the work group members if there was anyone in the group who did not favor the idea of a code. Mr. Hodges responded that he initially had believed the whole notion of a code was unnecessary. However, as he had learned more about codes and worked on the draft, his opinion had changed, and he now stands behind the draft created by the group. He had come to the realization that there are many issues that the University is better equipped to handle than are the courts, and that it is in a position to protect students, rather than harm them. In general, he believes this is a good code. Regent Baker said that he believes the students who developed the code should be willing to state whether they endorse it or not. President Duderstadt recalled that the Regents had specifically stated that there would be a code, and the only issue was whether it would be written by the Regents or students. Vice President Hartford pointed out that both the Dearborn and Flint campuses already had codes in place; the document under consideration would apply only to the Ann Arbor campus. Regent Power also supported Regent McGowan's and the president's point that the Regents had stated very clearly that there would be a code. Regent Deitch stated that he had no problem with the notion of a code as it relates to academic issues, as well as the requirements of federal law that 189

Page  190 November Meeting, 1995 there be a code in place. However, he was wrestling with the notion of whether this code would make student life better at Michigan, and he was interested in the views of the students who drafted it. Mr. Hodges responded that he believed that the code would make life better for students because 1) it serves as a grievance procedure to protect students from other students; 2) the jurisdiction is much better defined than in the previous version, which is helpful to students; 3) the University makes an effort to work with students, providing various options in the area of sanctions and in using mediation as the primary means of resolving conflicts. This will make it function more like a grievance procedure than a more punitive system. Mr. Bernard also pointed out that this code goes beyond the requirements of the law in providing due process, giving the students more opportunities to think about the issues and to learn from the process. It thereby gives students more protections than they would have under the previous code or if there were no code. Another student pointed out that this code gives an opportunity to students to define their own community and their own values. It is positive for students because it provides clearly defined expectations of the values of the community. Vice President Hartford referred to a document first issued by the American Association of University Professors, the U.S. Students Association, the National Association of Student Affairs, and the AAU, in 1967: "A Joint Statement on the Rights and Responsibilities of Students." This document clearly stated that universities should have standards of conduct, noting that in communities of teaching and learning there are some behaviors that might also be violations of law but that also get in the way of both teaching and learning. It is those kinds of behaviors that we should seek to stop, although perhaps in a different fashion than courts of law. Regent Power stated that he was impressed by this version of the code, because it reflects the input of students and seeks to bring forward the values which they wish to codify to deal with their lives as members of an academic community. In response to his question of how many contacts had been received in the form of feedback from students, a committee member responded that about 500 contacts had been received from students, of the total of 1,000 contacts. Presidential Search Process Regent McGowan noted that Professor Brewer had asserted that the general counsel's office had taken a position on a model he had proffered as a process for the presidential search. She requested that General Counsel Cole respond to those comments. Ms. Cole reported that the general counsel's office "has not endorsed any particular approach regarding how to conduct the presidential search, 190

Page  191 November Meeting, 1995 nor has it examined in depth and subsequently issued any opinion regarding any particular procedure to use in doing that search." Regent McGowan commented that while the Regents are genuinely seeking input from the community on how to design a search procedure that will best serve the University, there are certain legal limitations that preclude the ability to start with a totally blank slate. Regent Newman made the following response to Professor Brewer's comments: "I think we all collectively believe that SACUA's comments are very important to the search process, as we believe all faculty input is very important However, we are troubled with the tone in which a portion of your comments were delivered. Especially in a community- wide search process, threats are unnecessary and out of place. This Board takes its responsibility very seriously and appreciates constructive comments which can and will add to the search process." The meeting then recessed and reconvened at 4:10 p.m. in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union to hear Public Comments. Public Comments The Regents heard comments from the following people, on the topics indicated: Brandon Riordan, student and board member of the Student Buyer's Association (SBA), on SBA's office space in the Michigan Union; and Anne Marie Ellison, student, Devorah Adler, student, Mary H. Rave, president of the Washtenaw County branch of the ACLU, Eugene Feingold, ACLU board member, and Sallie R. Churchill, ACLU board member on the topic of the Code of Student Conduct. Friday, November 17, 1995 The Regents met at 9:00 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were also present. President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and called the Regents' attention to a report describing the progress of the first year of the Michigan Agenda for Women. Presidential Search Committee The president called on Regent Newman, who read the following resolution: 191

Page  192 November Meeting, 1995 Resolved, that pursuant to the provisions in Section 1.07 of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents, a committee of the whole to be known as the Presidential Search Committee consisting of Regents Deane Baker, Laurence B. Deitch, Daniel D. Horning, Shirley M. McFee, Rebecca McGowan, Andrea Fischer Newman, Philip H. Power, and Nellie M Varner, or the successor in ofice of each such person, be and is hereby established. The Committee shall consider all matters in connection with selecting a president and shall have the power and authority to take such steps and perform such acts as may be necessary and proper to carry out its assignment. The Committee shall elect such chairpersons as may be appropriate. Regent Horning seconded the motion. Regent McFee commented that the committee will meet in public in the same manner as is done for its regular business meetings. The purpose of the committee is to set forth the framework of the search and to determine how to proceed. The establishment of this committee does not preclude establishing other advisory committees; its purpose is provide a framework within which to operate to make such decisions. Regent Baker reiterated that the Regents intend to bring into the process the various elements of the University committee. The vote was then taken and the resolution was approved unanimously. Regent McGowan nominated Regent Nellie Varner as co-chair of the Presidential Selection Committee. Regent Deitch seconded the nomination, noting that "the University of Michigan has no more distinguished daughter than Nellie Varner." The nomination was approved unanimously. Regent Horning nominated Regent Shirley McFee as co-chair of the Presidential Selection Committee. Regent Newman seconded the nomination, noting Regent McFee's long history of service to her community and the University. The motion was approved unanimously. Regents Varner and McFee both expressed their appreciation for the confidence shown by the other Regents in selecting them as co-chairs of the committee. Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the October 10, 1995 special meeting and the October 19-20 regular meeting for approval. Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports on investments, plant extension, litigation, and personnel-labor relations. With regard to the endowment and long term portfolio funds, he observed that 192

Page  193 November Meeting, 1995 with the market at historically high levels, a correction should be expected to occur at some point. Vice President Neal submitted reports on projects established and summaries of a selection of current research and sponsored projects for the month of October 1995. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear submitted the report of voluntary support for October 1995. He noted that with 75 percent of the time having passed, the Campaign for Michigan is at 92 percent of its goal. Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois for research in the Medical School.................................... 7,500 Jay and Maryanne Alix Foundation, Southfield for the Cancer Center in the Medical School........................................ 14,200 American Automobile Manufacturers Association, Detroit for highway safety research in the Transportation Research Institute............... 220,000 American Brain Tumor Association, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School..........................................6,250 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science and the Arts, and the Biophysics Research Division.......................... 66,620 Ameritech Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for employee matching gifts...................................................... 13,056 William J. Anderson, Ann Arbor for research in the College of Engineering.........................................15,000 Anonymous Donor for scholarship support in the College of Engineering and the Medical School......... 200,000 Aramco Services Company, Houston, Texas for the Industrial Affiliates Program in Flow and Reaction in Porus Media in the College of Engineering.................................................... 20,000 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School................................................12,750 Rodney S. W. Basler, Lincoln, Nebraska for the William B. Taylor Endowment in the Medical School........................... 5,000 Alvin M. Bentley Foundation, Owosso for the Alvin M. and Arvella D. Bentley Scholarship................................. 40,000 Robert H. Berry, Ann Arbor 127 shares of General Motors Corporation common stock for research in the M edical School................................................. 5,628 M. E. Barr Bigelow, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada for support in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, and for the Biological Station in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, in memory of Howard E. Bigelow............................................... 6,000 Peter F. Borish, New York, New York for support in the School of Public Policy..........................................10,000 Robert Bosch Company, Reutlingen, Germany for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute............. 14,990 BP America, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, and for em ployee m atching gifts......................................................... 10,100 Richard D. Brezina Trust for support in the School of Nursing.............................................. 78,496 Margaret K. Brigham, Evart for the Glaucoma Research and Development Fund in the Medical School.............. 20,000 James R. Browne, Houston, Texas 100 shares of Chase Manhattan common stock for tax policy research in the School of Business Administration...................... 6,325 Fred M. Brubaker, Pennington, New Jersey 170 shares of Bristol-Myers Squibb common stock for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy......................... 12,729 Alfred H. Burwitz Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................ 100,000 193

Page  194 November Meeting, 1995 Roderick Campbell, Dearborn for the Save A Heart Campaign Fund in the Medical School........................10,000 Campbell Soup Company, Camden, New Jersey for Community Health Programs support in the School of Public Health................5,000 Cardiac Rhythm Management Research Foundation, St. Paul, Minnesota for cardiology research in the Medical School....................................... 20,000 Robert C. Christensen, Kingsport, Tennessee 200 shares of Sonoco Products Company common stock for support in the M edical School........................................ 5,638 Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park for research in the College of Engineering................................ 460,000 Colgate-Palmolive Company, New York, New York for support in the School of Dentistry..................................36,013 Comerica, Inc., Detroit for student aid, School of Business Administration, and for employee matching gifts....... 5,455 Coopers & Lybrand, Detroit for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute.......7,500 May W. Corby, Rockville Center, New York 100 shares of Pfizer common stock for support of the Law School.................................................... 5,600 Marilyn Mayer Culpepper, Lansing 300 shares of Michigan National Corporation common stock for gifts pending designation in the Campaign for Michigan.......................... 32,831 Dermatology Foundation, Evanston, Illinois for research in the M edical School................................................ 19,750 Charles DeVlieg Foundation, Detroit for the Devlieg Fellowship and Scholarship in the College of Engineering.............. 21,000 Mary Hunter Dobson, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................... 5,000 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Scholarship, the Cooperative Education Program and other support in the College of Engineering.................. 14,500 Dow Chemical Company, Midland for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 40,00 Electronic Data Systems Corporation, Dallas, Texas for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute...... 10,000 Geneva M. Ellwood Estate 8 shares of Groundstar Resources, Ltd., common stock and a cash gift for the Architecture Alumni Scholarship in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and for Institute for Human Adjustment in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................ 441,584 Envision, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 Eldred E. Evans, Prairie Village, Kansas for the Eldred E. Evans Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering..................................................... 20,000 John D. Evans Foundation, Middleburg, Virginia for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..................... 100,000 Exxon Company, U.S.A., Houston, Texas for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, and for support in the College of Engineering..........................................27,000 Ernestine Fields Estate for the Ernestine Fields Scholarship in the School of Music..........................15,184 Stanley E. Fleszar Estate for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan.............................. 10,527 Ford Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Public Policy....................................... 200,000 Ford Motor Company, Dearborn for metallic materials research in the College of Engineering and for the Harmonize for Hope Fund in the Medical School.................................... 54,000 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration.................................... 10,000 John M. Forelle, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Forest Health Services Corporation, Ann Arbor for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................. 20,000 194

Page  195 November Meeting, 1995 Dale P. Fosdick, Saline for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.......................................... 5,000 Stanley and Judith Frankel Support Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Social Work................ 22,500 Donald N. Frey, Evanston, Illinois for the Class of 1947 Engineers Fund in the College of Engineering................... 10,000 Fujisawa USA, Inc., Deerfield, Illinois for research in the College of Pharmacy........................................ 14,000 Stanley Garn, Ann Arbor 20 units of the EF Hutton Texas EX NTL Investment Trust for gifts pending designation in the Campaign for Michigan.......................... 9,563 General Motors Foundation, Inc., Detroit for the Library Development Fund, the University of Michigan-Flint................. 40,000 Charlotte Geyer Foundation, Williamsville, New York for research in the Medical School.........................................25,000 Ellen Weis Goldstein, Washington, DC for history support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................. 5,000 Joseph I. Goldstein, Washington, DC for support of the Law School.................................................... 5,000 Gralnick Foundation, Rye Brook, New York for the Gastrointestinal Peptide and Education Fund in the Medical School...........10,000 GTE Foundation, Stamford, Connecticut for the GTE Foundation Fellowship in the School of Business Administration, for electrical and computer engineering fellowships in the College of Engineering and for employee matching gifts.......................................30,750 Sheila Ford Hamp, Dearborn 1,080 shares of Applix, Inc. and 692 shares of R F Monolithics common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics..................... 36,100 Gertrude G. Hewlett Estate for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................ 35,000 Honeywell, Inc., Farmington Hills for the C. S. Mott Golf Classic Benefit Fund........................................45,000 Max L. Hutt Trust for support in the Medical School.............................................. 102,000 James W. Hyde Estate for the Class of 1904 Scholarship in the Law School.............................. 2,300,000 IMRA America, Inc., Ann Arbor for the Industrial Affiliates Program in the College of Engineering.................... 15,000 Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon for the Excellence II Fund in the College of Engineering............................. 40,000 Andrew M. Isaacs, Sunnyvale, California for the Isaacs Kappmeyer Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...... 10,000 ITT Automotive Group, Auburn Hills for course support in the College of Engineering..................................... 7,500 William R. Jentes, Chicago, Illinois for the William R. Jentes Merit Scholarship in the Law School...................... 142,326 Larry L. Johnson, Orchard Lake for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................... 5,000 John F. Joity, Houston, Texas for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........5,000 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International, New York, New York for research in the M edical School............................................... 12,400 JVM and JKM Foundation, Wyckoff, New Jersey for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 Max Kade Foundation, New York, New York for the Junior Year in Freiburg Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 20,000 W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for research in the School of Public of Health and the University Libraries, and for employee matching gifts................................................ 510,360 Constance M. Kinnear, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................... 5,000 Thomas C. Kinnear, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................... 5,000 KPMG Peat Marwick, Montvale, New Jersey for minority fellowships in the School of Public Policy................................ 5,000 195

Page  196 November Meeting, 1995 Joel E. Krischer, Beverly Hills, California for support of the Law School............................................5,000 Lear Seating Corporation, Southfield for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute....... 7,500 Liberace Foundation for the Performing Arts, Las Vegas, Nevada for support in the School of Music......7....................... 7,000 Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........... 10,000 Lilly Endowment, Indianapolis, Indiana for research in the School of Education........................................... 23,995 J. Mark and Linda C. Lozier Fund of the Fidelity Investment Charitable Fund, Boston, Massachusett; for the Loganberry Scholarship in the Department of Athletics..................... 15,000 Ann and Robert H. Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education......................................... 182,000 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the Medical School........................................10,000 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, Southeast Michigan Chapter, Southfield for the Jonas Salk Memorial Laboratory in the School of Public Health............... 25,000 Loretta Matthews Memorial Fund for the Cancer Center in the Medical School....................................... 12,000 McGraw Foundation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for the Max McGraw Professorship of Corporate Environmental Management in the Schools of Business Administration and Natural Resources and Environment..... 300,000 Robert E. Meader Trust, Ann Arbor for the Bentley Historical Library................................................ 25,000 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Foundation, Inc., St. Paul, Minnesota for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering, for the National Pollution Prevention Center in the School of Natural Resources and Environment and for research in the School of Nursing............................ 175,000 Monroe-Brown Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Monroe-Brown Undergraduate Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, for the Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center in the College of Engineering, for the Monroe-Brown Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; and for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................ 120,000 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, Missouri for instructional support in the School of Business Administration....................12,000 Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc., Tucson, Arizona for research in the Medical School........................... 54,302 John M. Nannes, Washington, DC for support of the Law School................................................... 15,000 National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC for the University M usical Society................................................ 20,000 National Glaucoma Research, Rockville, Maryland for research in the M edical School................................................. 6,250 National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, Inc., Ann Arbor for research in the M edical School................................................. 5000 National Multiple Sclerosis Society, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................27,493 NEC Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan for the Solid State Engineering Laboratory in the College of Engineering............ 10,000 Newman Family Foundation, Troy for the Newman Family Foundation Scholarship in Physical Medicine in the M edical School.......................................................... 15,000 John F. and Ann L. Nickoll CDF of the Jewish Community Foundation, Los Angeles, California for support of the Law School.................................................... 12,000 Oliver M. Oakland Estate for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Gift Fund....................................21,000 John J. O'Leary, Green Valley, Arizona 18,018 shares of various corporate common stock for the John J. and Mary C. O'Leary Unitrust Fund for the ultimate benefit of the M edical School........................................................ 1,054,470 196

Page  197 November Meeting, 1995 Oral Health America, Chicago, Illinois for the Cavity Free Clinic Fund in the School of Dentistry...........................25,000 David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, California for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 25,000 Sam Pack's Lee Jarmon Ford, Carrollton, Texas for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn...... 5,000 Elsa U. Pardee Foundation, Midland for research in the M edical School................................................ 74,434 Peninsula Community Foundation, San Mateo, California for program support in the Law School.......................................... 100,000 Pharmacia, Inc., Columbus, Ohio for the Cancer Center in the Medical School....................................... 50,000 PPG Industries Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration and for employee matching gifts........................................................ 5,250 QAD, Inc., Mount Laurel, New Jersey for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute........ 7,500 Katherine T. Ransel, Hickory Corners 75 shares of Kellogg Company common stock for the Cancer Center in the Medical School......................................... 5,611 Barbara K. Reid Estate for student aid in the Medical School............................................... 9,568 Research Fund of American Otological Society, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana for the Kresge Hearing Research Institute in the Medical School....................... 6,250 Marguerite S. Roll, Battle Creek 2,500 shares of Smucker common stock and a cash gift for the Lyle C. Roll Memorial Fund in the Medical School.......................... 100,010 Judith Dow Rumelhart, Ann Arbor for support in the School of Music, and for the University Musical Society............... 6,000 Susan Ryback, Potomac, Maryland for support in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, in memory of Sol King..... 5,000 Saline Construction Company, Ann Arbor for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................. 10,000 Satech, Kirkland, Washington for research in the Center for Ergonomics, College of Engineering....................10,000 Charles H. Sawyer, Ann Arbor for the Charles H. and Katharine C. Sawyer Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for the M useum of Art................................................................. 11,182 Millie Schembechler Memorial Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Millie Schembechler Memorial Fund in the Medical School.................. 226,500 Helen L. Schmutz Estate for support in the Medical School............................. 750,000 Schneider National, Inc., Greenbay, Wisconsin for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business A dm inistration................................................................ 11,250 Seabury Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Charles Ward Seabury Research Fellowship in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning..........................................................10,000 Benson P. Shapiro, Concord, Massachusetts 734 shares of Staples, Inc., common stock for support in the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Minority Scholarship Fund............................................ 19,772 Edward L. Shearer, Metairie, Louisiana for the Loyal Crew Fund in the College of Engineering.............................. 5,000 Shell Oil Company Foundation, Houston, Texas for geological sciences and physics support in the College of Literature,Science, and the Arts, and for the Sea Grant/Industry Consortium Fund in the College of Engineering................................................................. 30,000 Jerold S. Solovy, Chicago, Illinois for the Solovy Judaica Book Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.... 10,000 Telecom Analysis Systems, Inc., Eatontown, New Jersey for support in the College of Engineering.......................................... 15,000 Doris H. Terwilliger Trust, Ann Arbor for the Kent M. Terwilliger Dissertation Prize Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts............................................................. 5,000 197

Page  198 November Meeting, 1995 Texaco, Inc., White Plains, New York for the Institute of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health....... 5,000 Mary L. Tiffany, Ann Arbor 75 shares of Texas Instruments common stock for the Physics Faculty and Alumni Fund, College of Literature, Science,and the Arts...... 6,070 Clayton M. Timmons, Farmington for the Allen L. Shields Memorial Fellowship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................................................... 10,000 James M. Trapp, Winnetka, Illinois 200 shares of Motorola common stock for capital support in the Law School.......................................... 15,463 T.S.G. Ventures, Inc., Stamford, Connecticut for the Alfred L. Edwards Collegiate Professorship and other support in the School of Business Administration.............................................. 10,000 Tourette Syndrome Association, Bayside, New York for research in the Medical School........................................... 5,000 Union Carbide Corporation Chemicals & Plastics Group South Charleston, West Virginia for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute.......... 5,000 United Airlines Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Under-Represented Students Scholarship, School of Business Administration....... 5,000 United Cerebral Palsy Research & Educational Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School...................................26,250 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah for the Obert C. Tanner Lecturer Fund in Philosophy, College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................... 23,000 John C. Unkovic, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for support of the Law School.................................................... 5,000 Frederick S. Upton Foundation, St. Joseph for research in the Center for the Education of Women............................... 5,000 L. Vad Technology, Inc., Detroit for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 5,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for the Basic Organic Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for biostatistics support in the School of Public Health, and for the Save A Heart Campaign Fund in the Medical School................ o......................45,436 Warner-Lambert Company, Morris Plains, New Jersey for em ployee m atching gifts...................................................... 13,103 W. Gerald Warren, Grosse Pointe Shores for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Warren/Conner Development Coalition, Detroit for the MBA Peace Corp Fund in the School of Business Administration............... 16,500 Norman Williamson, Jr., Claremont, California for the Gargoyle Scholarship...................................................... 5,000 Ferdinand B. Zienty, St. Louis, Missouri for the Ferdinand B. Zienty Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Pharmacy................................................ 15,000 The following nonmonetary gifts-in-kind were received: Hugh D. Barnett, Springfield, Ohio a 1968 Custom Flex sailboat with a trailer and other related equipment for Camp Michigania Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park a 1994 Plymouth Neon for the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Ford Motor Company, Dearborn a 1996 Ford Taurus; for the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics Daniel H. Gilbert, Farmington Hills a Hunter 22 sailboat with an outboard motor, a trailer and other related equipment for Camp Michigania Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon an Intel computer systemfor the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science John G. Manikas, Ann Arbor a Meyer aluminum boat with an outboard motor, a trailer and other related equipment for Camp Michigania Geraldine Ponte Markel, Ann Arbor an oil on canvas painting, untitled, by Harry Nadler; for the Museum of Art Reginald E. Whitcomb, Petoskey two Mistral sailboards including rigging and extra sails; for Camp Michigania 198

Page  199 November Meeting, 1995 Additional gifts ranging from $1 to $999 in value were received from the following donors: Naomi G. Campbell, Flint Robert M. Lougheed, Ann Arbor Gracia Clark, Ann Arbor Donna W. Loundy, Glencoe, Illinois John C. Dann, Dexter Bruce Mannheim, Ann Arbor Norma Diamond, Ann Arbor Gardner I. Parsons, Hilton Head Island, South Sharon C. Herbert, Ann Arbor Carolina James R. Horein, Fort Wayne, Indiana Ann Stoler, Ann Arbor Paul Lee, Highland Jack W. Thompson, Naples, Florida James Lorenz, Tinton Falls, New Jersey Chester H. Wilson, Flint Personnel Actions. Provost Machen, Chancellor Nelms, and Chancellor Renick submitted a number of personnel actions. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITH TENURE Effective September 1, 1996 Guck, Marion A., Ph.D., Professor of Music (Music Theory) NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITHOUT TENURE Effective December 1, 1995 Lee, Jan L., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nursing REAPPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective September 1, 1995 Kotowicz, William E., Acting Dean, School of Dentistry, and Professor of Dentistry, appointment extended as Acting Dean, School of Dentistry, two-year term JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective January 19, 996 unless otherwise indicated Drewnoski, Adam, Professor of Environmental and Industrial Health, with tenure, also appointed Professor of Psychology, without tenure, December 1, 1995 Ellison, Julie K., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, also appointed Associate Vice President for Research, two-year term Gillespie, Carolyn M., Associate Professor of Theatre, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of Theatre, UM-Flint, August 15, 1995-June 30, 1998 Lippi-Green, Rosina, Associate Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, with tenure, also appointed Associate Professor of Linguistics, with tenure, December 1, 1995 Richardson, Frank C., Professor of French, German, and Comparative Literature, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Acting Chair, Department of Foreign Languages, UM-Flint, six-month term Snyder, James C., Professor of Architecture and Urban Planning, with tenure, also appointed Associate Dean for Administration, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, five-year term 199

Page  200 November Meeting, 1995 Wixson, Karen K., Professor of Education, with tenure, also appointed Associate Dean, School of Education, three and one-half year term OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Avigad, Jeremy D., the T. H. Hildebrandt Research Assistant Professor of Mathematics, three-year term, September 1, 1995 Bole, Giles G. Jr., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, and Dean, Medical School, reappointed Dean, Medical School, one-year term, July 1, 1996 Farley, W. Reynolds, Professor of Sociology, with tenure, also appointed Otis Dudley Duncan Collegiate Professor of Sociology, five-year term, July 1, 1995 Hsu, Timothy M., the T. H. Hildebrandt Research Assistant Professor of Mathematics, three-year term, September 1, 1995 Nabel, Gary J., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, and Professor of Biological Chemistry, without tenure, also appointed the Henry Sewall Professor of Medicine, five-year term, December 1, 1995 Owyang, Chung, Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, also appointed the H. Marvin Pollard Collegiate Professor of Gastroenterology, five-year term, December 1, 1995 Riggs, Donald E., Professor of Information and Library Studies, with tenure, and Dean, University Library, reappointed Dean, University Libraries, one-year term, January 1, 1996 Sieving, Paul A., Professor of Ophthalmology, with tenure, and the Paul R. Lichter Professor of Ophthalmic Genetics, reappointed the Paul R. Lichter Professor of Ophthalmic Genetics, five-year term, October 1, 1995 Associate Dean for Research. The Regents approved changing the title of Assistant Dean for Research and Development in the School of Social Work to Associate Dean for Research, effective July 1, 1996. Ford Motor Company Co-Directorship. The Regents approved the establishment of the endowed administrative position of Ford Motor Company Co-Directorship, effective December 1, 1995. George Granger Brown Professorship of Chemical Engineering. The Regents approved a change in name of the George Granger Brown Assistant Professorship of Chemical Engineering to the George Granger Brown Professorship of Chemical Engineering, effective December 1, 1995. Herrick Professor of Manufacturing. The Regents approved the establishment of the Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, effective December 1, 1995. William Clay Ford Professorship of Manufacturing. The Regents approved a change in the name of the William Clay Ford Professorship of Product Manufacturing to the William Clay Ford Professorship of Manufacturing, effective December 1, 1995. The following committee appointments were submitted: Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics Daniels, Danielle F., student representative, retroactively appointed, July 1, 1995 -June 30, 1997, vice Chris Veber, term expired Pryor, Cecil L., alumni member, retroactively reappointed, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998 200

Page  201 November Meeting, 1995 Committee on Honorary Degrees Cramer, John F., student representative, retroactively, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1997, vice Karen DeGannes, term expired Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies Executive Board West, Edward, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996, vice Luiz 0. Gomez, unable to serve School of Nursing Executive Committee Barnard, Ruth M., retroactively appointed, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996, vice Sally L. Lusk, sabbatical leave UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Executive Committee Bolkosky, Sidney M., November 1, 1995-August 31, 1997, vice Leslie W. Tentler, resigned Bord, Donald J., November 1-December 31, 1995, during tenure and promotion deliberations, vice Linda E. Fisher Hoft, Margret H., November 1-December 31, 1995, during tenure and promotion deliberations, vice John A. Gillespie Loeb, Roger C., November 1-December 31, 1995, during tenure and promotion deliberations, vice Robert W. Hymes Summers, Claude J., November 1-December 31, 1995, during tenure and promotion deliberations, vice Sheryl S. Pearson University of Michigan Press Executive Committee Gikandi, Simon E., September 1, 1995-August 30, 1998, vice Laurence A. Goldstein, term expired Gocek, Fatma M., September 1, 1995-August 30, 1998, vice Earl Lewis, term expired Lindner, Rudi P., September 1, 1995-August 30, 1998, vice William I. Miller, term expired Personnel Reports. The following personnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated School of Business Administration Hart, Stuart L., Ph.D., Lecturer in Business Administration College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Ceballo, Rosario, Ph.D., Lecturer II in Psychology Granzow-de la Cerda, Inigo, Ph.D., Lecturer II in Biology, January 1, 1996 Mattis, Jacqueline S., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Psychology Pasakarnis, Helen A., B.A., Lecturer II in Communication Studies Tepaske-King, Susan L., M.A., Lecturer I in Classical Studies Medical School Becton, William W., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, October 1, 1995 Raner, Gregory M., Ph.D., Lecturer in Biological Chemistry Russell, James W., M.B.Ch.B., Lecturer in Neurology, October 16, 1995 Thomas, Pamela M., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, November 1, 1995 School of Public Health Rochford, Rosemary A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, January 1, 1996 UM-Dearborn School of Engineering Zhu, Qiang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Science 201

Page  202 November Meeting, 1995 CHANGE TO ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENT OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective July 17, 1995 Medical School Kurtz, Ron M., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology (previously reported as Lecturer) ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, TRANSFERS, OR JOINT APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Medical School Chenoweth, Carol E., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School, also appointed Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health D'Errico, Celia M., from Lecturer to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Anesthesiology, July 1, 1995 Evans, Jeffrey E., from Lecturer to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Ramos-Cortes, Edwardo, from Lecturer to Adjunct Lecturer in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, July 1, 1995 Richardson, James K., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Rosenberg, Jack M., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology Rowan, James M., from Lecturer I in Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, to Research Fellow, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Medical School, October 2, 1995 Taylor, Stephen F., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, August 7, 1995 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Gano-Phillips, Susan K., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Psychology ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective September 1, 1995, unless otherwise indicated Medical School Castelli, Walter A., Professor Emeritus of Anatomy, one-year term Green, Robert A., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term Zannoni, Vincent G., Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology, one-year term School of Music Wilson, George B., Professor Emeritus of Music (Composition), four-month term ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated School of Art Pijanowski, Hiroko S., Professor of Art, with tenure, extended sick leave, October 25, 1995 -January 9, 1996 West, Edward, Associate Professor of Art, with tenure, and Associate Dean, extended sick leave, October 6, 1995-January 9, 1996 School of Business Administration Rogers, Priscilla S., Associate Professor of Business Communication, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 25-December 31, 1995 202

Page  203 November Meeting, 1995 College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Brown, Morton, Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor extended sick leave, September 27-November 27, 1995 Coffin, C. Tristram, Professor of Physics, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1, 1996 -May 31, 1997 Gazda, Elaine K., Professor of Classical Art and Archaeology, with tenure, and Director and Curator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995 -May 31, 1996 Humphreys, Sarah C., Professor of History, with tenure, Professor of Anthropology, without tenure, and Professor of Greek, without tenure, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Milne, Michael G., Lecturer III in Spanish, leave without salary, September 22-December 31, 1995 Stern, Robert M., Professor of Economics and Public Policy, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Policy, extended sick leave, October 10, 1995-December 31, 1995 Widner, Jennifer A., Associate Professor of Political Science, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Medical School Foster, Carol M., Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, with tenure, sabbatical leave, October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996 School of Music Fogel, Jessica K., Associate Professor of Dance, with tenure, extended sick leave, October 26-November 30, 1995 School of Natural Resources and Environment Polakowski, Kenneth J., Professor of Landscape Architecture, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1998 College of Pharmacy Sweet, Burgunda V., Clinical Assistant Professor II, extended sick leave, August 6-September 6, 1995, and family medical leave, October 10-December 31, 1995 School of Public Health Chatters, Linda M., Associate Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Flanagan, Constance A., Associate Professor of Psychology, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Raleigh, Mary E., Lecturer in English, extended sick leave, September 1, 1995 -February 9, 1996 CHANGE TO ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated School of Business Administration Oswald, Lynda J., Associate Professor of Business Law, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 1-December 31, 1995, and on sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 (previously reported as on sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996) College of Engineering Samson, Perry J., Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, with tenure, and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, College of Engineering, and Professor of Environmental and Industrial Health, without tenure, School of Public Health, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 (previously reported as September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996) 203

Page  204 November Meeting, 1995 CANCELLATION OF PREVIOUSLY REPORTED ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVE OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF School of Art Carter, Carol A., Associate Professor of Art, cancellation of scholarly activity leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1995 TERMINATIONS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated School of Dentistry Wataha, John C., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, resigned, September 24, 1995 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Isaacson, Joel, Professor of History of Art, with tenure, retired, December 31, 1995 Schuman, Howard, Professor of Sociology, with tenure, retired, December 31, 1995 Medical School Castor, C. William, Jr., Professor of Internal Medicine, retired, November 30, 1995 Fekety, F. Robert, Jr., Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School, and Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, retired, October 31, 1995 Husney, Adam C., Lecturer in Family Practice, resigned, September 30, 1995 MacDonald, Graeme A., Lecturer in Internal Medicine, term complete, September 30, 1995 CANCELLATION OF REGENTS COMMUNICATION Effective September 1, 1995 College of Literature. Science, and the Arts Farrell, Joseph, Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor, declined appointment (previously approved in May Meeting, 1995) School of Music Workman, Maya M., Associate Professor of Dance, without tenure, declined appointment (previously approved in November Meeting, 1994) Workman, Reginald D., Professor of Music (Jazz), with tenure, declined appointment (previously approved in November Meeting, 1994) Retirement Memoirs. Secretary Palmer submitted two retirement memoirs. F. Robert Fekety, Jr., M.D., professor of internal medicine in the Medical School and professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health, retired from active faculty status on October 31, 1995, after a most productive career as a teacher, clinician, and researcher. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Dr. Fekety received his A.B. degree from Wesleyan University in 1951 and his M.D. degree from Yale University in 1955. Following an internship in medicine at Yale Medical Center (1955-56), he served with the Epidemiology Intelligence Service of the U.S. Public Health Service at the University of Pennsylvania and The Johns Hopkins University from 1956-58. In 1958, he returned to Yale Medical Center for a two-year residency, after which he served on the faculty of The Johns Hopkins University Medical School as an instructor (1960-62) and assistant professor (1962-67). 204

Page  205 November Meeting, 1995 Dr. Fekety came to the University of Michigan in 1967 as associate professor of internal medicine and chief of the division of infectious diseases in the Department of Internal Medicine. He was promoted to professor of internal medicine in 1971 and received the additional appointment of professor of epidemiology in the School of Public Health in 1987, while maintaining the position of chief of infectious diseases until his retirement. Dr. Fekety established the University's infectious disease training program and has trained more than 50 fellows who have gone on to positions of prominence throughout the United States. He is best known for his pioneering work in the identification and treatment of antibiotic-associated colitis caused by clostridium difficile, as well as his previous work on the epidemiology of the staphylococcus. Dr. Fekety is a superb clinician whose expertise was widely sought. He is also well regarded as a teacher because of his clarity of thought, ability to synthesize complex concepts and present them in a clear, concise manner, and his wonderful sense of humor. The Regents now salute this distinguished physician for his dedicated service by naming F. Robert Fekety, Jr., professor emeritus of internal medicine and professor emeritus of epidemiology. Frank Whitehouse, Jr., M.D., associate professor of microbiology, retired from active faculty status on August 31, 1995, after a productive career as a teacher and counselor in the preprofessional medical arena. A native of the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area, Dr. Whitehouse received his B.A. and M.D. degrees from the University of Michigan in 1949 and 1953, respectively. He completed an internship at Blodgett Memorial Hospital in Grand Rapids before accepting a position as an instructor at the University of Michigan in 1954. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1961 and associate professor in 1967. During his tenure at the University, Dr. Whitehouse's interests and contributions included research on immunoglobulin Fc fragments in burn patients and the teaching of a variety of students, including medical, undergraduate, honors, and allied health students. He was instrumental in organizing the preprofessional counseling activities at Michigan and in forming the National Association of Advisors for the Health Professions. In recent years, Dr. Whitehouse's research focus has been in the area of test-taking strategies. The Regents now salute this dedicated educator and counselor for his contributions by naming Frank Whitehouse, Jr., associate professor emeritus of microbiology. Memorials. One faculty death was reported to the Regents this month. The Regents of the University of Michigan acknowledge with profound sadness the death on October 6, 1995, of Andrea Foote, distinguished research scientist, director of the Worker Health Program, Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations, and adjunct professor in the School of Social Work. Andrea Foote was born in Roosevelt, Utah, on March 23, 1941. She received her B.A. degree in German from the University of Utah in 1963 and 205

Page  206 November Meeting, 1995 two degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan-a master's in 1969 and a doctorate in 1973. She joined the University of Michigan Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations as an assistant research scientist in 1973. Along with her research partner and husband, the late John Erfurt, she founded the Worker Health Program that same year. She was named distinguished research scientist in 1994. A leading expert in the area of health promotion and wellness in the work place, Dr. Foote was best known for designing and testing health care delivery systems in industrial settings, with a special emphasis on chronic disease control (hypertension, alcoholism, substance abuse, and mental and emotional disorders). She and John Erfurt developed health screening programs for many major corporations, including Ford Motor Company, General Motors Corporation, Detroit Edison, and the United Auto Workers union. She helped guide the U-M's efforts in confronting the problem of student and employee substance abuse. Dr. Foote published nearly 50 articles, chapters, and monographs on topics ranging from controlling high blood pressure to cost-containment of health screening in the work place. Two books published by her team of researchers on employee assistance programs were among the first to address the topic and fast became standard texts in the field. Her more than 20 years of research in the area of hypertension control culminated this fall in the publication of the manual for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' work-site cardiovascular programs. All of Dr. Foote's staff and colleagues will miss her calm leadership, her often understated but always keen intelligence, and her unflagging dedication to perfection as she carried out her research. As we mourn the loss of this distinguished researcher and scholar, our condolences go to her mother Norma, her son, Brett Miner, her brother, G. Brant Foote, and her sisters, Brandwyn Foote, Ariel Barfield, and Adrien Taylor, and their families. Degrees. The Regents took the following actions with respect to degrees: They approved final degree lists for the May and September, 1995, Law School commencements and the August 1995 commencements of the various schools, colleges, divisions, and branch campuses; they approved the December 1995 Doctoral Degree List; and they approved changes to previously approved degree lists. Copies of all of the degree lists are on file in the Office of the Secretary of the University. Honorary Degrees. The president submitted recommendations for honorary degrees to be awarded to Neil Shine, publisher of the Detroit Free Press, and Hayden White, historian. Consent Agenda Approved. On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Varner, the Regents unanimously approved the consent agenda. 206

Page  207 November Meeting, 1995 The University of Michigan 1995 Financial Report Supplemental Schedules for the Year Ended June 30, 1995 Executive Vice President Womack submitted University of Michigan 1995 Financial Report Supplemental Schedules for the Year Ended June 30, 1995. Six Month Report on University Audits The Regents received the six month report on Office of University Audits activities for the period April 1, 1995, through September 30, 1995. Sequoia Capital VII, L.P. Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that the University has committed $5 million to Sequoia Capital VII, L.P., as provided for in Bylaw Section 3.07(2a). Estate of Walker L. Cisler On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved irrevocable assignment of the medals, citations and honors of the late Walker L. Cisler to the Detroit Edison Company for uses it deems appropriate. It was noted that the Detroit Edison Company intends to display these items in its corporate headquarters. Sales of Gifted Real Estate Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents of the sale of the following three parcels of gifted real estate: a 13-acre parcel in Republic Township, Marquette County, Michigan, from the estate of Helen F. Weber; five lots in Carroll Heights Subdivision, Commerce Township, Michigan, that was a gift from Victor L. and Joyce Schneider; and a one-third acre parcel located in Lakeside Park Subdivision, Lapeer County, Michigan, that was a gift from John D. and Alice M. Klumpp. Amendments to University Retirement Plan On a motion by Regent Horning, seconded by Regent Varner, the Regents unanimously approved amendments to the University retirement plan effective December 1, 1995, as described in the Regents Communication. The amendments will reflect the direct rollover rules, the $150,000 compensation limit required, and the over $200,000 compensation limit permitted by the Internal Revenue Code. Stinchfield Woods Easement On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent Newman, the Regents unanimously approved authorizing the executive vice president and chief financial officer to grant an easement to James and Kathleen Nicastri, as described in the Regents Communication. 207

Page  208 November Meeting, 1995 Detroit Observatory Restoration On a motion by Regent Varner, seconded by Regent Newman, the Regents unanimously approved a project and budget for the restoration of the Detroit Observatory, the appointment of Quinn Evans Architects as the architect, and proceeding with the project as described in the Regents Communication. University Housing Major Renewal and Improvements On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved the following four projects: Couzens Hall renovation project; Alice Lloyd Hall renovation project; Northwood II and III underground utilities replacement; and Northwood IV underground electrical system replacement. UMMC East Campus Primary Care Facility Project Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents that contracts have been awarded for the fourth package in this project, Interiors, as described in the Regents Communication. University of Michigan Hospitals Projects On a motion by Regent Horning, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved the following projects at University of Michigan Hospitals: Mott Hospital elevator lobby and interior refurbishment project; North Ingalls Building power upgrade project; Turner Geriatrics Building HVAC system replacement; and Taubman Health Center variable speed drive pump replacement. Capital Outlay Request, 1997-98, All Campuses President Duderstadt observed that the state did not have a capital outlay budget for the last fiscal year; it is hoped that there would be one for the coming year. He submitted a list of new project requests and for the Ann Arbor, Dearborn, and Flint campuses. President Duderstadt noted that the University has nearly completed the rebuilding of the University's campuses. The requested funds for the central campus are for projects that represent critical needs to complete the renovation of that campus. Regent Horning moved approval of the 1997-98 Capital Outlay Request for all three campuses. Regent Newman seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. Code of Student Conduct Regent McFee moved approval of the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor Code of Student Conduct; Regent Power seconded the motion. Vice President Hartford thanked the student work group who had worked for seven months to produce the proposed code; she also thanked MSA officers Flint Wainess, Sam Goodstein, and Ann Marie Ellison for their 208

Page  209 November Meeting, 1995 review and suggestions, as well as staff in the Office of the General Counsel. She pointed out two changes in the final draft that had been made at the behest of Board members. She noted that although all of the University's peer institutions, as well as other state institutions, already have conduct codes, this code is a unique University of Michigan document. President Duderstadt pointed out that the code currently in place is the Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities (SSRR), and that there is general agreement that the code now under consideration is a better document. Should the proposed code not be approved, the SSRR would remain in place, as the University does not have the option of having no code. Regent Varner observed that while this code may not be perfect, students had played a significant role in its development, and she supported its approval. Regent McFee expressed her support for this code, noting that the Regents had mandated that there would be a code. She pointed out that part of what students learn when they go to college is how to govern themselves. She commended the student work group for this document, which represents their best effort in developing a plan for self-government and self-discipline. Regent Newman reviewed the specific concerns that had been raised by the Michigan Student Assembly about the current draft of the code, and Vice President Hartford responded to each of the concerns. Regarding the overlap between Bylaw Section 2.01 and the Codes' emergency suspension procedure, President Duderstadt and Vice President Hartford responded that the procedure outlined in the code is in fact the way this situation is handled currently under Bylaw Section 2.01. Regarding MSA's opinion that hearings should be opened upon the request of the accused, Vice President Hartford stated that the students in the workgroup believed that each student involved in a dispute had an equal right to request a closed hearing, and that this was especially true in cases involving sexual assault or harassment. Regarding the power of the resolution coordinator, Vice President Hartford reviewed the systems in place that provide a check on the power of that position. She also responded to students' concerns about ambiguity of the definitions in the violations section of the document. Regent Newman suggested that if the code is adopted, there ought to be a review and perhaps clarification of definitions in the violations section. Regent Newman emphasized that she does not believe this document encompasses any speech codes, and that she had asked that a word be removed to ensure that it would not be considered a speech code. Vice President Hartford responded that this is not a speech code, and that the student work group sought to express that notion within the document. 209

Page  210 November Meeting, 1995 Regent Deitch observed that he had always had reservations about a code, as he believes that academic integrity should be the University's chief interest in regulating academic life. He also believes that while the University has a moral duty to address issues of alcoholism and sexual harassment, beyond that, his personal belief is that an honor code is all that is necessary, with the caveat that students should obey the law. However, he would be voting for the code for four reasons: 1) it was student generated in response to a Regental mandate; 2) this code "treads lightly" because of its emphasis on mediation; 3) as Dean Lehman had observed, communities can set their own codes of conduct for their own reasons, even when that creates redundancies; and 4) he respects Vice President Hartford and her work with students, as well as his colleagues. Regent Baker reviewed the history of codes at the University and elsewhere, noting that a speech code had been put in place in the 1980s that was eventually found to be unconstitutional by a U.S. District Court, and that other codes have also been found to be unconstitutional. Throughout the process of instituting codes, there has been tremendous opposition from students and from some Regents, including him. He believes that if there is to be any code, it should be a minimalist code. Regent Baker believes that the arguments presented by the ACLU are convincing, that existing rules and regulations and that the areas covered in the Code of Student Conduct govern a very narrow area of student life. He noted that many people on campus object to the code, and he would liked to have heard from some of them during this process. Regent Baker offered an amendment to the motion on the floor that the code would end in three years unless reviewed and re-approved by the Regents. Regent Newman seconded the motion. At Regent Horning's request, President Duderstadt reported that the University had been cited by the North Central accreditation agency for its lack of a student disciplinary policy. He stated that the amendment to have the code disappear at a time certain would be in violation of the law and would jeopardize the University's accreditation. Regent Varner pointed out that the code could always be amended if there were problems. Regent Newman said that the portions required by state and federal law could remain in place, but that a sunset provision forces the issue to be reconsidered. President Duderstadt reiterated that creating a sunset provision in which the default would be the elimination of a student disciplinary policy would be an unwise decision. Regent Deitch pointed out that to his credit, Regent Baker had voted against the speech code that had subsequently been found to be unconstitutional. He suggested that Regent Baker's motion be amended to call for a report and review in three years, with the code remaining in effect. This would require a reconsideration of the policy after a reasonable period of time. Regent Baker accepted that amendment. 210

Page  211 November Meeting, 1995 Regent McFee requested that records be kept as to the type of activities being governed by this code, including the venues where violations and complaints arise (e.g., residence halls, classrooms, etc.). Regent Baker stated that he is concerned that this code of conduct would control speech. The vote was then taken on Regent Baker's amendment to the original motion, as amended, that would require a review and discussion of the code by the Board of Regents after three years. The motion was approved unanimously. Regent Power commented that having been a member of the Board at the time of Regent Baker's dissent from the original speech code, he believes this current code has remedied many of the defects of the earlier documents. He delineated what to him are the four most useful features of this code: 1) it is written down; 2) it was developed in a consultative way, rather than being imposed by another body, and reflects this generation of students and their values; 3) it stresses the norms of an academic community, into which students enter voluntarily; and 4) it is not punitive, but rather stresses values and education via the device of mediation. It is a great improvement over both the earlier version and the former statement that had later been found to be unconstitutional. Regent Baker stated that he would be willing to accept a code that could be put on one page in twelve-point type. The vote was then taken on the original motion to approve the Code of Student Conduct for the Ann Arbor campus, and it was approved on a vote of seven to one, with Regent Baker opposed. The text of the Code of Student Conduct for the Ann Arbor campus can be found in the Appendix, page 213. Recommendations for Appointment to Medical Staff Membership On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent McFee, and on the recommendation of the University of Michigan Hospitals Executive Board, the Regents unanimously approved several appointments to medical staff membership. Report on Research Expenditures for FY 1995 Vice President Neal suggested that the annual research report be given in two parts. The metrics section would be given now; the other part, which would describe actual research projects and their impact on students and technology transfer activities, would be given in February. Regent McFee expressed support for this approach. Vice President Neal then proceeded with a report on research expenditures for FY 1995. Total FY1995 expenditures amounted $409.2 million, a 6.0 percent increase over FY1994. Federal research expenditures increased 211

Page  212 November Meeting, 1995 by 4.0 percent and the number of awards increased by 3.8 percent; the dollar value of federal awards, $401.9 million, represented a 10.3 percent increase over FY1994. Vice President Neal displayed charts and graphs showing research expenditures by sponsor groups and federally sponsored research expenditures by agency. He reviewed projections of funding levels of the various federal agencies through 2002, noting that several agencies are facing significant decreases in funding and some are targeted for possible elimination. Vice President Neal described some of the steps being taken both within the University of Michigan and in cooperation with sister institutions to prepare for the future funding situation. Vice President Neal informed the Regents about some of the changes in the University's intellectual properties policy that he is preparing to propose to the Board at an upcoming meeting, perhaps in February 1996. Regent McFee noted the importance of the faculty's continuing to submit award proposals of high caliber and of benefit to society so that they continue to have a high potential of being granted. President Duderstadt reported that Vice President Hartford had recently been elected chair of the National Council of Vice Presidents of Student Affairs. Adjournment There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 10:45 a.m. The next meeting will be held on December 14 and 15, 1995. Regents' expenses reported for the month of October 1995 totaled $280.22. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 212

Page  213 November Meeting, 1995 APPENDIX THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-ANN ARBOR CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT INTRODUCTION The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor ("the University") is dedicated to maintaining a scholarly community. As its central purpose, this community promotes intellectual inquiry through vigorous discourse. Essential values which under gird this purpose include civility, dignity, diversity, education, equality, freedom, honesty, and safety. When students choose to accept admission to the University, they accept the rights and responsibilities of membership in the University's academic and social community. As members of the University community, students are expected to uphold its values by maintaining a high standard of conduct. Because the University establishes high standards for membership, its standards of conduct, while falling within the limits of the law, may exceed federal, state, or local requirements. Within the University, entities (such as schools and colleges campus, professional, and student organizations) have developed policies that outline standards of conduct governing their constituents and that sometimes provide procedures for sanctioning violations of those standards. This Code of Student Conduct ("the Code") does not replace those standards; nor does it constrain the procedures or sanctions provided by those policies. This Code describes possible behaviors which are inconsistent with the essential values of the University community; it outlines procedures to respond to such behaviors; and it suggests possible sanctions which are intended to educate and to safeguard members of the University community. STUDENT RIGHTS Students at the University have the same rights and protections under the Constitutions of the United States and the state of Michigan as other citizens. These rights include freedom of expression, press, religion, and assembly. The University has a long tradition of student activism and values freedom of expression, which includes voicing unpopular views and dissent. As members of the University community, students have the right to express their own views, but must also take responsibility for according the same right to others. Students have the right to be treated fairly and with dignity regardless of age, color, creed, disability, marital status, national origin or ancestry, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or veteran status. The University has a long-standing tradition of commitment to pluralistic education. Accordingly, the University, through this Code, will not discriminate on the basis of group status. Students have the right to be protected from capricious decision-making by the University and to have access to University policies which affect them. The University has an enduring commitment to provide students with a balanced and fair system of dispute resolution. Accordingly, this Code will not deprive students of the appropriate due process protections to which they are entitled. This Code is one of the University's administrative procedures and should not be equated with procedures used in civil or criminal court. VIOLATIONS Behaviors which contradict the essential values of the University community are: A. Physically harming another person including acts such as killing, assaulting, or battering B. Sexually assaulting or sexually harassing another person 213

Page  214 November Meeting, 1995 - Appendix C. Hazing, stalking, or harassing another person D. Possessing, using, or storing firearms, explosives, or weapons on University-controlled property or at University events or programs (unless approved by the Department of Public Safety; such approval will be given only in extraordinary circumstances) E. Tampering with fire or other safety equipment or setting unauthorized fires F. Illegally possessing, using, distributing, manufacturing, or selling alcohol or other drugs G. Intentionally and falsely reporting bombs, fires, or other emergencies to a University official H. Stealing, vandalizing, damaging, destroying, or defacing University property or the property of others I. Obstructing or disrupting classes, research projects, or other activities or programs of the University; or obstructing access to University facilities, property, or programs (except for behavior that is protected by the University's policy on Freedom of Speech and Artistic Expression) J. Making, possessing, or using any falsified University document or record; altering any University document or record, including identification cards and meal cards K. Failing to leave University-controlled premises when told to do so by a police or security officer with reasonable cause L. Violating state or federal law if such action has serious impact on the University community M. Misusing, failing to comply with, or jeopardizing Code procedures, sanctions, or mediated agreements, or interfering with participants involved in the resolution process N. Violating University computer policies SCOPE OF THE VIOLATIONS Behavior which occurs in the city of Ann Arbor, on University-controlled roperty, or at University sponsored events/programs may violate the Code. Behavior which occurs outside the city of Ann Arbor or outside University-controlled property may violate the Code only if the behavior poses an obvious and serious threat or harm to any member(s) of the University community. The Code of Student Conduct is intended to incorporate other specific University policies by reference. These policies are: the University Housing's Community Living at Michigan Handbook, the Information Technology Division's Condition of Use Statement, and the Computer Aided Engineering Network's Conditions of Use Policy. The Code will be used to address violations of these policies only if the violation warrants a process or a sanction beyond what is available in these policies. In such cases, policy adjudicators may take intermediate action regarding a complaint as defined by their individual policy; however, final resolution will occur under the procedures outlined in this Code. PROCEDURES The University will use the following procedures to respond to behavior which goes against the essential values of the University community. The University considers the procedures for resolving disputes a part of its educational mission and is committed to a process which provides both peer review and mediation. Persons who have questions about the Code should contact the resolution coordinator who provides support to all participants. 214

Page  215 November Meeting, 1995 - Appendix Resolution and appeal processes are administrative functions and are not subject to the same rules of civil or criminal proceedings. Because some violations of these standards are also violations of law, students may be accountable to both the legal system and the University. Stage 1: Initiating the Resolution Process. Any student, faculty member, or staff member may submit a complaint alleging a violation of the Code. A student, faculty member, or staff member may also submit a complaint based upon information reported to that person. All complaints must be submitted to the resolution coordinator ( RC"), in writing, within six months after the incident(s) alleged in the complaint. The RC may waive the six-month limitation when a late submission is reasonable. If the RC determines, based on an investigation, that the alleged behavior may be a violation of the Code, the RC will notify the accused student and schedule a meeting as described below. Stage 2: The Resolution Process. The RC will meet with the accused student to explain the complaint and the resolution process. The student will have the opportunity to ask questions and make a statement. The student may be accompanied by an advisor. In all incidents, except those involving violence, if both parties agree to resolve the complaint through mediation, the RC will make arrangements for the mediation to occur. The nature of some complaints, especially those involving violence, may make mediation an unrealistic option. When violence is involved, the RC must concur in the decision to use mediation. Parties will be offered the choice of using a University or a non-University mediator. Mediation is a voluntary process which may or may not result in a mediated agreement. When a mediated agreement is reached, the case is resolved and parties are encouraged to use the RC as a resource for future questions. Mediated agreements may not be appealed. If the parties involved in the dispute do not choose mediation, if the mediator reports a failed mediation, or if the nature of the complaint makes mediation unrealistic, the dispute will be resolved through arbitration. The accused student may choose to have a resolution officer or a student resolution panel arbitrate the dispute. In cases which involve more than one accused student the RC will choose the form of arbitration if the students cannot agree. Each party involved in arbitration has the right to be assisted but not represented by an advisor of her or his choice. At an arbitration, the RC will be in charge of preparing and submitting information gathered during the investigation. Both parties may have access to this information prior to the arbitration. To ensure the privacy of the parties and to maximize the educational potential of the process, both parties must agree to the admission of any other people (except witnesses or advisors) to the arbitration. All arbitrated resolutions will result in a recommendation(s) to the dean of students, who may accept or modify the recommendation(s). The dean may not modify a sanction to include suspension or expulsion. However, when expulsion is recommended, the dean may instead suspend the student. Stage 3: Appealing the Resolution Process. An appeals process is an essential safeguard for an imperfect human process that attempts very hard to be fair. The appeal process is available to each party. Appeals may be filed for the following reasons: proper procedures were not followed, the evidence clearly does not support the finding(s), sanctions are insufficient or excessive relative to the violation, or there is new evidence not reasonably available at the time of the arbitration. All appeals must be submitted in writing to the RC within 10 academic calendar days of the arbitration outcome. The vice president for student affairs ("the VPSA") may waive the 10 day limitation when a late submission is reasonable. The appeal will be reviewed by an Appeals Board composed of one student appointed b the Michigan Student Assembly, one faculty member appointed by the Faculty Senate, an one administrator appointed by the president. MSA, the Faculty Senate, and the president will each appoint one alternate member to the Appeals Board. The Appeals Board will recommend one of the following actions to the VPSA: confirming the decision made through the arbitration process, altering the sanction(s), or recommending a re-arbitration. The VPSA ma accept or modify the recommendation(s). The VPSA may not modify a sanction to include suspension or expulsion. However, when expulsion is recommended, the VPSA may instead suspend the student. SANCTIONS In keeping with this policy's stated essential values, sanctions are designed to promote the University's educational mission. Sanctions may also serve to promote safety or to deter students from behavior which harms, harasses, or threatens people or property. Some behavior is so harmful to the University community or so deleterious to the educational 215

Page  216 November Meeting, 1995 - Appendix process that it may require more serious sanctions: removal from housing, removal from specific courses or activities, suspension from the University, or expulsion. More than one sanction may be recommended. Possible sanctions are: A. Fo al ep nd. frmal Reprimand A formal notice that the Code has been violated and that future violations will be dealt with more severely. B. Disciplinary Probation. A designated period of time during which the student is not in good standing with the University. The terms of probation may involve restrictions of student privileges and/or set specific behavioral expectations. C. Restitution. Compensation for loss, damage, or injury to the appropriate party in the form of service, money, or material replacement. D. Restriction from Employment at the University Prohibition or limitation on University employment. E. Class/Workshop Attendance. Enrollment and completion of a class or workshop that could help the student understand why her or his behavior was inappropriate. F. Educational Project. Completion of a project specifically designed to help the student understand why her or his behavior was inappropriate. G. Service. Performance of one or more tasks designed to benefit the community and help the student understand why her or his behavior was inappropriate. H. University Housing Transfer or Removal. Placement in another room or housing unit or removal from University housing. I. Removal from Specific Courses or Activities. Suspension or transfer from courses or activities at the University for a specified period of time. J. No Contact. Restriction from entering specific University areas and/or all forms of contact with certain person(s). K. Suspension. Separation from the University for a specified period of time or until certain conditions are met. L. Expulsion. Permanent separation from the University. RELATED PROCEDURES A. Emergency Suspension. If a student's actions pose an immediate danger to any member of the University community, the VPSA or a designee may immediately suspend the student pending a meeting. Except in extraordinary circumstances that meeting shall be scheduled within two academic calendar days. At this meeting, the student will be given the opportunity to make a statement and present evidence. If the emergency suspension is continued, the student will be offered an arbitration option within ten academic calendar days. B. Procedural and Interpretive Questions. All procedural and interpretive questions concerning the Code will be resolved by the VPSA or designee. At any time, the VPSA or the RC may consult the Office of the General Counsel about a case or procedures. C. Selection of Mediators. Student Panelists, and Resolution Officers. University mediators will be selected by the VPSA. A list of trained non-University mediation services will be maintained by the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs. The VPSA will try to identify non-University mediators who will serve parties at no charge or on a sliding fee scale. A neutral 216

Page  217 November Meeting, 1995 - Appendix mediator will be assigned to each mediation. Each winter term 60 students will be appointed to serve as panelists for the following academic year. The student government of each school and college, in consultation with its dean or designee, will appoint a number of students proportionate to its college's share of the total University enrollment. Graduate students will be appointed through their home school or college. It is expected that each student government will appoint a diverse pool of students to serve as panelists. Resolution officers are recommended by the Faculty Senate and/or the VPSA. Each student resolution panel will consist of five voting student panelists and a nonvoting resolution officer who will oversee the proceedings. D. Records of Resolution Actions. Records will be maintained by the RC with regard to any and all actions taken under the Code. Accordingly, records will be maintained by the RC of complaints, mediations, arbitrations, findings, and sanctions. Confidentiality of records will be maintained to the extent permitted by law and the University of Michigan Student Rights and Student Records Policy. If a student is suspended or expelled, a notation will be made on the student's academic record. The notation of suspension will be removed at the time the student is readmitted to the University. E. Student Access to Records. Records and documents that will be considered during an arbitration will be made available in advance to all parties but may be redacted to protect the privacy rights of individuals not directly involved in the resolution process. F. Reports of Actions. Statistical reports of actions taken through the Code will be published following each academic term. These data will cover the number of complaints and the types of violations, resolutions, and sanctions. Periodic, regular review of Code arbitrations will be made available, in confidence, to the Student Rights Commission chair of MSA. Personally identifiable information will be removed from all records prior to any review. G. Concurrent Legal and Code Proceedings. If an accused student is undergoing civil or criminal action for the same behavior which forms the basis of a complaint under this Code, the accused student may choose to delay a Code resolution until the external proceedings come to fruition. By choosing to delay the Code process, the accused student accepts suspension from the University and may not enter University property without authorization from the RC. H. Advisor Corps. MSA, with approval of the General Counsel, has the option to develop a student peer advisor corps. These advisors will be available to any student party involved in arbitration. All potential peer advisors in the Advisor Corps must successfully complete training provided by the office of the RC. I. Amending the Code of Student Conduct. This Code of Student Conduct may only be amended by a majority vote of the Regents of the University of Michigan. MSA, the Senate Assembly, or the University administration may propose amendments to the Code. 217

Page  218 SPECIAL MEETINGS, DECEMBER 1995 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor December 1, 1995 A special meeting of the Board of Regents commenced via telephone conference call at 3:30 p.m. Present were Regents Baker, Deitch, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Regent Horning was absent. Also present were Executive Vice President Womack, Provost Machen, Vice President Harrison, Secretary Palmer, and General Counsel Cole. Executive Session Motion Regent Varner offered the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session on December 1, 1995, for the purpose of considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Horning seconded the motion and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then continued in executive session. The University of Michigan Ann Arbor December 4, 1995 A special meeting of the Board of Regents convened at 12:00 noon in the Regents' Room. Present were Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Also present were Executive Vice President Womack, Provost Machen, Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford, and General Counsel Cole. Executive Session Motion Regent Varner offered the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session on December 1, 1995, for the purpose of considering material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Horning seconded the motion and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then continued in executive session. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 218

Page  219 DECEMBER MEETING, 1995 The University ofMichigan Ann Arbor Thursday, December 14, 1995 The Regents met at 11:50 a.m. in the Founder's Room of the Alumni Association. Present were Regents Baker, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer and Vice President Harrison were also present. Executive Session Motion Regent Varner made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, Imove that the Board of Regents meet in closed session at 12:00 noon on December 14, 1995, to consider material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. I also move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session at 7:30 a.m. on December 15, 1995, for the same purpose. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then continued in executive session. Friday, December 15, 1995 The meeting reconvened in public session at 9:20 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were also present. Public Comments The Regents heard comments from Lee Beckett, citizen, about intercollegiate athletics. Provost's Report Marshall Scholarship. Provost Machen called on Associate Provost Susan Lipschutz, who announced that Mr. Benjamin Novick, a senior at the University of Michigan, had been awarded a Marshall Scholarship. She gave 219

Page  220 December Meeting, 1995 some background on the scholarship and on Mr. Novick and introduced Mr. Novick to those in attendance. There followed a round of applause. Retirement of Dean Ara Paul. Provost Machen announced that Ara Paul, dean of the College of Pharmacy, would be stepping down from the deanship on December 31, 1995, and returning to faculty status. Because of his long and distinguished career as dean, he requested that the Board consider naming Dean Paul to dean emeritus status. On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously adopted the following retirement memoir for Dean Paul and also recognized him with a round of applause. Ara G. Paul, dean of the College of Pharmacy and professor of pharmacognosy, will retire from his deanship position on December 31, 1995, after a remarkable, twenty-year tenure. Dean Paul received his B.S. degree from Idaho State University in 1950 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Connecticut in 1953 and 1956, respectively. Prior to joining the University of Michigan faculty, Dean Paul was a consultant in plant physiology at the Argonne National Laboratory and an assistant professor of pharmacognosy at Butler University. He was appointed assistant professor of pharmacognosy at the University of Michigan in 1957 and was promoted to associate professor in 1963 and professor in 1969. He also held visiting faculty appointments at the University of California at Berkeley and Tokyo University. Under Dean Paul's leadership, the College of Pharmacy rose to its present status as a premier center of pharmaceutical education, practice, and research. One of his earliest efforts was the orchestration of a move to establishment of the doctor of pharmacy degree as the entry-level degree, which other colleges of pharmacy have since adopted. He worked tirelessly to help build close working relationships with the Department of Pharmacy Services at the UM Hospitals, thus improving the college's influence in the delivery of clinical services and clinical research. The stage has now been set for the college and the UM Hospitals to develop new models of pharmacy practice for the future. Dean Paul's vision also included an increase in the quality and size of the faculty. During his tenure, numerous faculty members have been selected for the most prestigious awards for pharmaceutical research, and the welcoming environment and the college's growing prestige have led to a steady increase in the number and quality of student applicants. An aggressive fund-raiser, Dean Paul oversaw a rise in the college's endowment from $500,000 to a market value of more than $16.3 million, as well as the construction of a new research wing built with $4.5 million in private support. There can be no doubt that Ara Paul has left an indelible mark on the College of Pharmacy in all of the important arenas. The Regents now salute Ara G. Paul for his many contributions to the College of Pharmacy and the University by naming him dean emeritus. 220

Page  221 December Meeting, 1995 Chief Financial Officer's Report Executive Vice President Womack reported that Mr. William Krumm, associate vice president for business operations, would be leaving the University to become vice president, controller, and chief financial officer of Texas A & M University. He noted that Mr. Krumm has been a valuable associate and has "made enormous contributions to the University in a wide variety of ways." Mr. Krumm received a round of applause and commented about the privilege it had been for him and his wife Martha to have served the University for the past thirty years. Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the November 1995 meeting for approval. Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports on investments, plant extension, litigation, and personnel-labor relations. Vice President Neal submitted reports on projects established, research and other activities and summaries of a selection of current research and sponsored projects for the month of November 1995. He noted that the University of Michigan has retained its number one ranking in research expenditures among public universities in 1995 and number one overall when the Applied Physics Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins University is removed from consideration. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear submitted the report of voluntary support for November 1995. He noted that the Campaign for Michigan has achieved 93 percent of its overall goal with 76 percent of the time having elapsed. AAUW Educational Foundation, Washington, DC for research in the School of Education.....................................2,870 Alan T. Ackerman, Troy for the Comprehensive Cancer Center............................................25,000 Aeroquip, Maumee, Ohio for instructional support in the School of Business Administration..................... 32,500 Alcoa Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for aerospace engineering support in the College of Engineering...................... 7,500 Robert G. Aldrich, Ann Arbor 200 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for the Orthodontic Alumni Clinic in the School of Dentistry, and for the University M usical Society....................................................... 11,963 Allied Signal Foundation, Inc., Morristown, New Jersey for employee m atching gifts...................................................... 26,460 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science and the Arts and the Biophysics Research Division...........................66,620 American Diabetes Association, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................ 19,325 American Digestive Health Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland for gastroenterology research in the Medical School................................ 12,500 American Fund for Dental Health, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Dentistry....................................... 6,000 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the Medical School............................................... 10,973 221

Page  222 December Meeting, 1995 American Heart Association of Michigan, Southfield for research in the Schools of Medicine and Nursing, and in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............................. 133,113 American Society of Hematology, Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina for research in the M edical School................................................ 10,000 Herbert S. Amster, Ann Arbor for support in the Schools of Medicine, Music, and Social Work; and for the University Musical Society...................................................... 6,910 Andrews and McMeel Foundation, Kansas City, Missouri for the Michigan Journalism Fellows Program in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies....................................................... 5,000 ARCO Foundation, Inc., Los Angeles, California for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration................... 10000 ARCO Transportation Company, Long Beach, California for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration.................. 5,000 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science and the A rts....................................................................... 71,167 AT&T, Orlando, Florida for instructional support in the School of Business Administration................... 10,000 AT&T Foundation, New York, New York for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of E ngineering................................................................... 70,000 Austenal, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for prosthodontics support in the School of Dentistry................................. 5,000 Cheryl M. Baumgartner, Moraga, California for the Robert A Baumgartner Football Scholarship in the Department of A thletics...................................................................... 40,000 Charles M. Bell, St. Louis, Missouri for support in the Medical School................................................. 5,000 Ralph E. Bennett, Mount Clemens for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School..............................................................10,803 Jack L. Berman, Los Angeles, California for the Drs. Jack and Barbara Berman Merit Scholarship in the Medical School........................................................................ 9,000 Dickson G. Brown, Larchmont, New York for support in the Law School, and the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................... 26,000 Wilbert H. Budd, Elkhart, Indiana 1,550 shares of CTS Corporation common stock for the Budd Student Aid Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 52,022 Cancer Research Foundation of America, Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................. 8,000 Ceres Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Humanities Institute Director's Graduate Student Fellowship Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................ 5,000 Mrs. Jaswinder K. Chattha, Weirton, West Virginia for Sikh Studies support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............. 25,000 Chelsea Milling Company, Chelsea for the Wilbur K. Pierpont Scholarship in the School of Business A dm inistration................................................................. 20,000 Chrysler Corporation Fund, Highland Park for instructional support, mechanical engineering support, and the Chrysler Corporation Scholarship and Fellowship in the College of Engineering................. 15,000 Clorox Company Foundation, Oakland, California for the Clorox Fellowship in the School of Business Administration................... 8,000 Community Foundation for Southeastern Michigan, Detroit for the Southeastern Michigan Neighborhood and Family Initiative Fund in the School of Social Work............................................................12,000 Jean Decker Connell, Wheaton, Illinois 200 shares of General Motors Corporation common stock for the Jean and Phelps Connell Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................. 9,063 Cook Family Foundation, Owosso for the Cook Family Foundation Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................................... 10,000 222

Page  223 December Meeting, 1995 David S. Cooper Trust for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 11,000 Howard Cooper, Ann Arbor 2,000 shares of various corporate common stocks for the Sue W. Cooper Research Fund in the Medical School....................... 103,056 Eleanor W. Cottrell Estate for the Alan P. Cottrell Memorial Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................................... 25,000 Loren S. Daniels Trust for the Donald A. Kerr Endowed Collegiate Professorship in the School of D entistry....................................................................... 5,000 Delta Dental Fund, Lansing for research at the University of Michigan-Flint..................................... 10,000 Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program, Inc., Detroit for the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering.................. 10,900 Detroit Edison Foundation, Detroit for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, for the Center for Engineering Education and Practice at the University of MichiganDearborn and for employee matching gifts........................................20,190 Detroit University of Michigan Club Scholarship Fund, Detroit for the University of Michigan Club of Greater Detroit Football Scholarship in the Department of Athletics............................................... 12,000 George H. Deuble Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio for the George H. Deuble Foundation Fellowship in the Law School................. 5,000 Mary Hunter Dobson, Ann Arbor for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, the Clements Library, the Museum of Art, the Michigan League, and the University M usical Society....................................................... 22,700 Robert J. Donia, Fort Worth, Texas for the Center for Russian and East European Studies Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................................... 5,000 Doran Foundation, Dearborn for the Chain of Support Fund at the University of Michigan-Dearborn................ 10,000 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for the Chemical Sciences Facility and the Dow Chemical Company-Britton Fellowship in Chemistry, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 260,000 Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., White Plains, New York for support at the University of Michigan-Dearborn.................................. 5,000 Ducker Research Company, Inc., Bloomfield for instructional support in the School of Business Administration................... 10,000 Ralph H. Dwan, Jr., Washington, DC 8,520 shares of Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company common stock and a cash gift for the Ralph H. Dwan, Jr., Dean's Discretionary Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for support of the Law School....... 502,518 Albert D. Early, Sarasota, Florida 1,000 shares of Northeast Utilities common stock and a cash gift for the Albert D. and Virginia B. Early Unitrust Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the Law School............................................................ 124,500 Electronic Data Systems Corporation, Dallas, Texas for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 Thomas and Elaine Evans Fund of the Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, Boston, Massachusetts for support in the Schools of Art and Music, for the University Hospitals, the University Musical Society, the Museum of Art and for WUOM/WVGR................. 5,000 Paul P. Fan, Irvine, California for biological chemistry support in the Medical School................................ 5,000 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Natural Resources and Environment, the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane and the Center for Engineering Education and Practice at the University of Michigan-Dearborn........ 1,099,994 Frey Foundation, Grand Rapids for research in the Center for the Education of Women.............................. 25,000 Melvin Friedland, New York, New York for political science support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........... 5,000 Gelman Sciences, Inc., Ann Arbor for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 8,000 223

Page  224 December Meeting, 1995 Gemini, Morristown, New Jersey for the Corporate Environmental Management Program in the School of Business Administration............................................................ 50,000 General Electric Company Lighting Business Group, East Cleveland, Ohio; for the Michigan Leadershape Institute in the College of Engineering................ 10,000 General Electric Foundation, Fairfield, Connecticut for the Faculty for the Future Program in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................. 110,000 General Motors Corporation, Warren for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School......... 50,000 James B. Griffin, Bethesda, Maryland for the James B. Griffin Unitrust Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..............................................30,000 GTE Foundation, Stamford, Connecticut for minority and female scholarships and the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering, and for employee matching gifts......................... 13,105 Clayton Hale Trust for support in the School of Business Administration........................... 75,848 William J. Halliday, Jr., Grand Rapids for the Lois and William Halliday Scholarship in the Law School......................10,000 Hereditary Disease Foundation, Santa Monica, California for research in the Medical School............................................... 17,500 Hermelin Family Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for the Irving M. Hermelin Curator of Judaica Endowment in the University Library...... 32,500 Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies, Princeton, New Jersey for em ployee m atching gifts.................................................... 9,650 Max Kade Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the Max Kade Foundation Visiting Professorship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................................... 11,000 Kalamazoo Foundation Civic Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Comprehensive Cancer Center.............................................. 5,000 W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for the Michigan Journalism Fellows Program in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................................. 99,666 Knox Family Foundation, Johnstown, New York for support in the School of Natural Resources and Environment...................... 5,000 David T. Krom, Northville for the Jason Krom Memorial Scholarship......................................... 5,000 L. Bates Lea, Naples, Florida 1,500 shares of Concord EFS, Inc., and 1,200 shares of Viking Office Products common stock for the L. Bates Lea Visiting Professorship in the Law School...................... 109,163 Teh-Hsun Lee, Fort Pierce, Florida 1,200 shares of various corporate common stocks and a cash gift for the Teh-Hsun and Mang Shuen Lee Unitrust Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................... 100,000 Julie H. Levy, Bloomfield Hills for the Julie Levy Bridge Program Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and th e A rts......................................................................... 7,000 Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana for the Mental Health Research Institute in the Medical School........................5,000 Robert A. Line, Rochester Hills for the Stark/Line Dean's Merit Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts....................................... 9,000 Lupus Foundations of America, Inc., Washington, DC for research in the M edical School................................................. 7,500 Lupus Society of the Arthritis Foundation, Toledo, Ohio for the McCune Gift Fund in the Medical School..................................... 5,000 Ann and Robert H. Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education.................................. 55,000 K. S. Mahindru, Dubai, United Arab Emirates for gastroenterology research in the Medical School................................. 5,000 Mallinckrodt Sensor Systems, Inc., Ann Arbor for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 7,500 224

Page  225 December Meeting, 1995 Alex and Marie Manoogian Foundation, Grosse Pointe Farms for the Armenian Studies Programin the College of Literature, Science and the Arts..... 36,500 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 20,312 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, Southfield for the 40th Anniversary and Health Sciences Archives Fund in the Medical School....... 5,000 Carole Simpson Marshall, Chevy Chase, Maryland for the Martin Luther King Scholarship........................................... 10,000 C. Blake McDowell, Jr., Akron, Ohio for support of the Law School....................................................,500 Pauline L. McMullen Trust for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women............ 5,000 Meijer, Inc., Grand Rapids for WFUM/TV and WUOM/WVGR.................................................5,276 Meister Family Trust, North Hampton, New Hampshire for the Susan B. Meister Endowed Fund in the School of Nursing..................... 20,000 Mette Foundation, Southfield for the Norman Mette Scholarship in the Medical School.......................... 100,000 Mexican Town Restaurant, Inc., Detroit for research in the M edical School................................................ 40,168 Michigan Fire Sprinkler Contractors, Ann Arbor for the Trauma Burn Center Firefighter's Fund in the Medical School.................. 5,000 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota for minority and female scholarships in the College of Engineering.................... 28,750 Joe D. Morris, Ann Arbor 85 shares of Johnson Controls common stock for golf course restoration and scholarship support in the Department of Athletics....... 5,265 Mosaic Foundation of R. & P. Heydon, Ann Arbor for the M. F. A. Director's Discretionary Fund in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, for support in the School of Music; and for the University Musical S ociety......................................................................... 7,000 Motorola Foundation, Schaumburg, Illinois for electrical and computer engineering support in the College of Engineering.......... 10,000 National Endowment for the Arts, Washington, DC for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Network Express, Inc., Ann Arbor for instructional support in the School of Business Administration....................10,039 Newman Family Foundation, Troy for the Isadore Lampe Professorship in the Medical School........................... 25,000 Leonard M. Newman, Grand Rapids for the Leonard and Eileen Newman Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................... 5,000 Nobelpharma USA, Inc., Westmont, Illinois for the Center for Excellence Fund in the School of Dentistry........................ 25,000 New York Council on Adoptable Children, Inc., New York, New York for research in the School of Social W ork.......................................... 12,500 Office-Related CTD Research Committee, Manchester Center, Vermont for the Muscle Research Fund in the College of Engineering.......................... 10,000 Thomas M. O'Leary, Bloomfield Hills for support of the Law School............................................ 5,000 David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, California for. mathematics support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............ 25,000 Parker-Hannifin Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio for support of the Law School..................................................... 6,250 Harold J. Peplau, Ypsilanti 1,000 shares of Michigan National Corporation common stock for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund in the Medical School and for gifts pending designation in the Campaign for Michigan.............. 110,000 Jorge M. Perez, Miami, Florida for the Jorge M. Perez Urban Planning Fellowship in the College of Architecture and U rban Planning............................................................ 10,000 Polish National Alliance, Chicago, Illinois for instructional support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............. 7,000 PPG Industries Foundation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering................... 5,000 Price Waterhouse, New York, New York for the Price Waterhouse Professorship in the School of Business Administration....... 30,000 225

Page  226 December Meeting, 1995 Robert B. and Jacqueline K. Reese Trust for the Robert B. and Jacqueline K. Reese Medical Student Loan Fund in the M edical School.................................................................44,229 Regal Plastics Company, Roseville for the building fund in the School of Social Work.................................... 5,000 Peter J. Rosewig, Hobe Sound, Florida for the Varsity Tennis Complex and other support in the Department of A thletics...................................................................... 55,000 Jack Roth, Malibu California for the Jack Roth Scholarship in the Department of Athletics.........................10,000 Joseph B. Rounds Estate for the Joseph B. Rounds Fund for Excellence in Librarianship, School of Information and Library Studies...................................... 5,000 RTB Corporation, East Lansing for research in the College of Engineering.........................................12,000 Donald H. Runck, Green Valley, Arizona 240 shares of International Business Machines common stock for the Donald H. and Elizabeth F. Runck Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the University of Michigan.....................................23,730 Robert F. Ruthruff Trust for the Dr. Robert F. and Alice Ruthruff Memorial Fund in Chemistry, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................... 270,000 Russell Sage Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Population Studies Center, College of Literature, Science, and the A rts...................................................................... 39,000 Seariver Maritime, Inc., Houston, Texas for the Center for Ergonomics Affiliates Program in the College of Engineering......... 20,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Santa Fe, California for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 23,915 Herbert E. Sloan, Jr., Ann Arbor for the Doris Sloan Memorial Fund in the Museum of Art............................10,000 William T. Smith, Fort Worth, Texas for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 12,000 Southeast Asia Art Foundation, Hill, New Hampshire for the Southeast Asia Art Foundation Photo Archive Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Southeast Asia Art Foundation Book Fund in the University Library.................................................. 11,685 Marjorie M. St. Onge, Milford for support in the Schools of Art and Business Administration, and in the College of E ngineering.................................................................. 5,000 Irvin Stern Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Comprehensive Studies Program Director's Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................. 22,800 Joshua J. and Eunice Stone Philanthropic Fund, Bloomfield Hills for the Communicative Disorders Clinic........................................... 20,000 Ruth L. Striffler, Ann Arbor for the Dave Striffler Fund in the School of Public Health............................ 5,000 Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care, Stockholm, Sweden for research in the M edical School................................................ 15,105 Takeda Chemical Industries, Ltd., Osaka, Japan for research in the College of Pharmacy.......................................... 15,000 Telecom Analysis Systems, Inc., Eatontown, New Jersey for the Fred and Louise Tarver Scholarship in the College of Engineering............. 5,000 Tenneco Management Company, Houston, Texas for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, and for employee matching gifts.........................................................11,000 Robert E. Terkhorn, Greenwich, Connecticut 100 shares of Citicorp common stock for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 6,781 Jonathan Uhr, Dallas, Texas for unrestricted support of the Campaign for Michigan............................. 10,000 University of Michigan Alumni Association, Ann Arbor for the R. G. Forman Alumni Fund for Undergraduate Education and for the Martin Luther King Scholarship.................................................. 12,500 University of Michigan Club of Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor for the University of Michigan Club of Ann Arbor Scholarship.........................6,000 226

Page  227 December Meeting, 1995 Harold and Grace Upjohn Foundation, Kalamazoo for the MAC Program Endowment in the School of Education.............. 25,000 Vical, San Diego, California for the Vical Gift Fund in the Medical School..................................... 100,000 Bob Vizas, Berkeley, California for the Vizas Family Dean's Merit Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science and the A rts........................................................... 12,000 Harvey A. Wagner, Grosse Pointe Park for the Harvey A. Wagner Fellowship in the College of Engineering...................5,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School and the College of Pharmacy, for biostatistics support in the School of Public Health, for the Habitat for Humanity Programin the School of Business Administration; and for the Ann Arbor Flower Show, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.,...................................49,936 Warner-Lambert Foundation, Morris Plains, New Jersey for the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Fellowships in the Medical School and the College of Pharmacy, for the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professorships in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for the building fund in the College of Pharmacy and for student support in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................ 789,000 Wege Foundation, Grand Rapids for the National Pollution Prevention Center in the School of Natural Resources and Environm ent............................................................... 5,000 Marshall Weinberg Philanthropic Fund, New York, New York for the Marshall Weinberg Judaic Studies Fund in the College of Literature, Science and the A rts............................................................. 5,000 Harley J. Westfall, Adrian for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics................................ 7,500 Ruthmary S. Westfall Trust, Adrian for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics............................... 7,500 Wetsman Foundation, Birmingham for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business A dm inistration.................................................................. 5,000 Elizabeth F. Wood Estate for the Walter F. Wood Endowed Scholarship in the School of Dentistry............... 50,000 Worthington Industries, Inc., Columbus, Ohio for support in the College of Engineering........................................... 8,500 S. K. Yee Foundation, New York, New York for the S. K. Yee Scholarship in the Law School.................................... 50,000 Paul A. Yhouse, Ann Arbor for support in the School of Business Administration, and for the Special Programs Fund in the School of M usic...................................................... 5,100 George D. Zuidema, Ann Arbor for the MomentUM: Advancing Medicine at Michigan Fund in the Medical School....... 5,000 The following nonmonetary gifts-in-kind were received: Apple Computers, Southfield an Apple 8150 workgroup server for the College of Engineering Marvin Bryant, Cascade, Idaho a Fordson tractor for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn Caremark, Inc., Northbrook, Illinois two boxes of books for the Department of Environmental and Industrial Health Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park a 1993 Eagle Vision with a Zexel Route Guidance System for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Christopher Cundy, London, England two needlepoint chairs and a needlepoint loveseat for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn David A. Domzal, Franklin an Interlake sailboat with sails and a trailer for Camp Michigania Eugene M. Grant, New York, New York eight hand-tinted lithographs by David Roberts for the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology Hollywood Creative Directory, Santa Monica, California 216 copies of the Hollywood Creative Directory for the Department of Film/Video Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon a pentium 90 workstation for the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 227

Page  228 December Meeting, 1995 International Business Machines Corporation, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina IBM equipment for the Information Technology Division Jack H. Shuler, Naples, Florida a bronze head sculpture, untitled, by John Pappas for the Museum of Art Southeast Asia Art Foundation, Hill, New Hampshire 41 binders illustrating Japanese architecture and Cambodian sculpture for the Department of History of Art Additional gifts ranging from $1 to $999 in value were received from the following donors: Laura M. Ahearn, Chester, Maryland Alex Manoogian, Grosse Pointe Farms Dora M. Arecheja, Ann Arbor Richard L. Merrill, West Bloomfield Lars Bjorn, Ann Arbor Hillary A. Murt, Ann Arbor Ann E. Hanson, Ann Arbor A. Russell Nelson, Ann Arbor Marlene K. Hurley, Dearborn Dennis R. Papazian, Troy International Business Machines, Research Michael A. Palavin, Flint Triangle Park, North Carolina Max Roberts, Onstead Paul W. Koch, Dearborn Nancy Schaff, Jackson Ludwig Koenen, Ann Arbor Mike Skinner, St. Clair Shores Conrad P. Kottak, Ann Arbor Ann Stoler, Ann Arbor Kathryn G. Lyon, Ann Arbor TOYS 'R' US, Canton Carl K. Mahakian, Palm Springs, California Sharon A. Wysocki, Ann Arbor Personnel Actions. President Duderstadt pointed out the request for the reappointment of Vice President Hartford for a second five-year term. He commented that the unusual respect, love, appreciation, and compassion for students that she has brought to the campus has had an extraordinary impact on the institution. He expressed his personal appreciation for her efforts, noting that her recent election as chair-elect of the Student Affairs Council of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC) is a measure of the esteem with which she is regarded among her peers. Regents McFee and Power commented on the positive relationships with students that Vice President Hartford has developed as well as her other remarkable achievements since she has been at the University. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITH TENURE Effective January 1, 1996 Kapteyn, Henry C., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Murnane, Margaret M., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS FOR REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS, WITHOUT TENURE Effective January 1, 1996 Moor, Michael R., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Environmental Economics Sanchez, John E. Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering 228

Page  229 December Meeting, 1995 REAPPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective January 1, 1996 Chow, Chi L., Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, and Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering, UM-Dearborn, reappointed Chair, Department of Mechanical Engineering JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective January 1, 1996, unless otherwise indicated Lehman, Jeffrey S., Professor of Law and Public Policy, with tenure, Dean, Law School, also appointed Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Mowbray, Carol T., Associate Professor of Social Work, with tenure, also appointed Associate Dean for Research, School of Social Work, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Ribbens, William B., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with tenure, also appointed, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, without tenure West, Kenneth B., Professor of History, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Interim Chair, Department of History, UM-Flint, six-month term LEAVES OF ABSENCE FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADE MIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Banks, Peter M., Professor of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, with tenure, and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, without tenure, personal leave extended, January 1-December 31, 1996 Lee, Lung-Fei, Professor of Economics, with tenure, leave without salary extended, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Stacchetti, Ennio S., Associate Professor of Economics, with tenure, leave without salary extended, January 1-May 31, 1996 OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Agranoff, Bernard W., Professor of Biological Chemistry, with tenure, Professor of Biological Chemistry in Psychiatry, with tenure, and the Ralph Waldo Gerard Professor of Neurosciences, reappointed the Ralph Waldo Gerard Professor of Neurosciences, five-year term, January 18, 1996 Bean, James C., Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, with tenure, also appointed Ford Motor Company Co-Director of the Tauber Manufacturing Institute, three-year and eight-month term, January 1, 1996 Hartford, Maureen A., Vice President for Student Affairs, reappointed Vice President for Student Affairs, five year term, January 20, 1997 Hayashi, Robert H., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, with tenure, and the J. Robert Willson Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics, reappointed the J. Robert Willson Collegiate Professor of Obstetrics, five-year term, October 1, 1995 Jeszensky, Geza, the Helen L. DeRoy Visiting Professor in Honors, five-month term, January 1, 1996 Talbot, Frederick B., Professor of Operations Management, with tenure, also appointed the Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, five-year term, January 1, 1996 Ulsoy, A. Galip, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, with tenure, also appointed, the William Clay Ford Professor of Manufacturing, January 1, 1996 229

Page  230 December Meeting, 1995 Woolliscroft, James 0., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, also appointed the Josiah Macy, Jr. Professor of Medical Education, five year term, December 15, 1995 Zell, Samuel, the Helen L. DeRoy Visiting Professor in Honors, five-month term, January 1, 1996 Interim Appointment Approval. The Regents authorized the president or the provost and executive vice president for academic affairs to make such interim appointments and/or changes from January 1-31, 1996, as may become necessary to complete the staffing for the winter term. Maude T. Lane Professorship in Surgical Immunology. The Regents approved the establishment of the Maude T. Lane Professorship in Surgical Immunology, effective December 20, 1995. Josiah Macy, Jr. Professorship in Medical Education. The Regents approved the establishment of the Josiah Macy, Jr. Professorship in Medical Education, effective December 15, 1995. Committee Appointments. The following committee appointments were submitted: Ann Arbor Summer Festival Board of Trustees Retroactive reappointments effective October 1, 1995-September 30, 1998 Cole, Phillip Peters, Helen A. Edwards, Rosalie Reece, James S. Malcolm, Judith W. Schriber, Thomas J. UM-Dearborn Citizens Advisory Committee Burrell, Ralph J., reappointed, January 1, 1996-December 31, 1999 UM-Dearborn School of Management Executive Committee Bayou, Mohamed E., retroactive appointment, January 1, 1994-December 31, 1996, vice Barbara B. Murray, term expired Kumar, Kamalesh, appointed, November 10, 1995-December 31, 1998, vacant position Landon, Timothy E., January 1, 1996-December 31, 1997, vice Gail K. McCracken, term expired Murray, Barbara B., retroactive appointment, January 1, 1995-December 31, 1998, vice Gary A. Waissi, term expired Padmanaghan, K. H., appointed, November 10, 1995-December 31, 1998, vacant position Personnel Reports. The following personnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated School of Business Administration Velasco, Paul C., M.B.A., Lecturer in Business Economics, November 1, 1995 School of Dentistry Atanase, Corina, D.M.D., Lecturer in Dentistry, November 1, 1995 Ignelzi, Michael A. Jr., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, November 1, 1995 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Carrigan, Andrew G., A.M., Lecturer II in Creative Writing, January 1, 1996 230

Page  231 December Meeting, 1995 Erni, Gabriela A., M.A., Lecturer I in Germanic Languages and Literatures, September 1, 1995 Wellman, Vincent A., J.D., Lecturer II in Philosophy, January 1, 1996 Medical School Buysse, Christina A., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, November 15, 1995 Freer, James A., M.D., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Surgery, November 1, 1995 Smith, David C., M.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Assistant Professor of Surgery, January 1, 1996 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, JOINT APPOINTMENTS, OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Medical School Bonadio, Jeffrey F., from Assistant Professor of Pathology to Associate Research Scientist, July 1, 1995 Chenoweth, Carol E., from Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School, and Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, to Clinical Assistant Professor II of Internal Medicine, Medical School, and Assistant Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, October 1, 1995 Zubieta, Jon K., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry also appointed Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine, August 7, 1995 UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Rosano, Michael J., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Political Science, September 1, 1995 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective September 1, 1995 Medical School Whitehouse, Frank Jr., Associate Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, eight-month term ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Alwin, Duane F., Professor of Sociology, with tenure, duty off campus, September 1, 1995 -August 31, 1996 Fricke, Thomas E., Associate Professor of Anthropology, with tenure, duty off campus, October 12-November 13, 1995 Norich, Anita, Associate Professor of English Language and Literature and Judaic Studies, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Zakharov, Valentine I., Professor of Physics, with tenure, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Medical School Coon, William W., Professor of Surgery, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1-December 31, 1996 Greenberg, Harry S., Professor of Neurology, with tenure, and Professor of Surgery, without tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-February 29, 1996 Trobe, Jonathan D., Professor of Ophthalmology, with tenure, Professor of Neuro-Ophthalmology, without tenure, and Associate Professor of Neurology, without tenure, sabbatical leave, October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996 231

Page  232 December Meeting, 1995 School of Social Work Lockery, Shirley A., Assistant Professor of Social Work, leave without salary, January 1-December 31, 1996 UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Moch, Leslie P., Professor of History, with tenure, and Chair, Department of History, leave without salary, January 1-December 31, 1996 UM-Flint School of Management Fortner, Richard W., Professor of Management, with tenure, retirement furlough, January 1 1996-December 31, 1997 CHANGES TO PREVIOUSLY REPORTED ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Hegyi, Dennis J., Professor of Physics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1996-May 31, 1997 (previously reported as January 1, 1996-May 31, 1996) Office of the President Kennedy, Richard L., Secretary Emeritus of the University and Vice President for Government Relations, sick leave, July 1, 1994-June 30, 1996 (previously reported as July 1, 1994-June 30, 1995) TERMINATIONS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective December 31, 1995, unless otherwise indicated School of Art Carter, Carol A., Associate Professor of Art, with tenure, resigned School of Business Administration Bernard, Victor L., Professor of Accounting, with tenure, and the Price Waterhouse Professor of Accounting, deceased, November 14, 1995 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Shy, John Wo, Professor of History, with tenure, retired Medical School Robertson, John M., Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology, resigned, December 11, 1995 School of Natural Resources and Environment Clendenin, Heather A., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, resigned School of Nursing Springer, Ninfa S., Associate Professor of Nursing, with tenure, retired Retirement Memoirs. The following retirement memoirs were submitted: Frederick W. Gehring, the T.H. Hildebrandt Distinguished University Professor of Mathematics, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. A native of Ann Arbor, Professor Gehring earned two B.S.E. degrees (1946) and an M.S. degree (1949) at the University of Michigan. He earned 232

Page  233 December Meeting, 1995 his Ph.D. degree from the University of Cambridge in 1952. He taught at Harvard University from 1952-55, when he returned to the University of Michigan as an instructor in mathematics. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1956, associate professor in 1959, professor in 1961, and the T.H. Hildebrandt Distinguished University Professor in 1987. Professor Gehring served three terms as chair of the mathematics department. Among his honors are the Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award (1981), the Henry Russel Lecturer (1990), and the Sokol Faculty Award (1994). He was invited three times to address the International Congress of Mathematicians (1966, 1974, 1986) and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1989. A Guggenheim Fellowship brought Professor Gehring to the University of Helsinki and the E.T.H. in Zurich in 1958-60. There he began to learn the theory of quasiconformal mappings, which became the focus of his life's work. He was instrumental in developing the theory and bringing it into the mainstream of mathematical analysis. In particular, he pioneered the important extension of the theory to n-dimensional space, emphasizing new tools such as extremal length and capacity. More recently he has brought quasiconformal mappings into a broad study of discrete transformation groups. Throughout his career, Professor Gehring has maintained close ties with Finnish mathematicians. He speaks fluent Finnish, has made many visits to the country, and has received several high honors from Finland. Over the years, he and his wife Lois have also welcomed many Finnish and other foreign scholars to Ann Arbor. He has directed 26 Ph.D. students at the University of Michigan, plus 2 others who obtained degrees from other institutions. As a measure of their loyalty and continuing scholarly activity, 25 of his 28 Ph.D. students attended an international conference held in Professor Gehring's honor in August 1995. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Frederick W. Gehring the T. H. Hildebrandt Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Helen M. Graves, associate professor of political science at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Graves received her B.S. degree from Southern Illinois University in 1946, her M.A. degree from the University of Minnesota in 1949, and her Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University in 1975. She joined the faculty of the University of Michigan-Dearborn in 1972 as a lecturer in political science. She was promoted to associate professor in 1976 and has distinguished herself as the director of the Political Internship Program on the Dearborn campus. Two major commitments, one to political internships and experiential education, and the other to women's education, have marked Professor Graves' academic career. The innovative internship models that she introduced have received state, national, and international recognition. Through her efforts, the college's internship/seminar program expanded from one course to four courses per year. Professor Graves also initiated a 233

Page  234 December Meeting, 1995 comparative political experience offered in two Canadian capitals: the first, in the provincial legislature in Toronto, and the second, a federal experience in the Canadian House of Commons in Ottawa. Approximately 1,400 students have had a political internship under her direction. Professor Graves organized the first "Women, Politics and the Law" course on the Dearborn campus in 1974 as well as the first women's studies minor certified by the college. She is a founding member of the University of MichiganDearborn Women's Commission. Professor Graves' work merited a tribute read on the floor of the House of Commons in recognition of fifteen years of work organizing the Toronto/Ottawa Comparative Political Internship. She was recognized further by her appointment to a three-year term on the Fulbright Program for Canadian awards. Michigan Governor James Blanchard appointed Professor Graves to the Michigan Women's Commission for two consecutive three-year terms. Her work with internships in the Michigan House and Senate was honored by resolutions from both houses. Among her many awards were the Susan B. Anthony Award given by the University of Michigan-Dearborn Women's Commission in 1980, the Sarah Goddard Power Award given by the University's Academic Women's Caucus in 1989, and the Outstanding Service Award (External) given by the Dearborn campus in 1993. She also served as the first woman president of the Michigan Conference of Political Science in 1970. The Regents now salute this distinguished teacher and innovative member of the Dearborn faculty for her dedicated service to the University by naming Helen M. Graves associate professor emerita of political science. Joel Isaacson, professor of history of art in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Isaacson received his B.A. degree in design from Brooklyn College in 1952. He studied painting at the Slade School of Fine Arts in London from 1954-55 before earning his M.A. degree in painting with a minor in art history from Oberlin College in 1957. Only then did he devote his academic energies totally to the history of art, receiving his Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Berkeley in 1967. Professor Isaacson came to the University of Michigan in 1964 as instructor of history of art. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1967, associate professor in 1971, and professor in 1979. Professor Isaacson enjoys an international reputation as a specialist in the impressionist painters. His publications range from books on Monet (Monet: Le dejeuner sur 'herbe, Penguin 1972; and Claude Monet: Observations and Reflections, Phaidon 1978) to major University of Michigan Museum of Art exhibitions and catalogues of profound scholarly impact (including Manet and Spain in 1969 and The Crisis of Impressionism in 1980.) Beyond these works of monographic scope, Professor Isaacson has written numerous articles, reviews, and essays. His most recent article, "Constable, Duranty, Mallarme Impressionism, Plein Air, and Forgetting," in The Art Bulletin (September 1994) is an eloquent excursion into the 234

Page  235 December Meeting, 1995 complexities of the creative act. It also symbolizes the union of Isaacson's love for painting as a material, intellectual, and spiritual process and his love for the discipline of art history as rigorous engagement with that effort. Throughout his years at Michigan, Professor Isaacson has been an inspiring teacher to undergraduate students and to the many graduate students who have flocked to Ann Arbor to study the impressionists with him. He has also been a warm, generous, genuinely beloved colleague in every way. He served as chair of the Department of History of Art from 1982-85, during which time he had oversight of the renovations and addition to Tappan Hall. He has also been a leader within the national professional organization of art historians and artists, the College Art Association. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Joel Isaacson professor emeritus of history of art. Harold R. Johnson, professor of social work, former dean, School of Social Work, and professor of health behavior and health education, School of Public Health, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Johnson received his B.A. degree from the University of Western Ontario in 1950 and his M.S.W. degree from Wayne State University in 1957. He held leadership positions in a variety of public and voluntary social welfare agencies before joining the faculty of the University of Michigan School of Social Work as a full professor in 1969. He received the additional appointment in the School of Public Health in 1976. Prior to his appointment as dean of the School of Social Work in 1981, Professor Johnson served as head of the school's Community Practice Program and also as the school's divisional coordinator. From 1975-81, he was the director of the Institute of Gerontology He served as dean until 1993, when he became special counsel to the president. In this role, he assisted with the many issues challenging the University at that time and provided leadership and a respected presence in the Detroit area. From July through December 1994, Professor Johnson served as interim secretary of the university. His wisdom, skill, and expertise in this role afforded the University the continuity and stability needed throughout this transition period. Professor Johnson has a distinguished record of scholarship and publications on gerontological, organizational, and human services issues and has consulted broadly on these matters. His impressive record of national and state service includes leadership roles with the White House Conference on Aging, chair of the National Institute of Mental Health Review Panel for Geriatric Mental Health Training Grants, and consultant to the National Institute of Mental Health/National Institute on Aging on the enhancement of geriatric training. He has been principal investigator for a number of research and training grants dealing with issues involving aging, the elderly, and minorities. He was named a Gerontological Society of America Fellow in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field of aging. Within the University, Professor Johnson has served on many search, advisory, and other committees and has served as chair of SACUA. In 1993, he was the recipient of the Dreamkeeper Award in recognition of his exceptional 235

Page  236 December Meeting, 1995 contributions to the University's commitment to cultural diversity. He is widely respected for the dynamic and thoughtful leadership he brought to the University and the School of Social Work and for his personal attributes of fairness, tolerance, and good humor. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Harold R. Johnson professor emeritus of social work, professor emeritus of health behavior and health education, and dean emeritus. Robert B. Keller, associate professor of mechanical engineering in the College of Engineering, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Keller received his B.S. degree in 1948 from the University of Wichita and his M.S. degree in 1951 from the University of Michigan. He worked for North American Aviation as a research engineer from 1951-54 and as engineering supervisor at the Allison Division of General Motors from 1954-59 and then returned to the University of Michigan, where he received his Ph.D. degree in 1961. He joined the faculty of the mechanical engineering department as an assistant professor in 1961 and was promoted to associate professor in 1964. Professor Keller's research has focused on the area of fluid mechanics, and he has published papers on forced and self-excited oscillations in propellant lines, dynamics of two-dimensional confined jets, thermistor probe for low velocity flow measurement, air-breathing engines in a first stage boost vehicle, and electrical hazards posed by graphite fuses. He maintained his ties with industry while on the faculty, consulting with numerous firms throughout his long career. From 1985 until the present, Professor Keller has collaborated on NASA-sponsored microgravity pool boiling research. In this capacity, he has designed and developed successful instrumentation, controller, and data acquisition systems for the experiments, including pressure controller, temperature controller, and heater temperature controller. He also collaborated on similar research regarding forced convection boiling projects. In service to the department, Professor Keller has been a member of the Advisory Committee, served as advisor for the student chapter of ASME and as coordinator of the Power Faculty, and supervised the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory. In recognition of his outstanding efforts as a teacher throughout his career, Professor Keller received the 1992 MEAM Teaching Excellence Award. Among his achievements as an educator are his coordination of the Whirlpool Fellowship Program and his design and development of experiments and instrumentation for a number of laboratory courses, particularly in the area of automatic controls. The Regents now salute this educator and scholar for his contributions by naming Robert B. Keller associate professor emeritus of mechanical engineering. Howard Schuman, professor of sociology in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and research scientist in the Survey Research Center, 236

Page  237 December Meeting, 1995 Institute for Social Research, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Schuman received his A.B. degree in 1953 from Antioch College, his M.S. degree in 1956 from Trinity University, and his Ph.D. degree in 1961 from Harvard University. He joined the University of Michigan in 1964 as an assistant professor of sociology; he was promoted to associate professor in 1967 and professor in 1971. Much of Professor Schuman's research has arisen out of his concerns for peace and social justice. Other work reflects a lifelong dedication to understanding survey research and to improving the quality of survey instruments and the information they convey. His publications include important works on racial attitudes in the United States and the methodology of attitude surveys. He has been a leader in the experimental implementation of survey instruments to ascertain the effects of questions' wording and context on the information being gathered. Professor Schuman has mentored many graduate students and has co-authored numerous journal articles with them. He has also been a valued undergraduate instructor. Professor Schuman has served as director of ISR's Survey Research Center, chair of the Department of Sociology, director of the Detroit Area Study, and has served in the Senate Assembly and on the Rackham Graduate School's Divisional Board for the Social Sciences, including one year as board chair. He has been on the editorial boards of numerous journals; has edited the journals Social Psychology and Public Opinion Quarterly; and was elected president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) in 1985-86. Among Professor Schuman's honors are the Gordon W. Allport Prize in 1970, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1980-81, and a fellowship at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences in 1985-86. He received the Annual Scholarship Award of the North Central Sociological Association for his book, Racial Attitudes in America, in 1986 and received a Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from the University in 1989. He was named a fellow of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology in 1991, and in 1993, he was elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1994, he received AAPOR's Award for Exceptionally Distinguished Achievement in the field of public opinion and research. The Regents now salute this faculty member for his dedicated service by naming Howard Schuman professor emeritus of sociology and research scientist emeritus. John W. Shy, professor of history, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995, after 28 years of service to the University of Michigan. Professor Shy received his B.S. degree in 1952 from the United States Military Academy, his M.A. degree in 1957 from the University of Vermont, and his Ph.D. degree in 1961 from Princeton University, where he also taught for 10 years. He came to Ann Arbor in 1967 as associate professor of history. He was promoted to professor in 1971. 237

Page  238 December Meeting, 1995 Professor Shy is the preeminent American authority on the military aspects of the Revolutionary era. He has led the way in emancipating military history from its traditionally narrow focus upon strategy and tactics, making it instead an essential component of any full understanding of humanity's past. Professor Shy's first work, Toward Lexington: The Role of the British Army in the Coming of the Revolution, published in 1956, was instantly recognized as a seminal contribution, and received the John H. Dunning Prize from the American Historical Association. Since that time, he has published extensively. A People Numerous and Armed: Reflections on the Miitary Struggle for American Independence, published in 1976 and in a revised edition in 1990, is widely praised because of its perceptivity and breadth of vision. Professor Shy's courses in military history and in the American colonial period are models of their kind, extremely popular with students, and he has been equally successful in teaching the survey course in American history. He has directed the graduate work of a number of Ph.D. candidates. He has presided over the creation of the Military Studies Group, an informal but impressive gathering of those with such interests that is now nationally recognized for its quality. Within the Department of History, Professor Shy has been a frequent member of the executive committee and served a term as associate chair. He has been a member of the council of the Institute of Early American History, the Department of the Army Historical Advisory Committee and, during his entire service in Ann Arbor, the Committee of Management of the William L. Clements Library. He is also a trustee of the Society for Military History. He has been a visiting professor at the United States Army War College and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales. In 1983-84, he served as the Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford, the most prestigious appointment in American history in the United Kingdom. Just recently, he received from this University both a Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award and a Distinguished Senior Lecturer Award. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming John W. Shy professor emeritus of history. Ninfa S. Springer, associate professor of nursing and assistant research scientist, School of Nursing, will retire from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Springer obtained her B.S. degree from the University of the Philippines in 1952 and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Iowa in 1957 and 1959, respectively. She joined the University of Michigan in 1969 as program director of nutrition at the Institute for the Study of Mental Retardation and Related Disabilities (ISMRRD), where she developed and directed training, research, and clinical programs in nutrition. Concurrently, she was assistant professor in the School of Public Health. She was promoted to associate professor in 1978 and moved to the School of Nursing in 1982 after federal support for ISMRRD was terminated. Professor Springer was among the first School of Nursing faculty members to utilize computer exercises in her courses. Her recent focus has 238

Page  239 December Meeting, 1995 been on the continuing development of Clinical Computer Aided Simulation Exercises (Ccase), which is a user-friendly software package that allows faculty to develop units specific to their specialties. She has authored or co-authored a number of specialty units for Ccase currently being used by nursing faculty in courses taken by 300 undergraduate students each year. Her research endeavors focused on the nutritional status of pregnant women, infants, and children. Most recently, she served as co-investigator on a five-year project comparing services and outcomes of pregnant women served by certified nurse midwives or obstetricians. In addition to her academic and research responsibilities, Professor Springer has served as consultant for numerous agencies and institutions here and abroad. She has also served in various professional capacities with the American Dietetic Association at the local, state, and national levels. Professor Springer has received numerous awards and has authored 48 journal manuscripts, books, chapters, and audiovisual and computer units. Her many interdisciplinary collaborations resulted in publications with co-authors from the fields of information technology, nursing, pharmacology, psychology, social work, and special education. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Ninfa S. Springer associate professor emerita of nursing and assistant research scientist emerita. Memorial Statement. The death of one faculty member, Victor L. Bernard, was reported to the Regents. Vice President Kinnear commented on the accomplishments of Professor Bernard, who had been his colleague in the business school. The Regents of the University of Michigan acknowledge with profound sadness the death on November 14, 1995, of Victor L. Bernard, the Price Waterhouse Professor of Accounting and director of the Paton Accounting Center. Professor Bernard was a model faculty member who was among the most highly regarded researchers in his field as well as an outstanding teacher. His combination of academic excellence, approachability, and an unusual ability to communicate his knowledge effectively placed him in high demand. He was extremely generous in sharing his considerable knowledge and insights and never disappointed the many students, faculty, colleagues, and others from around the world who so frequently called upon him. In one of many acknowledgments of his extraordinary ability and character, Professor Bernard was the first recipient, in 1994, of the business school's "Leadership in Teaching Award," which recognized his contributions to students and to the development of junior faculty members. Professor Bernard's research was sometimes controversial and always highly respected. His work had significant impact in academia and business and provided his students with leading-edge knowledge. Professor Bernard was considered an expert on the savings and loan industry; he co-authored a book on the subject in 1989 and testified before Congress about the industry several times. A controversial series of publications he researched and wrote with a colleague documented a systematic inefficiency in the stock market; 239

Page  240 December Meeting, 1995 this work continues to generate interest and study on Wall Street and in academia. At the time of his death, Professor Bernard was excited about his work in the area of fundamental analysis, a method for company valuation on which he was breaking new ground. The recently published textbook he co-authored, Business Analysis and Valuation, provided state-of-the-art information on this subject. Professor Bernard won the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants/American Accounting Association "Notable Contribution to the Accounting Literature Award" twice, a rare achievement. Another reflection of the esteem in which he was held was his selection as research director and executive committee member of the American Accounting Association. He earned his Ph.D. degree from the University of Illinois in 1982 and joined the Michigan faculty the same year. In just six years, he was promoted to tenured full professor. Despite enviable achievement in his work, Professor Bernard's life was filled with other pursuits that were profoundly important to him. He valued his work as a scout leader for his son Lewis, 11, and he was proud to serve as a softball coach for neighborhood girls when his daughter Marie, now 14, was younger. And he considered scaling Mount Kilimanjaro to be one of his greatest accomplishments. Victor Bernard left behind a powerful legacy and set high standards for the School of Business Administration and the University. As we mourn the loss of this great scholar, teacher, advisor, and friend, our condolences go to his companion, Dara Faris; his former wife Maureen; his two children; his sisters, Brenda Custis and Connie Bishop; and his parents, Glenn Lewis and Erma S. Bernard. Degrees. There was no action with respect to degrees this month. Consent Agenda Approved. On a motion by Regent Newman, seconded by Regent Horning, the Regents unanimously approved the consent agenda. Presidential Retirement Security Program Regent Varner stated that she was offering a resolution in light of the fact that the president has decided not to take the sabbatical leave to which he was entitled when he resigned from the presidency. Regents' Resolution In September 1993, the Regents approved a presidential retirement security program for President Duderstadt in accordance with provisions that had been made for past presidents after they ended their service as presidents. As part of that program the Regents provided for a transitional year as follows: 'A one year sabbatical leave at the presidential compensation rate at the end of his career as president and prior to resuming his role as a faculty member. " 240

Page  241 December Meeting, 1995 President Duderstadt has now indicated to us his desire to return immediately to the faculty and not to take the sabbatical leave provided him. In addition to his teaching, research, and service responsibilities, President Duderstadt has indicated his willingness to continue to serve the University in institutional advancement, as needed and requested. In light of his expressed intention to forego his presidential sabbatical year, the Regents hereby authorize the presidential sabbatical year compensation stipulated in the September 1993 agreement to be provided to President Duderstadt in equal fourths over a four year period, beginning on July 1, 1996. All other provisions of the 1993 resolution shall remain as originally stipulated. Regent Varner is authorized to enter into a letter agreement with President Duderstadt incorporating the terms and conditions set forth in this resolution. We thank President Duderstadt for his willingness to continue to serve the University, both in institutional advancement and as a faculty member. Regent Varner offered the resolution as a motion; it was supported by Regent McFee. Regent Baker observed that he had voted against the original presidential retirement security program because he had objected to some of its structure, and his position has not changed. His negative vote should not be construed as anything other than the view he held at that time. The vote was then taken, and the motion was approved on a vote of seven to one, with Regent Baker opposed. Alternative Asset Investment (OCM Opportunities Fund, L.P.) On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved commitment of $8 million of the Long Term Portfolio to the OCM Opportunities Fund, L.P., pending favorable legal review of the documents by the general counsel's office. Sale of $5,000,000 Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995 Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents of the sale of the Variable Rate Demand Intercollegiate Athletic Revenue Bonds, Series 1995. Sale of $56,705,000 Regents of The University of Michigan Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995A, 1995B, 1995C, and 1995D Executive Vice President Womack informed the Regents of the sale of the Construction and Renovation Projects Student Fee Bonds, Series 1995A, 1995B, 1995C, and 1995D. 241

Page  242 December Meeting, 1995 Stadium and Main Plaza Development Executive Vice President Womack called on Mr. Fred Mayer, university planner, to describe a proposed project for improvements to the entrance area to Michigan Stadium, at the corner of Stadium Boulevard and Main Street. Mr. Mayer gave a presentation describing the project and proposed improvements, the first phase of which includes construction of new entrance gates that will be moved further back from the intersection, repaving the area with brick, renovation and relocation of the base for the veterans memorial sculpture at the main entrance, consolidation of vendor stands and improvement of pedestrian circulation inside the gates, and general upgrading of the landscaping. Mr. Joe Roberson, athletic director, was also present to respond to questions. The total project is to be completed in phases over the next five years as funding is identified. It was noted that the brick paving presents extraordinary opportunities for fundraising. Regent Power observed that this project is an example of the University and the city of Ann Arbor working cooperatively together. Following the discussion, Regent Horning moved to proceed with the project as described in the Regents Communication. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. South Ferry Field Sports Service Building Mr. Mayer gave a presentation describing the project, site, and proposed design of a sports service building for the two South Ferry Field playing fields that are heavily used for women's sports. The building would provide locker rooms, rest rooms, equipment storage, two offices, and conference space. The project also includes construction of a small press box between the two fields. Regent McGowan expressed equally strong enthusiasm for this project as for the Stadium/Main renovation project and moved approval of the project, site, design, and proceeding with the project as described. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. East University Walkway Mr. Mayer gave a presentation describing plans for the East University Walkway, which is noted in the 1987 Central Campus Master Plan Update as vital to the master plan concept for the central campus. He reviewed three schemes that had been proposed for the walkway and described the chosen scheme in detail. Following the presentation, Regent Power moved to approve proceeding with the project as described. Regent McFee seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. 242

Page  243 December Meeting, 1995 North Campus Core Area Landscape Plan Mr. Mayer observed that until now, landscape planning for the North Campus had focused on preservation of existing trees, streams, and other natural features which characterize the land on which North Campus was developed. However, the development of the campus has led to a need for a strong landscape concept for the academic core. To develop such a concept, Mr. Mayer informed the Regents that the University had held a limited competition under which three leading landscape architectural firms were asked to submit entries which were judged by a jury consisting of various University academic and business personnel. The winning scheme was submitted by the firm of Johnson, Johnson & Roy/inc. Mr. Mayer reviewed the winning plan in detail and the other schemes in brief. Following his presentation, he noted that any of the schemes, including the winning scheme, would have to be refined somewhat as projects are defined and implemented. Specific implementation projects will be brought to the Regents as they are developed. Regent McGowan asked whether anyone examining the scheme had expressed concerns over safety issues. Mr. Mayer responded that officials were comfortable that the trees and other features of the scheme would not hinder visibility or otherwise contribute to safety concerns. Regarding the issue of lighting, Mr. Mayer explained that the current philosophy of lighting being implemented is to provide "overall lighting", in which every place on campus will have a minimal level of lighting, with no dark spots. In addition, every individual lighting and landscaping scheme is reviewed with safety officials before being implemented. There followed some discussion about the history of the development of the North Campus site. Regent Baker expressed concerns that the Regents had not been informed of the competition for the landscape design in advance. Regents McFee and Power thanked Mr. Mayer and others involved in the series of presentations that morning, noting that they had been very helpful in enhancing their understanding of planning issues. Negotiations with Mission Health Executive Vice President Womack called on Mr. John Forsyth, executive director of University Hospitals, to report on the recently concluded negotiations with the Daughters of Charity, the Sisters of Mercy, and Mission Health Corporation. Mr. Forsyth reported that a memorandum of understanding had been agreed to seven months ago to look at the desirability and feasibility of integrating Mission Health and the University of Michigan Hospitals/Clinical Delivery System. It was found that this integration would be highly desirable and would result in very significant cost savings over a ten-year period, and that much of these savings could only take place if the assets were merged over a short period of time. After all parties agreed that integration was desirable, the next question involved feasibility. The University's representatives reached the conclusion 243

Page  244 December Meeting, 1995 that integration would only be feasible if there were a merger in a relatively short period of time. The Daughters of Charity and Sisters of Mercy suggested at the final meeting that a separate company be set up that would include a limited number of operations, with component parts being added on an incremental basis. Mr. Forsyth reported that the University believed that under that model, the previously mentioned savings could not be achieved; they could only be achieved with a complete operational integration. Therefore, the University decided not to extend the memorandum of understanding, and no further discussions are scheduled. Regents Baker and Power commented on the fact that even though these negotiations did not succeed, the University continues to be a leader in its commitment to seeking ways to reduce health care costs. Action Requests Related to Purchase of Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. An executive summary and complete details of the following action requests can be found in the Regents Communication. Lease Agreement with Dr. Ihsan Ui Haq. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved a lease agreement with Dr. Ihsan Ui Haq which adds 4,676 square feet to the 10,424.5 square feet the University has rented from Dr. Haq since June 15, 1995. Regent Deitch was away from the table when the vote was taken. Because Dr. Haq is also a University employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Dr. Haq. 2. Terms of the contract: The duration of the contract is through June 14, 2002. The University will lease property located at 901 North Macomb Street, Monroe, Michigan. The medical office facility is 3,676 square feet, at a rental rate of $14.00 per square foot, $51,464 annually (for year one starting December 20, 1995, with a 3% inflation cost added for each subsequent year) plus the Tenant's pro rata share of the Landlord's operating expenses for each calendar year during the term of the lease. The Medical Center will place clericals, radiological technologists, and physicians to provide necessary radiology services to the community. 3. Dr. Haq's pecuniary interest arises from ownership of the building. Dr. Haq will receive revenues generated by the leasing of the property to the University. Purchase agreement with Claudia K. Breen d/b/a Deluxe Leasing Company. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved a purchase agreement between the University of Michigan and Claudia K. Breen d/b/a/ Deluxe Leasing Company. Regent Deitch was away from the table when the vote was taken. Because Ms. Breen is a University employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 244

Page  245 December Meeting, 1995 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Claudia K. Breen d/b/a/ Deluxe Leasing Company. 2. Terms of the contract: The University will purchase from Claudia K. Breen d/b/a/ Deluxe Leasing Company, located at 6103 Sterling, Newport, Michigan, 11 pieces of radiological equipment on December 20, 1995. The purchase price is $213,970. The Medical Center will place clericals, technicians, and physicians to provide necessary radiology services to the community. 3. Ms. Breen's pecuniary interest arises from ownership of the Deluxe Leasing Company. Ms. Breen will receive revenues generated by the sale of the radiological equipment owned by Deluxe Leasing Company to the University. Asset Purchase Agreement with Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved an agreement to purchase all of the assets of Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. Regent Deitch was away from the table when the vote was taken. Because Claudia K. Green is both a 50 percent stockholder in Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. and is also a University employee, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. 2. Terms of the contract: The University will purchase all of the assets of Monroe Diagnostics, Inc., located at 901 N. Macomb Street, Monroe, Michigan, on December 20, 1995. The purchase price is $9,873. The medical center will place clericals, technicians, and physicians to provide necessary radiology services to the community. 3. Ms. Breen's pecuniary interest arises from fifty percent ownership of the stock of Monroe Diagnostics, Inc. Certificate of Need Application. On a motion by Regent Power, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved submission of an application for a Certificate of Need to the Michigan Department of Public Health for Medical Associates Imaging, HCA at the Monroe Health Center to be a host site for a mobile CT scanner, as described in the Regents Communication. Student Funded Infrastructure Fee Program Mr. Paul Spradlin, director of plant extension, and Mr. James Christenson, director of plant operations, gave a presentation describing the accomplishments made possible by the student funded infrastructure fee program. Mr. Christenson noted that more than $18 million from this fund and $6 million in one-time state funds has been spent since the inception of this program, cutting the deferred maintenance backlog in half. The presentation concluded with a videotape showing some of the improvements that have been made possible through the fee program. 245

Page  246 December Meeting, 1995 Renaming of East Engineering and West Engineering Buildings On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents unanimously approved renaming of the present East Engineering and West Engineering Buildings as East Hall and West Hall, respectively. Renaming of North Campus Commons in Honor of Wilbur K. Pierpont President Duderstadt observed that the current policy for naming buildings after an individual is that upon approval by the Board of Regents, buildings are named after a) donors who contribute more than fifty percent of the cost of the facility, b) presidents of the University, and c) deceased members of the University community whom it is appropriate to honor. To name a building after Wilbur K. Pierpont, who served first as controller (1947-50) and then as vice president and chief financial officer (1950-77) would be an exception to this policy. However, President Duderstadt noted the extraordinary influence he had had on the University and especially on the development of the North Campus. Dr. Pierpont had envisioned the North Campus Commons, which was one of the original buildings on the North Campus and built during his tenure as vice president, as the cornerstone of social and community life on the North Campus. Because of his extraordinary service to and impact on the University, this request is being made as an exception to the current building naming guidelines. Regent Baker moved to rename the North Campus Commons in honor of Dr. Wilbur K. Pierpont. Regent Power seconded the motion. Regent Baker noted that he had come to know Dr. Pierpont during his first eight years on the board, and that he was a "great teacher." He noted that the North Campus had been acquired during Dr. Pierpont's tenure and is an indication of his foresight. Therefore, he expressed enthusiastic support for this recommendation. Regent Varner stated that she was also delighted with the recommendation, noting that when she first started working in administration at the University, Dr. Pierpont had been a great mentor, a wonderful person, and an excellent vice president. The vote was then taken, and the motion was approved unanimously. It was noted that Dr. Pierpont himself will be consulted as to what will be the exact name of the facility. Renovations On a motion by Regent Homing, seconded by Regent McFee, the Regents unanimously approved the following renovation projects: Medical Campus way finding improvements; renovation of the third level of Kellogg Eye Center for the Department of Ophthalmology; and renovation in the 246

Page  247 December Meeting, 1995 North University Building to accommodate a research laboratory in the Herbarium. Lease Agreement with Rubinoff, Stein, and Weiner On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Varner, the Regents unanimously approved a lease agreement with Rubinoff, Stein and Weiner. Because Drs. Rubinoff, Stein, and Weiner are also University employees, this agreement falls under the state of Michigan Conflict of Interest Statute. The following information is provided in compliance with statutory requirements: 1. Parties to the contract will be the University of Michigan and Dr. Rubinoff, Dr. Weiner, and Dr. Stein (Rubinoff, Stein & Weiner). 2. Terms of the contract: The duration of the contract is through January 15, 2001. The University will lease property located at 2100 Middlebelt Road, Farmington, Michigan. The medical office facility is 2,600 square feet, at a rental rate of $16.00 per square foot, $41,604 annually (for year one starting January 15, 1996, with a 3 percent inflation cost added for each subsequent year) plus the Tenant's pro rata share of the Landlord's operating expenses for each calendar year during the term of the lease. The Medical Center will place clericals, medical office assistants, nurses, and physicians to provide necessary pediatric services to the community. 3. Dr. Rubinoffs, Dr. Stein's, and Dr. Weiner's pecuniary interest arises from ownership of the building. The physicians will receive revenues generated by the leasing of the property to the University. New Degree Program for the UM-Dearborn School of Engineering ("Master of Science in Engineering (Automotive Engineering)") On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Newman, the Regents unanimously approved a new degree program to be offered by the UM-Dearborn School of Engineering: "Master of Science in Engineering (Automotive Engineering)." Gift of Property (AutoWorld) President Duderstadt stated that this is an extraordinary opportunity for the future of the University of Michigan and the University of Michigan-Flint, as well as for the city of Flint. Chancellor Nelms reviewed the reasons that the gift of the AutoWorld property is important for the Flint campus: 1) the campus is currently "landlocked," and this property would provide opportunities for growth; 2) UM-Flint will be better positioned to work in a more collaborative fashion with the city of Flint and other entities within the city; 3) it helps to ensure University control over how this prime piece of property is developed. He noted that the city of Flint had passed a companion resolution endorsing this action, and also that prior to completing the transaction, the property will be cleared of all buildings and that environmental assessment and remediation will have been completed. Regent Varner moved acceptance of the gift of the AutoWorld property, subject to fulfillment of all conditions to the satisfaction of the executive vice president and chief financial officer and chancellor and authorization for the 247

Page  248 December Meeting, 1995 executive vice president and chief financial officer and president to execute all necessary documents. Regent Power seconded the motion. Regent Baker observed that acquisition of this property will be the equivalent of Wilbur Pierpont's acquisition of the land for North Campus. He thanked President Duderstadt, Chancellor Nelms, the Mott Foundation, the city of Flint, and all others who had participated in the transaction, noting that "it's just a marvelous thing that's been done." Regent McGowan expressed her agreement with Regent Baker's comments. Regent Power pointed out the importance of the fact that the site will be cleared and environmental issues dealt with before the transaction is completed. For this, he wished to recognize the "consistent, supportive, far-sighted support given to the University and the Flint campus by the Mott Foundation." The vote was then taken and the motion was approved unanimously. 40 Acres in Burt Township, Cheboygan County, Michigan On a motion by Regent McFee, seconded by Regent Power, the Regents approved purchase of the SE 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 6, Burt Township, Cheboygan County, Michigan at a price of $17,000, subject to satisfactory completion of environmental due diligence, as described in the Regents Communication. Proposed Revision of the Bylaws of the Board of Regents Governing Intercollegiate Athletics President Duderstadt reported that in response to a request from the Regents, an ad hoc committee had prepared proposed revisions to the Regents' Bylaws governing intercollegiate athletics. The intention is to bring the proposed revisions to the Regents and the larger University community at this time for initial reaction and comments. He called on Vice President Harrison, who had chaired the ad hoc committee and served as its liaison to the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics. Vice President Harrison stated that the goals of the committee were 1) to bring the athletic department more in line with the way that the rest of the University operates; 2) to make it clear that the athletic department and the athletic director report to the president, who in turn reports to the Board of Regents; 3) to provide that policy questions or questions affecting the public standing of the University come to the Board of Regents; and 4) to clarify the relationship between what is now known as the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics, the athletic direthe atetic director, the president, and the Board of Regents. Vice President Harrison reported that the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics ("Board in Control") had recently had a working session in which they had reviewed the proposed revised bylaws, and that he planned to incorporate some of their comments into a new draft for further discussion. 248

Page  249 December Meeting, 1995 He anticipated that other groups, such as SACUA, MSA, and the Alumni Association, would also desire to review and comment upon the proposal. Regent Newman suggested that before incorporating the comments of the Board in Control into a new document, it might be more productive to provide the Board of Regents with the comments made by the Board in Control. She requested that the Regents be provided with a written synopsis of the comments of the Board in Control. Regent Deitch observed that he had reviewed the preliminary draft of the bylaws revisions and commended the working group for its effort. He suggested that Section 11.212 (regarding the director and operation of the Department of Athletics) still needs additional work, particularly the sentence, "All matters that affect the reputation, character, or public standing of the University shall be brought before the Board." He believes that sentence should be more "specific and definitive" in order to more clearly state its intent. Specifically, he observed that it is clear that the Board of Regents has authority over physical property and intangible personal property, such as investments. He believes that the matter of regental oversight in the area of intellectual property, such as the use of the trademarks and image of the University, ought to be more specifically defined. It is his belief that the Board of Regents owns the University's trademarks, just as it owns physical property and other University assets. Regent Deitch also cited an example of a policy decision made by the athletic department that affected the life of the University: scheduling an early football game, which affects the move-in dates for the dormitories and other aspects of student life. He also cited problems that have occurred in the implementation of Title IX that perhaps should have received more oversight by the Board. Therefore, he advised that more thought be given toward addressing these issues so that there will be a clear understanding of responsibility for future boards and administrators. Regent Baker stated that he had been "dumfounded" by the proposed revisions, which he believes are an overreaction to legitimate Regental concerns. For instance, he believes that for the most part, the Athletic Department has been a very positive force for the University, and that the revisions unnecessarily remove the authority and financial control of the Board in Control. He expressed the hope that people concerned with athletics would speak up and defend the department. President Duderstadt reiterated that this topic would be subject to much discussion and interaction with Board in the coming months. Regent Newman expressed her support for Regent Deitch's remarks. She stated that she believes strongly that the Board in Control of Intercollegiate Athletics should be advisory, because its members are appointed rather than elected. She noted that that board currently makes financial decisions which do not necessarily come to the attention of the executive vice president and chief financial officer, president, or Regents, but that the Regents are 249

Page  250 December Meeting, 1995 ultimately responsible for the dissemination of those funds. She does not believe it should be in the purview of the appointed Board in Control to oversee the actions and the decisions of the athletic director; rather the board should function in an advisory capacity to the athletic director. Regent Newman suggested a change to the proposed language of Bylaw Section 11.214(6), to the effect that the director of athletics should chair the committee, rather than serve on the committee without vote. She believes that since the committee should only be advisory, no voting is necessary for anyone on it; control of the athletic department should be in the hands of the athletic director, who has been chosen by the president and appointed by the Board of Regents. Regent Deitch observed that these comments should not be interpreted as denigrating the past achievements of the Athletic Department. Rather, they are an indication that change occurs as institutions evolve, so that it is appropriate that the people who are held accountable also ought to have commensurate responsibility. President Duderstadt commented that intercollegiate athletics has changed significantly over the past decade. The Big Ten Conference is now incorporated, with decisions being made by the Big Ten presidents sitting as a formal board of directors. That structure is also going to be adopted by the Division I schools in the NCAA, and the proposed changes to the bylaws are very appropriate in that context. Vice President Harrison commented that public discussion of this issue can be expected to resume at the February meeting. He also presented the Regents with a petition from the Student Athlete Advisory Council requesting that student athletes be elected to the Athletics Advisory Committee. He reviewed the procedure followed for changes to the Regents' Bylaws: Proposed changes are published in the University Record for public reaction and discussion 14 days prior to being placed on the Regents' agenda for a vote. President Duderstadt announced that the last order of business would be a presentation about presidential search models. Following that, the meeting would be adjourned and the Regents would then reconvene as a presidential search committee to hear proposals from executive consulting firms. Presidential Search Models Provost Machen noted that this presentation had been prepared in response to a request from the Regents to conduct research about how presidential searches are being conducted at peer institutions. He introduced Ms. Marilyn Knepp, director of Academic Planning and Analysis, to present a report summarizing the findings of this research. Ms. Knepp gave a slide presentation about various models for conducting presidential searches, based on information obtained from recent 250

Page  251 December Meeting, 1995 presidential searches conducted at the following institutions: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Iowa, Michigan State University, Oakland University, The Pennsylvania State University, Central Michigan University, Ferris State University, University of California, University of Washington, and the University of Michigan. The Regents requested copies of the summaries of the interviews which provided the basis for the presentation. Adjournment Following the presentation, the regular meeting was adjourned at 12:10 p.m. There will be no regular meeting in January 1996; the next meeting will occur February 15 and 16, 1996. Regents' expenses for the month of November 1995 totaled $2,924.30. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 251

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Page  253 SPECIAL MEETING, JANUARY 1996 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Friday Januay 19, 1996 The Regents met at 8:55 a.m. in the Gerald R. Ford Library to consider two business items. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, and Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford were also present. President Duderstadt called the meeting to order and called on Executive Vice President Womack to present the first item of business. Easement to City of Ann Arbor for Sidewalk Placement and South Main Street Widening Project Executive Vice President Womack noted that the Regents had approved a project for improvements to the area surrounding the entrance to the football stadium. These improvements called for moving and replacement of the current fence to provide for an additional lane of traffic at the South Main Street/Stadium Boulevard intersection. Action on an easement request from the city to begin this work is necessary now to comply with conditions of a federal grant for partial funding of the project. Regent Power moved authorization for the executive vice president and chief financial officer to grant an easement on University land on the east side of South Main Street to the City of Ann Arbor, as described in the Regents Communication, and to proceed with the project as described. Regent Horning seconded the motion. Executive Vice President Womack stated that this action would improve crowd flow at the corner of Stadium Boulevard and South Main Street. The vote was then taken, and the motion was approved unanimously 1996 Henry Russel Lecturer President Duderstadt commented that the Henry Russel Lectureship is the highest award the University bestows upon a faculty member. He noted that the recommended recipient, Professor Ludwig Koenen, is a faculty member of international distinction. Regent Baker moved the appointment of Ludwig Koenen, the Herbert C. Youtie Distinguished University Professor of Papyrology, as the Henry Russel Lecturer for 1996. Regent Varner seconded the motion. Regent McFee commented that she had been extremely impressed by the background material she had received about Professor Koenen. Regent Power observed that Professor Koenen is not only an internationally 253

Page  254 January 19, 1996, Specal Meeting acclaimed scholar, but also an extraordinary personality, because of "his extraordinary warmth and knowledge and willingness to talk to anybody about anything." The vote was then taken, and the motion was approved unanimously. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 9:00 a.m. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 254

Page  255 SPECIAL MEETING, JANUARY 1996 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Friday, January 25, 1996 The Regents met at 4:00 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, McGowan, Newman, Power, and Varner. Also present were Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, and Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford. Regent Baker, acting as chair of the Board of Regents in the absence of the president, noted that the Presidential Search Committee had made a recommendation to the Board of Regents to elect Vice President Homer A. Neal as interim president, effective July 1, 1996. Regent Newman moved acceptance of this recommendation; Regent McGowan seconded the motion. Regent McFee commented that it was appropriate for this decision to be made at this time, following the adoption of a search plan and timetable. She noted that Vice President Neal wanted it made clear that he would not become president until President Duderstadt steps down. At the appropriate time, Vice President Neal would start working with President Duderstadt to accomplish a smooth transition, but until that time Vice President Neal wished to be allowed to attend to his current responsibilities. To accommodate the schedule of one of the Regents, Regent Newman requested that the question be called at this point. The vote was then taken, and the election of Homer A. Neal as interim president, effective July 1, 1996, upon the retirement of President Duderstadt, was approved unanimously. Regent Baker commented that he could not think of a better person to serve in this capacity than Vice President Neal; that he is a superb choice. Regent McGowan observed that "this is a moment of complete unanimity at this table, in this room, and throughout this University community," and thanked Vice President Neal for his willingness to assume this role. Regent Power thanked Vice President Neal and his family for being willing to serve, and stated that he is the ideal choice for this position. "I don't know of any one person for whom every constituency in this University has shared respect and admiration and happiness to be working with other than Homer Neal." Regent Deitch thanked Vice President Neal and noted that the Regents were very lucky that he was willing to accept this responsibility. Vice President Neal made the following comments: "I am deeply honored to have been asked by the Board to make myself available to be interim president, and I am also very grateful 255

Page  256 January 25, 1996, Special Meeting for the encouragement that I've received from my fellow executive officers. If (and you'll notice the word, if) interim leadership is required, if it is indeed needed, which of course depends on the pace of the search process, I believe I can say with a great deal of confidence that my fellow executive officers and I are prepared to strive to nurture and sustain those initiatives that Jim Duderstadt and the Board have underway, to work to sustain the overall momentum of the campus generally, and to work to prepare for the effective transfer of leadership to the next president. I am very sorry that Jim Duderstadt can't be with us today; that's the one matter that adds a note of sadness to this event. But Jim is traveling. I think many of you know I have a very high degree of admiration for him and for his vision for the University. And indeed, that was the reason I agreed a couple of years ago to come over and work with him for the remaining period of his presidency. In this vein, the reason for allowing my name to stand for consideration for the interim appointment is that I think it is a shared responsibility that the executive officers and I have to see that the momentum of the campus is sustained during this rather sensitive period as the Board searches for a new president. I'd like to echo the comment made by Regent McFee that is veryimportant for us all to remember that Jim is and will continue to be the president of the university, and the executive officers and I look forward to his vigorous leadership up until the very last moment of his term as president. The University can have only one president at a time. So I'd like to thank the Regents again for the confidence you've expressed in me, and we will work very, very hard to make sure that we deserve it. There followed a standing ovation. On a motion by Regent Deitch, seconded by Regent Newman, and unanimously approved by the Regents, the meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m.. Roberta R. Palmer Secretary of the University 256

Page  257 FEBRUARY MEETING, 1996 The University of Michigan Ann Arbor Thursday, February 15, 1996 The Regents met at 2:50 p.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, McFee, Newman, Power, and Varner. Provost Machen, Executive Vice President Womack, Vice Presidents Harrison and Hartford, and Secretary Palmer were also present. Regents Horning and McGowan, Vice Presidents Kinnear and Neal, and Chancellors Nelms and Renick were absent. Executive Session Motion Regent McFee made the following motion: Pursuant to Section 8(h) of the Open Meetings Act, as amended by 1984 PA 202, I move that the Board of Regents meet in closed session on Thursday, February 15, 1996 to consider material exempt from discussion or disclosure by the Michigan Freedom of Information Act [Sec. 8(h)]. Such exempt material consists of a written opinion from the Board's legal counsel. Regent Power seconded the motion, and it was approved unanimously. The meeting then resumed in executive session. The meeting ended at 5:30 p.m. Public Comments There were no public comments; one speaker had been scheduled but did not attend. Friday, February 16, 1996 The Regents met at 9:10 a.m. in the Regents' Room. Present were President Duderstadt and Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, Newman, Power, and Varner. Secretary Palmer, Provost Machen, and Executive Vice President Womack were also present, as were Vice Presidents Harrison, Hartford, Kinnear, and Neal and Chancellors Nelms and Renick. Regent McGowan was absent. Michigan Initiative for Women's Health Provost Machen noted that each Regent had received a copy of the publication, Women's Health: A Guide to Curricular Opportunities at the University of Michigan. He introduced the three students who had compiled this guide: Laura Katz, Mona Kumar, and Valerie Press, thanked them for 257

Page  258 February Meeting, 1996 their efforts, and noted that it would be a very useful volume for people who have an interest in taking courses involving women's health or related issues. Higher Education Appropriation President Duderstadt reported that the University of Michigan was very encouraged by the governor's "exceptionally strong" recommendation for an increase of 5 percent in the higher education appropriation. The recommendation provides an across-the-board increase of 4 percent for all of the state's public colleges and universities, with a minimum "floor" amount per enrolled student that will particularly benefit the Dearborn campus. He also lauded the governor for recognizing the missions of the state's three graduateintensive universities (University of Michigan, Michigan State University, and Wayne State University). Finally, he noted that the governor had made a very generous recommendation for capital outlay to assist the campuses in meeting their most urgent needs. He commented that this was the most optimistic budget outlook of the past decade, and that the presidents of all of the state's universities would be working very hard with their representatives to insure its approval. Regent Baker expressed his appreciation for the governor's budget recommendation. President Duderstadt noted that the state's university presidents intended to pursue a much more coordinated, cooperative approach toward this year's budget negotiations than they did last year. Comments from Vice President Harrison Vice President Harrison commented on a new publication about the University of Michigan, a copy of which had been distributed to the Regents. Its intent was to capture the excitement of the University in graphics, as opposed to words. 1996-97 Residence Halls and Family Housing Rates Vice President Hartford observed that the proposed rate structures were developed by two committees, one for family housing and the other for traditional residence halls. Both committees include students as well as staff members. The proposals call for rate increases averaging 4.9 percent for residence halls and 4.7 percent for family housing apartments. Regent Power pointed out that each proposed increase included an increment for debt service as well as general inflation. Mr. William Zeller, director of housing, said that it is anticipated that the debt service increments, which cover renovations to Alice Lloyd and Couzens Halls and the information infrastructure renewal project, would be in effect for next year, with increases only for general inflation after that. Regent Baker questioned how the housing staff had arrived at its 3.5 percent rate for general inflation for the residence halls, since most figures indicate the rate as being under 3.0 percent. Mr. Zeller responded that 258

Page  259 February Meeting, 1996 increases in telephone and insurance were calculated at 5.0 percent, equipment and supplies at 3.0 percent, utilities at 3.8 percent, and raw food at 2.9 percent. Regent Baker observed that they ought to be working toward reducing the cost to students for housing and tuition and these figures go against that goal. Regent Newman inquired as to whether consideration had been given to achieving cost savings through privatizing any of the services provided by the housing division, particularly in the area of food service. Vice President Hartford responded that this had been investigated, but that so far she had not been impressed by the sustained quality of privatized food service. Regent Newman stated that she believes that increases in the cost of student housing ought to be reduced, especially increases that are higher than the rate of inflation. She believes that one way to keep costs under control would be to consider alternatives to rate increases, particularly in the area of privatization of various housing services. Vice President Hartford indicated that she would continue to explore this matter. There being no further discussion, Regent Power moved approval of an average rate increase of 4.9 percent for residence halls and 4.7 percent for family housing apartments for 1996-97, according to the schedule provided in the Regents Communication. Regent Varner seconded the motion, and it was approved, with Regents Baker, Deitch, Horning, McFee, Power, and Varner in favor and Regent Newman opposed. Consent Agenda Minutes. Secretary Palmer submitted the minutes of the December 14 ahd 15, 1995, regular meeting and the minutes from both the January 19 and January 25, 1996, special meetings. Reports. Executive Vice President Womack submitted reports of investments, plant extension, litigation, personnel-labor relations, and the report on noncompetitive purchases over $2,000 for the period October 1-December 31, 1995. He observed that this month's agenda contains notice of a change in ownership of an investment management organization, and that he will continue to inform the Regents about such changes in the future. He stated that the general policy is that if an organization loses the people responsible for managing the University's assets, the University will change managers. Endowment. President Duderstadt noted that in a recent annual listing of the value of university endowments in the Chronicle of Higher Education, the University of Michigan had ranked second in the nation among institutions with endowments of over $1 billion in the growth of its endowment over the past year. He praised Executive Vice President Womack and his team for this achievement. Executive Vice President Womack commented that the value of the endowment reflects the value added through gifts and performance, minus payouts. 259

Page  260 February Meeting, 1996 Report on Noncompetitive Purchases Over $2,000 for the Period October 1-December 31, 1995. Regent Newman inquired as to whether the proposed increase in the amount for reportable noncompetitive purchases to $5,000, to be considered later in this meeting, was sufficiently high. This led to a discussion of the purchasing system. Executive Vice President Womack noted that the University had recently introduced the use of purchasing cards which can be used to make relatively small purchases. Other cost-savings ideas under consideration are to reduce the University's need for inventory storage by having contracts with vendors through which units could order supplies directly. Research Reports. Vice President Neal submitted reports on projects established for the months of December 1995 and January 1996 and summaries of a selection of current research and sponsored projects. Intellectual Properties Policy. With regard to intellectual properties policies, Vice President Neal reported that the Regents' Bylaws deal with the University's ownership of intellectual property and do not address the implementation policy that he has been developing. Thus, although, the new policy will not require a bylaw change, he recommends broad dissemination of a draft of the policy so as to obtain feedback prior to the discussion at the March meeting. Regent Newman suggested that there be a presentation describing proposed changes in this policy prior to the Regents being asked to adopt it. Vice President Neal stated that he intended to follow a suggestion from Regent Power that the policy be presented for adoption by the Board in the form of a Regents Resolution. Wiesner Symposium. Vice President Neal informed the Regents that the University would be convening the first annual Wiesner Symposium on February 26, 1996. The symposium honors Jerome PO Wiesner, who received four degrees from the University of Michigan, served as president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and played a major role in the development of national policy in the areas of science and technology. Voluntary Support. Vice President Kinnear submitted reports of gifts received for the months of December 1995 and January 1996 and commented on progress to date in the Campaign for Michigan. AAE Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Dentistry............................................ 6,000 Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois for research and the Immunopathology Research Fellowship and Training Fund in the Medical School...................................................... 19,220 Bonnie L. Ackley, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund................................ 5,000 James N. Adler, Los Angeles, California 78 shares of Shiva Corporation common stock for support of the Law School.........1.................................. 5,811 Aeroquip Foundation, Jackson for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute........ 5,000 Ahmanson Foundation, Beverly Hills, California for the David W. Belin Phi Beta Kappa Scholarship in the Law School................. 25,000 Keith E. Alessi, Virginia Beach, Virginia for the Keith E. and Valerie J. Alessi Fund and other support in the School of Business Administration........................................................ 15,000 260

Page  261 February Meeting, 1996 Jay Alix and Associates, Southfield for the Comprehensive Cancer Center............................................. 5,000 Allied Signal Foundation, Morristown, New Jersey for research in the Medical School............................................. 50,000 Aluminum Company of America Headquarters Office, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration........................................................ 15,000 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature, Science, and the Arts, and the Biophysics Research Division............... 67,036 American Chemical Society, Washington, DC for research in the Medical School, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts... 171,700 American Heart Association, Inc., Dallas, Texas for research in the Medical School................................................38,641 American Kennel Club, New York, New York for research in the Medical School.............................................. 18,750 American Lung Association of Michigan, Lansing for research in the Medical School............................................ 46,250 American Society of Clinical Oncology, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................52,500 Amersham-Searle Corporation, Arlington Heights, Illinois for nuclear medicine research in the Medical School.................................30,000 Herbert and Carol Amster Family Philanthropic Fund, Ann Arbor for the Herbert S. and Carol L. Amster Research Fund in the Medical School........... 10,000 Pauline V. Anderson, Cupertino, California for the Program in Manufacturing in the College of Engineering.................... 100,000 Anonymous Donor for ophthalmology support in the Medical School................................... 35,000 Anonymous Donor for the University Musical Society................................................. 5,000 Anonymous Donor for the Classical Studies Endowed Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......................................................... 5,135 Anonymous Donor for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health............................ 20,465 Arthritis Foundation, Michigan Chapter, Southfield for research in the M edical School................................................. 5,833 AT&T Foundation, New York, New York for research in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................... 25,000 Charles W. Attwood Foundation, Canton for the Architecture Alumni Scholarship in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, in memory of Charles W. Attwood.................................. 6,000 Baldwin Foundation, Grand Rapids for support in the College of Architecture and Urban Planning, for the Robert H. Lurie Engineering Center in the College of Engineering and for the Baldwin Fellowship in Astronomy and the Baldwin Foundation Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 37,500 Thomas J. Banwell, Claremont, California for the Loyal Crew Fund in the College of Engineering............................... 5,000 Harold S. Barron, Blue Bell, Pennsylvania 1,375 shares of RedFed Bancorp and 500 shares of MLF Bancorp common stocks for the Harold S. Barron Scholarship in the Law School.............................. 25,078 Joseph H. Bassett, Royal Oak for the Cary-Bassett Endowed Scholarship.......................................... 5,000 Luella C. Bassett, Royal Oak for the Scholarship and Student Aid Fund in the College of Engineering, in memory of William H. Cary, Jr.......................................... 5,000 Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Santa Ana, California for the Nephrology Fellows Fund in the Medical School............................... 8,000 Raymond A. Beck, Jr., Estate for the Raymond A. and Virginia T. Beck Medical Scholarship in the Medical School...... 25,000 Everett E. Berg, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada for the Class of 1945 Engineers Fund in the College of Engineering.................... 5,000 261

Page  262 February Meeting, 1996 Terry J. Bergstrom, Ann Arbor for ophthalmology support in the Medical School..................................... 5,000 Robert H. Berry, Ann Arbor 112 shares of Philip Morris common stock for research in the Medical School.......................................... 10,136 Satnam Singh Bhugra, East Lansing for Sikh Studies support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 5,000 A. G. Bishop Charitable Trust for the Nursing Program at the University of Michigan-Flint.................... 9,875 H. Glenn Bixby, Dearborn for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........ 7,500 Herbert M. Blair III, Spring Lake for the William B. Taylor Endowment in the Medical School........................... 5,000 Michele and Mitchell Bleznak Philanthropic Fund, Farmington Hills for the Comprehensive Cancer Center.............................................5,000 Henry W. and Marion H. Bloch Foundation, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri for the Marion and Henry Bloch Arts Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................................... 60,000 BOC Group, Inc., Technical Center, New Providence, New Jersey for the BOC Group Graduate Student Support Fund in the College of Engineering...... 10,000 Boehringer Mannheim Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Rockville, Maryland for the Nicklas Video Gift Fund in the Medical School................................ 5,000 Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington for the Boeing Scholarships in the College of Engineering............................. 6,000 Brauer Investment Company, Ann Arbor for the Class 1945 Engineers Fund in the College of Engineering...................... 8,500 British Telecommunications, Plc., London, England for the Global Learning Study Fund, School of Business Administration............. 230,250 Floydene B. Brownlee Trust for the Donald S. and Floydene Beardslee Brownlee Scholarship Loan Fund in the School of Education, and for support in the Alumni Association............ 225,000 Leo Burnett Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Leo Burnett Scholars Award in the School of Business Administration, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................. 12,844 Byk Gulden, Konstanz, Germany for research in the College of Pharmacy........................................... 15,000 Doris N. Caddell, Ann Arbor for the Robert Caddell Memorial Scholarship, College of Engineering................... 5,000 Cancer Research Institute, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,083 CaP CURE, Beverly Hills, California for research in the Medical School.............................................. 100,000 Patricia H. Carver, Brighton for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the University M usical Society........................................................ 7,700 Emily C. Chang, Pacific Palisades, California for the William A. Paton Accounting Scholarship, School of Business Administration.... 10,000 Chase Manhattan Bank National Association, New York, New York for the Under-Represented Students Scholarship and other support in the School of Business Administration, and for employee matching gifts............... 15,550 Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, Concord, California for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts....... 15,000 Chicago Community Trust, Chicago, Illinois for the Searle Scholars Program in the Medical School............................... 30,000 Chiron Corporation, Emeryville, California for research in the Medical School............................................... 10,000 Chrysler Corporation, Highland Park for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute.................. 15,000 Howard Cohodas, Marquette for student aid in the School of Business Administration, and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................... 8,700 Communications Cross Cultural, Irvine, California for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................ 100,000 Alfred F. Conard, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 250 shares of T. Rowe Price New Horizons mutual fund for the Allan F. Smith Scholarship in the Law School................................. 5,565 262

Page  263 February Meeting, 1996 Jon A. Cyganiak, Brookfield, Wisconsin 2,000 shares of Criticare Systems common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics........................8,063 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation National Headquarters, Bethesda, Maryland for research in the Medical School........................................... 14,922 Arthur K. Darbaker Estate for support in the College of Engineering......................................... 84,800 Dean Transportation, Inc., Lansing for wheelchair restraints research, Transportation Research Institute.................. 5,000 Delta Dental Fund, Lansing for the Continuing Education Fund in the School of Dentistry.................. 5,000 Roger E. DeMeritt, Reedsburg, Wisconsin 600 shares of United Wisconsin Services common stock and a cash gift for support in the College of Engineering, and for the Comprehensive Cancer Center..... 16,150 Jack Demmer Ford, Inc., Wayne for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, the University of M ichigan-D earborn.............................................................. 5,000 Detroit Edison Foundation, Detroit for employee m atching gifts.......................................................9,641 George H. Deuble Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio for the George H. Deuble Fund in the School of Business Administration............... 5,000 Dixon R. Doll, San Francisco, California 310 shares of Remedy Corporation and 40 shares of Picturetel Corporation common stocks for support in the School of Business Administration, and for the Millie Schembechler Memorial Fund in the Medical School................................ 21,380 Donnelly Corporation, Holland for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute........ 5,000 Dow Chemical Company, Midland for program support in the Schools of Business Administration and Natural Resources and Environment and for the Catalytic Surfaces Studies Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...................................... 261,250 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for support in the School of Public Health....................................... 150,000 June Duck, Manalapan, New Jersey for the Robert B. Sweet Memorial Fund in the Medical School......................... 7,000 Clara Dushnik Trust for the Clara L. Dushnik-Fanny Fink Scholarship................................... 36,000 A. G. Edwards & Sons, Inc., St. Louis, Missouri for the Mallinckrodt Award Fund in the Medical School............................. 50,000 Electronic Data Systems, Plano, Texas for the Michigan Leadershape Institute in the College of Engineering............ 10,000 Electronic Data Systems Corporation, Dallas, Texas for student aid in the School of Business Administration.............................. 9,552 Robert C. Emde, Bloomfield Hills 114 shares of Home Depot common stock for the Ernst & Young Scholarship, School of Business Administration................. 5,094 LeRoy A. Engelhardt, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin 100 shares of Consolidated Papers, Inc., common stock and a cash gift for the William A. Paton Accounting Scholarship and other support in the School of Business Administration, for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund and for the University Library..................7,119 Thomas and Elaine Evans Fund of the Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, Boston, Massachusetts for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.......................................... 10,000 Exxon Company, U.S.A., Houston, Texas for the Minority Engineering Program and other support in the College of Engineering, and for the Exxon Corporation Fellowship in the School of Business Administration 7,000 George L. Farr, Greenwich, Connecticut for the George L. Farr Merit Scholarship, School of Business Administration............. 10,000 Russell H. Fifield Living Trust, Ann Arbor for the W. K. Kellogg Eye Center.................................................. 5,000 Sonja and Conrad Fischer Fund of the Kalamazoo Foundation, Winnetka, Illinois for the F. Conrad Fischer Fund, School of Business Administration.................... 8,000 First Michigan Bank Corporation, Greenville for the Stanley S. Kemp Scholarship in the Division of Kinesiology............... 5,000 263

Page  264 February Meeting, 1996 W. R. Flannery, Bloomfield Hills for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics........................ 7,500 Sidney Forbes, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics................... 5,000 Benson Ford, Jr., Dearborn for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn...... 5,000 Edsel B. Ford II, Grosse Pointe Farms for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn...... 5,000 Benson and Edith Ford Fund, Dearborn for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn..... 20,000 Walter and Josephine Ford Fund, Dearborn for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn.....40,000 William and Martha Ford Fund, Dearborn for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn.... 20,000 Ford Foundation, New York, New York for the American Culture Program and the Women's Study Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for research in the School of Social Work, and for support in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.................. 219,500 Ford Motor Company, Dearborn for student aid in the School of Business Administration, for research and other support in the College of Engineering, and for the Harmonize for Hope Fund in the M edical School............................................................. 73,500 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Under-Represented Students Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, and for support at the University of Michigan-Dearborn............... 35,000 Lawrence C. Frank, Yakima, Washington for student aid in the School of Business Administration.............................. 5,700 Martin J. Frank, Beverly Hills, California for support in the School of Education, and for the Cecil J. Nesbitt Actuarial Education Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................... 10,005 Arthur M. Friedman, Palos Verdes Estates, California 150 shares of Cincinnati Financial Corporation common stock for the Arthur Andersen Faculty Fellowship in the School of Business Administration......9,863 Otto B. Gago, Ann Arbor for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics................................ 5,000 William A. Garrison Estate for the William A. Garrison Memorial Scholarship.................................. 6,313 Wood M. Geist, Washington for support in the Schools of Arts and Education, and for the Humanities Institute in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 7,000 Gelman Sciences, Inc., Ann Arbor for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 8,000 Genentech Foundation for Growth and Development, Charlottesville, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................ 45,000 General Motors Corporation, Warren for human factors research in the Transportation Research Institute and for the Ann Arbor Flower Show, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 16,000 Gerber Companies Foundation, Fremont for research in the Center for Human Growth and Development...................... 25,000 Martin R. Goldman, Bloomfield Hills for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 10,000 Government of Canada, Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,262 Grand Rapids Foundation, Grand Rapids for research in the School of Social Work.......................................... 20,000 William T. Grant Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Population Studies Center, College of Literature, Science, and the A rts....................................................................... 33,144 Evelyn G. Hart Estate for support in the School of Music................................................ 65,000 James C. Hays, Atlanta, Georgia for the James C. Hays Scholarships in the Medical School........................... 17,500 William Randolph Hearst Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................50,000 Vira I. Heinz Endowment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for research in the School of Education............................................ 50,000 264

Page  265 February Meeting, 1996 Hercules, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware for research in the Medical School.............................................. 100,000 Francis E. Heydt & Sons, Miami, Oklahoma for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics................................6,000 Jack D. Highfield, Grand Rapids for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, for support in the College of Pharmacy, and for the Martin Luther King Scholarship.................. 7,000 David A. Hughes, Omaha, Nebraska for the Thoracic Surgery Research Fellowship in the Medical School.............. 10,000 Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Bethesda, Maryland for research, scholarships and fellowships in the Medical School.................... 128,500 Ichikoh Industries, Ltd., Kanagawa, Japan for rear view mirror research in the Transportation Research Institute............... 35,000 Ralph J. Isackson, Bay City 250 shares of NationsBank Corporation common stock for the Biller Law Student Scholarship in the Law School............................ 18,297 Joseph R. Jarabak Charitable Lead Trust, Valparaiso, Indiana for the Joseph and Louise Ada Jarabak Funds in the School of Dentistry............... 10,000 Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration.................. 10,000 Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, Wisconsin for automotive transportation research in the Transportation Research Institute........7,500 Johnson Controls Foundation, Milwaukee, Wisconsin for employee m atching gifts...................................................... 14,355 Marion L. Johnson Estate for the Marion L. Johnson Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the Law School...................................................... 300,000 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for the research in the School of Public Health, and for the Survey Research Center in the Institute for Social Research......................................... 29,580 Joyce Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education.......................................... 110,829 Juvenile Diabetes Foundation International, New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 46,906 Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Menlo Park, California for the Juan Tienda Scholarship in the Law School.................................. 10,000 Kellogg Company, Battle Creek for employee matching gifts....................................................... 5,120 John G. Kirk, Santa Barbara, California for the John G. Kirk Fund in Astronomy, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.... 7,000 Kirkland & Ellis Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Kirkland & Ellis Professorship in the Law School, and for employee m atching gifts....................................................... 150,550 Robert I. Kleinberg, New York, New York for the Robert I. Kleinberg English Language Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 10,000 Edward S. Klotz, Hollywood, Florida for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 26,000 William C. Knicely Estate for the William C. Knicely Endowed Scholarship in the School of Music.............. 61,800 Kraft General Foods, Inc., Glenview, Illinois for student aid in the School of Business Administration............................. 35,000 Leonard J. Kujawa, Atlanta, Georgia 130 shares of St. Jude Medical, Inc., common stock for the Leonard J. Kujawa/Arthur Andersen LLP Scholarship in the School of Business Administration................................................. 5,151 Katherine Kutsche, Trenton for the Kutsche Memorial Chair in Internal Medicine in the Medical School........... 5,000 Edwin A. and Alma Lakin Philanthropic Fund, Reading, Pennsylvania for the Edwin and Alma Lakin Orthopedic Research Fund in the Medical School........ 50,000 Sallie Faster Larson, Ann Arbor for the John L. Kemink Professorship in the Medical School and for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.................................................... 15,000 Thomas R. Larson, Ann Arbor for the John L. Kemink Professorship in the Medical School and for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund.................................................... 15,000 265

Page  266 February Meeting, 1996 Genevieve Latulip Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................. 159,027 John W. Lawrence, Richland for the Teaching Excellence Fund in the School of Business A dm inistration........................................................... 5,000 Morton Q. Levin, Cleveland, Ohio for the Law Class of 1966 Reunion Fund in the Law School, and for the Sumner and Laura Foster Library Acquisitions Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................. 7,000 Jacqueline H. Lewis, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund, and for the University Musical Society........ 5,100 Life & Health Insurance Medical Research Fund, Washington, DC for scholarships and fellowships in the Medical School............................... 16,000 Christopher U. Light, Kalamazoo 279 shares of Philip Morris common stock for the Music Library in the School of Music.................................. 25,250 Lilly Endowment, Indianapolis, Indiana for research in the School of Education............................................23,994 Lincoln National Corporation, Fort Wayne, Indiana for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration....................................................15,000 Anna Suk-Fong Lok, Ann Arbor for the Liver Research Fund in the Medical School.................................. 13,700 William T. Ludolph Estate for the William T. Ludolph Junior Faculty Development Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 47,724 Joe Lunghamer Chevrolet, Inc., Pontiac for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics................... 10,000 Ann and Robert H. Lurie Family Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 Lyons Equipment Company, Ypsilanti for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................. 5,000 Josiah Macy, Jr., Foundation, New York, New York for the Josiah Macy, Jr., Professorship of Medical Education in the M edical School.............................................................. 2,000,000 Thomas S. Maentz, Bloomfield Village for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics................... 33,333 Donald H. Malloure, Beverly Hills 1,000 shares of Merck & Company common stock for support in the M edical School................................................. 58,813 March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, White Plains, New York for research in the Medical School................................................ 10,000 Oliver Dewey Marcks Foundation, Detroit for the Alumnae Council Memorial Scholarship in the Alumni Association............... 5,000 Marion Merrell Dow, Inc., Kansas City, Missouri for research in the Medical School..............................................40,000 Mark IV Industries Foundation, Inc., Amherst, New York for the Mark IV Foundation Fund in the College of Engineering...................... 20,000 Frederick C. Matthaei, Jr., Birmingham 131 shares of Kellogg Company common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 10,095 M. Mildred McIntosh, Boca Raton, Florida for the Mildred McIntosh Voice Scholarship in the School of Music.................... 10,000 Margaret A. McKinley, Holland for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................ 10,000 McLaren Regional Medical Center, Flint for the Max Ronald Burnell Resident Fellowship in the Medical School................81,000 McNamara Charity Fund, Grosse Pointe Farms for the McNamara Charity Fund at the University of Michigan-Dearborn............... 5,000 Medtronic, Inc., Corporate Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota for the Yellowstone Summit Fund in the Medical School............................. 25,000 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, New York, New York for the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research in the Institute for Social Research............................................... 165,000 Merck Company Foundation, Rahway, New Jersey for the Merck Fellows in Pharmaceutics Fund in the College of Pharmacy............. 60,000 266

Page  267 February Meeting, 1996 Mette Foundation, Southfield for the Mette Foundation Scholarship in the School of Dentistry...................... 25,000 Norman F. Miller Gynecologic Society, Ann Arbor for the George W. Morley Professorship in the Medical School........................ 10,000 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Foundation, St. Paul, Minnesota for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 29,000 Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Cambridge, Massachusetts for the Real-Time Computing Laboratory in the College of Engineering................ 50,000 Monroe Street Journal, Ann Arbor for the Monroe Street Journal Scholarship in the School of Business Administration.... 10,000 Morris Animal Foundation, Englewood, Colorado for research in the Medical School............................................... 37,500 Cruse W. Moss, Ann Arbor for the D'Arms Awards in the Humanities in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and for the Clements Library, and the Museum of Art...............20,918 John D. Moss, Peekskill, New York for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics....1................. 10,000 Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc., Tucson, Arizona for research in the Medical School, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................................................ 142,421 Irene M. Myers, Bloomfield Township for support in the School of Art....................................10,000 William D. Myers, Bloomfield Township for support in the M edical School................................................. 10,000 William K. Najjar, Grand Rapids for the Research in Periodontics Fund in the School of Dentistry..................... 20,000 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for research in the M edical School................................................ 10,417 National Organization for Hearing Research, Narberth, Pennsylvania for the Lynn and Ruth Townsend Professorship in the Medical School................. 20,000 Robert D. Neary, Cleveland, Ohio for the Robert D. and Janet E. Neary Funds in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................... 90,000 Ray E. Newton, Jr., Chicago, Illinois 750 shares of Concord EFS, Inc., common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 31,781 Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey for the Crystallography Facility in the Biophysics Research Division.................. 20,000 Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation, Rosemont, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 24,566 Marion E. Paine Estate for the Willmarth R. and Marion E. Paine Scholarship in the School of Dentistry...... 600,000 Marion Palmer, Grand Rapids 814 shares of the Mutual Series Fund, Inc., mutual fund for the Lloyd L. Kempe Scholarship in Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering................................................................. 80,000 William B. Palmer, Ann Arbor 366 shares of First Union common stock for special exhibitions support in the Museum of Art................................ 20,153 Richard H. Pao, Ann Arbor 800 shares of AT&T Corporation common stock and a cash gift for the Professor Miranda Lee Pao Memorial Fund in the School of Information and Library Studies, and for the Tien Award for Excellence in the College of Engineering.................................................................. 53,350 Elsa U. Pardee Foundation, Midland for the Comprehensive Cancer Center..................................... 88,952 Donald R. Parfet, Richland for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 5,000 Mary Jo Brooks Peters, Ann Arbor 120 shares of Duke Power common stock for the C. Wilbur Peters Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, for the Marching Band Fund and other support in the School of Music and for Camp Michigania........................ 5,580 Pharmacia and Upjohn, Inc., Kalamazoo for the Upjohn Company Scholarship in the School of Public Health................... 25,000 Laurence J. Pons, Scottsdale, Arizona for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 15,000 267

Page  268 February Meeting, 1996 Mervin Pregulman, Chattanooga, Tennessee 324 shares of Nucor common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Administration....................................... 16,301 Yvonne S. Quinn, New York, New York for support in the Law School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....................................................................... 10,000 Ahmad Rahbar, Wheeling, West Virginia for support in the Medical School................................................ 5,000 Leonard Rand Trust for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 7,500 James G. Ravin, Toledo, Ohio 225 shares of Watkins-Johnson common stock and a cash gift for the History of Art Special Fellowship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for ophthalmology support in the Medical School....................... 10,470 Research Corporation Operating Account, Tucson, Arizona for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............ 27,000 Ricardo North American, Inc., Burr Ridge, Illinois for research in the College of Engineering.........................................60,000 Ridgefield Foundation, New York, New York for support of the Law School....................................................10,000 Oren L. Robertson Trust, Farmington Hills for the Comprehensive Cancer Center, in memory of James D. and Emma Robertson..... 5,000 Rockefeller Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Population Studies Center, College of Literature, Science, and the A rts....................................................................... 25,300 J. Speed Rogers, Brevard, North Carolina for the Crosby-Kahn Professorship in Neurosurgery in the Medical School.............. 5,000 Irwin Roth, New York, New York 1,000 shares of Network General Corporation common stock for support of the Law School.................................................... 41,313 Jack Roth, Malibu, California for the Jack Roth Scholarship in the Department of Athletics......................... 10,000 Royal Bank of Canada, Montreal, Canada for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration................................................... 15,000 Theodore Sachs, West Bloomfield 146 shares of First Interstate Bancorp common stock for endowment support in the Law School......................................... 20,248 Russell Sage Foundation, New York, New York for research in the School of Public Health, and for the Research Center for Group Dynamics in the Institute for Social Research... 62,700 Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey for support of the First Annual University of Michigan Psychiatry Colloquium in the M edical School..............................................................10,000 Schering-Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, New Jersey for gastroenterology research in the Medical School................................. 10,000 Helen L. Schmutz Estate for neurology research in the Medical School....................................... 31,585 Douglas R. Schrank, Pepper Pike, Ohio 100 shares of General Electric common stock for support in the School of Business Administration, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................. 6,900 Stanley S. Schwartz, Franklin for the Stanley S. Schwartz Dean's Discretionary Fund in the Law School.............. 20,000 Seoam Scholarship Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Korean Studies Program Development Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................. 25,000 Dennis G. Severance, Ann Arbor 100 shares of Chrysler Corporation common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,231 Violet Sharpe Estate for the School of Engineering Building Fund at the University of Michigan-Dearborn...... 11,300 David T. Shelby, Chicago, Illinois for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 10,000 268

Page  269 February Meeting, 1996 Jack H. Shuler, Naples, Florida 100 shares of Ameritech Corporation common stock for support in the Department of Athletics, the College of Engineering, and the Law School................................................... 5,308 Simba Information, Inc., Wilton, Connecticut for support in the School of Business Administration.............................. 5,000 Bruce H. Simpson Trust for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn........... 5,000 Gordon H. Sindecuse Estate for the Sindecuse Dental Museum in the School of Dentistry.................... 379,368 Philip L. Smith, Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida 140 shares of Motorola, Inc., common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 9,266 SmithKline Beecham Corporation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund and other upport in the Medical School...............................................30,750 SmithKline Beecham International, Singapore for gastroenterology research in the Medical School.................................. 5,000 Margaret Sokol, New York, New York for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........... 100,000 George E. Sperling, Jr., Santa Monica, California for the George E., Jr. and Elizabeth S. Sperling Fund in the Law School............... 7,500 Lodge D. Staubach Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................ 1,400,000 Christopher J. Steffen, Greenwich, Connecticut 350 shares of Microsoft common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 30,319 Clinton F. Stimpson III, Fort Gratiot for support in the School of Business Administration, and the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts................................ 27,000 Dean C. Storkan, Hollister, California for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 Charlotte B. Sundelson Trust for research in the Medical School, and for the Geriatrics Center....................... 6,000 Supreme Council 33rd Degree, A.A.S.R. Benevolent Foundation of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, Lexington, Massachusetts for the Scottish Rite Funds in the Medical School.................................... 8,625 Sycamore Fund, Chicago, Illinois for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, and for the Teaching Excellence Fund and other support in the School of Business Administration...................... 7,500 Syndeco, Inc., Detroit for the Habitat for Humanity Program in the School of Business Administration......... 7,738 FBO TenBroeck Irrevocable Trust for the Jane and Howard M. TenBroeck Scholarship in the College of Engineering....... 8,800 Texas Instruments, Inc., Dallas, Texas for the Industrial Partners of Computer Science Engineering Fund in the College of Engineering..................................................................5,000 Robert P. Thome, Chevy Chase, Maryland for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 10,000 Joel L. Tonkin, Leawood, Kansas for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Toshiba Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan for electrical and computer engineering support in the College of E ngineering................................................................... 15,000 Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, and for employee matching gifts.................................................... 105,500 Trico Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Administration......................................................... 5,000 United Technologies Corporation, Hartford, Connecticut for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, and for employee matching gifts.................................................. 15,120 L. Vad Technology, Detroit for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 9,000 269

Page  270 February Meeting, 1996 George A. Wade, Boise, Idaho for the building fund in the Division of Kinesiology.................................. 5,000 Eleanor M. Wagner, Grosse Pointe Park for support in the School of Education............................................. 5,000 Michael A. Wainstock, Bloomfield Hills for the Dr. Michael and Lee Wainstock Educational Fund in the Medical School........ 25,000 Charles R. Walgreen, Jr., Northfield, Illinois for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.........................11,032 Herbert S. Wander, Highland Park, Illinois for the Judaic Studies Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........ 5,000 Robert M. Warner, Mamaroneck, New York for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 Warner-Lambert Company, Ann Arbor for the Fitness Research Center in the Division of Kinesiology, for research and the G. Robert Greenberg Symposium in the Medical School, and for the Warner-Lambert Distinguished Lectureship Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 110,760 Washtenaw United Way, Ann Arbor for support in the Schools of Dentistry and Nursing, the University Hospitals, and the Comprehensive Cancer Center.................................... 7,970 Marshall Weinberg Philanthropic Fund, New York, New York for the Frankena and Stevenson Prize Fund and other support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 45,000 Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Museum of Anthropology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................. 5,000 Kenneth Whipple, Bloomfield Hills 360 shares of Ford Motor Company common stock for the Comprehensive Cancer Center............................................. 10,373 Whirlpool Corporation, Benton Harbor for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration...................................................... 15,000 Whitaker Foundation, Rosslyn, Virginia for research in the School of Dentistry, the College of Engineering, and the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................... 383,960 Thomas S. Wilson, Rochester Hills for the William Davidson Professorship in the School of Business Administration........ 5,000 H. W. Wilson Foundation, Inc., Bronx, New York for scholarships in the School of Information and Library Studies..................... 10,000 Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, New Jersey for the APPAM/Sloan Fellowship in the School of Public Policy....................... 54,000 Kurt J. Wolff, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 J. Reimer Wolter, Ann Arbor for ophthalmology support in the Medical School................................... 10,000 Marian E. Wright, Flint for support at the University of Michigan-Flint..................................... 17,000 Irma M. Wyman, St. Paul, Minnesota 105 shares of Honeywell, Inc., common stock for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women............ 5,040 Xerox Corporation, Webster, New York for the Fluidics Research Fund in the College of Engineering......................... 10,000 Yamanouchi U.S.A., Inc., White Plains, New York for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund in the M edical School.............................................................. 20,000 Zatkoff Seals & Packings, Farmington for scholarships in the Department of Athletics..................................... 10,000 Stanley R. Zax, Woodland Hills, California for support of the Law School.................................................... 25,000 Samuel Zell Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Professorship in the College of Engineering................. 600,000 Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, Delaware for the Cardiac Anesthesiology Research Gift Fund in the Medical School.............. 10,000 Roy H. Ziegler Trust for the Roy H. and Helen Ziegler Scholarship in the College of Engineering............ 10,000 William E. Zimmie Trust for the Benford-Zimmie Scholarships in the College of Engineering................ 129,040 270

Page  271 February Meeting, 1996 Abbott Laboratories Fund, Abbott Park, Illinois for chemistry scholarships in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for the Public Health Merit Scholarship in the School of Public Health, for support in the College of Pharmacy, and the Schools of Medicine and Nursing and for em ployee m atching gifts..................................................... $ 25,300 Terence E. Adderley, Bloomfield Hills for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 James N. Adler, Los Angeles, California 900 shares of Komag, Inc., common stock for support of the Law School...................................................42,300 Richard B. Ainsworth, Jr., Cleveland, Ohio for the Corporate Environmental Management Program in the School of Business Administration............................................. 5,000 Akzo Nobel, West Orange, New Jersey for support in the College of Pharmacy............................................ 21,500 Richard R. Allen, Greensboro, North Carolina 400 shares of Ladd Furniture, Inc., common stock; for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................. 5,350 American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Foundation, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia for research in the Medical School................................................ 20,000 American Automobile Manufacturers Association, Detroit for highway safety research in the Transportation Research Institute................ 395,000 American Brain Tumor Association, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School.................................................6,250 American Cancer Society, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School, the Colleges of Pharmacy and Literature,Science, and the Arts, and the Biophysics Research Division................ 66,620 American Diabetes Association, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia for research in the M edical School................................................ 31,825 American Digestive Health Foundation, Bethesda, Maryland for research in the M edical School................................................ 12,500 American Federation for Aging Research, Inc., New York, New York for research in the M edical School................................................ 19,997 American Heart Association of Michigan, Southfield for research in the Medical School and the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................. 132,363 American Paralysis Association, Springfield, New Jersey for research in the Medical School...............................................14,986 American Society of Hematology, Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina for research in the M edical School................................................10,000 William J. Anderson, Ann Arbor for support in the College of Engineering........................................... 7,000 Anika and Associates, Inc., Bloomfield Hills for the Autism Program in the Institute for Human Adjustment, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies........................................... 10,000 Anonymous Donor 110 shares of Amgen, Inc., common stock; for the Donald W. Tinkle Memorial Scholarship and the Frank E. Ammerman Zoology Research Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 5,594 Anonymous Donor for support in the School of Education.............................................. 5,000 Anonymous Donor for the Helmut Stern Dean's Merit Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts; and for support in the College of Engineering, the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and the Museum of Art............... 95,000 Anonymous Donor for the Thomas A. Reynolds, Jr., Dean's Discretionary Fund in the Law School......... 25,000 Joseph A. Aristeo, Livonia for scholarships and the Swimming and Diving Fund in the Department of Athletics, and for the Civil Engineering Alumni Friends Association Fellowship and other support in the College of Engineering........................... 8,100 John M. Armstrong, Ann Arbor for the Center for Russian and East European Studies Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...................................... 5,000 271

Page  272 February Meeting, 1996 Arthritis Foundation, Atlanta, Georgia for research in the Medical School............................................... 66,000 ASDA Foundation, New York, New York for the Regional Chemotherapy Research Gift Fund in the Medical School........... 150,000 Asset Investment Management, Grand Rapids for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................... 5,000 AT&T Foundation, New York, New York for mechanical engineering and applied mechanics support in the College of Engineering, and for employee matching gifts.................................... 13,371 Baker & Hostetler Founders Trust, Cleveland, Ohio for the Kathryn Strimbu Memorial Fund.................................... 5,000 Daniel R. Balbach, Ann Arbor 317 shares of Somatogen, Inc., common stock and a cash gift; for the Orthodontic Alumni Clinic in the School of Dentistry, and for the University Musical Society....................................................... 5,053 Louis G. Baldacci, Atherton, California for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics................ 5,000 Joseph C. Bancroft Educational and Charitable Foundation, McComb, Missouri; for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Administration...................................................... 20,000 Fleming A. Barbour, Flint 318 shares of Citizens Banking Corporation common stock and a cash gift for the F. B. Fralick Ophthalmology Fund in the Medical School, and for WFUM/TV..... 9,998 Norman E. Barnett, Jr., Ann Arbor for the Norman E. and Mary E. Barnett Funds in the School of Music and the Colleges of Architecture and Urban Planning and Literature, Science, and the Arts and for support in the Schools of Medicine and Music.................... 35,325 BASF Wyandotte Corporation, Wyandotte for chemical engineering support in the College of Engineering....................... 10,000 Peggy Bauervic Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Peggy Bauervic Foundation Scholarship in the Department of Athletics......... 12,500 Bayer Corporation, West Haven, Connecticut for the Robert Fekety, M.D., Lectureship Fund, the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, and the 1996 Lecture Fund in the Medical School........ 6,500 Marion Bellairs, Flint Thomas P. Ryan Memorial Scholarship at the University of Michigan-Flint............ 20,000 Alice M. Bender, Kalamazoo for the Scholarship and Student Aid Fund in the College of Engineering, in memory of William H. Cary, Jr................................................. 5,000 Gordon A. Berenson, Ann Arbor for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................... 6,000 Berkshire Hathaway, Inc., Omaha, Nebraska 161 shares of General Dynamics Corporation common stock for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Medicine, and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for unrestricted support of the University of of Michigan............................................ 9,761 Jack L. Berman, Los Angeles, California for the Drs. Jack and Barbara Berman Merit Scholarship in the Medical School......... 6,000 Philip C. and Sara D. Berry, Moreland Hills, Ohio for the Ernst & Young Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, for the Donald A. Kerr Endowed Collegiate Professorship in the School of Dentistry, for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, for the H. A. and B. W. Kenyon Fund in the University Library and for the University of Michigan Club of Cleveland Scholarship.............. 5,000 Robert H. Berry, Ann Arbor 298 shares of General Motors Corporation common stock and a cash gift for research in the Medical School, for support in the School Music, and for the Clements Library....................................................... 16,010 Sanjoy Bhattacharya, Chicago, Illinois 477 shares of various corporate common stocks and a cash gift for the S. Bhattacharya Mamata Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 24,776 Brian L. Bilzin, Miami, Florida 60 shares of Philip Morris Company common stock for the Bilzin Student Travel Fellowship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 5,428 272

Page  273 February Meeting, 1996 Florence E. Bingham Trust for the Florence E. Bingham Fund in the Medical School............................17,608 Maurice S. Binkow, Bloomfield Hills 140 shares of Automatic Data Processing common stock for gifts pending designation.....................................................10,194 Russell S. Bishop III, Incline Village, Nevada 400 shares of Ameribank Federal Savings Bank common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................26,800 Bonisteel Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund......................................... 63,000 Carol Bowling, Ann Arbor for the Scholarship and Student Aid Fund in the College of Engineering, in memory of William H. Cary, Jr................................................. 5,000 Hubert J. Brandt, Long Beach, New York for Judaic Studies support, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 25,000 Paul S. Brentlinger, Cleveland, Ohio 3,500 shares of Verifone, Inc., common stock for the Paul S. Brentlinger Unitrust Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts....... 103,250 Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for employee matching gifts..................................................... 13,172 Ann and Eric V. Brown, Sr., Fund of the Kalamazoo Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Eric V. Brown Family Scholarship in the Law School......................... 10,000 Robert W. Browne, Ada for golf course restoration and the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, and for the Robert W. and Lynn H. Browne Professorship in Science, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................ 427,813 Edmund B. Brownell, Flint for the Begole, Brownell, Schneider, Kahn Fund in the Medical School.................. 5,000 Brush Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio for the Public Health Merit Scholarship in the School of Public Health................ 17,500 Bugas Fund, Dearborn for research in the M edical School................................................ 25,000 Richard R. Burns, Duluth, Minnesota 210 shares of General Electric common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for support of the Law School...... 14,753 Richard J. Burstein, Bloomfield Hills for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, for the Comprehensive Cancer Center, and for the University Musical Society................. 5,000 Alfred H. Burwitz Trust, Ann Arbor for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan................................ 8,625 Brian P. Campbell, Ann Arbor for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for support in the School of Business Administration................................................. 6,500 Paul B. Campbell, Cleveland, Ohio 150 shares of Chemical Financial Corporation common stock for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Law........................ 5,925 Jean W. Campbell Trust for the Jean Campbell Research Fund in the Center for the Education of Women, and for the University Musical Society................................... 5,200 David L. Chambers, White River, Vermont 80 shares of Pepisco, Inc., and nine shares of TRW common stock for gifts pending designation...................................................... 5,327 David G. Chardavoyne, Farmington Hills for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics, and for the William Revelli Marching Band Scholarship in the School of Music.............. 5,250 Kathleen G. Charla, Bloomfield Hills for the Graduate Research Internships and Fellowships Fund in the Center for Russian and East European Studies, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......... 5,000 Mrs. Jaswinder K. Chattha, Weirton, West Virginia for Sikh Studies support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............. 25,000 Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Concord, California for the Minority Engineering Program and other support in the College of Engineering, and for employee matching gifts...................................... 11,350 Chicago Community Trust, Chicago, Illinois for research in the M edical School................................................ 30,000 273

Page  274 February Meeting, 1996 Chrysler Corporation Fund, Highland Park for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Summer Projects Fund in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering, and for employee matching gifts............................................... 39,132 Clarcor Foundation, Rockford, Illinois for support of the Law School.....................................................5,000 C & M Recycling, Inc., North Chicago, Illinois for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund, Medical School...... 10,000 Consolidated Rail Corporation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for minority fellowships in the School of Public Policy...............................15,000 Coopers & Lybrand Foundation, New York, New York for employee matching gifts.............................................22,901 Alice S. and Allen F. Corey Trust for the Chester B. Slawson Memorial Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..........................................................8,000 Alice Berle Crawford, Ann Arbor for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women, for support in the School of Music and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts for special exhibitions support in the Museum of Art, and for the University Musical Society......................................... 8,250 Dewey B. Crawford, Chicago, Illinois for support of the Law School......................................... 5,000 Ronnie M. Cresswell, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex and the Stadium Brick Project Fund in the Department of Athletics, for support in the School of Music and the College of Pharmacy and for the University Musical Society........................... 6,100 Franklin M. Cunard, Clinton Township 200 shares of Colgate-Palmolive Company and 100 shares of International Business Machines common stocks for the Franklin M. Cunard, Jr., Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering...................................... 23,375 Current Medical Directions, Inc., New York, New York for research in the Medical School................................................. 5,000 Louis B. Cushman, Houston, Texas for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 Dana Corporation, Toledo, Ohio for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration................... 5,000 James E. Daverman, Glencoe, Illinois 900 shares of Somatogen, Inc., common stock for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics, for the Office for the Study of Private Equity Finance in the School of Business Administration, and for support in the School of Education......................................... 13,838 Deafness Research Foundation, New York, New York for research and the Kresge Hearing Research Institute in the Medical School.......................................................................... 15,000 Dekers Blue Line Club, Ann Arbor for ice hockey support in the Department of Athletics............................... 10,000 Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies................... 30,000 Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program, Inc., Detroit for the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering.................. 66,000 Detroit Association of University of Michigan Women, Wyandotte for scholarships in the Alumni Association.......................................... 7,450 Detroit Diesel Corporation, Detroit for instructional support in the College of Engineering............................... 9,000 Detroit Free Press, Inc., Detroit for the Detroit Free Press Dean's Merit Scholarship and the Minority Workshop Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................... 25,000 Peter F. de Vaux, Verona, Virginia 350 shares of Walgreen common stock for support in the School of Business Administration................................ 10,172 Diabetes Discovery Group, Novo Alle Bagsvaerd, Denmark for biological chemistry research in the Medical School............................. 15,000 A. Richard Diebold, Jr., Tucson, Arizona for the Middle English Dictionary Gift Support Fund................................ 10,000 Daniel L. Dierdorf, St. Louis, Missouri for support in the Department of Athletics.......................................... 5,000 274

Page  275 February Meeting, 1996 J. Robert Dobbins, Dallas, Texas for the Office for the Study of Private Equity Finance in the School of Business Adm inistration......................................................... 5,000 James R. Donahey, Ann Arbor for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics...................... 10,000 Robert J. Donia, La Jolla, California 3,700 shares of Vanguard Index Small Capital Fund mutual fund and 1,500 shares of Pasadena Growth Fund common stock for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................ 97,175 Jean W. Dorsett-Robinson, Isle of Palms, South Carolina for support in the School of Public Health........................................ 10,000 Dow Chemical Company, Midland for the Catalytic Surfaces Studies Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts.................................................................. 11,250 Dow Chemical Company Foundation, Midland for employee matching gifts................................................. 5,323 Caroline M. Duesberry Estate for the Caroline M. Duesberry Scholarship at the University of Michigan-Flint............ 34,086 Mark F. Duffy, Burr Ridge, Illinois for support in the Department of Athletics..........................................5,000 Connie R. Dunlap, Ann Arbor 2,000 shares of various corporate common stocks and a cash gift for the Stadium Brick Project Fund in the Department of Athletics, and for the Connie R. Dunlap Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the University Library................................................. 95,350 Morris D. Dunn, New Vernon, New Jersey for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, for support in the College of Engineering, and for scholarships and other support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................................ 11,700 Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Adm inistration........................................................ 15,000 Virginia J. Ehrlicher, Sarasota, Florida for the Virginia J. Ehrlicher Fellowship in the School of Information and Library Studies, and for the Clements Library...................................... 51,000 John D. Evans, Middleburg, Virginia 2,600 shares of SBC Communications common stock for the John D. Evans Fund.................................................... 150,963 John M. Evans, Northville for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, the University of M ichigan-Dearborn.............................................................. 5,000 Exxon Education Foundation, Irving, Texas for support in the College of Engineering, and for employee matching gifts............. 10,100 Federal Express, Memphis, Tennessee for the Curt Reimann Scholarship in the School of Business Administration............. 5,000 Murray J. Feiwell, Indianapolis, Indiana for golf course restoration, scholarships and the Men's Basketball Fund in the Department of Athletics, for the Roy F. and Jean Humphrey Proffitt Research Professorship in the Law School, and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................ 9,950 E. Ann Finlayson, New York, New York for the Louise and Robert Finlayson Family Scholarship in the School of Business Administration, and for chemistry support and the Honors Programin the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................... 5,000 Robert M. Finlayson, Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida for the Louise and Robert Finlayson Family Scholarship in the School of Business Adm inistration........................................................ 10,000 Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation, Inc., Detroit for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for the Replacement H ospital Project Fund...........................................................26,000 Morgan L. Fitch, Jr., Western Springs, Illinois for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Nathan M. Forbes, Bloomfield Hills for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics........................ 5,000 Eleanor and Edsel Ford Fund, Detroit for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn.... 25,000 275

Page  276 February Meeting, 1996 Henry Ford II Fund, Dearborn for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse University of Michigan-Dearborn.... 20,000 Ford Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Center for Russian and East European Studies, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for gifts pending designation.............. 255,000 Ford Motor Company, Dearborn for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration, for the Program in Manufacturing and other support in the College of Engineering, and for the University Musical Society........... 66,609 Ford Motor Company Fund, Dearborn for the Associates Program in the School of Business Administration, for the Comprehensive Cancer Center, for the University Musical Society and for employee matching gifts.................................................... 151,812 Ford Senior Players Championship, Dearborn for the Chain of Support Fund and the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane, the University of Michigan-Dearborn........................................ 35,000 Francis Families Foundation, Kansas City, Missouri for research and the Parker B. Francis Fellowship in the Medical School e.............. 35,909 Bruce Frankel Fund of the United Jewish Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for Judaic Studies support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........... 8,600 Edward P. Frohlich, Grosse Pointe Farms 91 shares of Atlantic Richfield common stock for the All-State Scholarship, the Larry Teal Scholarship in Saxophone and other support in the School of Music, for support of the Law School, and for the University M usical Society................................................... 10,101 Donna K. Fry-Welch, Flint for minority scholarships at the University of Michigan-Flint.......................... 5,000 Robert W. Galvin Foundation, Schaumburg, Illinois for research support and equipment............................................... 50,000 Stanley Garn, Ann Arbor 10 shares of E. F. Hutton National Series and seven shares of E. F. Hutton Select Trust investment units for gifts pending designation...................................................... 7,842 Charles Gelman, Ann Arbor 250 shares of Gelman Sciences, Inc., common stock for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 5,906 Gelman Sciences, Inc., Ann Arbor for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 8,000 Dick Genthe Chevrolet, Southgate for the Comprehensive Cancer Center.............................................. 5,000 General Motors Corporation, Warren for support in the College of Engineering, and for the Burn Development Research and Education Fund in the Medical School.............................. 138,900 GHS Corporation, Battle Creek for the Shirley and Robert McFee Guitar Fund and the Marching Band Fund in the School of Music, and for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Law, and the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts........ 12,500 Dudley J. Godfrey, Jr., Milwaukee, Wisconsin for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Robert T. Goldman, West Bloomfield for support in the Medical School............................................... 5,000 Thomas A. Goss, Oakland, California for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics................................ 5,000 Thomas M. Graber, Evanston, Illinois 2,236 shares of Bellsouth Dividend Reinvestment Fund for the Thomas M. Graber Unitrust Fund for the ultimate benefit of the School of D entistry............................................................. 92,943 Grand Rapids Foundation, Grand Rapids for research in the School of Social Work......................................... 77,449 Granite Rock Company, Watsonville, California for the Curt Reimann Scholarship in the School of Business Administration............. 8,000 Eugene M. Grant and Company, New York, New York for the NEH Challenge Grant Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Irving M. Hermelin Curator of Judaica Endowment in the University Library....................................................... 20,833 276

Page  277 February Meeting, 1996 Greenfield Fund of the Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund, Ann Arbor for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for the Department of Surgery Research Fund in the Medical School....................................... 9,050 Charles B. Greening, West Bloomfield for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................... 8,000 Dorothy Greenwald Trust for the Greenwald Law Student Aid Fund in the Law School, and for the Dorothy Greenwald Scholarship in the School of Music.............................. 92,435 Greenwall Foundation, New York, New York for research in the Medical School............................................ 28,350 Kalvin M. Grove, St. Petersburg, Florida for the Kalvin and Eileen Grove Scholarship in the Department of Athletics............ 20,000 Carroll J. Haas, Mendon 3,412 shares of Amgen, Inc., common stock for gifts pending designation................................................... 200,405 Joseph F. Haas, Atlanta, Georgia 820 shares of Premier Industrial common stock and a cash gift for the Geismer-Haas Reinach Dean's Merit Scholarship and other support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts...................................20,698 Cornelia W. Hamilton, West Hartford, Connecticut for support in the Medical School, and for the University Library...................... 5,000 George Hammond Family Trust 1,435 shares of various corporate common stocks and 10,000 Massachusetts Municipal Bonds for the George Hammond, M.D., Scholarship in the Medical School.................... 90,600 John T. Hammond, Kenosha, Wisconsin for the Claire Sliney Memorial Fund in the School of Education...................... 20,000 Steven K. Hamp, Ann Arbor for the C. S. Mott Children's Hospital Gift Fund, and for the Clements Library.......... 6,000 Handelshogskolan, Stockholm, Sweden for the National Quality Research Center in the School of Business Administration..... 41,493 Jerry F. Hanlon, Ann Arbor for support in the Department of Athletics.......................................... 5,000 Arlene D. Harris, Flint 300 shares of D&N Financial Corporation and 200 shares of Bio-Met common stocks for the Student Aid Fund in the Medical School................................... 7,269 Marian E. Harris, Lakewood, New Jersey for the James E. Harris Scholarship in Chemistry, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................. 5,000 Roger B. Harris, Chicago, Illinois 18 shares of Harris Family Investment Company common stock for the NEH Challenge Grant Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for support of the Law School.................................... 10,000 David G. Hartman, New Providence, New Jersey 100 shares of Chubb Corporation common stock for the Cecil J. Nesbitt Actuarial Education Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................. 9,800 John B. Hazelworth, Winter Haven, Florida 100 shares of Philip Morris Companies common stock and a cash gift for the John and Barbara Hazelworth Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................... 10,306 Hercules, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware for minority and female scholarships and the Minority Engineering Program in the College of Engineering..................................................... 8,000 David B. Hermelin, Southfield for support in the School of Business Administration, and for the State of Israel Bonds Fund............................................................... 5,250 William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, Menlo Park, California for research in the Center for Population Planning, School of Public Health............ 40,000 F. Hoffman-LaRoche AG, Basel Switzerland for research in the Medical School.............................................. 235,155 Howard S. Holmes, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund, and for the Matthaei Botanical Gardens Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..................... 25,100 277

Page  278 February Meeting, 1996 James C. Holmes, Jr., Bloomfield Hills 100 shares of Exxon Corporation common stock for the Retinal and Macular Dystrophy Center in the Medical School................... 8,175 Jon R. Holt, Minnetrista, Minnesota for the Industrial Engineering Special Gift Fund, College of Engineering.............. 8,500 John K. Hoyns, New York, New York for support of the Law School.....................................................6,000 Mary I. Hunting, Grand Rapids for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund, and the Michigan League Development Fund... 10,000 Frances B. Imoberstag Charitable Foundation, Romulus for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Center for Heritage Landscaping Fund, the University of Michigan-Dearborn......................................... 7,000 Indian Trail Charitable Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..................... 40,000 Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon for the HPS Architecture Fund in the College of Engineering......................... 30,000 Intel Foundation, Hillsboro, Oregon for scholarships in the College of Engineering.....................................12,150 International Foundation for Ethical Research, Inc., Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 23,600 Marguerite Iskenderian, Brooklyn, New York for the Haig P. Iskenderian Engineering Scholarship in the College of Engineering...... 20,000 Marjorie M. Jackson Revocable Trust for special exhibitions support in the Museum of Art................................. 5,000 Marc Jacobson, Norfolk, Virginia for the Marc and Constance Jacobson Lectureship Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts................................................. 16,000 Thomas H. Jeffs, II, Grosse Pointe Farms 400 shares of First Chicago NBD Corporation common stock for the MBA Peace Corp Fund in the School of Business Administration............... 16,600 Conrad and Caroline Jobst Foundation, Toledo, Ohio for the Caroline B. Jobst Laboratory in the Medical School........................... 25,000 Garrett B. Johnson, Winnetka, Illinois for the Kirkland & Ellis Professorship in the Law School............................ 10,000 Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies Contributions Fund, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the College of Pharmacy, and for employee matching gifts.............. 15,400 Robert Wood Johnson, Princeton, New Jersey for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 37,201 Ray Warner Judson, Pasadena, California for the Ray W. and Mary Lou Judson Scholarship in the College of Engineering......... 20,000 K1 Spring & Stamping Corporation, Chicago, Illinois for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics.................... 5,000 Max Kade Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the Max Kade German House Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts............................................................. 6,000 Jim Kamman, Laguna Hills, California for the Benny Friedman Scholarship in the Department of Athletics.................... 7,500 Richard Katcher, Cleveland, Ohio for the Varsity Tennis Complex, the Tom Harmon Scholarship and other support in the Department of Athletics and for the Richard and Shirley R. Katcher Family Scholarship and other support in the Law School..................... 18,260 M. David Keil, Hinsdale, Illinois 320 shares of Dun & Bradstreet common stock for support in the Department of Athletics......................................... 20,370 W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Battle Creek for the Kellogg Child Welfare Law Institute in the Law School, and for research in the School of Public Health.......................................... 889,022 Elizabeth E. Kennedy Fund, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................ 10,000 David F. Keren, Ann Arbor 3,000 shares of Network Express common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics..................................... 14,813 C. Robert Kidder, Columbus, Ohio 5,000 shares of Duracell common stock for the C. Robert and Mary Kidder Endowed Scholarships in the Colleges of Engineering and Literature, Science, and the Arts................................ 254,688 278

Page  279 February Meeting, 1996 Robert P. Kirby, Augusta, Georgia for support in the School of Natural Resources and Environment......................5,000 Barbara M. Kitzner, Allen Park for the Environmental Study Area Fund at the University of Michigan-Dearborn........5,000 Koepfgen Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for student aid and other support in the School of Business Administration.............8,000 Marlene Koivunen, Livonia for the DeWeese Educational Endowment in the Medical School....................... 5,000 Daniel F. Kolb, New York, New York for support of the Law School........................................... 10,000 Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Dallas, Texas for the Comprehensive Cancer Center........................................... 149,794 Sylvia M. Kosciolek, Grand Blanc for support in the Medical School......................................... 5,000 C. Douglas Kranwinkle, New York, New York for the William W. Bishop, Jr., Research Professorship and other support in the Law School.................................................................25,000 Louis A. Kubicek Estate for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 10,000 Bernard J. LaCroute, Saratoga, California 915 shares of IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corporation common stock for scholarships in the College of Engineering, and for the Helfman Literary Student Aid Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................. 12,924 Dorothy Lahey, Plymouth for research in the M edical School................................................. 5,000 John R. Laird, Ann Arbor 430 shares of TCF Financial Corporation common stock for support in the Law School and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund............................. 12,981 Lear Seating Corporation, Southfield for the Manufacturing Initiatives Fund in the College of Engineering.................. 20,000 Lynn A. Leedy, Bellvue, Colorado for the R. Timothy Leedy Scholarship, School of Business Administration.............. 10,000 Suzanne R. Lehmann, New York, New York 325 shares of Microsoft common stock for gifts pending designation..................................................... 28,559 Judith C. Leondar Trust for the Dr. Ralph E. Bennett Endowment Funds in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................... 10,000 Mark J. Levick, Atlanta, Georgia for support of the Law School, and for the Humanities Institute in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................................... 6,500 Michael J. Levitt, Englewood, New Jersey for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Law, and for the Rollicking Crew Endowed Scholarship.............................................10,760 Lillian Levy Trust for the Norman Levy Research Fund in the Medical School........................... 9,800 Kirk J. Lewis, Boise, Idaho for support in the Department of Athletics.......................................... 8,000 Edmonts G. Linamegi Estate for kidney research in the Medical School........................................... 6,781 Lincoln Health Care Foundation, Charlotte, North Carolina for the M. B. Landers, Sr., Memorial Student Loan Fund in the Medical School......... 32,000 Robert A. Line, Rochester Hills for the Stark/Line Dean's Merit Scholarship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and for support in the School of Business Administration......... 9,100 Winfield H. and Grace Song Line Trusts for the Winfield H. and Grace Song Line Fund in the School of Public Health......... 800,855 Jeffrey Liss, Chevy Chase, Maryland for the Jeffrey and Susan Liss Scholarship in the Law School, and for the Jeffrey and Susan Liss Travel Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 5,000 Loews Foundation, New York, New York for the Replacement Hospital Project Fund........................................ 12,500 Long-Lewis Ford, Bessemer, Alabama for the Henry Ford Estate at Fair Lane Powerhouse, University of Michigan-Dearborn..... 10,000 Robert P. Luciano, Madison, New Jersey for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy.......................... 5,000 279

Page  280 February Meeting, 1996 Ann Lurie Revocable Trust, Chicago, Illinois for the Robert H. Lurie Fund in the College of Engineering........................ 100,000 John W. Madigan, Chicago, Illinois 1,700 shares of Tribune Company common stock for the Holly and John Madigan Endowed Scholarship and other support in the School of Business Administration.......................................... 104,231 James N. Malina, Pennington, New Jersey 800 shares of General Electric and 450 shares of International Business Machines common stocks, and a cash gift for the James N. and Dorothea Malina Unitrust Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering............................................ 100,000 Edward and Helen Mardigian Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for the Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Geriatrics Center.................... 500,000 Richard H. May, Bloomfield Hills for support of the Law School.................................. 5,000 Olivia P. Maynard, Goodrich 600 shares of Procter & Gamble common stock for the Olivia P. Maynard and S. Olof Karlstrom Donor Pooled Income Fund, for the ultimate benefit of the Schools of Law and Social Work.................. 49,825 MBNA America Bank, N.A., Wilmington, Delaware for the Alumni Association Scholarship..................................... 5,000 Kenneth B. McConnell, Bloomfield Hills for support of the Law School................................ 25,000 Robert E. McFarland, Orchard Lake for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Joanne T. Meagher, Ypsilanti for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.................................................. 6,000 Meijer, Inc., Grand Rapids for the Fred Meijer Fellowship in Creative Writing, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................ 50,000 Mellor Family Foundation, Potomac, Maryland 488 shares of General Dynamics common stock for the James R. and Suzanne S. Mellor Faculty Support Fund in the College of Engineering.......................................................... 29,158 Merck & Company, Inc., West Point, Pennsylvania for support in the M edical School.................................................. 5,000 Helen L. Metzner, Ann Arbor for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women............ 5,000 Arthur A. Miller, Roxbury, Connecticut for the Arthur Miller Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the A rts................................................................... 25,000 Milliken & Company, Spartanburg, South Carolina for the Curt W. Reimann Scholarship in the School of Business Administration......... 10,000 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. Paul, Minnesota for research in the School of Nursing.............................................. 25,000 Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Foundation, Inc., St. Paul, Minnesota for chemistry support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............... 14,500 Monroe-Brown Foundation, Kalamazoo for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, and for the Clem ents Library................................................................ 6,000 Minnie L. Morrison Estate for the Charles N. and Minnie L. Morrison Scholarship............................... 5,569 Kenneth H. Mortenson, New York, New York 200 shares of Digital Equipment common stock and a cash gift for the Robert A. Baumgartner Football Scholarship in the Department of Athletics, and for support in the School of Business Administration................... 14,938 R. Stan Mortenson, McLean, Virginia for support of the Law School..................................................... 7,500 John S. Munn, Clark, Colorado for the Comprehensive Cancer Center............................................. 35,000 Alberto A. Munoz II, McAllen, Texas for the Alberto A. Munoz II and Sharon Munoz Fund in the Law School............. 100,000 National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, Chicago, Illinois for research in the Medical School................................................ 52,203 National Glaucoma Research, Rockville, Maryland for research in the Medical School.................................................6,250 280

Page  281 February Meeting, 1996 National Kidney Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for research in the M edical School................................................ 10,517 National Kidney Foundation of Michigan, Inc., Ann Arbor for research in the Medical School...........................................5,000 Gregor N. Neff, Dobbs Ferry, New York for the Gregor N. Neff Scholarship in the Law School...............................25,000 Henry H. Newlin, Tecumseh for the Henry and Nancy Newlin Women's Basketball Scholarship in the Department of Athletics............ e10,000 Andrea Fischer Newman, Ann Arbor for the Andrea Fischer Newman Fund.............................................10,000 Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corporation, Tokyo, Japan for endowment support in the School of Business Administration.................. 1,500,000 Nokomis Foundation, Grand Rapids for research in the Center for the Education of Women.............................. 15,000 Donald E. Nordlund, Barrington, Illinois for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 NYX, Inc., Livonia for Sikh Studies support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.............. 6,500 Oakland Investment Company, Bloomfield Hills for research in the Institute for Human Adjustment, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................... 5,000 Alan J. Olson, Chicago, Illinois for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Ronald L. Olson, Los Angeles, California 287 shares of Johnson & Johnson common stock for support of the Law School.................................................... 25,148 William P. O'Neil, Washington, DC for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Graham A. Orley, Bloomfield Hills for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Adm inistration........................................................ 10,000 Thomas W. Ostrander, New York, New York for endowment support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............. 11,500 David and Lucile Packard Foundation, Los Altos, California for scholarships and fellowships in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies............................................................... 15,000 William M. Packer, Orchard Lake for support in the Medical School................................................. 10,000 Ann V. Parfet, Richland for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women.......... 5,000 Randolph C. Paschke, Ann Arbor for support in the Department of Athletics, and for the William A. Paton Accounting Scholarship and other support in the School of Business Administration........................... 5,000 Beatrice Paul, Bloomfield Hills for the William Davidson Professorship of Business in the School of Business Administration.................. 10,000 Louis Perlmutter, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Olga E. Petters Estate for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 14,202 Pew Charitable Trusts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for scholarships and fellowships in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.............................................................. 10,000 Pfizer, Inc., New York, New York for support in the College of Pharmacy............................................ 20,000 Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association Foundation, Inc., Washington, DC for research in the Medical School................................................ 12,500 Pharmacia and Upjohn, Inc., Kalamazoo for the MFM Educational Fund in the Medical School, and for the Comprehensive Cancer Center.................................................... 9,000 Philips Display Components Company, Ann Arbor for the University Musical Society................................................. 7,500 Ronald L. Piasecki, Spring Lake for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics................... 20,000 Jeffry M. and Barbara Picower Foundation, New York, New York for the Residential College Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts..... 10,000 281

Page  282 February Meeting, 1996 Plough Foundation, Memphis, Tennessee for the Plough Pharmacy Scholarship in the College of Pharmacy..................... 45,000 Hughes and Sheila Potiker Foundation, Bloomfield Hills for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women, and for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.......... 83,275 Power Foundation, Kalamazoo for the support in the Institute for Human Adjustment, and for the D'Arms Award in the Humanities, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies.............10,600 E. Miles Prentice III, New York, New York for support of the Law School..................................................... 5,000 Roy F. Proffitt, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 3,063 shares of various corporate common stocks for the Roy F. and Jean H. Proffitt Research Professorship in the Law School........ 182,383 John A. Pursley, Belleview, Florida for the John A. Pursley Donor Pooled Income Fund for the ultimate benefit of the College of Engineering.............................................. 10,000 Raymond R. Reilly, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund........................................... 5,000 Florence M. Rennie Scholarship Trust for the Florence M. Rennie Scholarship Foundation Award Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................................... 5,231 Research Fund of American Otological Society, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana for the Kresge Hearing Research Institute.......................................... 6,250 Rhone-Poulenc, Inc., Cranbury, New Jersey for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Adm inistration....................................................... 15,000 John Rich, Beverly Hills, California for the John Rich Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............. 50,000 Robert B. and Pearl P. Richardson Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................... 23,915 P. Anthony Ridder, Miami, Florida 375 shares of Knight-Ridder, Inc., common stock for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 23,906 Thomas B. Ridgley, Columbus, Ohio 325 shares of Worthington Industries common stock for support of the Law School.................................................... 6,439 Richard H. Rogel, Southfield 8,728 shares of American Mutual Fund for support of the Campaign for Michigan........................................ 209,998 Lois R. Ross, Naples, Florida for support in the College of Arts and Sciences, and for the Coleman and Lois Ross Scholarship at the University of Michigan-Flint............................ 50,000 Jeffrey R. Roth, West Bloomfield for the building fund and other support in the Division of Kinesiology.................. 6,000 Joseph E. Rowe, Kettering, Ohio 4,878 shares of PPG Industries common stock and a cash gift for the Dr. Joseph E. and Anne P. Rowe Unitrust Fund and other support in the College of Engineering..................................................... 224,144 Marshall V. Rozzi, Chicago, Illinois for the S. J. Axelrod Scholarship in the School of Public Health........................ 5,000 Richard V. Sandler, Los Angeles, California 780 shares of Fruit of the Loom common stock and a cash gift for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, and for gifts pending designation in the Campaign for Michigan.................................. 22,061 Richard N. Sarns, Ann Arbor for support in the Schools of Business Administration and Education, for the Fitness Research Center in the Division of Kinesiology, for the University Musical Society and for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan.............. 5,500 Schering-Plough Foundation, Madison, New Jersey for the Schering-Plough Educational Fund and the Plough Pharmacy Scholarship in the College of Pharmacy, and for employee matching gifts............ 145,350 Milton J. Schloss, Cincinnati, Ohio for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................ 10,000 Schlumberger Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the Schlumberger Foundation Collegiate Scholarship in the College of Engineering.................................................................... 6,000 282

Page  283 February Meeting, 1996 Madeleine T. Schneider, Ann Arbor for the Begole, Brownell, Schneider, Kahn Fund in the Medical School, and for the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology......................................... 5,250 Schneider National, Inc., Greenbay, Wisconsin for the Michigan Human Resources Partnership Program in the School of Business Administration........................................................ 11,250 Werner W. Schroeder Estate for the Gerald R. Ford Fellowship in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts... 8,220 Nellie G. Scott Marital Trust for the Graduate Financial Aid Fund in the School of Nursing......................... 20,700 Searle Family Trust, Northbrook, Illinois for the Ara G. Paul Professorship in the College of Pharmacy....................... 100,000 Shape Corporation, Grand Haven for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 10,000 Donald R. Shepherd, Rancho Santa Fe, California for the Marching Band Fund in the School of Music................................ 15,000 Skillman Foundation, Detroit for the Michigan Neighborhood Americorp Program................................ 33,000 Alene Smith, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund, in memory of Allan F. Smith and for the Stadium Brick Project Fund in the Department of Athletics................. 5,100 Charles L. Smith, Perrysburg, Ohio 100 shares of Microsoft and 91 shares of Intel Corporation common stocks and a cash gift for the Charles L. and Kathleen Smith Endowment in the Medical School, and for the University Library.....................................14,408 Nelson L. Smith, Escanaba 339 shares of Mutual Qualified Fund mutual fund for the Nelson L. Smith Award Fund in the School of Dentistry, and for the Stadium Brick Project Fund in the Department of Athletics.......................11,000 Richard C. Sneed, Cleveland, Ohio 100 shares of TRW, Inc., common stock for support of the Law School..................................................... 7,550 Spencer Foundation, Chicago, Illinois for research in the School of Education............................................ 12,000 SPX Foundation, Muskegon for the Michigan Joint Manufacturing Initiatives Program in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering, and for the Pediatric Dental Clinic Renovation Fund in the School of Dentistry...................20,500 Statprobe, Inc., Ann Arbor for the Richard G. Cornell Scholarship in the School of Public Health, and for employee matching gifts......................................................30,075 Lodge D. Staubach Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan............................. 340,000 William M. Stein, Jr., Highland Park, New Jersey for support in the School of Public Policy...........................................5,000 Cam G. Stewart, West Peabody, Massachusetts for the Yost Arena Renovation Fund in the Department of Athletics....................5,000 Stuart Foundations, San Francisco, California for employee m atching gifts.......................................................5,000 Helen K. Summers Trust for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan................................5,000 John W. Sweetland, Los Angeles, California for support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................10,000 Tandy Corporation, Fort Worth, Texas for geological sciences support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........7,334 Tanner Lecture Trust, Salt Lake City, Utah for the Obert C. Tanner Philosophy Endowment in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................................................50,000 Tapestry Foundation of Mary Carmel and Thomas P. Borders, Ann Arbor for the Mary Carmel and Thomas P. Borders Women's Basketball Scholarship in the Department of Athletics........................................20,000 W. David Tarver, Little Silver, New Jersey 926 shares of HBO & Company common stock for the Fred and Louise Tarver Fund in the College of Engineering...................73,386 Texas Instruments, Inc., Lewisville, Texas for the Curt W. Reimann Scholarship in the School of Business Administration......... 10,000 283

Page  284 February Meeting, 1996 Textron Charitable Trust, Providence, Rhode Island for employee m atching gifts.................................................... 6,110 Ileane and Bruce E. Thai Philanthropic Fund, Bloomfield Hills for the American Culture Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.... 12,000 W. Bruce Thomas, Sewickley, Pennsylvania for support of the Law School................................................ 5,000 Michael E. Thoyer, New York, New York for the MBA African Corp Fund in the School of Business Administration.............. 12,500 Time Warner, New York, New York for the Time Warner Fellowship for Minority Journalists in the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies........................................ 50,000 Tisch Foundation, Inc., New York, New York for the Replacement Hospital Project Fund.......................................12,500 Tourette Syndrome Association, Bayside, New York for research in the Medical School...............................................12,196 Harry A. and Margaret D. Towsley Foundation, Ann Arbor for the Hill Auditorium Restoration Fund, and for employee matching gifts.......... 101,000 Frank H. Tranzow, Arcadia, California for support in the College of Engineering and the School of Nursing, for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts and for the University Library....................... 8,100 James M. Trapp, Winnetka, Illinois 600 shares of John H. Harland Company common stock for support of the Law School.................................................... 13,050 Nicolas Triantafyllidis, Ann Arbor for the Triantafyllidis Research Fund in the College of Engineering................... 15,000 Charles J. Trick, Livonia for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics............................... 5,000 A. Kirk Twiss, Chicago, Illinois for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 John F. Ullrich, Ann Arbor for support in the College of Engineering, the School of Music, and the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies and for the University Library and the University Musical Society........................................ 14,850 United Technologies Corporation, Hartford, Connecticut for support in the School of Business Administration and the College of Engineering, for WUOM/WVGR, and for employee matching gifts..................... 68,394 University Microfilms International, Ann Arbor for the UMI Information Management Fellowship in the School of Information of Library Studies................................................... 25,000 University of Michigan Alumnae Club of Ann Arbor, Lucile B. Conger Group, Ann Arbor for the Alumnae Council Scholarship in the Alumni Association...................... 22,500 David F. Upton, St. Joseph 96 shares of Whirlpool Corporation common stock for the Class of 1945 Engineers Fund in the College of Engineering, and for the Clem ents Library......................................................... 5,478 Frederick S. Upton Foundation, St. Joseph for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics, for support of the Law School, for the Clements Library and for employee matching gifts............ 8,900 Lawrence Usher Trust for support in the M edical School.................................................. 5,000 L. Vad Technology, Inc., Detroit for research in the School of Public Health......................................... 12,000 Vintage Charities, Los Altos, California for support of the Law School.................................................... 10,000 Ching P. Volpp, Princeton, New Jersey for support in the School of Information and Library Studies........................ 5,000 Carl H. von Ende, Bloomfield Hills for support of the Law School.................................................... 5,0000 George A. Wade, Boise, Idaho for support in the Department of Athletics, the Schools of Education and Medicine, and the Division of Kinesiology.......................................... 11,500 Timothy Wadhams, Ann Arbor for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics, and for support in the School of Business Administration........................................... 5,000 284

Page  285 February Meeting, 1996 Gary T. Walther, Chicago, Illinois for support in the School of Business Administration................................. 5,000 John D. Warner, Seattle, Washington 70 shares of Boeing Company common stock for the John D. Warner Endowed Scholarship in the College of Engineering............. 5,443 Charles D. Weir, Bethesda, Maryland for the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts......................................... 10,000 Werner Pump Company, Cincinnati, Ohio for Schembechler Hall in the Department of Athletics...............................15,000 David Westin, New York, New York for the David Westin Endowment in the Law School, and for philosophy support in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts........................... 12,600 Whirlpool Foundation, Benton Harbor for the MBA Peace Corps Fund in the School of Business Administration, and for unrestricted support of the University of Michigan................... 76,000 Gilbert R., Jr. and Ruth Whitaker, Ann Arbor for support in the Schools of Art, Business Administration and Music, the College of Literature Science, and the Arts, the Museum of Art, the Clements Library and the University Library for student aid and other support in the Center for the Education of Women, for the University Musical Society, and for the Men's Glee Club...................................... 5,000 Ann Douglass Wilhite, New Canaan, Connecticut 380 shares of Merck & Company common stock for scholarships in the Department of Athletics, and for the International Studies Discretionary Fund in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts............................. 24,938 Calvin Williams, Encino, California for support in the M edical School............................................... 100,000 Janette F. Williams, Ann Arbor for the Janette Ferrantino Pediatric Hematology Research Fund in the Medical School................................................................. 20,500 Erwin B. Wittus Trust for the William A. Paton Scholarship in the School of Business Administration.......... 5,000 Ronald J. Woods, North Palm Beach, Florida for golf course restoration in the Department of Athletics............................ 10,000 World Heritage Foundation, Southgate for the building fund in the School of Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn...... 50,000 John R. Worthington, Washington, DC 400 shares of MCI Communications common stock for unrestricted support of the Law School......................................... 10,475 Daisy T. Wu, Ann Arbor for the University Library...................................................... 20,000 E. Lisk Wyckoff, Jr., New York, New York for support of the Law School................................................... 15,000 Xerox Corporation, Stamford, Connecticut for the Curt Reimann Scholarship in the School of Business Administration............. 5,000 Maida K. Yuen, Chula Vista, California 1,050 shares of American International Group common stock for the Maida K. Yuen Unitrust Fund for the ultimate benefit of the School of Business Adm inistration...................................................... 95,878 Frances Ely Zahm Trust for the Harlow Whittemore Lectureship Fund in the School of Natural Resources and Environment..................................................... 15,000 Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, Wilmington, Delaware for the Michigan Prostate Institute Research and Education Fund and other support in the M edical School..................................................... 5,500 Roy H. Ziegler Trust for the Varsity Tennis Complex in the Department of Athletics....................... 10,000 The following nonmonetary gifts-in-kind were received: Jessica Sullivan Bernd Estate two Paul Cesar Helleu color drypoint prints, and a reproduction of a Whistler etching for the Museum of Art Elizabeth H. G. Brown, Ann Arbor 137 pieces of sheet music and 75 books for the Clements Library 285

Page  286 February Meeting, 1996 Robbins Burling, Ann Arbor seven sets of professional journals, volumes 1959-1994 for the Department of Anthropology Irving F. Burton, Huntington Woods two books on artist Ernst Trova, and a sculpture maquette, entitled "Abstraction Variation", by Ernst Trove for the Museum of Art Jack Faxon, Farmington Hills two Chinese rugs for the Museum of Art Sandra A. Golden, Bloomfield Hills a Chinese carved wood table for the Museum of Art James and Carol Goodfriend, New York, New York a graphite, brown ink and wash artwork on paper, entitled "St. Catherine of Siena Blessing a Sick Child", attributed to Francesco Vanni, and an engraving entitled "Farnese Hercules", by Jacob Bos for the Museum of Art Ruth Hiltner, Ann Arbor a 1978 Butterfly sailboat and sail for Camp Michigania Joel Isaacson, Ann Arbor an oil and pencil on paper drawing, entitled "Nude", by David Slee for the Museum of Art Sharon Lalonde, Port Austin a collection of manuscript and printed materials relating to church architecture for the Clements Library Charles J. Moss, Midland a collection of the Woods Family papers for the Clements Library Maurice F. Parkins, Bingham Farms a collection of 2,533 books, surveys, research studies, reports, professional and technical journals dealing with architecture, urban planning and community development for the University Library Philip H. Power, Ann Arbor a carved wood African mask for the Museum of Art Ruth B. Siegel, Ann Arbor two paintings: one untitled and one entitled "English Weather", by Gerome Kamrowski for the Museum of Art James K. Thompson, Jr., Rochester four serigraphs: entitled, "GS-!", by Norman Ives, "Red Strangled Buildings" and "E.V. Mime", by Folon, "Articulation Formation", by Josef Albers, and a lithograph entitled "Les Bijoux Indescrete", by Rene Margritte; for the Museum of Art Andrew S. Watson, Ann Arbor books and journals for the Department of Psychology Albert Young, Ferndale glass art, set of three "Araktomines", by Albert Young; for the University of Michigan-Dearborn Art Collection AT&T Foundation, New York, New York computer equipment for the Department of Psychology James R. Baker, Jr., Ann Arbor three sails for a flying scot sailboat for Camp Michigania Conlin-Faber Travel, Ann Arbor airline tickets for the Office of Development CTC Sports, West Bloomfield a tennis fundraising videotape for the Department of Athletics Duane N. Diedrich, Muncie, Indiana nine manuscript lots for the Clements Library GM Powertrain Flint V-6 Engineering Center, Flint an ERV V-6 engine for the Department of Physics and Engineering S. Martin Lindenauer, Ann Arbor a surgeons's head light with xenon light source for the Department of Surgery Peerless Mattress & Furniture Company, Flint furnishings and art work for the University of Michigan-Flint Faculty/Staff Lounge Glennis M. Stout, Ann Arbor a one-keyed flute in a stained woodbox for the School of Music Trade Exchange of America, West Jordan ten copies of Microsoft Access and ten copies of Microsoft PowerPoint for ITS at the University of Michigan-Flint Elliot S. Valenstein, Ann Arbor books and journals for the Department of Psychology VanBoven, Inc., Ann Arbor five monogrammed leather bags for the National Championship Swim Coaches 286

Page  287 February Meeting, 1996 C. Edward Wall, Ypsilanti 52 prints by Arthur Secunda and one print by Richard Anuszkiewicz for the University of Michigan-Dearborn Art Collection David L. Wisniewski, Canton two keyboards, 400 adaptors and 200 mouses for ITS at the University of Michigan-Dearborn An additional 31 gifts ranging from the following: Elizabeth S. Adams, Drayton Plains Alton L. Becker, Ann Arbor Norma Diamond, Ann Arbor Allen Erlich, Ann Arbor Robert A. Fakler, Ann Arbor Stephen A. Gaucher, Whitmore Lake Ann E. Hanson, Ann Arbor Bridget A. Hayden, Sharon, Wisconsin Domingo Hermosillo, Chelsea Leslie Kish, Ann Arbor Ludwig Koenen, Ann Arbor Bruce Mannheim, Ann Arbor Pamela Morrison, Dearborn Kent Murray, Dearborn Hans Neukomm, New York, New York Charles Pemble, Marquette Harry J. Regenstreif, Ann Arbor Shaman Drum Bookshop, Ann Arbor Arlene P. Shy, Ann Arbor Michael W. Skinner, St. Clair Shores Ralf J. Spatziav, Ann Arbor Estelle Titiev, Ann Arbor Christine M. Waters, New Hudson Sue Woestehoff, Ann Arbor from $1 to $999 in value were received Clarence Wolf, Gladwyne, Pennsylvania Albert Young, Ferndale Armenian Genealogical Society, Provo, Utah D. R. Shackleton Bailey, Ann Arbor Thomas Bailey, Canton Alfred Berkowitz, Birmingham Alphonse R. Burdi, Ann Arbor Joan E. S. Chesler Elinor W. Davidson, Ann Arbor Margot I. Duley, Ypsilanti Jerry M. Gray, Ann Arbor Paul Ingersoll, Havertown, Pennsylvania J. Dale Jeffs, Ann Arbor David A. Johnson, Howell Shirley Y. Kauper, Ann Arbor Ludwig Koenen, Ann Arbor William G. Lockwood, Grass Lake Carl K. Mahakian, Palm Springs, California Herman L. Miller, Ann Arbor Sharon Rogers Quiroz, Ann Arbor Roy A. Rappaport, Ann Arbor Joseph L. Rife, White Bear Lake, Minnesota Phillip Singer, Southfield Mark White, Grass Lake Personnel Actions. Provost Machen, Chancellor Nelms, and Chancellor Renick submitted a number of personnel actions. NEW APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE AND FULL PROFESSOR RANKS WITH TENURE Effective on the dates indicated Deretic, Vojo, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, July 1, 1996 Robillard, Jean E., M.D. Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases and Chair, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, February 1, 1996 Swanson, Joel A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, July 1, 1996 Thakor, Anjan V., Ph.D., Professor of Finance, with tenure, and the Edward J. Frey Professor of Banking and Finance, five-year term, September 1, 1996 REAPPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Mays, Clarita, reappointed Assistant Dean of Student and Multicultural Affairs, School of Social Work, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Pijanowski, Eugene M., Professor of Art, without tenure, and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, School of Art, reappointed Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education, two-year term, July 1, 1996 287

Page  288 February Meeting, 1996 Renick, James C., Professor of Education and Public Administration, with tenure, School of Education, and Chancellor, UM Dearborn, reappointed Chancellor, UM-Dearborn, two and one-half year term, January 1, 1998 Weiss, Janet A., Professor of Organizational Behavior and Public Policiy, with tenure, Associate Dean, School of Business Administration, and Professor of Public Policy, without tenure, School of Public Policy, appointment extended as Associate Dean, School of Business Administration, eight-month term, January 1, 1996 JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSORS AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Faires, Nora, ssociate Professor of History, with tenure, UM-Flint, also appointed Chair, Department of History, UM-Flint, three year term, July 1, 1996 Humes, H. David, Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, also appointed Interim Chair, Department of Internal Medicine, February 14, 1996 Jones, Betty J., Professor of Theatre, with tenure, School of Music, also appointed Associate Dean Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, January 1 1996-June 30, 1999 Lewis, Eari, Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed Senior Associate Dean, Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies, May 1, 1996-June 20, 2000 Olson, Gary M., Professor of Psychology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Professor of Information and Library Studies, without tenure, School of Information and Library Studies, also appointed Associate Dean, School of Information and Library Studies, three-year term, October 1, 1995 Repic, Randall L., Assistant Professor of Resource Science, UM-Flint, also appointed Acting Chair, Department of Earth and Resource Science, UM-Flint, six-month term, January 1, 1996 Richards, James W., from Professor of Pharmacy, with tenure, and Associate Dean, College of Pharmacy, to Professor of Pharmacy, with tenure, and Interim Dean, College of Pharmacy, six-month term, January 1, 1996 Sichel Martin, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, with tenure, also appointed Interim Chair, Department of Aerospace Engineering, five-month term, January 1, 1996 Schmoll, Beverly J., from Professor of Physical Therapy, with tenure, and Interim Director of Graduate and Special Programs, UM-Flint, to Professor of Physical Therapy, with tenure, and Dean of Graduate Programs and Research, UM-Flint, three and one-half year term, January 1, 1996 Zellers, Edward T., Associate Professor of Environmental and Indistrial Health, with tenure, School of Public Health, also appointed Associate Professor of Chemistry, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts LEAVES OF ABSENCE FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Aleinikoff, T. Alexander, Professor of Law, with tenure, leave without salary extended, January 1-December 31, 1996 Gabrielli, Michel, J. P., Lecturer III in French Language and Literature, leave without salary extended, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 OTHER PERSONNEL TRANSACTIONS FOR REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AND SELECTED ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Effective on the dates indicated Allen, Michael D., reappointed Chair, Air Force Officer Education Program, six-month term, January 18, 1997 Canning, Kathleen M., Associate Professor of History, with tenure College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1, 1996 288

Page  289 February Meeting, 1996 Courant, Paul N., Professor of Economics and Public Policy, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Davidson, Donald, the James B. and Grace J. Nelson Philosopher-in-Residence, March 18-22, 1996 Francis, Anthony H. Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Karnopp Bruce H., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, with tenure, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Martin, Michael M., Professor of Biology, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1, 1996 Miller, Josef M., Professor of Otorhinolaryngology, with tenure, and Director, Kresge Hearing Research Institute, also appointedthe Lynn and Ruth Townsend Professor of Communication Studies, five-year term, February 16, 1996 Potter, David S., Associate Professor of Greek and Latin, with tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also appointed an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor, three-year term, July 1 1996 Weiss, Stephen J., Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, and the E. Gifford and Love Barnett Upjohn Professor of Internal Medicine and Oncology, reappointed the E. Gifford and Love Barnett Upjohn Professor of Internal Medicine and Oncology, five-year term, November 15, 1995 George F. and Nancy P. Valassis Professorship in Urologic Oncology. The Regents approved the establishment of the George F. and Nancy P. Valaiss Professorship in Urologic Oncology in the Medical School, effective February 16, 1996. Dean of Graduate Programs and Research. The Regents approved the establishment of the position of Dean of Graduate Programs and Research at the University of Michigan-Flint, effective January 1, 1996. Committee Appointments. The following committee appointments were submitted: College of Architecture and Urban Planning Executive Committee Nystuen, John D., January 1-June 30, 1996, vice James C. Snyder, assumed associate dean position Division of Kinesiology Executive Committee Maloy, Pat, retroactive appointment, January 1-April 30, 1996, vice Christine M. Brooks, on sabbatical leave Transportation Research Institute Executive Committee Beck, Robert F., retroactive reappointment, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998 Sivak, Michael, retroactive reappointment, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998 Stein, Jeffrey L., retroactive reappointment, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1998 Personnel Reports. The following personnel reports were submitted: ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED NEW APPOINTMENTS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective January 1, 1996, unless otherwise indicated College of Engineering Srinivasan, Keeran R., Ph.D., Lecturer in Chemical Engineering Heinrichs, Kara A., B.S.E., Lecturer in Technical Communications 289

Page  290 February Meeting, 1996 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Astourian, Stephan H., M.A., Lecturer II in American History Bardwell, James, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biology Buchan, Mark, M.A., Lecturer I in Classical Studies Clark, R. Lane, M.F.A., Lecturer II in Film and Video Studies Crawford, Kenneth M., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Biology Dunn Robert A. Ph.D. Lecturer I in Physics Foss, Pedar W., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Classical Studies Grafe, Alan G., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Physics, November 1, 1995 Griener, Paul S., B.S., Lecturer II in Mathematics Hagy, Alyson C., M.F.A., Lecturer II in English Language and Literature Kardia, Diana, M.A., Lecturer II in Psychology Kineke, Sheila A., M.A., Lecturer II in Women's Studies Kotre, Kathy B., M.A., Lecturer II in Psychology Lin, Ali M. T., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Physics Luebbe Christopher D., M.A., Lecturer I in Italian Mihic, Sophia J., M.A., Lecturer II in Women's Studies Nolta, Kathleen V., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Chemistry Reynolds, David W., Lecturer I in Classical Studies Schubnell, Michael S. G., Diplom Dr.Rernat, Lecturer I in Physics Shaver, Jeremy M., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Chemistry Shin, Donggyun, Ph.D., Lecturer I in Economics Simoes, Solange D., Ph.D., Lectutrer II in Sociology Springer, Tamar, Ph.D., Lecturer I in Psychology Sweeney, Christopher J., Ph.D., Lecturer I in Physics Weiers Matthew G., B.A., Lecturer I in Film andVideo Studies, September 1, 1995 Zelditch, Miriam L., Ph.D., Lecturer II in Geological Sciences Medical School Allswede, Michael P., D.O., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, January 10, 1996 Chafty, Michael D., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, January 2, 1996 Chen, Zhi, M.D., Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine Colone, Pino D., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, July 1, 1995 Durham, Lucian A. III, M.D., Lecturer in Surgery, July 1, 1996 Gomez, Hernan F., M.D., Clinical Instructor I in Surgery Manikas, Steven G., D.O. Clinical Assistant Professor II of Family Practice Munoz-Drummond, Martha, D.D.S., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Dentistry Russell, Mark W. W., M.D., Lecturer in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases Sandvig, Sara J., M.D., Clinical Instructor II in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, March 1, 1996 Setty, Grandhim N., M.B.B.S., Clinical Instructor II in Surgery, November 1, 1995 Snider, Sandra J M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, July 9, 1996 Wagner, Ronald G., M.D., Lecturer in Anesthesiology School of Natural Resources and Environment Curran, Lisa M., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Ecology and Environmental Biology School of Natural Resources and Environment, and Assistant Professor of Biology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, September 1, 1996 School of Nursing Walker, Deborah S., D.NSC., Assistant Professor of Nursing School of Public Health Ruch, Randall J., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Toxicology, September 1, 1996 Bechhofer, Laurie J., M.P.H., Lecturer in Health Behavior and Health Education, September 1, 1995 Presby, Kay L., M.P.H., Lecturer in Health Behavior and Health Education, September 1, 1995 School of Social Work Burton, David L., M.S.W., Lecturer in Social Work Hollingsworth, Leslie D., Ph.D., Lecturer in Social Work, January 1, 1996, and from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Social Work, September 1, 1996 UM-Dearborn School ofEngineering Goldbold, C. Van, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Bailey, Marlon M., M.F.A., Assistant Professor of African-American Studies 290

Page  291 February Meeting, 1996 UM-Flint School of Health Professions and Studies Hudson, Bonnie L., Lecturer in Nursing Richards, Sharon M., M.S.N., Lecturer m Nursing ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED PROMOTIONS, JOINT APPOINTMENTS OR TRANSFERS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective January 1, 1996 School of Dentistry Sweier, Domenica G., from Lecturer in Dentistry to Research Fellow College of Engineering Robertson, Richard E., Professor of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering and Macromolecular Science and Engineering, with tenure, also appointedDirector, Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1998 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Richards, Janet E., Assistant Curator, Kelsey Museum of Archaeology, also appointed Lecturer II in Near Eastern Studies Potts, Blyden B., from Lecturer II in Sociology to Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Medical School Suarez, Therese M., from Lecturer to Clinical Instructor II in Internal Medicine Nickoloff, Brian J., from Associate Professor of Pathology, with tenure, and Associate Professor of Dermatology, without tenure, to Visiting Associate Professor I of Pathology, January 20, 1996 Sima, Anders A. F from Professor of Pathology, without tenure, and Professor of Internal Medicine, without tenure, to Visiting Assistant Professor of Pathology, February 1, 1996 Shane Steven A., Lecturer in Surgery, also appointed Lecturer in Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, July 1, 1995 College of Pharmacy Woster, Patricia S., from Clinical Assistant Professor II to Clinical Assistant Professor I of Pharmacy, March 3, 1996 School of Public Health Demitrack, Mark A., from Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Medical School, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health, to Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environmental and Industrial Health, School of Public Health UM-Flint School of Health Professions and Studies Afford, Peggy A., from Lecturer to Assistant Professor of Nursing, September 1, 1995 ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED EMERITUS/A FACULTY REAPPOINTMENTS Effective January 1, 1996, unless otherwise indicated College of Engineering Schmerl, Rudolf B., Associate Professor Emeritus of Education, four-month term College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Livermore, Shaw Jr., Professor Emeritus of History, four-month term Scholler, Harald F., Professor Emeritus of German, four-month term Medical School Bacon, George E., Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, one-year term, November 1, 1995 Castor, C. William, Profesor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term 291

Page  292 February Meeting, 1996 Dekker, Eugene E., Professor Emeritus of Biological Chemistry, one-year term Dekornfeld, Thomas J., Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology and Professor Emeritus of Postgraduate Medicine and Health Professions Education, one-year term Kostyo, Jack L., Professor Emeritus of Physiology, one-year term, December 1, 1995 Malvin, Richard L., Professor Emeritus of Physiology, one-year term McLean, James A., Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, one-year term School of Music Britton, Allen P., Professor Emeritus of Music and Dean Emeritus, four-month term School of Natural Resources and Environment Cares, Charles W. Jr., Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture and Director Emeritus of the Nichols Arboretum, four-month term UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Warschausky, Sidney, Professor Emeritus of English Language and Literature, four-month term UM-Flint College of Arts and Sciences Cox, Kendall B., Assistant Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, four-month term ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Architecture and Urban Planning Duke, Richard D., Professor of Urban Planning, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1, 1996-May 31, 1998 School of Dentistry Rowe, Nathaniel H. Jr., Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, the William R. Mann Professor of Dentistry, School of Dentistry, and Professor of Oral Pathology, without tenure, Medical School, retirement furlough, May 15, 1995-October 15, 1997 College of Engineering Freudenberg, James S., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with tenure, leave without salary, September 1-December 31, 1996 Stevenson, Dwight W., Professor of Technical Communication, with tenure, retirement furlough January 1-December 31, 1996 Williams, William J., Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with tenure, scholarly activity leave, February 1-April 30, 1996 Wineman, Alan S., Professor of Applied Mechanics and Molecular Science, and Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 School of Information Warner Amy J., Associate Professor of Information and Library Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Division of Kinesiology Brooks, Christine M., Associate Professor of Kinesiology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Baxter, Charles M., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Bien, David D., Professor of History, with tenure, duty off campus, January 1-April 30, 1996 Downs, Laura L., Associate Professor of History with tenure sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995, and scholarly activity leave January 1-May 31, 1996 Fine, John V. A. Jr., Professor of History, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Gocek, Fatma M., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, and Associate Professor of Women's Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 292

Page  293 February Meeting, 1996 Hart, Janet C., Associate Professor of Anthropology and Women's Studies, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995 Johnson, Lemuel A., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Kopelman, Raoul, Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, and the Kasimir Fajans Professor of Chemistry, Physics, and Applied Physics, scholarly activity leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Livingstone, Frank B., Professor of Anthropology, with tenure, and Research Scientist, Museum of Anthropology, retirement furlough, January 1-December 31, 1996 Meiland, Jack W., Professor of Philosophy, with tenure, extended sick leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Mullaney, Steven G., Associate Professor of English, with tenure, extended sick leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Somers, Margaret R., Associate Professor of Sociology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 Stafford, J. Tobias, Professor of Mathematics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995 -May 31, 1996 Wagaw, Teshome G., Professor of Education, with tenure, School of Education, and Professor of Afroamerican and African Studies, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts sabbatical leave, September 1-December 31, 1995, and duty off campus, January 1-May 31, 1996 Yocum, Charles F., Professor of Biology, with tenure, and Professor of Chemistry, without tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Zwiep, Mary N., Lecturer III in English Language and Literature, leave without salary, January 1-May 31, 1996 Medical School Barclay, Mel L., Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-June 30, 1996 Blodi, Barbara A., Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology, leave without salary, July 1, 1995 -June 30, 1996 Camper, Sally A., Associate Professor of Human Genetics, with tenure, sabbatical leave, November 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 Clarke, Michael F., Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, with tenure, sabbatical leave, July 1-December 31, 1995 Foster, Norman L., Associate Professor of Neurology, with tenure, sabbatical leave, January 1-June 30, 1996 Kazerooni, Ella A., Assistant Professor of Radiology, extended sick leave, December 22, 1995 -February 19, 1996 Krause, Christine W., Clinical Instructor II in Family Practice, extended sick leave, October 27-November 20, 1995, and family medical leave, November 21 1995-January 15, 1996 Maybaum, Jonathan, Professor of Pharmacology, with tenure, and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, without tenure, sabbatical leave, October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996 Webb, R. Clinton, Professor of Physiology, with tenure, duty off campus, January 15-June 1, 1996 School of Music Crawford, David E., Professor of Music, with tenure sabbatical leave, January 1-May 31, 1996 Kaenzig, Fritz A., Associate Professor of Music (Tuba/Euphonium), with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-May 31, 1996 College of Pharmacy Paul, Ara G., Dean and Professor of Pharmacognosy, with tenure, administrative leave, January 1-December 31, 1996 School of Public Health Zellers, Edward T., Associate Professor of Environmental and Indistrial Health, with tenure, School of Public Health, and Associate Professor of Chemistry, without tenure, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, sabbatical leave, January 1-December 31, 1996 UM-Dearborn College of Arts. Sciences, and Letters Shah, Parth J., Assistant Professor of Economics, extended sick leave, January 21-April 30, 1996 UM-Dearborn School of Engineering Chen, Yubao, Associate Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 293

Page  294 February Meeting, 1996 Shaout, Adnan K., Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, with tenure, sabbatical leave, September 1, 1995-April 30, 1996 UM-Dearborn School of Management Murray, Barbara B., Associate Professor of Business Economics and Finance, sabbatical leave, January 23-April 30, 1996 CHANGES TO ADMINISTRATIVELY APPROVED LEAVES OF ABSENCE GRANTED TO REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective on the dates indicated College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Blinder, S. M., Professor of Chemistry, with tenure, retirement furlough, September 1-December 31, 1995 (previously reported as sabbatical leave) Johnson, Lemuel A., Professor of English Language and Literature, with tenure, extended sick leave, September 22, 1994-December 31, 1995 (previously reported as September 22, 1994-May 31, 1995) TERMINATIONS OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective December 31, 1995, unless otherwise indicated College of Architecture and Urban Planning Johnson, Robert E., Professor of Architecture, with tenure, and Associate Dean for Academic Programs and Administration, resigned School of Business Administration Danko, James M. Lecturer in Business Administration, resigned Griffin, Carleton H., Professor of Accounting, without tenure, retired School of Dentistry Campbell John H., Lecturer in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, and Lecturer in Surgery, Medical School, resigned, December 22, 1995 Clayton, Joseph A., Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, retired Crow Heidi C., Assistant Professor of Dentistry, resigned Strachan, Donald S., Professor of Dentistry, with tenure, School of Dentistry, and Associate Professor of Anatomy, with tenure, Medical School, retired, March 31, 1996 College of Engineering Chen, Kan, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with tenure, College of Engineering, and Professor ofUrban, Technological, and Environmental Planning, without tenure, College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and Research Scientist, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, retired Kammash, Terry B. Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, with tenure, retired, January 3, 1996 Keller, Robert B., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, with tenure, retired Singh, Medini R., Assistant Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering, resigned School of Information Garland, Kathleen, Assistant Professor of Information and Library Studies, term complete, May 31, 1995 Panko, Walter B., Professor of Information and Library Studies, without tenure, resigned, July 31, 1995 Law School Field, Julie K., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Law, resigned College of Literature, Science, and the Arts Adamczyk, Laura L., Lecturer I in Chemistry, term complete Betancourt, Luis A., Lecturer II in Sociology, deceased, April 9, 1995 Blinder, S. M., Professor of Chemistry, retired Boruta-Sadkowski, Alicja, Lectuter I m Slavic Linguistics, term complete, August 31, 1995 Butler, John J. III, Lecturer II in Philosophy, term complete, April 30, 1995 294

Page  295 February Meeting, 1996 Carlson, David M., Lecturer I in Japanese, term complete, April 30, 1995 Dykes, DeWitt S., Lecturer I in Afroamerican and African Studies, term complete, April 30, 1995 Ericson, William A., Professor of Statistics, with tenure, retired Forshee, Richard, Lecturer II in Political Science, term complete, April 30, 1995 Grayzel, Susan R., Lecturer II in History, term complete, April 30, 1995 Herold, Kirsten F., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature, and Lecturer II in Germanic Languages and Literatures, term complete Holliman, Daniel A., Lecturer II in Afroamerican and African Studies, term complete, April 30, 1995 Kato, Ayako, Lecturer I in Japanese, term complete, April 30, 1995 Kearns, Josie, Lecturer I in English Language and Literature, term complete Kurtz, Marcus J., Lecturer II in Politica Science, term complete April 30, 1995 Langlois, Walter R., Lecturer I in Asian Languages and Literatures, term complete, April 30, 1995 Laskowski, Gene L., Lecturer I in English Language and Literature, term complete Lehne Laurie, Lecturer II in Sociology, resigned, April 30, 1995 Libretti, Timothy R., Lecturer I in English, term complete Liu, Maichen T., Lecturer I in Comparative Literature, term complete, April 30, 1995 Lutkehaus, Nancy C., Lecturer II in Anthropology, term complete, April 30, 1995 Martin, Glenn B., Lecturer II in Chemistry, term complete Mintz, Eric S., Lectutrer II in Communication, term complete Opprs, Stefan E., Assistant Professor of Economics, resigned, November 14, 1995 Ore, Tracy E., Lecturer II in Sociology, term complete, April 30, 1995 Peters, Stephanie L., Lecturer II in Russian Literature, term complete, April 30, 1995 Pietila, Richard W., Lecturer II in Communication, term complete Poteet, Ellen S., Lecturer I in Classical Studies, term complete, December 31, 1994 Puppi-Redfern, Liliana, Lecturer I in Spanish, resigned Qu, Sangping, Lecturer I in Asian Languages and Literatures, term complete, April 30, 1995 Rooney,7Phyllis A., Lecturer II in Philosophy, term complete April 30, 1995 Schiff, Rebecca L., Lecturer II in Political Science, term complete April 30, 1995 Shaw, Todd C., Lecturer II in Afroamerican and African Studies, term complete, April 30, 1995 Spang, Rebecca L., Assistant Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, resigned, January 31, 1996 Watanabe, Yasuo, Lecturer I in Asian Languages and Literatures, term complete, April 30, 1995 Weintraub, Daniel J., Professor of Psychology, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, and Research Scientist, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, retired Medical School Levine, Myron, Professor of Human Genetics, with tenure, retired, January 7, 1996 Marshall Jeffrey S., Lecturer in Anesthesiology, term complete Nickoloff, Brian J., Associate Professor of Pathology with tenure, and Associate Professor of Dermatology, without tenure, resigned, January 19, 1996 Rotter, Steven J., Clinical Assistant Professor II of Anesthesiology, resigned, December 1, 1995 School of Nursing Howard, Lucy A. C., Associate Professor of Nursing, with tenure, resigned Rowsey, Pamela J., Assistant Professor of Nursing, resigned School of Public Health Cornell, Richard G., Professor of Biostatistics, with tenure, retired, January 31, 1996 Vaughn, Thomas, Lecturer in Health Services and Management, resigned, February 28, 1995 School of Social Work Johnson, Harold R., Professor of Social Work with tenure, School of Social Work, and Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education, without tenure, School of Public Health, retired UM-Dearborn College of Arts, Sciences, and Letters Graves, Helen M., Associate Professor of Political Science, with tenure, retired 295

Page  296 February Meeting, 1996 CHANGE TO TERMINATION OF REGULAR INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF Effective December 31, 1995 Medical School Robertson, John M., Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology, resigned (previously reported as December 11, 1995) Retirement Memoirs. Secretary Palmer submitted eleven faculty retirement memoirs. S. M. Blinder, professor of chemistry, retired from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Blinder received his A.B. degree from Cornell University in 1953 and his A.M. and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University in 1954 and 1958, respectively. Following positions at the Johns Hopkins University (1958-61), the Carnegie Institute of Technology (1961-62), and Harvard University (1962-63), he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan as professor of chemistry in 1963. Professor Blinder has had an extraordinarily diverse career in both teaching and research. He has been an inspiring teacher for a generation of graduate and undergraduate students and has offered the largest number of different courses ever taught by a member of the chemistry faculty and probably in the College of LS&A. He has also published two texts on such different subjects as classical thermodynamics and quantum dynamics, both of which have received great acclaim as models of incisive scholarship and precision and have been much imitated by other authors. Professor Blinder's research has centered around various forms of perturbation methods in physics and chemistry. He has had particular success in achieving closed-form solutions of the Schrodinger equation for some major problems, including that of the Fermi contact interaction in terms of what is now known as the "Blinder operator." Professor Blinder was also successful in obtaining an analytical solution for the Coulomb (hydrogen atom) propagator which had eluded other workers for over forty years. This was the culmination of his discovery of a new spectral variational principle which allows optimization of the energy spectrum of an approximate propagator. These general methods also led to the resolution of an old paradox concerning the canonical partition function for the hydrogen atom. Despite his formal retirement, Professor Blinder intends to remain active, particularly in the important area of nonlinear dynamics and in the search for quantum chaos. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming S. M. Blinder professor emeritus of chemistry. C. William Castor, Jr., M.D., professor of internal medicine, retired from active faculty status on November 30, 1995, after a career at the University of Michigan that spanned more than 40 years. A Michigan native, Dr. Castor pursued undergraduate training at the University of Michigan in 1943-44 and 1946-47 and received his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School in 1951. He was a house 296

Page  297 February Meeting, 1996 officer in internal medicine from 1951-54, a junior clinical instructor from 1954-55, and instructor in internal medicine from 1955-57. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1957, associate professor in 1961, and professor in 1967. Dr. Castor's illustrious investigative career has resulted in the publication of approximately 100 peer-reviewed publications and multiple reviews and book chapters. His early research was some of the first to use cell culture methods to study the human synovium. The application of cell culture techniques to examine the mechanisms of inflammatory activation responsible for joint destruction in arthritis was groundbreaking and has subsequently become central to almost all investigation of cellular mechanisms underlying arthritis inflammation. In 1981, Dr. Castor was awarded the International Geigy Rheumatism Prize by the International League Against Rheumatism, and in 1985, he received the Lee Howley Prize for Arthritis Research from the Arthritis Foundation. These are the most prestigious scientific awards in the field of rheumatology. In 1991, he delivered the University of Michigan Distinguished Faculty Lecture in Biomedical Research. In 1992, he was honored as a Master of the American College of Rheumatology, and in 1994, he received the Laureate Award from the American College of Physicians. After his retirement from active faculty status, Dr. Castor will remain active in laboratory research, patient care, and teaching. The Regents now salute this distinguished clinical scholar for his lengthy and dedicated service to the University of Michigan by naming C. William Castor, Jr., professor emeritus of internal medicine. Joseph A. Clayton, D.D.S., professor of dentistry, retired from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Dr. Clayton received his B.S. degree from Utah State University in 1952, his D.D.S. degree from Washington University in 1959, and his M.S. degrees in denture prosthesis and restorative dentistry from the University of Michigan Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies in 1966 and 1967, respectively. He was appointed instructor in complete dentures in 1959 and assistant professor at the Washington University School of Dentistry in 1964. Dr. Clayton joined the faculty of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry as an assistant professor in 1966; he was promoted to associate professor in 1970 and professor in 1974. Dr. Clayton is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Chi honor societies. He has served the school and the University through membership on a number of committees, including those governing graduate dental education, human subjects, research, resuscitation and emergency procedures, student affairs, and student table clinics. He directed the graduate program in restorative dentistry (crown and bridge) for 20 years. Dr. Clayton's service has extended to membership and offices in professional societies, including the American Association of Dental Research, the American Academy of Crown and Bridge Prosthodontics, the American College of Dentists, and the American Dental Association and has served the Washtenaw District Dental Society in several capacities, including 297

Page  298 February Meeting, 1996 president. He has been a diplomate of the American Board of Prosthodontics since 1968. Known for his dedication to teaching, Dr. Clayton has chaired the master's theses committees of over 50 students. He has also contributed through research, in the areas of restorative crown and bridge, occlusion, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. He has contributed to the scientific literature through professional journals, as well as through chapters in several textbooks. Dr. Clayton has also developed numerous television teaching tapes and manuals and has been a lecturer at major meetings and study clubs, both nationally and internationally. The Regents now salute this distinguished health sciences educator by naming Joseph A. Clayton professor emeritus of dentistry. Richard G. Cornell, professor of biostatistics in the School of Public Health, retired from active faculty status on January 31, 1996, after a most productive career. Professor Cornell received his A.B. degree in 1952 from the University of Rochester, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, in 1954 and 1956, respectively, from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. From 1956-60, he worked as a statistician for the U.S. Public Health Service and for the Communicable Disease Center. From 1960-71, he served on the faculty of Florida State University as associate professor (1960-68) and professor (1968-71) of statistics. He came to the University of Michigan in 1971 as professor of biostatistics and chair of the Department of Biostatistics. Professor Cornell served as chair for 14 years, building the department into one of the major biostatistics departments in the country. He served again as interim chair of the department from 1990-93. From 1993-95, he postponed his planned retirement to serve as interim dean of the School of Public Health. He displayed steady and wise leadership during that period of serious controversy within the school, which included a review of the school's activities and culminated in a major reorganization from eight to five departments. Through his research, Professor Cornell made important methodological contributions to medical decision-making and to the design and analysis of surveys and clinical trials. He has served as director of biostatistics cores for the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center, the Michigan Multipurpose Arthritic Center, and the Michigan Cancer Center, and he also directed the Data Coordinating Center for the Heterosexual HIV Transmission Study. As both a teacher and administrator, he has made major contributions to the training of biostatisticians for industry and academia. He has also played an important role in teaching clinicians and other professionals how to conduct scientific research through the non-residential master's and Ph.D. programs offered by the Department of Biostatistics and the School of Public Health. The Regents now salute this distinguished health educator for his dedicated service by naming Richard G. Cornell professor emeritus of biostatistics. 298

Page  299 February Meeting, 1996 Carleton H. Griffin, professor of accounting in the School of Business Administration, retired from active faculty status on December 31, 1995. Professor Griffin received his B.B.A. degree in 1950, his M.B.A. degree in 1953, and his J.D. degree in 1953, all from the University of Michigan. Following completion of his J.D. degree, he joined the firm of Touche Ross and Company, serving in various positions, including national director of operations and chair of the board. In September 1985, he joined the faculty of the School of Business Administration as a professor, teaching in the area of accounting. Professor Griffin has been an outstanding teacher and faculty advisor. Where a normal faculty course load is three or four courses, he has consistently taught five courses every year. His teacher ratings are routinely among the highest in his area and in the school, ranging between 4.5 and 5.0 on a 5.0 scale. He recently received the Student Award for Teaching Excellence in the B.B.A. program for 1994-95, a highly regarded, student-selected award. Professor Griffin's presence in the classroom will be sorely missed, both by students and by his colleagues who have relied on him as an example of classroom excellence and leadership. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Carleton H. Griffin professor emeritus of accounting. Garth W. Jones, associate professor of microbiology and immunology, retired from active faculty status on December 31, 1995, after a productive career as an investigator, teacher, and consultant. A native of South Wales, U.K., Professor Jones received his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Reading in 1969 and 1972, respectively. He came to the University of Michigan as an assistant professor in 1975 and was promoted to associate professor in 1982. The main thrust of Professor Jones' research involved the adhesive properties of bacteria and the role of adhesion in bacterial pathogenicity and in the colonization of the body by these microorganisms. His early work on the adhesive properties of pathogenic E. coli bacteria was a pioneering contribution that, for the first time, proved conclusively that bacterial adhesion to the tissues of the body is an important mechanism in the development of infectious disease. His subsequent research included studies of the role of bacterial adhesion in cholera and in the colonization of the oral cavity by streptococci. He made noteworthy contributions to the genetics of virulence of salmonella typhimurium (an intestinal pathogen), the genetics of enzymes involved in the production of adhesion molecules of streptococci, and the ecological implications of adhesion factors. These contributions have been documented in numerous articles in scientific journals and in many book chapters and monographs. Professor Jones has been an invited speaker at numerous conferences and symposia and has been a visiting professor at universities in Europe and Australia. He has served as consultant to a number of organizations, including the National Institutes of Health, the World Health Organization, the Veterans Administration, and various pharmaceutical companies. Throughout his career, Professor Jones has also been a mentor to doctoral candidates 299

Page  300 February Meeting, 1996 and an effective teacher of undergraduate, graduate, medical, and dental students. For these contributions, he was awarded the Kaiser Permanente Award for Excellence in Teaching. The Regents now salute this dedicated faculty member by naming Garth W. Jones associate professor emeritus of microbiology and immunology. Terry Kammash, professor of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences and Stephen S. Attwood Professor, retired from active faculty status on January 3, 1996. Professor Kammash received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from Pennsylvania State University in 1952 and 1954, respectively. He joined the University of Michigan faculty as instructor in engineering mechanics and nuclear engineering in 1955. In 1958, Professor Kammash received, from the University of Michigan, one of the first three Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering awarded in the United States and was appointed assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor in 1960 and professor in 1967. Professor Kammash served as acting chair of the department from 1976-77 and was named the Stephen S. Attwood Professor of Engineering in 1977. During his career, he has produced more Ph.D. recipients than any other faculty member in the department. Professor Kammash's primary research since the early sixties was in magnetic fusion. He carried out some of the more comprehensive analyses of plasma dynamics in the magnetic mirror machine and was credited with the identification of several major plasma instabilities that have practically eliminated the mirror machine as a potential power reactor. His recent proposal for utilization of the gasdynamic mirror as a propulsion device could open up the solar system and beyond to human exploration. NASA has expressed interest in this device and plans to carry out basic experiments to test his ideas. In 1975, Professor Kammash wrote the first book on fusion reactor physics and engineering. His unique combination of talents in fusion and aeronautics also resulted in his co-authoring the first book on the utilization of fusion energy in space propulsion. Professor Kammash is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Nuclear Society (ANS), and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has received several awards from the ANS and served as chair of the Subcommittee on the Role of Nuclear Engineering in Controlled Fusion Research for the President's Office of Science, and Technology in 1972. He has also received the College of Engineering Research Award and the Department of Nuclear Engineering Service Award. The Regents now salute this faculty member by naming Terry Kammash professor emeritus of nuclear engineering and radiological sciences and Stephen S. Attwood professor emeritus. Myron Levine, professor of human genetics in the Medical School, retired from active faculty status on January 7, 1996. Professor Levine received his B.A. degree from Brooklyn College in 1947 and his Ph.D. degree from Indiana University in 1952. He held several positions as a researcher and biologist before joining the University of 300

Page  301 February Meeting, 1996 Michigan as associate professor in 1961. He was promoted to professor in 1967. Professor Levine was responsible for introducing the discipline of prokaryotic molecular genetics to the Department of Human Genetics. First introduced to the field of genetics through studies on Paramecium with the legendary Tracy Sonneborn at Indiana University, he was influenced by the group of researchers who had seized upon bacterial viruses (phages) as the ideal subject with which to probe the central secrets of genetics. The nature of the gene, its mode of action and regulation, and the concept of a genetic code were discoveries of the Phage School that transformed modern biology. Professor Levine's contributions to this field were made through genetic and molecular biological analysis of bacteriophage P22, a virus of salmonella bacteria. Beginning in the late 1950s, he and his students isolated mutants in phage P22, established a linkage map of its genes, and initiated a brilliant study of how this phage achieves lysogeny, the continuous maintenance of the viral genome within an infected salmonella cell and its progeny. Professor Levine succeeded in describing the complex program of molecular events required for lysogeny, including sequential gene activation and recombination of phage and cell DNA. He next turned his attention to herpes simplex; for the past 20 years his laboratory has been in the forefront of the molecular genetic analysis of this important human infection. Among Professor Levine's former students are a Nobel laureate, as well as others who have become nationally known geneticists and virologists. He received the University's Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award in 1980 and the Distinguished Faculty Lectureship in Biomedical Research in 1987. His leadership of the graduate program in cell and molecular biology for a fifteen-year period was critical to this program's success. The Regents now salute this distinguished faculty member by naming Myron Levine professor emeritus of human genetics. Joseph A. Placek, associate librarian, retired from the University Library on December 31, 1995. A native of Michigan, Mr. Placek earned his A.B. degree from the University of Detroit in 1953, his M.L.S. degree from Catholic University of America in 1956, and his M.S. degree in Russian language from Georgetown University in 1965. He joined the staff at the University of Michigan Library in 1967 as head of the Slavic Area Program Unit. In the course of his 28-year career, Mr. Placek helped develop the library collection and helped establish local and national bibliographic databases. During his tenure as head of the Slavic Area Program Unit, Mr. Placek was instrumental in developing the specialized collection of monographic and serial publications through acquisition of quality material and creation of bibliographic records for local and national databases. He established a strong relationship with the Center for Russian and East European Studies and closely supported the faculty and graduate students in their research efforts. His knowledge of the Slavic collection is exceptional. Mr. Placek made important contributions to national programs in which the library participated. In 1981, he became the NACO liaison to the Library 301

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